The Fifth Column Forum

RAN part 2

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bug2 - 12-9-2017 at 02:03 PM

ANOTHER deletion, the RAN thread.............this is a restart...........

Aussie Warship Project to be Delayed for Two Years by Local Companies: Minister

(Source: Xinhuanet; issued Sept 08, 2017)

CANBERRA --- A 28-billion-U.S.-dollar Australian warship project could be delayed for two years if local companies are handed the contract, a government minister has warned.

The Future Frigates project will see nine new anti-submarine warfare frigates designed and built to replace Australia's existing Anzac frigate fleet.

The Australian bid to build the ships is being led by South Australia's ASC and Western Australia's Austal, but Spain's Navantia, Britain's BAE Systems and Italy's Fincantieri have also been shortlisted for the project.

Despite an initial promise that the ships would be built in Australia, the Defence Department has convinced the government that the Australian-built clause should be "optional" rather than "mandated."

Christopher Pyne, Australia's defence industry minister, said: "Advice from the Department of Defence is that changing the request for tender to mandate a particular shipbuilder would result in a delay of at least two years in the Future Frigates program."

"The government is committed to creating an indigenous naval shipbuilding industry in Australia which will involve a significant increase of employees in the shipbuilding industry, focused on South Australia," Pyne said in a statement on Friday.

Appearing alongside ASC and Austal at a parliamentary inquiry into the project, Glenn Thompson, assistant national secretary at Australian Manufacturing Workers' Union (AMWU), said that the foreign companies had to commit to hiring 1,000 Australian apprentices and graduates for the program.

"The government must reward and support tenderers that show that level of commitment to developing the skills that workers will need to complete these projects," Thompson said.

"It is pretty remarkable that we've got a foreign company bidding for this project, talking up the Australian workforce, while the government's own documents make it clear that using these workers is optional.

"A sovereign capability to build, maintain, sustain and upgrade ships and submarines in Australia is not optional, using Australia workers on these projects from day one isn't either."

-ends-

bug2 - 12-9-2017 at 02:06 PM

Deployable Mine Countermeasures Increase

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Sept 08, 2017)

The Royal Australian Navy is forging ahead with new technologies to counter the threat of sea mines to military and commercial vessels.

The Head of Navy Capability, Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead, said the prevalence and increasing sophistication of sea mines means the Royal Australian Navy must continue to improve the way it finds and disposes of these mines.

“New autonomous and remote-controlled technologies deployed from within the maritime task force provides the opportunity to find and dispose of sea mines more safely and efficiently,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

“In the 2030s, Defence will seek to replace its specialised mine hunting and environmental survey vessels with a single fleet of multi-role vessels embarking advanced autonomous and uninhabited systems.”

Rear Admiral Mead said these newly introduced systems are the first step in realising a future capability which would allow the Royal Australian Navy to clear sea mines with minimal risk to its people and assets.

“Thales Australia Ltd will deliver and support the new equipment over the next 15 years,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

The new capability will primarily be based and sustained at HMAS Waterhen in Sydney, New South Wales.

-ends

bug2 - 15-9-2017 at 02:00 PM

Frigate contenders warned off ASC/Austal build option

14 Sep 2017

Julian Kerr | Sydney

Exchanges in the Senate References Committee have made it clear the government has no intention of amending the terms of the Request for Tender (RfT) for the Sea 5000 Future Frigate program to mandate the inclusion of an Australian shipbuilder.

This means the winner among the three shortlisted international contenders for the $35 billion program will retain responsibility for the construction – albeit in Australia – of its proposed Future Frigate design.

The three competing designs comprise a version of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship offered by the UK’s BAE Systems, a modified F-100 design proposed by Spanish shipbuilder Navantia, and a derivative of the Carlo Bergamini-class variant of the FREMM multi-mission frigate offered by Fincantieri of Italy.

At the committee’s 8 September hearing into the future sustainability of Australia’s naval shipbuilding industry, Labor Senator Kim Carr quoted Clause D of the RfT as stating “The successful tenderer will not be directed to utilise any particular shipbuilding workforce or engage any particular provider of shipbuilding services. In particular, the Commonwealth is not mandating that the successful tenderer use the workforce of ASC.”

Independent Senator Nick Xenophon earlier quoted a passage stating the Commonwealth’s intention “that the successful tenderer will directly manage and supervise the workforce undertaking shipbuilding work. The responsibility for build management and supervision should not be subcontracted in its entirety to a third party entity”.

Both Austal CEO David Singleton and ASC Shipbuilding CEO Mark Lamarre told the committee that meaningful engagement with the contenders had ended after the RfT’s release on 31 March. Three months later the two companies entered a teaming arrangement for Future Frigate construction.

Responding to questions from Senator Carr, Department of Defence Associate Secretary Brendan Sargeant confirmed that CASG head Kim Gillis had subsequently telephoned the three contenders.

“Austal and ASC were making statements about their desire to participate in the (RfT) process,” Sargeant said.

“It may be that people thought the Government was making a decision to change that process and the communications with the companies were to ensure that they understood that the process as designed would proceed.”

Asked if the change in attitude of the preferred tenders to Austal and ASC had anything to do with Gillis’s telephone call, Sargeant responded “I have no idea. That would be speculation on my part and I don’t think it’s appropriate for me to talk about how tenderers might approach their commercial relationships.”

ADMK2 - 16-9-2017 at 01:23 PM

No it's not mandated, however if you don't agree to build our ships at our new shipbuilding facility, the likelihood of you gaining the contract is dubious...

bug2 - 19-9-2017 at 07:09 PM

Australian frigate conducts first MUM-T operations with MH-60R helicopter, ScanEagle UAS

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

19 September 2017

The Royal Australian Navy’ (RAN’s) Adelaide (Oliver Hazard Perry)-class guided missile frigate HMAS Newcastle (06) has completed the service’s first ever man-unmanned teaming (MUM-T) integrated flying serials.

The operations, which involved Newcastle’s embarked MH-60R helicopter, and a ScanEagle unmanned aerial system (UAS), were conducted while the frigate was on a two-week attachment with the US Fifth Fleet in the Arabian Gulf, said the Australian Department of Defence (DoD) in a statement on 19 September.

During its attachment, Newcastle also supported the US Navy’s (USN’s) USS Nimitz carrier strike group (CSG-11) with escort operations, and “a range of naval manoeuvres”, the DoD added.

(102 of 247 words)

bug2 - 22-9-2017 at 08:00 PM

BAE Systems proposes ‘digital shipyard’ for Australia

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

22 September 2017

BAE Systems Australia has outlined a plan to invest AUD100 million (USD80 million) in a new “digital shipyard” in Adelaide, South Australia, if it is selected to build Future Frigates for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), the company said in a statement on 21 September.

The statement said that BAE Systems Australia would facilitate the transfer to Adelaide of intellectual property (IP) and technical data – including the digital ship design optimised for the production of the Global Combat Ship (GCS) – together with naval shipbuilding processes tailored to the requirements of shipyard.

BAE Systems Australia is seeking to win the SEA 5000 Future Frigate programme, which features the construction of nine vessels for AUD35 billion (USD26.25 billion), with a variant of its Type 26 GCS design, which BAE Systems recently started building for the UK Royal Navy (RN).

(139 of 528 words)

bug2 - 26-9-2017 at 10:46 AM

Australia commissions first Hobart-class air warfare destroyer

Julian Kerr - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

25 September 2017

The first of three 7,000-tonne Hobart-class air warfare destroyers (AWDs) was formally inducted into the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) on 23 September and is expected to be ready for operational tasking in late 2018.

Attending the commissioning ceremony of HMAS Hobart held at Fleet Base East in Sydney, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull referred to the “brinkmanship” of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and stressed the criticality of having a strong and well-equipped Australian Defence Force (ADF) “in these uncertain times”.


The RAN commissioned the guided missile destroyer HMAS <I>Hobart</I> in Sydney on 23 September. (Commonwealth of Australia)

The second ship of the class, Brisbane , will undertake builder’s sea trials in the final quarter of 2017, with delivery to the RAN scheduled for September 2018.

(108 of 465 words)

bug2 - 26-9-2017 at 12:49 PM

HMAS Hobart Commissioning

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept 23, 2017)


HMAS Hobart, the first of three Air Warfare Destroyers built in South Australia by ASC, was commissioned on Saturday. She is fitted with a US-supplied Aegis air-defense system allowing it to protect several ships. (RAN photo)

The safety and security of Australia and our interests around the globe has been significantly strengthened with the commissioning of the first Australian-built Air Warfare Destroyer, HMAS Hobart, today.

Hobart brings together the best of Australian and global technology to be one of the world’s most potent and lethal warships. She will provide air defence for accompanying ships, in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft.

The commissioning of Hobart is the culmination of the hard work of thousands of Australians who built and delivered the future capability of the Royal Australian Navy. The crew and shipbuilders who have brought this new capability into service are to be congratulated on their achievement.

The Turnbull Government has committed to a continuous sovereign naval shipbuilding program that will keep our Navy equipped with the latest technology for generations to come and Hobart demonstrates our commitment and ability to meet that promise.

This sovereign continuous naval shipbuilding program will create thousands of jobs across the country and is another example of the Turnbull Government building and strengthening our defence capability and defence industry.

HMAS Hobart is the first of three Hobart class guided missile destroyers that will enter service in coming years and the third ship to carry the name, Hobart. Her motto, Grow with Strength, reflects the future direction of the Navy as it continues its primary mission of protecting Australia and its interests in an increasingly dynamic region.

As detailed in the Turnbull Government’s 2016 Defence White Paper, our Navy is undergoing its largest regeneration since the Second World War and our future fleet will be more flexible, more versatile, and more lethal than ever.

Hobart will now undergo her test and evaluation period where she will integrate into the fleet and Navy personnel will train to operate the warship.

Story history:

-- Sept. 25: corrected factual mistake in the photo caption. H/T to reader D.E. for catching it, and apologies to all our readers for making the mistake in the first place.

(ends)

Welcome to the Fleet - HMAS Hobart III

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Sept 23, 2017)

With a zealous crowd and great fanfare, the guided missile destroyer HMAS Hobart was commissioned in to the Royal Australian Navy fleet in a formal ceremony at Garden Island in Sydney today.

The Prime Minister of Australia, the Honourable Malcolm Turnbull, joined with other dignitaries, ship’s company and family and friends to welcome the newest ship to the Australian Fleet.

Mr Turnbull said Australia plays a leading role in ensuring the world remains at peace.

"In these uncertain times, a strong, well equipped Australian Defence Force is absolutely critical," he said.

"The commissioning of HMAS Hobart provides clear evidence of our determination to keep Australians safe and ensure we are ready and able to meet the challenges that come our way in the years ahead.

"Wherever she may travel around the world, Hobart will serve our nation and take action in Australia's name."

The third Australian Navy ship to carry the name Hobart will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft.

Hobart’s state-of-the-art Aegis combat system, including the phased array radar and missile systems, will provide an advanced air defence system capable of engaging enemy aircraft and missiles at ranges in excess of 150 kilometres.

She will also be capable of undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons

Commanding Officer, Hobart, Captain John Stavridis said the ship will be the most complex and capable warship ever operated by Australia.

“She is as powerful as she is potent and is every bit a destroyer,” he said.

“Her sensors and weapons are leading edge and she is capable of conducting the full span of maritime security operations.

“However, without the 185 men and women who serve in her, she is just another ship alongside. To be a warship requires a specialist team who are masters in their individual skills and are capable of working collectively to achieve the mission.

“I am blessed with such a crew, who are both proficient and professional.”

The ceremony included the breaking of the commissioning pennant and hoisting of the Australian White Ensign for the first time, at which point, Hobart became the responsibility of Captain Stavridis.

Witnessing the historic occasion were sailors from the former Hobarts which served with distinction in the Second World and Vietnam Wars.

-ends-

unicorn - 27-9-2017 at 10:34 PM

Marise Payne, Christopher Pyne hit back at report into $50bn subs plan

The Australian8:13PM September 27, 2017
ROSIE LEWIS
ReporterCanberra
@rosieslewis

The Turnbull government has hit back at a scathing independent report into the $50 billion plan for a fleet of French-built submarines, declaring it had been produced by “individuals who have no experience in designing, building or operating submarines”.

Commissioned by Sydney businessman Gary Johnston, who launched a push to torpedo the French-built submarines last year, the report from Insight Economics says the selected Shortfin Barracuda submarines carry “excessive costs” and come with strategic, economic, technical and industrial risks.

The report, Australia’s Future Submarine: Getting This Key Capability Right, urges the government to urgently move to acquire a fleet of military off-the-shelf submarines if Australia is to avoid a “very serious capability gap of several years”.

“The most immediate and possibly the biggest risk flowing from the decision to acquire the Shortfin Barracuda — a submarine that is yet to be designed, let alone built — is the inevitable long schedule for its delivery,” the report states.

“Even on the best possible scenario where everything goes according to present plans, the first Shortfin Barracuda becomes operational only in 2033, while the Collins Class submarines are scheduled to be progressively withdrawn at the age of 30, between 2026 and 2033. Even then, under these very benign circumstances where everything goes according to plan, the Navy will have only one submarine in 2034 and perhaps four by 2040. This capability is clearly inadequate.”

Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne called the 11-page document a “hatchet job” while Defence Minister Marise Payne said it appeared to be a “beat up” rather than an authoritative contribution to the submarine capability discussion.

The ministers said the consistent advice from Defence and “actual experts in the field” was that there was no military off-the-shelf submarine options that met Australia’s “unique capability requirements”.

“Much of this report is inaccurate and not informed by the facts. The writers of this report have not been involved in the process of the tender or the projects since the tender was completed,” Mr Pyne said.

“The submarine project is on schedule; on budget and will deliver the most lethal and effective weapon in the navy in the 2030s as planned. The Collins Class life of type extension will ensure there is no capability gap in Australia’s submarine fleet.”

‘Buy off the shelf’

The report blames “both persuasions” of government, from the Rudd government through to the Turnbull government, for the “predicament in which we now find ourselves” and estimates a “whole of life cost” for the 12 new submarines, including the acquisition, sustainment and a possible life extension for the Collins Class, of $180bn.

Insight Economics says the question is not whether the Navy needs to renew its submarine capability but what would be the most appropriate type of sub and how many are needed.

While it notes the proposal to extend the life of the Collins class submarines to help maintain “some capability into the 2030s and perhaps beyond”, the report suggests acquiring an evolved version of a military off-the-shelf submarine “built at a fixed price and modified for Australian conditions and requirements”.

“To avoid long and fatiguing transits, this fleet of smaller submarines would be serviced by a tender (mother) ship that could operate much closer to the submarines’ area of operations,” it states.

“This option should cost under $10bn for a 30-year life; much less than (extending the life of the) the Collins option and for a submarine that would have a longer life and be less at risk of detection. Importantly, this approach would also offer an insurance policy if the Shortfin Barracuda program failed, in that more of the military off-the-shelf boats could be acquired. A Collins (life of type extension) would not offer this very important benefit.”

Senator Payne said a modified off-the-shelf submarine was an “oxymoron” and any suggestion the future submarines would not be in service until the 2040s was “uninformed scaremongering”.

“Submarines are among the most complex pieces of machinery on earth. Contrary to the claims made today, modifying an existing submarine to substantially extend its range would involve a complex and risky redesign process,” she said.

The report’s co-author Hugh White, professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and a former deputy secretary for strategy at the Department of Defence, said he was not surprised by the government’s response.

“There’s a very serious risk, a very evident risk, that the project they now have underway to build a very sophisticated submarine in a very technically risky way is likely to deliver submarines too late after our present submarines are gone out of service,” he told Sky News.

The report argues the government took the “most risky option possible” when it chose the Shortfin Barracuda, which it labels a “new bespoke design”, and says there was “very little cabinet consideration of this enormous investment”.

“While the National Security Committee of Cabinet met five times to consider the Air Warfare Destroyer acquisition, which was basically a MMOTS (modified military-off-the-shelf) platform, ministers had only a very limited time around the Anzac Day long weekend to consider Defence’s much more complex, costly and risky FSM (future submarine) proposal,” the report states.

Mr Johnston, who owns Jaycar Electronics and runs a website for “those concerned about Australia’s future maritime defence”, said he decided to commission a “thorough investigation of the acquisition process” for the future submarine project after the government agreed last year to spend $50bn on the 12 new French subs.

He said the program will not be “regionally superior” as the waters to Australia’s north “teem with nuclear submarines in the 2030s”.

“In a time of a heightened strategic threat, we may lack any credible submarine capability for a decade or more. And it takes a long time to restore that capability, not just in terms of platforms but in retaining personnel and being able to train new people,” he said.

“The way forward would not require the government to change existing policy decisions.”

Mr Johnston said the Insight Economics team had consulted “very widely” with local and international strategic experts, admirals, former submarine commanding officers, engineers, shipbuilders and former defence officials to write up the report.

Insight Economics was founded in 2006 and says it is a consulting firm “uniquely focused on both public policy and corporate strategy”

Michael Keating, one of the firm’s directors who helped launch the report at the National Press Club today, is a former head of the Australian Public Service and secretary of three Commonwealth departments, including Prime Minister and Cabinet.

ADMK2 - 27-9-2017 at 11:19 PM

Australia’s LEADING think tank, just popped in and said who needs submarines anyway, when we could just solve the problem with F-111 kill boxes?

Sorry. I’ll just get my hat...

bug2 - 28-9-2017 at 01:28 PM

I'm glad to see the Apple Blossoms are still with us.......................

unicorn - 28-9-2017 at 08:09 PM

Pacific 2017 is next week, many of these stories are appearing now because of companies postioning themselves in the media leading up to the conference.

Future Frigates ‘must be North Korea-proof’



Warren King, a senior adviser to Navantia Australia. Picture: Gary Ramage
The Australian6:30PM September 26, 2017

ROSIE LEWIS
ReporterCanberra
@rosieslewis

A major shipbuilder competing for Australia’s $35 billion Future Frigate contract has warned the warships must have the capacity to deal with the emerging threat of North Korea.

Warren King, a Navantia Australia board member, said there had been a “great focus” on anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability but the ships also needed to “meet a whole range of requirements” that might surface over the next three decades.

As the war of words between the North Korean regimen and US President Donald Trump intensifies, Mr King said North Korea had become a “real and apparent (threat) right on our doorstep”.

“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.

“Are we making sure that the frigates have a balanced capability to deal with multiple threats that have had a light shone on them by North Korea? As a nation, we are spending a considerable amount of money in acquiring these frigates.”

The plan to buy nine Future Frigates with a strong emphasis on ASW was announced in the 2016 Defence White Paper.

Tensions with North Korea have escalated dramatically since then, with Malcolm Turnbull calling the regime’s nuclear program the “gravest threat to peace” on the peninsula in 60 years.

Malcolm Davis, a senior analyst in defence strategy and capability at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said the government had to “think beyond” the North Korean threat and also focus on China.

He noted a war with North Korea would likely be “over and done with in the space of a few weeks or months” while the threat of a future conflict with China could “last for decades”.

“If they’re not thinking about China as the long-term threat, they should be,” Dr Davis said.

“North Korea is a threat and I think it’s going to be evolving very rapidly and potentially resolved very rapidly … We need to think about how these ships will fare in a future conflict with China rather than North Korea.”

Spanish shipbuilder Navantia is bidding against BAE Systems and Fincantieri to build the frigates.

Navantia sees an opportunity to use the same hull in the ships as it used for its three Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers that are fitted with a US air defence missile system known as AEGIS.

Navantia says the AEGIS system could be upgraded to target ballistic missiles.

If it wins the tender, Navantia would closely model the Future Frigates on its Hobart Class warfare destroyer, which has been extensively modified for Australian conditions.

“We provide a low risk approach, leveraging on the experience of what has been done here with the Hobart class,” Navantia Australia’s managing director Donato Martinez said.

“If you want to retain employment and then grow the workforce, you need to start as soon as possible. We are fully committed to a fully Australian capability.”

But Dr Davis said if the government was “really serious” about dealing with threats from both North Korea and China it would purchase the American Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to cover air, surface and subsurface warfare.

The government is expected to announce the winning contender for the Future Frigates program in the first half of next year.

unicorn - 28-9-2017 at 08:10 PM

And another.

Italian shipbuilder’s pledge to use all-Australian labour on frigates



Fincantieri built FREMM frigate from Italy.
The Australian12:00AM September 28, 2017

CAMERON STEWART
Washington CorrespondentUnited States
@camstewarttheoz

Europe’s largest shipbuilder has promised to turn Australia’s $35 billion naval frigate project into an all-Australian endeavour, with a listing on the local stock exchange and an all local workforce.

Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri will release details of its bid to build the new frigate fleet today, with the company opening an Adelaide office next month and placing pilot orders with Australian industry to prepare for the venture.

Fincantieri, which builds both warships and cruise ships in 20 shipyards around the world, will maximise the Australian contribution to the project in response to accusations from local shipbuilders that the three European bidders for the frigate project are in effect mounting a foreign takeover of local shipbuilding.

Fincantieri is up against British defence giant BAE Systems and Spanish shipbuilder Navantia for the right to design and build nine new frigates for the navy, optimised for anti-­submarine warfare.

The company plans to list its Australian business unit for building the frigates on the Australian Stock Exchange.

“This initiative allows Australian investor par­tici­pation in Fincantieri Australia and ensures decisions will be taken locally and in the best interests of Australia,” chairman of Fincantieri Australia Dario Deste said. He said the move means a share of the profits from the project would remain in Australia and he confirmed an Australian workforce would be used to build the frigates.

Mr Deste said Fincantieri was already mobilising Australian industry for the project and would recruit more than 150 Australian engineers and technicians to send to Italy next year to train on the Italian FREMM frigate project before commencing work on the Australian frigates.

Opening a new Australian ­office on October 10 would ‘‘expand Fincantieri’s operations into Ade­laide as we mobilise Australian industry, activate the Adelaide shipyard with the proven digital tools needed to build the Italian FREMM frigates on time and on budget in Italy and recruit and train the Australian workforce for the project”.

The company will use its expertise in cruise ship construction to build cruise ship blocks in Australia from next year, using Australian subcontractors to accli­matise them to the company’s methods leading into the start of the frigate construction in Adelaide in 2020.

Fincantieri’s rival bidders for the frigate project have also tried to Australianise their bid, pledging to use local workers and to modernise and digitise shipbuilding operations in Adelaide.

Australian shipbuilder Austal last month warned of a foreign takeover of the nation’s naval shipbuilding industry after it was revealed the government would allow the European bidders to not only design but also control the building process for the frigates.

ARH - 28-9-2017 at 08:39 PM

Quote:
“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.


In other words, they want 12 air warfare destroyers with ballistic missile defence capabilities.

At ~6000t and $35 billion for just nine ships, if they can't manage a "general purpose" capability in addition to ASW as a standard matter of course, they have thoroughly fucked things up already.

ADMK2 - 28-9-2017 at 10:21 PM

Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
Quote:
“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.


In other words, they want 12 air warfare destroyers with ballistic missile defence capabilities.

At ~6000t and $35 billion for just nine ships, if they can't manage a "general purpose" capability in addition to ASW as a standard matter of course, they have thoroughly fucked things up already.


In completely unrelated news, it has been revealed that the ship being offered by Mr King’s firm is the only one even remotely suited to a realistic BMD capability thanks to it’s 48 cell Mk 41 launcher...

ARH - 28-9-2017 at 11:00 PM

It does seem like a bit of a coincidence.

ADMK2 - 2-10-2017 at 10:42 PM

The announcement of BMD and combat systems is supposed to happen tomorrow...

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/new-fl...

Australia's next fleet of navy frigates will be tailored to shoot down incoming missiles in a recognition of the growing threat posed by rogue regimes such as North Korea.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will announce on Tuesday that the nine "future frigates", which the government wants to start building in 2020, will be equipped with an ambitious combination of the US-made Aegis combat system meshed with locally made SAAB Australia technology.

While the frigates are primarily meant for anti-submarine warfare, the inclusion of Aegis will tilt the purpose towards air and missile defence in a clear signal of the government's growing concern about the threat of missiles.

"Recent events in our region have proven that Australia's future frigates must be equipped to defend Australia from the threat of medium and long-range missile attacks," Mr Turnbull said in written comments provided in advance of the announcement.

This technology will enable the future frigates to engage missiles at long range."

The frigates will not provide a comprehensive missile shield across Australia. But according to Andrew Davies, a defence expert with the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, the latest Aegis system would allow the future frigates to operate with US and Japanese partners as a kind of defence network to provide some protection to specific targets in the region.

The combat system is the brains of a warship, allowing it to detect threats, pinpoint targets and fire weapons.

Aegis, made by US giant Lockheed Martin, will be meshed with a system made by SAAB Australia that can work closely with the ships' Australian-made radar and specialises in tackling shorter-range threats.

The combat system is estimated to make up about $3 billion of the total $35 billion cost of the frigate program.

Other future Australian warships will use the SAAB system which Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne said would bring about $1 billion worth of work to local industry.

Dr Davies said a so-called "co-operative engagement capability" would allow the frigates to act as eyes and ears to allied ships and vice versa. Defence Minister Marise Payne stressed that being able to work with allies was a key part of the program.

But Dr Davies said the frigates would need to be upgraded with longer-range interception missiles than those already planned if they are to shoot down intercontinental ballistic missiles - the kind that North Korea could use to threaten Australia. The Aegis system the frigates will use would be optimised for shorter-range missiles but could catch intercontinental range missiles in the early phase of their flight, meaning the ships would need to be stationed in the seas close to North Korea.

US and Japanese destroyers are already equipped with Aegis ballistic missile defence systems and the latest SM-3 missiles, and are critical in trying to intercept any nuclear missiles fired by North Korea if the current tensions deteriorate into conflict.

Dr Davies said the Aegis announcement signalled a prioritisation of missile defence in addition to anti-submarine warfare but added that "they are 7000 tonne ships and there's no reason they can't do both".

The government is already considering ship-based, ballistic missile-defence on the Air Warfare Destroyers, which will hit the water over the next couple of years but for which an upgrade is already planned over the next decade.

Beyond North Korea, the US and its allies are also concerned in the longer run about China's vast arsenal of ballistic missiles.




Mercator - 3-10-2017 at 02:19 PM


Joint Media Release - Prime Minister, Minister for Defence and Minister for Defence Industry - New Approach to Naval Combat Systems
3 October 2017

The Turnbull Government is equipping Australia’s Navy with the world’s best technology as part of a multi-billion dollar investment unveiled today.

The new approach for combat management systems will ensure our Navy’s future ships are fitted out to protect Australia in the decades ahead.

Under the plan, the combat management system for Australia’s fleet of nine Future Frigates will be provided by the Aegis Combat Management System, together with an Australian tactical interface, which will be developed by SAAB Australia.

This decision will maximise the Future Frigate’s air warfare capabilities, enabling these ships to engage threat missiles at long range, which is vital given rogue states are developing missiles with advanced range and speed.

The Future Frigates will be operating in a complex and growing threat environment. By bringing together the proven Aegis system, with a cutting edge Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia, our Future Frigates will have the best capability to defeat future threats above and below the surface, while also ensuring we maintain sovereign control of key technologies, such as the Australian designed and built CEA phased array radar.

In the past, Defence has taken the tendered combat management systems individually, which has meant that the Navy has operated numerous systems at the same time. This has not allowed defence industry to strategically invest for the long-term and has also increased the cost of training, maintenance and repair.

Under the Turnbull Government’s new strategic enterprise approach, the Government has now mandated that where the high-end warfighting capabilities of the Aegis system are not required, a SAAB Australia developed combat management system will be used on all of Australia’s future ship projects.

This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels, which will be built in Australia from 2018, and an Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia for the Hobart class Air Warfare Destroyers when their

Aegis combat management system is upgraded in the future, consistent with the 2016 Defence White Paper.

Further, it guarantees the development of a long-term sustainable Australian Combat Management System industry, which is integral to the implementation of the Government’s Naval Shipbuilding Plan.

The Turnbull Government is investing in Australia’s Navy and ensuring it is fully equipped to protect the nation from future threats.

bug2 - 3-10-2017 at 05:26 PM

Excellent! BUT what about the missiles?

ADMK2 - 3-10-2017 at 08:13 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Excellent! BUT what about the missiles?


It’s a bit early... We have only just had our order for GBU-53 - SDB II approved by the State Department for the F-35 and they are arriving at Williamstown next year...

They’ll be using SM-6 along with the AWD and probably SM-3 in due course, however the orders for these will come after they do for AWD...

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 12:56 AM

Maybe's, but neither the SM-6 nor the SM-3 are short lead-time items. Approval will take 12-24 months, manufacture 3-4 years, although this may be cut to 2-3 years as everyone gets increasingly nervous about North Korea, ISIS, and the old nemesis China and Russia...............realistically 4 years is the quickest we could get any new missiles, more realistically 5-6 years.................it would be "nice" to have the damn missiles before, or just as, we get the warships!

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 01:22 AM

Published: Tuesday, 03 October 2017 10:04
 
Australia's SEA5000 ASW Frigates to be Fitted with AEGIS Combat System and CEA Radar
 
The Australian Governement announced a multi-billion dollar investment today at the PACIFIC 2017 exhibition, to equip the future SEA5000 Frigate of the Royal Australian Navy with what it called "the world’s best technology". Under the plan, the combat management system for Australia’s fleet of nine Future Frigates will be provided by the Aegis Combat Management System, together with an Australian tactical interface, which will be developed by SAAB Australia.

  
Scale model of Fincantieri's FREMM design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
  
This decision will maximise the Future Frigate’s air warfare capabilities, enabling these ships to engage threat missiles at long range, which is vital given rogue states are developing missiles with advanced range and speed.

The Future Frigates will be operating in a complex and growing threat environment. By bringing together the proven Aegis system, with a cutting edge Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia, our Future Frigates will have the best capability to defeat future threats above and below the surface, while also ensuring we maintain sovereign control of key technologies, such as the Australian designed and built CEA phased array radar.

  
Scale model of BAE Systems Type 26 design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
  
The Australian Governement shortlisted three designs for the SEA5000 ASW Frigate program in April 2016: BAE Systems with the Type 26 Frigate; Fincantieri with the FREMM Frigate, and Navantia with a redesigned F100 – have been short-listed to refine their designs. The frigates will all be built in Adelaide, incorporating the Australian-developed CEA Phased-Array Radar.

  
Scale model of Navantia Frigate design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
 
The Competitive Evaluation Process is on schedule to return second pass approval in 2018, which will allow for construction to commence in Adelaide in 2020. This program is estimated to be worth more than $35 billion, and will directly create over 2000 jobs.

9 new frigates will be procured as part of the SEA5000 program which calls for the replacement of the RAN ANZAC class frigates. The Future frigate-class is expected to have anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities and the CEAFAR2 radar currently in development by CEA.

  
Austal OPV design at PACIFIC 2017
 
Under the Turnbull Government’s new strategic enterprise approach, the Government has now mandated that where the high-end warfighting capabilities of the Aegis system are not required, a SAAB Australia developed combat management system will be used on all of Australia’s future ship projects.

This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels, which will be built in Australia from 2018, and an Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia for the Hobart class Air Warfare Destroyers when their Aegis combat management system is upgraded in the future, consistent with the 2016 Defence White Paper.

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 01:40 AM

Leonardo Establishes New Site In Western Australia to Deliver on Major Defence Contracts

(Source: Leonardo; issued Oct 03, 2017)


Leonardo’s new naval electronics facility in Western Australia is being set up for the SEA1442 program, which will see Leonardo become prime system integrator of the Royal Australian Navy’s ANZAC-frigate upgrade program. (RAN photo)

SYDNEY --- Leonardo continues to invest in Australia by opening a new site in Western Australia, through its subsidiary Selex ES Australia Pty Ltd.

The addition of this new site confirms Leonardo's commitment to growing its industrial footprint in Australia beyond its current presence in Melbourne in Victoria and Nowra in New South Wales. Further expansion is planned over the forthcoming 18 months. The new opening was announced at Pacific 2017, an international maritime exposition taking place in Sydney, Australia, where Leonardo is attending (Stand 4F10).

The new facility is located in Rockingham, South of Perth and will be the regional hub for engineering, integration, installation and through life support. Proximity to the Hendersen shipyards and Garden Island will allow Leonardo to be highly responsive on naval programmes. It will also allow Leonardo to team with Western Australian companies and build up a local workforce with specialist skills particularly in defence electronics that will complement the already strong shipbuilding capabilities in the area.

The new site will also play a key role in Leonardo's delivery as prime system integrator of the SEA1442 phase 4 solution. Under the programme, Leonardo will provide an integrated suite of state-of-the-art communications capabilities for the upgrade and modernisation of Australia's ANZAC frigates.

The solution includes enhanced external RF communications and internal communications equipment, the provision of a high-data-rate-line-of-sight bearer and the introduction of a modern communications management system.

The capability upgrade will lay the foundation for a maritime architecture critical to future tactical communications for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). It will also contribute towards the Australian Defence Force’s network-centric warfare concept in the maritime environment, helping reach the goal of a truly networked RAN.

Michael Lenton, Executive Chairman of Selex ES Australia said: “The facility is another example of Leonardo’s commitment towards Australia where the company has been active since it first supplied torpedoes to the Navies of Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia in 1885. Over many years, Leonardo has been building a considerable legacy in Australia through the supply of solutions, products and services for both the defence and civil markets. It is a long-term effort we are immensely proud of and intend to build on going forward.

“Leonardo is serious about its investment in Australia and has taken big steps over the past 12 months to significantly grow local capability as well as building and strengthening the national supply chain. Leonardo has been able to grasp the opportunities around the recent thrust in naval capability procurement and we are intent on demonstrating that our local investment in skills and people is as intense as our transfer of technology from our global operations, even ahead of the next round of naval contracts."

Leonardo is a global prime defence and electronics systems and aerospace specialist, operating in Australia as Selex ES Australia Pty Ltd (defence systems, land and naval), and as AgustaWestland Australia Pty Ltd (helicopters).

-ends-

ADMK2 - 4-10-2017 at 12:32 PM

Quote:
This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels,


Called it! Told ya’ll SAAB’s 9LV would go onto the OPV’s...


ADMK2 - 4-10-2017 at 12:33 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Maybe's, but neither the SM-6 nor the SM-3 are short lead-time items. Approval will take 12-24 months, manufacture 3-4 years, although this may be cut to 2-3 years as everyone gets increasingly nervous about North Korea, ISIS, and the old nemesis China and Russia...............realistically 4 years is the quickest we could get any new missiles, more realistically 5-6 years.................it would be "nice" to have the damn missiles before, or just as, we get the warships!


Fine! You can order your ‘damn missiles’ now then, I guess! (child!) :lol:

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 03:40 PM

Petulant bar steward! :lol::lol::lol:

It's the Contracts and Procurement Manager in me, I get soooooooooooo pissed off at the inadequacy of a lot of Defence (and Business) Procurement that bears no relationship to Integrated Project Management and Scheduling..............

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 04:32 PM

Data Analytics Collaboration to Improve Naval Capability

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 03, 2017)

The Royal Australian Navy will use an innovative new data analytics system to improve fleet efficiency and capability as part of a new collaboration with GE and CSIRO’s Data61.

The Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, said the GE LM2500 gas turbines that power the Adelaide and Anzac class frigates will be fitted with new sensors and coupled with advanced algorithms that will improve operational effectiveness and reduce operating costs.

“The collaboration between Defence, GE and Data61 would see the collection and analysis of gas turbine data to better understand the stresses placed on engines at sea,” Minister Payne said.

“This will enable Defence with real-time information to better identify and prevent issues before they occur, thereby reducing maintenance periods ensuring our frigates are available to spend more time at sea. Increasing engine performance and reducing fuel burn will also lead to greater operational efficiency.’’

“The information gained through this innovative data-sharing initiative could lead to increased operational effectiveness and readiness, as well as a reduction in the through life cost for the systems.”

“This is another example of Defence working collaboratively with industry to develop world-leading technology and deepen the relationships that create mutually beneficial outcomes,” Minister Payne said.

The existing contract for GE LM2500 gas turbine maintenance and logistic support was recently extended to include the Canberra class landing helicopter docks, with the Hobart class guided missile destroyers also expected to be included in the future.

-ends-

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 04:44 PM

Austal to sustain two Cape class patrol boats for Navy

03 Oct 2017



Austal today announced the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has awarded a sustainment contract worth up to $18 million over three years for the two Cape Class Patrol Boats, Cape Fourcroy and Cape Inscription.

The contract will employ eight directly and 20 indirectly in local contractors and Austal’s own facilities in the Cairns area, with the work in addition to that already undertaken by the company for the Australian Border Force.

The two vessels are being leased to cover a gap in Navy's patrol capabilities since the loss of the Armidale class patrol boat HMAS Bundaberg in a dockyard fire and limitations and maintenance constraints affecting the rest of the class, compounded by extra tasking as a result of Operation Sovereign Borders.

ADV Cape Fourcroy was delivered to the Navy in April 2017 and the delivery of ADV Cape Inscription followed in May. 

CEO David Singleton said the deployment of Austal’s Patrol Boats by the Commonwealth will allow export opportunities for Australia by effectively showcasing the vessel with a world class Navy.

“Austal is constantly pursuing opportunities for the Cape Class Patrol Boats and Pacific Patrol Boats to potential overseas customers.”

“Exports derived from defence programs, like Cape, highlight ’the potential multiplier effect’ on local job creation, where Australian suppliers are engaged to deliver both domestic and international contracts,” he said.

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 04:47 PM

Approvals for $540 million Collins class upgrades

04 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney



Approvals on two projects to sustain the capability superiority of the Collins submarine fleet until its replacement by the future submarine were announced today at Pacific 2017.

The first project addresses obsolescence in the control system, known as the Integrated Ship Control Management and Monitoring System (ISCMMS) to allow safe operation of the submarines, while the second provides improved submarine communications capability.

The first stage of the ISCMMS upgrade was awarded to Saab in November 2013, with work commencing on one of the Collins Class boats. The first stage work was valued at around $65 million. Defence had planned for the second stage of the project to update the system in the remaining five Collins Class submarines once installation and testing in the first submarine had been completed. 

Second pass approval has now been given for the second stage. The first stage was due for completion in 2016 but according to Minister Pyne it will now be completed in 2018.  

Minister Pyne said the expertise and experience of Raytheon Australia, in the role of Collins Combat Systems Integrator, will be leveraged to coordinate the communications upgrade.

ADM understands this forms part of Sea 1439 Phase 5B Stage 2 (Collins Communications and Electronic Warfare Improvement Program) which was slated for Second Pass in 2016-17. This follows on from Stage 1, under which the first replacement communication and EW suites are in the final stages of delivery by Raytheon. Stage 2 will provide additonal capabilities including wideband satellite communications. 

“The first stage of this project provides an obsolescence update for the external communications system, with the first installation to complete in December 2017,” Minister Pyne said.

“The next stage will install improved communications capabilities, with the first installation to be completed in 2020.

This will include enhancements to both the satellite communications and on-board Information and Communications Technology (ICT) capabilities. These capabilities are essential for our submarines to effectively conduct their principal roles and will provide the ability to rapidly share large quantities of information in high threat environments.”

The suite of satellite communications upgrades include the Super High Frequency and Advanced Extremely High Frequency communications platforms.

“The Super High Frequency band satellite communications will increase information exchange and support core Defence business functions, while the Advanced Extremely High Frequency component will provide satellite communications and supporting capabilities to further enhance operational information,” Minister Pyne said.

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 04:53 PM

$148m CEAFAR upgrades for Anzacs

04 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney


[img]A model of the CEAFAR2-L on display at Pacific 2017. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant[/img]

CEA Technologies will upgrade the CEAFAR phased array air search radar for Royal Australian Navy’s Anzac class frigates under a new $148 million contract.

The contract will see a new version of the radar, known as the CEAFAR2-L, fitted to the class. This contract is part of the larger program, the Mid-Life Capability Assurance Program (AMCAP) that will modify the ships and integrate the radars that has a total value of over $400 million. HMAS Arunta will be the first of the class to incorporate the full scope of the AMCAP upgrades.

The AMCAP scope of work includes replacement under Project Sea 1448-4B of the Raytheon SPS-49(V)8 ANZ long range air search radar with a more capable unit developed from the CEAFAR active phased array radar installed on the ANZACs as part of their ASMD upgrade.

The Commonwealth signed a standing offer for phased array radar development services with CEA Technologies in October 2013. Under this arrangement the company had progressed risk reduction and demonstration of the CEAFAR2 high power phased array radar (PAR) concept demonstrator in the S, X, and L bands. The radar will also be considered for the Future Frigate Sea 5000 project, under which the inclusion of a CEAFAR radar has been mandated by the Commonwealth.


The CEAFAR2-L as it will appear on the Anzac class following the AMCAP upgrade. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant

The CEAFAR2-L is a long range active electronically steered array (AESA) that provides high quality tracking in the L-band.

It includes an integrated, all mode, Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) capability. The new version marks the transition to gallium nitride (GaN) technology which will deliver much higher power but with half the weight and thickness of the previous generation technology used in CEAFAR1.

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 07:26 PM

Pacific 2017: Australia deploys S-100 rotary-winged UAS in evaluation roles

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

03 October 2017


The RAN will deploy the Schiebel S-100 Camcopter in evaluation roles. Source: Schiebel

Key Points
- The Royal Australian Navy will deploy its Schiebel S-100 Camcopters for trials and evaluations within a test unit
- The system will fill the service’s knowledge gap between fixed-wing and rotary-winged UAVs

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) will deploy its fleet of two Schiebel S-100 Camcopter rotary-winged unmanned aircraft system (UAS) with the service’s Navy UAS Unit as evaluation platforms.

Jane’ s first reported in February 2017 that the RAN has selected the system to fulfil its interim vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS requirement. A contract for the acquisition, which Jane’s has since learned to consist of two Camcopter units with three-years of technical support, was signed in December 2016.

An official from the Navy UAS Unit who spoke to Jane’s at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney has since confirmed that the units, which are currently scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2017, will not be deployed in operational roles.

“The units are intended to fill our knowledge gap between fixed-wing and rotary-winged unmanned aerial vehicles [UAVs]”, said Lieutenant Commander Ben Crowther, officer in charge of the Navy UAS Unit. “With the knowledge attained from the evaluation units, we will be an informed customer when we acquire similar UAVs in the future,” he added.

Among concepts that the S-100 units will evaluate for the RAN include different mission sets, payloads deliverable, and ship operating limits. The Navy UAS Unit, which is based within the RAN’s Headquarters Fleet Air Arm at HMAS Albatross, will also make recommendations on where best to situate UAS control consoles within a platform, based on results from the evaluations, added Lt Cdr Crowther. The S-100 units will be equipped with the MX-10 multi-sensor, multi-spectral imaging system from L3 Wescam.

(311 of 399 words)

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 07:28 PM

Pacific 2017: Ultra Electronics introduces sonobuoy mission pod concept to Asia-Pacific region

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

03 October 2017

Key Points
- Ultra Electronics is showcasing a mission pod concept that allows fixed- and rotary-winged UAVs to deploy sonobuoys
- Concept is expected to gain traction given the rapid proliferation of unmanned aerial systems, said the company


A scale model of the sonobuoy mission pod concept on display at Pacific 2017 (IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Ultra Electronics is showcasing the company’s sonobuoy dispenser concept for manned and unmanned platforms in the Asia-Pacific region for the first time at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney.

The concept is being showcased with the intention of generating awareness, and show operators of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in the region that these platforms can be used as effective anti-submarine warfare (ASW) platforms, an Ultra Electronics official told Jane’s during an interview on 4 October.

UAVs that can be equipped with the sonobuoy mission pod range from the Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton maritime surveillance high altitude long endurance (HALE) platform to the Schiebel S-100 rotary-winged UAS, said Peter Weir, market leader for Ultra Electronics’ Electronic Warfare and C2ISR division.

“The sonobuoy mission pod has been built with a bracket that can interface with hard points found on most UAVs and even helicopters,” said Wier, adding that the system has been designed for rapid front-line installation and removal.

According to specifications provided by the company, the sonobuoy mission pod has been designed to operate at altitudes of up to 30,000 ft, and speeds of up to 150 kt. The system can dispense sonobuoys at a rate of one every 2.5 seconds, and can work with Ultra Electronic’s spectrum sonobuoy products including the high-instantaneous-dynamic-range (HIDAR) and mini-HIDAR series.

(275 of 370 words)

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 07:29 PM

Pacific 2017: Ultra Electronics positions new torpedo countermeasures for SEA 1000

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

03 October 2017


A mock-up of the Deceptor and Defender torpedo countermeasures, on display at Pacific 2017 (IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Ultra Electronics is showcasing the latest models of its Defender and Deceptor series of torpedo countermeasures, with an eye on Australia’s SEA 1000 programme.

The new series, which are due for commercial production in 2018, feature programmable motion and acoustic plans that can better defeat the latest generation of torpedoes in the market today, said Douglas Burd, managing director of Ultra Electronics, in an interview with Jane’s at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney.

The Defender is a 1,000 mm by 100 mm vertically mobile countermeasure system that defeats torpedoes by luring it either upwards or downwards. The system transmits an acoustic signal to seduce torpedoes in a 360-degree direction horizontally, and can ascend and descend at a rate of about 1 m per second.

Meanwhile, the Deceptor is a fully swimmable countermeasure that works by luring an offending torpedo away from its intended target on the vertical and horizontal planes. The system is also encapsulated within a 1,000 mm by 100 mm unit, and has top swim speed of between 6 kt and 8 kt.

When deployed on submarines, the Defender and Deceptor systems can be launched at a maximum operating speed of 25 kt, and a maximum launch depth of 40 m. The countermeasures can operate in temperatures of between 0o and 30o Celsius.

(239 of 290 words)

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 08:08 PM

Pacific 2017: Tempting Australia with SDVs

3rd October 2017 - 08:10 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Sydney



Australia is looking forward to obtaining 12 new Future Submarines from Naval Group’s design studio under its Sea 1000 programme, but one French company is offering an extra dimension should Australia wish to add swimmer delivery vehicles (SDV).

Alseamar, joining Naval Group at its stand at the Pacific International Maritime Exposition in Sydney, had a scale model of its Sphyrene SDV alongside a model of the Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A submarine.

Alseamar offers two types of SDV – the six-man Sphyrene and the three-man Coryphene. The former is 8m long, has a cruising speed of 9kt and range of 100nm. The Coryphene is 6m long, has an 8kt cruising speed and 50nm range.

Eric de Tretaigne, sales manager for Alseamar’s defence side, said either wet shelters or dry shelters can be added to submarines to accommodate these SDVs, with the latter more suitable for larger submarines.

The company would not be drawn on who existing users of its SDVs are, but the French Navy is clearly one.

Shephard understands that Alseamar is developing a new, smaller SDV but details are not yet available.

The Royal Australian Navy has not issued any SDV requirement for its new diesel-electric submarines. However, such a capability would assist special forces and Alseamar remains hopeful about interesting the navy.

Alseamar also produces the portable Gib-Subsar, an acoustic geo-locating buoy. Deployed by ship, it can help identify the position of a submerged submarine in distress. The 2.5m-long underwater GPS tracking system can also detect and localise aircraft black boxes after an air accident, as occurred in the search for an EgyptAir aircraft that crashed in May 2016.
Used by France, Malaysia and the UK, the Gib-Subsar uses radio-frequency and Iridium communications.

The French company also makes antennas for radio communication on submarines, these being used on all French and Korean submarines, for example. De Tretaigne said his firm was discussing with Lockheed Martin the potential for its antenna on Australia’s new submarines.

Another product from the Alseamar portfolio is the 2m-long SeaExplorer underwater glider featuring an interchangeable payload section. The first client for the 59kg subsea glider used it for oceanography, followed by the oil/gas industry to detect underwater leaks. The latest client is a defence force, where the SeaExplorer has an acoustic recorder to find black boxes or submarines.

Last year Aseamar sold one glider to Tokyo University, this being fitted with American turbulence sensors.

bug2 - 4-10-2017 at 08:32 PM

ASC, Babcock extend partnership on RAN submarines

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

04 October 2017

Australian naval shipbuilder ASC has signed an agreement with Babcock International to support the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN’s) Collins-class submarines, it was announced on 4 October.

Under the goods and services agreement (GSA), ASC said it will collaborate with Babcock to supply maintenance, refurbishment, supply, engineering, and management services for the six submarines.

The GSA officially commenced in mid-September and runs for three years, with potential to extend for a further two years. The accord replaces a previous transitional services agreement (TSA), which was signed by the two companies in November 2015 but expired in June 2017.


ASC has signed an agreement with Babcock International to support the Collins-class submarines. (Royal Australian Navy)

The value of the new GSA was not disclosed, but the TSA was valued by Babcock at up to AUD15 million (USD12 million).

(120 of 327 words)

bug2 - 5-10-2017 at 05:28 PM

Sustaining the Capability Superiority of Collins

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 04, 2017)

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, and Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, announced today two projects to sustain the capability superiority of the Collins submarine fleet until its replacement by the future submarine.

“The 2016 Defence White Paper makes it clear submarines are an essential part of Australia’s defence strategy and a powerful instrument for deterring conflict and contributing to anti-submarine warfare in our region,” Minister Payne said.

“The Government is committed to continuing appropriate investments in the Collins class, including priority capability enhancements, obsolescence management and fleet sustainment.

“This will ensure Australia maintains a potent and agile submarine capability until the introduction of the future submarine fleet.”

The first project addresses obsolescence in the control system to allow safe operation of the submarines, while the second provides improved submarine communications capability.

Minister Pyne said the involvement of Australian defence industry, as part of Australia’s submarine enterprise, is fundamental to our ability to manage and sustain a multi-class submarine fleet.

“On average, 120 people per year across New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia will be employed over the life of the program,” Minister Pyne said.

“Combined the projects will inject approximately $540 million into the Australian economy over the next 20 years, with $300 million going into South Australia, $65 million to New South Wales, and $175 million to Western Australia.”

While ASC will manage the integration of the updated systems, Defence has engaged SAAB Australia to update the control system.

The expertise and experience of Raytheon Australia, in the role of Collins Combat Systems Integrator, will be leveraged to coordinate the communications upgrade.

The Turnbull Government is also pleased to advise that the Collins Class Submarines project (CN 10) has been officially removed from the Projects of Concern list. This project was added to the list in November 2008, but given the extraordinary effort that has been put into rectifying the issues associated with the Collins Class project, and given that submarine availability is now meeting international benchmarks, the Government is confident that the project can be removed from the list.

(ends)

$148 Million Radar Upgrade for Anzac Class

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 04, 2017)

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, today congratulated world leading Australian company CEA Technologies for winning a contract to upgrade the capabilities of the Royal Australian Navy’s Anzac class frigates.

Minister Pyne visited CEA Technologies today at PACIFIC 2017 and said the contract valued at $148 million would see the production of new air search radar, known as the CEAFAR2-L, for the Anzac class frigates. The contract is part of the larger program that will modify the ships and integrate the radars that has a total value of over $400 million.

“The air search radar upgrade will ensure Defence is able to adapt to modern and evolving air and missile threats and maintain a capability edge for the life of the Anzac class," Minister Pyne said.

“The radar has been developed by CEA Technologies here in Canberra, a company that employs almost 400 staff, whose technology is leading the world and being adopted by armed forces across the globe.

“The air search radar represents a leading-edge technology innovation and reflects a positive and effective ongoing collaboration between Defence and CEA Technologies over the last 15 years.

“CEA Technologies will build on the technology developed for the Anzac class frigates to develop the next-generation of air search radars for the future frigates.

"In addition to CEA, wider Australian industry will play a vital role in installing and sustaining the air search radar, particularly in providing local employment opportunities in Fremantle, Western Australia, with flow on benefits for the local economy,” he said.

CEA Technologies is an internationally recognised Australian company, and previously built the medium range Anti-Ship Missile Defence radar currently defending the Anzac class.

-ends-

bug2 - 5-10-2017 at 05:33 PM

Saab Combat Management System Announced as Choice for Royal Australian Navy

(Source: Saab; issued Oct 03, 2017)

Defence and security company Saab has been identified by the Australian government to provide the tactical interface to the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) fleet of nine Future Frigates. The Saab 9LV Combat Management System would form an integral part of the Future Frigate and upgraded Air Warfare Destroyer combat capability as well as being selected for the Offshore Patrol Vessels.

Over the last 30 years in Australia Saab has established a strong relationship with the Royal Australian Navy, delivering the combat management systems for the ANZAC class frigates, Canberra class Landing Helicopter Dock vessels and selected for the new supply ships.

“Saab welcomes the announcement made today by the Australian Prime Minister that confirms Saab as an integral part of the government’s enterprise approach to combat management systems. This is an endorsement of the advanced combat system capabilities we have developed for the RAN and we look forward to working closely with the Australian Defence Force to deliver highly capable systems for the Future Frigates and other platforms,” says Dean Rosenfield, Managing Director of Saab Australia.

At this stage there is no contract signed or order received by Saab.

“The government’s decisiveness and support for Australian industry will give Saab certainty to invest in the long-term. With a contract in place, this will mean new job opportunities and growth on the Australian market, carrying out development and support across every major ship in the Australian fleet”, says Dean Rosenfield.

Saab’s 9LV naval combat system solutions offer complete C4I for every type of naval platform, ranging from combat boats and patrol boats, to frigates and aircraft carriers, as well as submarines and vessels for anti-piracy, security and surveillance. Our 9LV solutions provide naval forces with outstanding operational capabilities, supporting all mission types, from littorals to the open ocean.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

-ends-

bug2 - 5-10-2017 at 06:15 PM

Australia chooses Lockheed, Saab for warship combat systems

By: Nigel Pittaway   16 hours ago

Sydney, Australia — Lockheed Martin and Saab have won major deals to supply combat systems for the Royal Australian Navy, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced Oct. 3, the first day of the Pacific 2017 maritime symposium.

The deals are reported to be worth several billion Australian dollars and have been announced as part of the country’s plans to establish a continuous naval shipbuilding capability.

Turnbull said the Lockheed Martin Aegis combat management system, or CMS, will be integrated into the Navy’s nine Future Frigates together with an Australian Tactical Interface to be developed by Saab Australia, which will be acquired under the SEA 5000 project.

He said the Australian government has also mandated Saab Australia to provide its 9LV CMS for the 12 offshore patrol vessels, or OPVs, to be acquired under the SEA 1180 project and a future upgrade of the Australian Tactical Interface for the Navy’s three Hobart-class air warfare destroyers that are currently being delivered.

The Hobart DDG destroyers currently have the Aegis Baseline 8 combat system with the Australian Tactical Interface provided by Raytheon Australia, but the government is mulling a ballistic missile defence capability, which, among other things, will require an upgrade to Aegis Baseline 9.

The overall announcement is largely seen as an intent by the Turnbull government to guarantee an indigenous CMS capability in coming years. “It guarantees the development of a long-term sustainable Australian combat management system industry, which is integral to the implementation of the government’s Naval Shipbuilding Plan,” Defense Minister Marise Payne said in a statement.

The Future Frigate program will acquire nine warships from the mid-2000s, which will be optimized for anti-submarine warfare but also have a significant air defence capability. The Australian government had previously mandated a phased-array radar to be developed by Australia’s CEA Technologies and the combat system competition was between Lockheed Martin with the Aegis Baseline 9 and Saab Australia with the 9LV system.

“The decision to select Aegis for the Future Frigate is a good decision,” said Gary Feldman, Lockheed Martin’s director of Australian mission systems. “We think the commonality with the air warfare destroyers, the interoperability and the overall capability and the growth path for the future makes it a very important decision.”

The Saab Australia 9LV system is already in service aboard several of the Australian Navy’s warships, including the upgraded Anzac-class anti-ship missile defence frigates and the two 27,000-tonne Canberra-class landing helicopter dock ships.
The decision to integrate the system with the 12 OPVs, to be built in Australia in 2018, will mean that Saab will most likely be involved in some way with all surface ship combat management systems in the future.

“Saab welcomes the announcement by the Australian prime minister that confirms the company as an integral part of the government’s enterprise approach to combat management systems. This is an endorsement of the advanced combat system capabilities we have developed for the RAN, and we look forward to working closely with the Australian Defence Force to deliver highly capable systems for the Future Frigates and other platforms,” Saab Australia’s managing director, Dean Rosenfield, said.

“The government’s decisiveness and support for Australian industry will give Saab certainty to invest in the long term. With a contract in place, this will mean new job opportunities and growth on the Australian market, carrying out development and support across every major ship in the Australian fleet.”

bug2 - 6-10-2017 at 12:18 AM

Defence Drives Innovation Exports

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Oct 04, 2017)

More than 30 global companies with contracts to supply critical major parts for the Type 26 Global Combat Ship being manufactured in the UK, will transfer bespoke technologies and capability to Australia, should BAE Systems’ bid for SEA5000 be successful.

BAE Systems has proposed an Australian version of the Global Combat Ship to replace the aging ANZAC class frigates.

As well as the many thousands of jobs that the Future Frigates project will generate, the transfer of technology by these 30 companies and the advanced manufacturing they will undertake will create hundreds of jobs.

The companies will produce, assemble and test equipment in Australia. They will develop advanced manufacturing hubs in propulsion and combat systems technology, establishing new, highly skilled jobs in these specialised sectors during the building of the Future Frigates and in the many decades of sustaining the ships during their service life.

Together with the skills, knowledge and engineering capability that will be transferred by BAE Systems, the technology transfer will not only underpin the building and sustainment of the Future Frigates, it will also enable Australia to lead the design and build its next generation of warships for the Royal Australian Navy.

BAE Systems expects that within ten years, the shipbuilding capability developed in Adelaide will be autonomous and competing for export sales.

BAE Systems Chief Executive Glynn Phillips said:

“The transfer of intellectual property and technology is key to establishing and maintaining an enduring Australian shipbuilding capability.

“Our approach is to create an economic powerhouse of advanced manufacturing.

“Our investment in industrial capability will see highly skilled Australians playing a lead role in the design and building of the next generation warship well beyond the immediate Future Frigate program.”

-ends-

bug2 - 6-10-2017 at 12:19 AM

Brainstorming the Future

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Oct 05, 2017)

Defence is holding its first force design conference to gather ideas from around Australia and the globe on designing the future force.

Decision-makers, practitioners, innovators, military partners, and researchers from Defence, industry, academia, and government agencies will join forces in Canberra from 10-11 October to discuss how to design and deliver a joint Australian Defence Force that is capable, potent and agile.

Deputy Director Force Options Development Commander Roger Fonhof, from Force Design Division, said the division, established last year post the First Principles Review, was transforming the way Defence undertakes force design, by making the force structure review a business-as-usual process.

“Force design is one of the big changes resulting from the First Principles Review,” Commander Fonhof said.

“It will finally provide Defence with an enduring capacity to review itself, to make sure we have the right mix of capability to do what we need to do today and in the future.

“We need to answer questions such as: What does the Australian Defence Force need today, tomorrow and well into the future? How can we maximise innovation and technology to give us an edge?

How do we continue to deliver an Australian Defence Force fit-for-purpose for today’s operations while also designing an Australian Defence Force that can not only fight but win, in future operations?”

Force Design Division is seeking to create a collaborative environment to promote creative thinking and to explore force option opportunities.

Commander Fonhof said it was critical the Australian Defence Force achieved the best fit in terms of capability and resources available while keeping within its budget.

“So it’s about frank and fearless advice, the understanding of options, benefits, trade-offs and implications,” he said.

Head Navy Capability Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead said Navy had embarked upon the most ambitious recapitalisation of its Fleet and supporting infrastructure since the Second World War.

“This offers both opportunities and challenges, but Navy’s potential will only be realised through a joint approach, which encompasses force design through to integrated warfighting,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

“It is absolutely essential that Navy’s needs and requirements are developed through a joint lens, and force design is the pathway by which we materialise our future order of combat.”

Head Force Design Air Vice Marshal Mel Hupfeld said he encouraged leaders in the fields of innovation, research and Defence to provide their ideas on areas such as collaboration, experimentation, wargaming, innovation, and options development to help Defence deliver a joint force by design.

“I’d like to enlist the collective wisdom to help the ongoing professionalization of our workforce and evolve the world-class tools, techniques and methodologies we need, so that every soldier, sailor and airman and airwoman has access to the best capability systems solutions at the right time in the right location,” Air Vice Marshal Hupfeld said.

“We have to be able to provide a clear, coherent, relatable and consistent capability narrative to both the public and government. This narrative must begin internally, before we begin our engagement with other external stakeholders, including central agencies, industry and academia.

“We draw on experts and information sources from both within the department and beyond. In particular, we work closely with our Service Chiefs and Group Heads who play a vital role providing input into force design, as well as a critical role in shaping the design of the future force.”

-ends-

unicorn - 7-10-2017 at 12:47 PM

Hi Guys, I'm sorry to report that I didn't get to the Pacific expo this year. Normally I post a photo essay of the stuff on show but not this year.

I've just started a new job that is kickiing my arse real hard and there was no way I could get out out of work before the exhibition closed each day, so no pics this time I'm afraid.

bug2 - 7-10-2017 at 02:02 PM

No sweat mate..............

unicorn - 7-10-2017 at 02:57 PM

OMFG!!! Reality from an article in The Australian, by Greg Sheriden even!

Let no one sink Australia’s super submarines

The Australian12:00AM October 7, 2017
GREG SHERIDAN
Foreign EditorMelbourne

Our new submarines are under ­bizarre attack, the Collins subs have been officially rehabilitated and the future frigates have been assigned the most powerful missile defence systems in the world.

At a time when across the political divide in Australia, and across Asia, there are worries about whether Donald Trump represents a new unreliability in the US alliance system, we have never in peacetime more needed a powerful navy than now.

Our region is militarising. North Korea will soon be able to deliver nuclear payloads on intercontinental ballistic missiles. China is undertaking one of the biggest military build-ups in modern history. By 2030, one half of the world’s total submarines will be operating in our region.

Belatedly, but determinedly, and with seeming bipartisan support, we are now on a path to build the most formidable navy we have ever had in peacetime, and a navy that, for the first time in many decades, will give us a real self-defence capacity, a real strategic projection capacity, and which will also act as a massive force multiplier for the American alliance system in Asia.

The government announced this week that the nine future frigates, which we will start building in 2020, while still being configured for anti-submarine warfare, will all have the US Aegis Combat System, the world’s most advanced missile defence system.

They will join our three air warfare destroyers, which also have Aegis, giving us 12 surface combatants with the magnificent system of capabilities that the latest Aegis variant offers. These will join our two giant landing helicopter dock ships, which give us the ability to project force through the region in a multiplicity of ways.

And we will have 12 long-range, lethal submarines all with the AN/BYG-1 combat system, the best technology the mighty US Navy can produce.

The 12 Aegis surface ships and the 12 subs will all be built in Australia. That means they will cost more, but the Turnbull government, with the support of the Shorten opposition, is absolutely right to commit to building them in Australia.

This is for three compelling reasons.

One. If they don’t get built here, they won’t get built. This is a political reality. It is impossible to sustain upwards of $100 billion of naval expenditure across numerous political cycles if most of the money is going overseas.

Two. Building in Australia, if done properly, offers us the chance to create and sustain sovereign defence technology capacity of enormous benefit to us.

Three. The main reason building in Australia is so costly is because governments keep postponing or cancelling projects. That means every project undertaken in Australia is a virgin start-up. It is in the nature of all big, complex industrial projects that start-up costs are huge.

Whether he is your cup of tea or not, Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne is in the process of transforming our strategic outlook and industrial prospects. The government’s efforts to create a naval shipbuilding industry based on “continuous build” across destroyers, frigates, submarines, offshore patrol vessels and the rest, means the start-up costs are only borne once.

If we have the wit as a nation to sustain our commitment to this program across the political cycles we will get the navy we need, a formidable domestic industry and sovereign technological capacity.

Bill Shorten and Labor’s defence spokesman Richard Marles, are deeply committed to national security and understand that both sides of politics bear some blame for the long, slow, ludicrously delayed start to the program to replace the Collins subs. And they are certainly just as committed to Australian jobs as the government is. So there is a fair chance that this might actually work.

But our political culture contains many nutty elements that conspire against good policy, as the quite ludicrous attacks on our submarine project in recent weeks demonstrate.

The Government is committed to building 12 new subs with the French Naval Group, formerly DCNS. They will start to come into service in the early 2030s. To avoid a capability gap in the meantime, the Collins-class subs will have their service extended.

The government has not yet decided how many Collins subs it will extend and for how long. The extension actually holds out the possibility of Australia building towards 12 subs earlier than forecast because it is possible that six Collins boats could be operational as new subs come into service.

The decision on the French boat followed an exhaustive competitive evaluation process and extremely energetic and detailed bids from the Japanese and the Germans. American submariners and the most senior military people were involved in advising Canberra that the French were the best option.

At the time I backed the Japanese on strategic grounds but the French, in alliance with Australia, will certainly build very good subs. Australia already has hundreds of people at work on the project including more than a dozen permanently stationed in France. This will rise to 50-odd government people before Christmas and Naval Group Australia will send nearly 100 Australians to France by the middle of next year to spend two or three years on design and development work, and learning the French techniques.

If anything, the project is ahead of schedule, with the hull dimensions already decided in detail. But it is coming under truly eccentric fire from a range of weird sources. A group of activists who hate the French option funded a report by Insight Economics which opposes the project root and branch and offers loopy alternatives. This report is several thousand words of semi-coherent fantasy with endless figures conjured from magic.

It has had a good run from commentators who don’t know anything about defence. For example, it states that extending the Collins will cost $15bn. But the government has not yet determined how many Collins it will extend, nor for how long, so any such figure is nonsense.

The report proposes instead buying or building six short-range French Scorpene-class subs. Its strategic illiteracy is epic. Short-range subs, even modified, and long-range subs are inherently different. Two shorts does not make one long. They do entirely different things and carry different weapons. It proposes modifying these subs to give them longer range and then setting up a mother surface ship to look after them far to Australia’s north.

This is strategic analysis at the level of Biggles books for dullards. Such a ship would be a sitting duck. At any time of tension it would need to be withdrawn, so the short-range subs would lose their notional long range just when it was needed.

The report, while damning the new Naval Group subs, says we should nonetheless go ahead with them, but also build the modified six short-range subs, and buy the mother ship, for the miracle cost of less than $10bn.

The whole thing is absolute ­baloney from start to finish. Many of the things the report says about the Naval Group’s future subs are also wrong. It is perplexing that in any big Australian project there is always such a dedicated constituency for making it fail.

Equally absurd is the related campaign by some that we should get nuclear subs. The nuclear sub is the better sub but no nation runs nuclear subs without a domestic nuclear industry. There is not a snowflake’s chance in hell of any political party establishing a nuclear industry in the next decade. But any politician who talks airily about nuclear subs can have no credibility without establishing an Australian nuclear industry.

Then there is the argument that soon all subs will be obsolete so we shouldn’t bother with them at all. How is it that this revolutionary military insight has passed the Americans by, not to mention the Chinese, the Russians, the British, the Indians and everyone else who are is acquiring subs?

If any of these nutty objections gets any traction, they can only create further delay, so that instead of getting new subs early in the 2030s we wait until the 2040s or beyond, and kill all chance of a continuous build industry.

Surely we have moved beyond this stage of national insanity.

The frigates, meanwhile, are almost as sexy as the subs. They are a $35bn project. They will have two roles, anti-sub warfare and missile defence. No one is fonder of missile defence than me, but at this stage we are talking about the frigates defending themselves, and perhaps ships in an associated task group, from missiles fired at them by other navies or air forces.

However, by committing now to the Aegis Baseline 9 combat system we give ourselves the capacity to upgrade to full ballistic missile defence capabilities. Not only that, but all the ships’ radars will be able to communicate with each other and with allies in what is known as co-operative engagement capability. Having 12 such ships — the frigates and the AWDs — would give us all kinds of capabilities.

It would also give us the ability to join seamlessly and lethally with our US allies, and with their Asian allies, Japan and South Korea. We would all be formidable force multipliers for each other in any joint contingency.

The three frigate bidders are Britain’s BAE Systems, Spain’s Navantia and Italy’s Fincantieri. All three have serious strengths. The British build magnificent anti-sub ships. Protecting their nuclear subs and their aircraft carrier from hostile subs is core business for them. Navantia would use the same hulls as the AWDs; the firm and its Australian collaborators, have learned a great deal from the AWD experience. Fincantieri is a formidable bidder. Its ships would have two helicopters to attack subs — a big factor.

Anti-submarine ships use a great deal of submarine-style technology to be ultra-quiet. This can be things like covering the hull with smooth, silent tiles, or all the technologies subs use to keep internal noise down. The balance of technology between the sub and the surface ship is shifting. The sub still has the advantage but ASW ships are much more in the game than has been the case previously.

Australians love working with the British navy, the Spanish are a familiar partner and themselves operate Aegis systems, the Italians produce a superb ASW ship.

It may be that the definition of the role of these ships changed marginally this week. When Malcolm Turnbull talked of them in the context of North Korea, he seemed to add greater weight to their missile defence capabilities. The government is determined not to diminish their anti-sub capabilities, but we may get more vertical missile pods, and deeper pods that can take the more formidable missile interceptors.

Although even the best of these interceptors at the moment would be tasked with hitting shorter-range ballistic missiles, their eventual ability to intercept even ICBMs should not be ruled out.

Australia has embarked on something of the utmost importance and with a chance of delivering benefit to our nation across several critical dimensions: military capability, economic base, sovereign defence technology.

The subs, and even the frigates, will inevitably face challenges along the road. But you can’t complete the longest road if you never start. It would be a tragedy if our perennial culture of naysaying, or political short-termism, doomed these efforts just as they, all too belatedly, get going.

bug2 - 7-10-2017 at 03:11 PM

I would note that Greg Sheridan, the Foreign Editor had to write this article..............NOT the so-called Defence section/editor

ADMK2 - 7-10-2017 at 05:10 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
I would note that Greg Sheridan, the Foreign Editor had to write this article..............NOT the so-called Defence section/editor


It just shows how crazy the defence debate is getting in this country when Greg Bloody Sheridan is the voice of reason...

The only other good news in this scenario is that Defence and the Government are absolutely ignoring these mouth-breathing imbeciles and continuing with these plans that are scheduled to deliver an outstandingly capable Navy in years to come.

Now if only we’d grow some balls, get Bugs beloved SM-6 and later SM-3 after AEGIS gets upgraded to Baseline 9 standard and we hurry up and put LRASM / Tactical Tomahawk (with the ASM seeker) onto the AWD’s and Collins in the meantime and then the FF and the future sub, things would be looking pretty sweet...


weasel - 7-10-2017 at 05:17 PM

One glaring inadequacy that might be "missing that it is missing" in the USN and The RAN (actually any Western Navy in the world) is that all of the surface combatants cannot take a hit.

A simple swarm of 50 lb bomb carrying drones will take out any Aegis system, how? it would be overwhelmed and therein seems to lie the Achilles heal.

The sensor suite which the vessel relies upon for survival is waaaaaaaaaaay too vulnerable to damage.

One cost effective solution to this might be to increase the height of the radar. Put it on an airship orbiting a ship, so that it has more time to respond to a swarm attack or whatever, but don't kid yourself, an Arleigh Burke or the new Australian AWD are fast becoming what Submariners call "targets".

Another cost effective solution might be to make the vessel survivable. The cheapest and easiest armor to incorporate in any vehicle is space and air (blast waves decay at a cubic rate in air) So build your design accordingly. What would that look like? A multi hull design. A mono hull is a dead duck to the one supersonic SSAshM that always gets through the "impregnable" Aegis shield (LMAO) Why always? Why would I shoot one, 4, 6 or even 8 missiles at an Aegis warship, if I wanted to kill it? I would shoot enough so it's fate would be sealed, because that's what enemies with missiles do. Any kind of thinking otherwise is Ostrich-with-your-head-(ummm, pause)-in-the-sand-thinking...


cheers

W

ADMK2 - 7-10-2017 at 05:42 PM

Quote:
[quote=2898&tid=263&author=weasel]One glaring inadequacy that might be "missing that it is missing" in the USN and The RAN (actually any Western Navy in the world) is that all of the surface combatants cannot take a hit.

A simple swarm of 50 lb bomb carrying drones will take out any Aegis system, how? it would be overwhelmed and therein seems to lie the Achilles heal.


What would be the effect do you think of attempting to fly a drone with range of the radiated power output of a SPY-1D radar?

Quote:
The sensor suite upon which the vessel relies upon for survival is waaaaaaaaaaay too vulnerable to damage.


If it gets hit... But by the same argument we might as well ground every aircraft in the world...

Quote:
One cost effective solution to this might be to increase the height of the radar. Put it on an airship orbiting a ship, so that it has more time to respond to a swarm attack or whatever, but don't kid yourself, an Arleigh Burke or the new Australian AWD are fast becoming what Submariners call "targets".


Or a 360 degree podded radar system mounted on say, an MQ-8C?

Quote:
Another cost effective solution might be to make the vessel survivable. The cheapest and easiest armor to incorporate in any vehicle is space and air (blast waves decay at a cubic rate in air) So build your design accordingly. What would that look like? A multi hull design. A mono hull is a dead duck to the one supersonic SSAshM that always gets through the "impregnable" Aegis shield (LMAO) Why always? Why would I shoot one, 4, 6 or even 8 missiles at an Aegis warship, if I wanted to kill it? I would shoot enough so it's fate would be sealed, because that's what enemies with missiles do. Any kind of thinking otherwise is Ostrich-with-your-head-(ummm, pause)-in-the-sand-thinking...


cheers

W


The problem with this line of thinking is real world missile inventories. In war games, weapon stocks are always unlimited and always available wherever and whenever you need them.

I remember CP exercises back in the day where we easily destroyed enemy armoured force after enemy armoured force with Hellfire and Javelin ATGW fires alongside M1A1 tank fire. It was a one sided slaughter, how stupid these enemy armoured forces were? Why would you even bother with an armoured vehicle when they were so easily destroyed?

Problem was, back in the real world we had none of these capabilities...

bug2 - 7-10-2017 at 09:14 PM

October 7 2017 - 12:01AM

$50b submarine project struggling to find qualified Australians: French shipbuilder

David Wroe

The head of the French firm helping to build Australia's $50 billion fleet of new submarines has admitted it faces a significant battle to find a qualified and experienced local workforce.

Herve Guillou, CEO of French firm Naval Group, told Fairfax Media this week that the firm is practically having to recruit workers "one-by-one". While there are many young, university-educated people they can train from scratch, older and experienced managers are hard to find.

"My worry is always that people confuse education with experience. These are very, very different," he said.

"Finding people with a diploma is not so difficult, finding people with experience and managerial skills is more difficult … It's nearly a one-by-one exercise."


Naval Group chief executive Herve Guillou, right, at the firm's shipyards in Cherbourg, France, with Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne. Photo: AP

Naval Group – formerly called DCNS – won the contract last year to help design and build Australia's new fleet of 12 submarines.

Submarines are notoriously complex and the project needs about 1500 highly specialised workers by the end of next decade.

The firm now has about 80 people – a mix of Australians and French – based in Adelaide. But next year it will launch a nationwide recruitment campaign targeting sectors such as oil and gas, and automotive, "because we're not really getting the scope of experience that we need and there's a whole industry that still doesn't know about the program", Mr Guillou said.

He described the management of submarine construction as "incredibly dense" because everyone involved needed to be very closely co-ordinated from engineers to plumbers. Mid-range managers with experience at this were the hardest to find in Australia.


An impression of a Shortfin Barracuda submarine being built with the help of French firm Naval Group. Photo: DCNS GROUP

But he added that Naval Group had done this before in India and Brazil and insisted that enough time had been factored in by the Australian government.

He said it was "more risky" to do it in Australia than in France because a new supply chain would have to be built but these were "the rules of the game" set by the government.

"This country wants to get sovereignty, the full maritime enterprise on their side and that's fine. That's what we've been contracted for. That's what we will deliver."

The first of the 12 new submarines is scheduled to hit the water in the early 2030s. At least some of the ageing Collins-class submarines will need to go through refits to extend their lives.

Meanwhile, Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne and Defence Minister Marise Payne were at odds this week over the idea of stating a minimum level of Australian industry involvement in the submarines.

Mr Pyne told reporters at the Pacific 2017 naval conference in Sydney that at least 60 per cent of the work on the submarines would be done by Australian firms, which he said met the government's promise of building them locally.

"A local build is 60 per cent … That's the definition of a local build," he said, though he added he would like it to be higher for all shipbuilding projects.

The government has faced political pressure in South Australia – Mr Pyne's home state – to guarantee a minimum Australian content, including for the huge supply chain for the millions of parts that make up a submarine.

Mr Pyne said he had had "very clear conversations with Naval Group and they fully understand that and they have committed to at least 60 per cent". This was confirmed by Mr Guillou.

But just hours later, Senator Payne told an industry briefing at the conference: "The political argy bargy will have some people say they want to see a percentage put on that, but I don't see why you would put a floor on an item like that. Why wouldn't you start by reaching for the highest point possible? It doesn't seem logical to me to put a base on it."

bug2 - 7-10-2017 at 10:15 PM

Collins removed from Projects of Concern at last

06 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney


A Collins class cutaway cross sectional model on display at Pacific 2017. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant

In a move that even Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne conceded was long overdue, the Commonwealth has finally removed the Collins class program (CN10) from the Projects of Concern list.

ASC’s Interim CEO Stuart Whiley said the move recognised the high performance of the Collins Class program, carried out by the Submarine Enterprise, including ASC as submarine platform sustainer and upgrader, the Royal Australian Navy, Defence Department and Raytheon Australia.
 
This decision recognises the fantastic work and expertise of our leading submarine platform personnel
 
“ASC welcomes the recognition by the Government of the Enterprise’s success in dramatically improving submarine availability for the Royal Australian Navy.

“This decision recognises the fantastic work and expertise of our leading submarine platform personnel, from our skilled production trades to our engineers, project managers and supply chain managers.”

Following an organisation-wide program of innovation and reform commencing in 2012, ASC is now performing at or above international benchmarks for its scope of work on Collins Class submarine.

During the Beyond Benchmark review last year, John Coles, who conducted the 2012 review into sustainment of the Collins Class Submarines, was impressed by the improvements made at ASC in a very short space of time.

The Beyond Benchmark review revisited the Collins submarine sustainment environment two years on from the March 2014 progress review and covered three areas: current Collins Class sustainment performance; sustaining performance during transition to the Future Submarine; and improving beyond the benchmark.

With observed improvements to planning, productivity, inventory investment, and performance monitoring, the review team saw the Enterprise would be in a position to achieve benchmark performance by mid-2017.

Whiley said ASC draws on its submarine personnel who number in excess of 1,200, and include some of Australia’s leading submarine platform engineers. It also leverages a network of Australian expert organisations to implement sovereign industrial solutions in Collins Class sustainment.

“ASC manages the integration of the Collins supply chain and has achieved Australian content of more than 92 per cent on its scope of work in Collins Class sustainment.”

bug2 - 8-10-2017 at 08:26 PM

Torpedo Countermeasures


The Subscut detects the torpedo and selects the appropriate decoy (Photo: Rafael)

At Pacific 2017, Rafael is also showcasing its submarine anti-torpedo systems: Shade, Scutter and Torbuster. Doron Levi, Marketing and Business Development Director for Naval Warfare Systems at Rafael, told MONS: “When an incoming torpedo is detected by a submarine, there are two things the Commander can do: manoeuvring and sending out a counter-measure. These are all human made decisions. We decided to offer systems that can facilitate and improve this decision-making either automatically or semi-automatically.”
 
Shade is the first step in the process. It is a torpedo defence suite that protects submarines from attacks by all types of acoustic homing torpedoes. “It consists of three components,” continues Mr. Levi: “A defence programmer that analyses threats and selects a pre-programmed response; a launcher controller that enables the selection and firing of torpedo countermeasures; up to 32 launchers for firing up to 32 decoys.”
 
In terms of decoys, Rafael offers the Subscut. Launched from the signal ejector of any submarine, the Subscut detects active acoustic transmissions, resulting in Countermeasure selection and generation of the appropriate deception signal for transmission, including Doppler effects, target highlights, and target self-noise. “However, torpedoes are becoming more and more intelligent and some have a long autonomy, as such it sometimes become inevitable to send another counter-measure that can end the run of the torpedo by disabling its electronics and motors,” says Mr. Levi.
 
To this end, Rafael has developed the Torbuster. Launched from an external launcher, it propels itself at a safe distance from the submarine and seduces the torpedo by transmitting specific acoustic signals. When the torpedo approaches the decoy, at the closest point of approach, it self explodes and neutralises it.
 
Scutter is already in use with the Royal Australian Navy on the ‘Collins’ class, as well as with the US and the Israeli navies.

bug2 - 8-10-2017 at 08:30 PM

OPV80 RAN


Model of the OPV80 RAN at the Pacific 2017 show in Sydney

In the context of the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) competition for the replacement of 13 ‘Armidale’ class patrol boats with 12 new vessels (SEA 1180), Fassmer of Germany teamed-up with Austal in Australia to offer the OPV80 RAN. Harald Fassmer, Managing Director of Fassmer, told MONS: “There are two main reasons we teamed-up with Austal. Firstly, because involvement of local industry was a requirement in the tender, but most importantly because we wish to build a vessel that we can then export in the Asia Pacific region and it will be much easier if we are building from Australia.”
 
The OPV RAN is the latest evolution of the proven Fassmer OPV 80 design, of which seven similar vessels are currently in service with the Chilean and Colombian navies since 2008 while three vessels are under construction for the German Coast Guard.
 
MONS asked Mr. Fassmer what makes the AustalFassmer OPV80 RAN particularly competitive compared to the other ships offered by Damen and Lürssen for SEA 1180: “The first customer for the OPV80 was the Chilean Navy, for which we had to build a ship that could withstand very harsh sea conditions.

Moreover, AustalFassmer are offering a ship with two medium speed engines, instead of two high speed engines, which increases the time between maintenance thus decreasing the costs.” The OPV80 RAN will be able to go as fast as 21knots.
 
Mr. Fassmer concluded by indicating that the contenders are expecting a decision by the end of October.

bug2 - 11-10-2017 at 01:38 PM

Frigates and OPVs parade three by three in Australia

10th October 2017 - 03:10 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Sydney



Frigates and OPVs were a major focus at the Pacific International Maritime Exposition in Sydney last week, with each programme – Project Sea 5000 and Sea 1180 respectively – shortlisted to three contenders each after RfTs were earlier issued.

On the last day of the expo, the three frigate contenders presented their designs at a conference session: the BAE Systems Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Fincantieri FREMM-A and Navantia F-5000. The former employed a chief engineer to highlight design features of the Type 26, while Fincantieri rolled in a couple of Italian Navy officers. Navantia took a multimedia approach to emphasise local industrial involvement and its ‘low-risk choice’ status.

Dominic MacNamara, business development manager at Navantia Australia, claimed: ‘The F-5000 will enhance the presence, persistence and lethality of future task group operations.’ He emphasised the frigate’s commonality and shared weapons with the Hobart class.

Given Navantia’s involvement in the Air Warfare Destroyer and Canberra-class LHD programmes, plus auxiliary oilers/replenishment ships currently under construction, the company is in a strong position. The fact that Navantia is the only one of the three to have integrated the Aegis combat management system – now mandated for the Future Frigates – ticks another box.

However, the F-5000 (based on the F100 of the Spanish Navy) was the only design to have a single helicopter hangar.

The Royal Navy’s Type 26 was designed from the outset for anti-submarine warfare so its acoustic signature has been carefully managed. It has a hull life of 35 years, according to Chris Muskett, a chief engineer at BAE Systems.

A feature of the Type 26 design is a mission bay that can hold up to ten 20ft containers or even a helicopter of Merlin size. This adds flexibility and the ship can be re-roled within 24 hours. The flight deck can handle a helicopter up to the size of a Chinook.

However, the Type 26 is the only one of the three not in service.

Fincantieri perhaps begins with the greatest disadvantage, having no naval shipbuilding experience in Australia.

Nevertheless, it is planning a new office in Adelaide and will list on the Australian Securities Exchange.

Sean Costello, director of Fincantieri Australia, highlighted the flexible propulsion and survivability of the 6,700t FREMM-A design. It features an azimuthal retractable thruster in the forward part of the hull. The frigate can accommodate up to two helicopters of MRH90 size.

The Sea 5000 schedule will see second pass approval given next April at the completion of the competitive evaluation process. Construction of the first of nine Future Frigates is to begin in South Australia in 2020 to replace the ANZAC class.

Moving on, the OPV contenders for 12 new vessels to replace the Armidale class are Fassmer, Lürssen and Damen. All were coy about their designs when speaking to media at the Pacific expo.

Fassmer has teamed with Austal to offer the OPV80 RAN design, with the German shipbuilder eyeing not only Australia’s tender but also wider sales in the Asia-Pacific region. This design is based on Fassmer’s OPV 80, of which seven examples are in service in Chile and Columbia and three are under build for the German Coast Guard.

Lürssen was particularly brusque in its handling of media, but it displayed a scale model of its OPV80, perhaps best known in the region under its Darussalam-class guise as used by Brunei. This type displaces 1,486t and measures 80m long. Lürssen has teamed with ASC and Civmec.

Damen has partnered with Forgacs Marine and Defence, and its design is based on the OPV 1800 Sea Axe (pictured above) that displaces 980t and measures 85m long. It has a specially shaped ‘axe bow’ to avoid slamming in heavy seas and which reduces fuel consumption by up to 20%. Damen has built similar Arialah-class hulls for the UAE.

At the Pacific expo Damen and Forgacs announced the award of a dredger contract, with the 60m craft to be built in Western Australia. Roland Briene, Damen’s area director for Asia-Pacific, told Shephard that this was significant as ‘it is a good step up to constructing OPVs in Australia’.

The three European shipbuilders are expecting an OPV selection decision by the end of October in readiness for construction to commence in Adelaide next year, before work shifts to Western Australia from the third vessel onwards.

ADMK2 - 12-10-2017 at 12:21 AM

Getting a bit sick of all these journalists basing their opinions on what exactly is being offered for Future Frigates and OPV’s etc, on what a loosely representative model shows...

They are MODELS people. Not the friggin boats themselves!!!

unicorn - 12-10-2017 at 05:30 PM

The're journalists, which is shorthand for overpaid, over-opinionated, under-informed and underwhelming idiots.

bug2 - 21-10-2017 at 10:41 AM

Australia completes operational evaluation phase of the ScanEagle UAS

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

20 October 2017

Key Points
- The Royal Australian Navy has completed operational evaluation of the ScanEagle UAS
- Milestone paves the way for greater adoption of MUM-T operations across the service

After executing a number of successful missions from an Adelaide (Oliver Hazard Perry)-class guided-missile frigate in the Middle East, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has completed operational evaluation (OPEVAL) of the ScanEagle unmanned aircraft system (UAS).

The OPEVAL was completed onboard HMAS Newcastle , which is currently deployed as part of Operation ‘Manitou’ – Australia’s contribution to an international effort promoting maritime security in the Middle East.

Newcastle has been equipped with four ScanEagle vehicles for the evaluations.

(128 of 499 words)

unicorn - 22-10-2017 at 09:07 AM

How to screw up a Romeo

Damaged Romeo helicopter could be a write-off

A multi-million dollar naval helicopter has been extensively damaged on its way to the Middle East.

It is understood the MH-60 Romeo Seahawk from 725 Squadron at HMAS Albatross was damaged onboard HMAS Warramunga on it’s way to Perth before heading to the Gulf.

It is believed the helicopter may have broken free of its lashing in an hangar area, half way across the Great Australian Bight in rough conditions.

It is understood the helicopter “bounced” around the hangar area, causing significant damage, with one of three sources who spoke to the Register saying the helicopter might be “a write-off”.

Other reports suggest the aircraft has suffered millions of dollars worth of damage.

It is understood no one was injured in the incident.

The Register has been told the aircraft was replaced to allow Warramunga, an Anzac Class Frigate Helicopter (FFH), capable of air defence, surface and undersea warfare, surveillance, reconnaissance and interdiction, to continue to the Middle East.

Defence was contacted for comment over the alleged incident but is yet to respond.

The Australian Government approved the acquisition of 24 MH-60R Seahawk Romeo naval combat helicopters at a cost of over $3 billion.

The Romeo, replacing the S-70B-2 Seahawk helicopters, is seen as the future of naval aviation. It is equipped with a highly sophisticated combat systems designed to employ Hellfire air-to-surface missiles and the Mark 54 anti-submarine torpedo.

The Romeo’s primary mission is anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare but also has the ability to undertake search and rescue, logistics support, personnel transport and medical evacuation.

The helicopters are largely military off-the-shelf built by Sikorsky and Lockheed Martin and were acquired through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process from the US Navy.

The final of the 24 helicopters arrived at Nowra’s HMAS Albatross in September 2016, providing navy the capacity to equip at least eight warships with a combat helicopter at the same time.

The remainder are based at Albatross with 725 Squadron which was recommissioned in 2015.

As well as Anzac Class frigates, the Romeos can also be deployed on the new Air Warfare Destroyers.

ENDS

The info I have heard is the damned thing bounced around inside the hangar like a "ping pong ball".

Apparently Warramunga was heading across the Great Australian Bite to the Gulf when she hit some rough weather. During the pitching and rolling the Romeo had come loose from her tie downs and had bounced around in the hanger for two days. They couldn't send anyone into the hanger to try and re-lash it down for fear of them being crushed by the aircraft moving around. They just had to leave it there until they got calmer weather.

They apparently now use material tie down straps instead of chains. These straps stretched under the strain which then came off the aircraft.

bug2 - 22-10-2017 at 03:19 PM

Australian Navy Perseveres With S-100 Camcopter Despite Crashes

by Mike Yeo - October 19, 2017, 10:51 AM


One of two Schiebel S-100 Camcopters that crashed while on trial with the Royal Australian Navy. (Photo: Australian Ministry of Defence)

Two S-100 Camcopter VTOL UAVs being provided by their Austrian maker Schiebel to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) for trials have crashed. But the service still plans to buy two S-100s plus two ground stations. Separately, the RAN is upgrading its fleet of 24 manned Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters, the last of which was delivered just over a year ago.

Speaking at a Naval Aviation Symposium on the sidelines of the Pacific 2017 Maritime Exhibition in Sydney, Commodore Chris Smallhorn, the commander of the RAN’s Fleet Air Arm, said both unmanned helicopters crashed for similar reasons and that investigations are ongoing. However trials with the S-100 are set to continue, with delivery of two more powered by a new heavy-fuel engine. According to documentation from Schiebel, the new engine will be able to use JP-5 fuel with its higher flash point for shipboard operations.

Australia selected the S-100 Camcopter for its Navy Minor Project (NMP) 1942 in December last year to meet the RAN’s interim requirement for a VTOL UAV, signing a three-year contract. This project will lead to Project SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1, which will select a UAV to go aboard the RAN’s 12 Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) whose construction is due to start in 2018.

Phase 2 of this project will select another UAV type to equip nine frigates the RAN is planning to build for service from the early 2030s.

At the symposium Commodore Scott Lockey, ‎director general of Navy Aviation Systems at the ‎Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG), said that the timeline for the start of SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1 has slipped by two years although he expects that with a compressed timeline the program will still be able to deliver UAVs to operate on board the OPVs when they are commissioned in the early 2020s.

The program will likely see Schiebel competing with UMS Skeldar again in a repeat of the NMP 1942 competition that saw the S-100 up against Skeldar’s V-200. However, other ship-capable UAVs such as the Insitu Scan Eagle or the Northrop-Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout may also be in contention.

CASG had released a request for information in May from potential suppliers for the SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1, which it said drew 27 responses, seeking to provide the OPVs “with an embedded, off-board intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that will enhance its ability to perform its primary and secondary missions.”

Commodore Lockey also revealed that the RAN’s MH-60R Seahawks will undergo a $500 million (Australian dollars, U.S.$394 million) Capability Assurance Program following its approval by the Australian government in June. There will be upgrades and replacement of systems, sensors and weapons to ensure commonality with the U.S. Navy’s MH-60Rs.

The first deliverable of the program will see the integration of the BAE Systems Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) guided rocket, which Lockey said fills an anti-surface warfare gap between door-mounted machine guns and the Lockheed Martin AGM-114 Hellfire missile. 

ADMK2 - 24-10-2017 at 08:14 PM

The Australian is running the story that BAE the ‘bidder’ for the Future Frigate program is responsible for losing the 126 page security manual for Parliament house.

Won’t help their T26 bid...

bug2 - 24-10-2017 at 08:30 PM

Hmmmm...........why would BAE have it to start with?

ADMK2 - 24-10-2017 at 08:55 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Hmmmm...........why would BAE have it to start with?


Because they are the contractor for the Parliament house upgrades...

bug2 - 25-10-2017 at 09:39 AM

Well it may or may not have been them, but then again that's never stopped The Australian from printing crap............!

bug2 - 25-10-2017 at 07:46 PM

RAN to receive first heavy-fuel-powered S-100 Camcopters by end-2017

Julian Kerr - IHS Jane's Navy International

25 October 2017

The first heavy-fuel-powered versions of the Schiebel S-100 Camcopter rotary-winged unmanned aircraft system (UAS) will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) – the vehicle’s launch customer – by the end of 2017, Schiebel’s Australia sales representative, Phil Swinsburg, confirmed on 25 October.

Schiebel has replaced the Diamond piston engine from previous versions of the S-100 with a two-disc rotary engine, sourced from UK company Rotron and modified in-house. The engine accepts JP-5, a kerosene-based fuel with a flash point above 60 degrees Celsius, specified by the RAN for safety reasons.

The vehicles were procured under a December 2016 contract to meet the RAN’s interim maritime vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) requirements.

(136 of 384 words)

ADMK2 - 25-10-2017 at 11:51 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Well it may or may not have been them, but then again that's never stopped The Australian from printing crap............!


BAE have publicly admitted they had lost it and reported such to the AFP in February this year...

bug2 - 26-10-2017 at 09:33 AM

Ah well, there you go, they told the truth for once...............

unicorn - 29-10-2017 at 05:58 PM

Fine-tuning starts for navy’s first air warfare destroyer

JULIAN KERRThe Australian12:00AM October 28, 2017
The formal commissioning at Sydney’s Garden Island on September 23 of HMAS Hobart saw the Royal Australian Navy welcome into service one of the world’s most capable multi-mission warships.

In essence, the 7000-tonne air warfare destroyer — now officially designated as a DDG (guided missile destroyer) — provides in the hull of a large frigate the weapons capability of a destroyer together with communications and command and control resources broadly similar to those of a much larger US Navy Ticonderoga-class cruiser.

Importantly, the DDGs come equipped with the US co-operative engagement capability (CEC) that provides an over-the-horizon capability across platforms. The CEC enables each ship to act as part of a wider grid of sensor and weapon platforms that allows similarly-equipped ships to share surveillance and targeting information.

Following significant improvements in what has been a contentious construction process, Ship 2, the Brisbane, is 95 per cent complete at ASC in Adelaide and is tracking to meet a rescheduled delivery date of June 2018. Delivery of Ship 3, the Sydney, now 65 per cent complete, has been advanced by three months to December 2019.

The RAN will then boast three ships whose capabilities, orchestrated by their Aegis combat systems, stretch well beyond those of their primary long-range anti-air role, albeit at a price. The final cost is estimated in 2016-17 budget papers as $9.09 billion — about $1.25bn in out-turned dollars over the original budget.

Fine-tuning those air-defence, land-attack, surface-attack and anti-submarine capabilities to reach initial operational capability by December 2018 is the responsibility of Captain John Stavridis.

In addition to three masters degrees and extensive command experience, Stavridis is also a qualified chartered accountant whose respect for ordered, detailed process should, he acknowledges, stand him in good stead during Hobart’s work-up program.

This is expected to culminate late next year with US Navy combat system sea certification (CSSC) trials. The trials will include firings over the southern California test range off San Diego of the ship’s SM-2 Block IIIB medium-range and Evolved Seasparrow (ESSM) short-range anti-air missiles. While the SM-2 Block IIIB is lethal against aircraft and sea-skimming anti-ship cruise missiles, it is not designed for use against ballistic missiles.

Given the threat posed by North Korea’s strategic missile program, it would be surprising therefore if consideration is not being given in Canberra to an early upgrade of the command and control element of the DDGs’ Aegis combat systems and the acquisition of SM-6 missiles to provide a sea-based terminal-phase ballistic missile defence (BMD) capability.

The intention to equip the DDGs with the SM-6 to enhance their capability “against emerging air threats” was explicitly confirmed in both the Defence Department’s 2009 and 2012 defence capability plans.

The 2016 policy white paper stated simply that the DDGs would be equipped with “new advanced surface to air missiles” — presumably the SM-6 Dual 1 with a range of about 370 kilometres and combined BMD, anti-air and anti-surface target capabilities — by the middle of the next decade.

Deploying SM-6 for terminal-phase BMD (that is, when the missile is approaching its target) would require upgrading the DDGs’ Baseline 8.0 Aegis systems to the latest Baseline 9.C1 configuration with an optional BMD module, thus combining BMD and air defence in a single integrated package. The Baseline 8.0 systems were ordered from the US in 2006, produced in 2009, and subsequently languished in warehouses for years before installation.

A report by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute suggests upgrading Aegis to Baseline 9.C1 could cost about $US125 million ($160m) per ship, together with the opportunity cost of taking each vessel out of service — or possibly delaying the delivery of Ship 3 — for an unknown period.

To that must be added the cost of BMD-capable missiles — about $US4m per copy for the SM-6 and $US12m each for the US Navy’s SM-3 exo-atmosphere ballistic missile interceptor, which can also be deployed with Aegis Baseline 9.C1.

Defence’s Integrated Investment Plan (IIP) includes a $4bn-$5bn provision for enhancements to the DDG combat system between 2017 and 2028, but gives no details of what these large sums will involve. The IIP also anticipates additional expenditure between 2018 and 2028 of $2bn-$3bn on area air-defence weapons.

Preliminary approval for the first upgrade to Aegis is slated for 2017-18 under Project Sea 4000 Phase 6, and this work is likely to be undertaken during Hobart’s first scheduled docking period in early 2019.

At present it is understood the docking will include some relatively minor software enhancements to Aegis, improving the protective armour on the magazine storing Hellfire air-to-surface missiles for the ship’s embarked MH-60R combat helicopter, and installing equipment to allow the ship to make use of the Hawklink high-speed digital data link already fitted on the MH-60R.

Barring the emergence in the meantime of a credible solution to the threats emanating from Pyongyang, that maintenance period could also provide the opportunity to initiate the BMD upgrade.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/defence/fin...

unicorn - 29-10-2017 at 06:00 PM

Future Frigate decision’s focus on combat system will leverage Aegis

KYM BERGMANNThe Australian12:00AM October 28, 2017

With evaluation of the three contending Future Frigate designs well under way, a critical decision regarding the combat system for them was announced by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on October 3.

In essence, this will be a combination of advanced Australian CEAFAR radars, a combat management system with a US Navy pedigree — Lockheed Martin’s Aegis — and vital software interfaces from Saab Systems called 9LV.

This latter system will then become common across the Royal Australian Navy’s entire surface fleet and has been mandated for the offshore patrol vessels as well as the Sea 5000 frigates. These measures define the way forward for naval combat systems and local industry for decades to come.

One way of looking at the nine ships being selected under the Sea 5000 program is that the ships are merely the floating vehicles for the advanced weapons and electronics they carry in order to fight and survive in a high-intensity conflict.

Reality is more complicated than that because the frigates themselves also need to be at the leading edge of naval technology, which is why the shortlist is the British Type 26 global combat ship from BAE Systems; the Italian anti-submarine warfare Fremm from Fincantieri; and a modified version of the three Hobart-class air warfare destroyers (AWDs) built and being built in Adelaide to a design from Spain’s Navantia.

When the Future Frigate project was conceived, it was with an emphasis on anti-submarine warfare, which has not diminished.

It was assumed the AWDs would provide long-range air cover for ships and task groups, leaving the frigates to concentrate on the vital job of detecting and hunting underwater threats that are rapidly increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. However, as events such as the rapid development of North Korea’s ballistic missile capability has necessitated, the future frigates will now also need to have anti-air warfare systems at least as good as the AWDs. Because of the need for this capability increase all three designs are about 7000 tonnes — almost indistinguishable in size from the Hobart-class destroyers.

The navy will achieve this ambitious goal by taking the heart of the AWD anti-air warfare solution — the Lockheed Martin Aegis firing-control system in widespread USN use since the 1980s — and marry it to the ultra-modern active digital phased-array radars developed by Canberra-based CEA Technologies. Because the combat system for the Hobart class was ordered in 2005, it is based on an earlier generation of passive phased-array radars that, while still formidable, are no longer state of the art.

But the Aegis anti-air software for the ships has been constantly updated. This is where another local player, Adelaide-based Saab Systems, comes into the picture.

Saab produces the 9LV combat management system that — along with the CEA radars — is responsible for the stunning success of the Anzac frigate anti-ship missile defence (ASMD) upgrade, which is able to defeat multiple simultaneous incoming supersonic targets.

A limitation of the Anzacs is that the ASMD solution is relatively short-range and insufficient for the future frigates, which will need to control SM-2 missiles to a distance of 200 kilometres and an altitude of 24,000 metres, which is more than twice the height of a cruising A380.

Indeed, it is highly likely that Australia will seek to acquire in the future a naval ballistic missile defence (BMD) capability using SM-3 missiles, which are designed to intercept targets well outside the Earth’s atmosphere and with ranges in excess of 2000km.

These could equip either the AWDs or future frigates — or both. Aegis is the backbone of the USN’s anti-air and BMD capabilities and so, by combining it with CEAFAR and 9LV, the RAN will receive an exceptionally modern system that is arguably the best in the world.

Aegis also comes with co-operative engagement capability, meaning that any ship equipped with it can be fully networked, giving the RAN, USN and potential coalition partners such as Japan and South Korea the ability to seamlessly exchange targeting data.

The practical consequence is that a threat detected by one ship could be automatically engaged and destroyed by a missile fired from another ship in the network many hundreds of kilometres away. The ability to do this and also network with coalition air assets such as F-35s is regarded as the future of naval warfare — especially for high-end conflicts.

The industrial picture for Sea 5000 is not necessarily finalised, with the October 3 announcement still leaving the door open for a possible overall combat system integrator. In the case of the AWDs, this is Raytheon Australia, so if the Future Frigate design is a modified Hobart, then the company might well replicate the success of that program. If either the BAE Systems or Fincantieri ships are selected, there are other possibilities with Lockheed Martin high on the list.

Another notable feature of the government’s overall approach to Sea 5000 is that it will be a major boost to sovereign capability. The most obvious manifestation is the decision to build all nine ships in Adelaide, which Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne believes will guarantee Australian content in excess of 60 per cent — and for a $35 billion program that is a lot of money going into the local economy.

But the big benefit for Defence is more likely from the combat-system decision, because it involves electronics, software and systems integration skills at the very top of the technology spectrum. If the Sea 5000 solution comes together as expected, that will have considerable export potential — and may even be retrofitted to the AWDs.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/defence/fut...

bug2 - 4-11-2017 at 12:55 PM

Australia to upgrade Nulka missile decoy system used by RAN

Gabriel Dominguez - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

03 November 2017

The Australian government announced on 3 November that it will invest AUD207 million (USD 159 million) into upgrading the Nulka missile decoy system used by Royal Australian Navy (RAN) vessels.

In a joint statement Minister for Defence Marise Payne and Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne said the upgrade will take place during the next 20 years and ensure that the system “remains at the cutting edge into the future”.

The upgraded system will be installed in all RAN frigates and Hobart-class air warfare destroyers and introduced for the first time on the Canberra-class landing helicopter docks.

The ministers pointed out that the Nulka system will continue to be upgraded in the coming decades “to keep pace with anti-ship missile technologies and ensure our sailors have the best available protection at sea”.

(155 of 446 words)

unicorn - 9-11-2017 at 07:03 PM

Germans bullish on patrol vessel bid

The Australian12:00AM November 8, 2017
PRIMROSE RIORDAN
Political reporterCanberra
@primroseriordan

German boatbuilder Fassmer, bidding for Australia’s new $3 billion offshore patrol vessels contract, believes it is in a “good position” to win the lucrative deal because of its ability to deliver helicopter hangars on the ships.

A decision to award the contract for 12 boats could be made this month, with Fassmer promoting its recent success against the same two bidders, Damen and Lurssen, to build ships for the German coast guard.

A recent Australian Strategic Policy Institute report has argued Defence’s proposed requirements for the vessels should have included capacity for a helicopter. The report, by former Defence Department analyst Ben Coleman, said the boats would be used to fight armed coastguard vessels, state-sponsored harassment by fishing vessels, pirates and armed terrorist groups. A lack of heli­copter facilities would restrict the navy’s ability to use the boats to fight future threats such as piracy, maritime terrorism and weapons proliferation, he said.

Fassmer managing director Harald Fassmer travelled to Canberra this week on a last-ditch charm offensive. “We believe we are in a good position, otherwise we wouldn’t be here,” he told The Australian.

Mr Fassmer said the ships’ helicopter capabilities set their design apart. “We have a helicopter hangar, which is different,” he said. “You cannot have it outside without being protected from the harsh environmental conditions — with the salty seawater you need to have a helicopter hangar. I think that gives it great advantage.”

ARH - 9-11-2017 at 08:37 PM

I personally have the Germans ahead on this one. Tis a pretty boat indeed!

ADMK2 - 10-11-2017 at 01:43 AM

Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
I personally have the Germans ahead on this one. Tis a pretty boat indeed!


Maybe, but no-one outside Defence and Damen really know what Damen bid, so I guess time will tell.

unicorn - 10-11-2017 at 09:11 PM

You would think the inclusion of a hangar on a ship of that size would be an essential capability, not a nice to have.

Sometimes ADF procurement leaves me shaking my head. Well most of the time actually.

ADMK2 - 10-11-2017 at 11:45 PM

Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
You would think the inclusion of a hangar on a ship of that size would be an essential capability, not a nice to have.

Sometimes ADF procurement leaves me shaking my head. Well most of the time actually.


Is there any chance that RAN would be considering using a semi / rigid fabric hangar such as that used on HMAS Choules and that is why they are not especially fussed about a permanent hangar? Particularly as these ships won’t have a permanent helo or UAV attached anyway?



unicorn - 11-11-2017 at 07:21 AM

My understanding is that you cannnot properly maintain a helo in that type of hangar, it's protection from the worst of the elements only.

bug2 - 11-11-2017 at 11:05 AM

Some maintenance can be done, but nothing that requires any lifting above manpower levels. There are, possibly, sufficient Stores space for anything needed...............possibly?

Mercator - 11-11-2017 at 02:11 PM

I can't help but think that the tight confines of the Cairns naval base are making us do something that is 6-10 m less than optimal. Even 6 m would have made a world of difference.

ADMK2 - 11-11-2017 at 05:30 PM

Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
My understanding is that you cannnot properly maintain a helo in that type of hangar, it's protection from the worst of the elements only.


Yup, but might that be considered enough for RAN’s purposes, given it won’t be a permanently attached helo?

unicorn - 12-11-2017 at 09:36 AM

To be honest the RAN should bite the bullet and invest in a light observation helicopter squadron for operational deployment from the OPVs, using a Seahawk or MRH-90 from an OPV is too much helicopter for the job.

They could stand up 805 Squadron once again and use it for supporting the OPV force, it could use the same helo as 723 Squadron, allowing them to replace the by now very old Squirrels and resulting in economies of scale in training, spares, maintenance, and operation.

Never happen though.

DEW - 12-11-2017 at 06:11 PM

Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
I personally have the Germans ahead on this one. Tis a pretty boat indeed!


Maybe, but no-one outside Defence and Damen really know what Damen bid, so I guess time will tell.


Surely the Arialah class that many people are suggesting is Damen's bid is only their stalking horse. Why would we select a cramped, wet deck patrol boat for what is a generational chance to upgrade our capability? If the prospect of a provided hangar is abhorrent to the selection criteria then this only makes the Luerssen bid shine in comparison.

DEW - 13-11-2017 at 06:07 PM

Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
You would think the inclusion of a hangar on a ship of that size would be an essential capability, not a nice to have.

Sometimes ADF procurement leaves me shaking my head. Well most of the time actually.


Could we reflect on these thought processes?

Acquire or lease a vessel of 94 metres specifically for the purpose of naval air training (helos and now UAVs).

That's helo training on a small vessel and the inherent acquisition of certain skills.

Plan for this vessel and such training, at the same time as planning for a new class of OPV in the 80 metre plus range. Then specifically leave out manned aircraft handling requirements from the selection criteria of the planned OPV. I think in diplomatic-speak this is referred to as a "puzzling" decision.

Thank god Land 400 is only a choice between better and best.


DEW - 14-11-2017 at 07:48 AM

Quote: Originally posted by Mercator  
I can't help but think that the tight confines of the Cairns naval base are making us do something that is 6-10 m less than optimal. Even 6 m would have made a world of difference.


Too true. It would be like saying we can't get P-8s because they won't fit in the hangars at Edinburgh, ditto C-17s at Amberley.

So they might have to add another 50m or so to the wharf… It should be done anyway. A Leeuwin class and a single Armidale can only just squeeze in now. I've seen more spacious facilities on a commercial fishing wharf. You can bet there are plenty of wonks in Defence who will say it can't be done.

NUSHIP Brisbane goes to sea

DEW - 20-11-2017 at 03:43 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=srMA2ira...

Some pretty sweet drone shots.

bug2 - 20-11-2017 at 09:10 PM

Navantia lays keel for first RAN replenishment vessel

David Ing - IHS Jane's Navy International

19 November 2017

Spanish shipbuilder Navantia held a keel-laying ceremony for the first of two auxiliary oiler replenishment (AOR) vessels ordered by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) at its Ferrol yard on 17 November.

According to Navantia the launch of the first oiler is planned for the third quarter of 2018, with hand-over due approximately a year later. Dates for the sister ship will be about nine months behind.

Based on the Spanish Armada’s supply ship SPS Cantabria , the oilers will be 173.8 m long and have a fully laden weight of 9,930 tonnes. They will have a top speed of 20 kt and have accommodation for 196, although the standard crew number will be 130.

(138 of 170 words)

ADMK2 - 20-11-2017 at 11:00 PM

I think they left the ‘1’ off that number unless the modified ‘Cantabria’ design we have bought, somehow managed to trim 10,000 tonnes of displacement from the design, yet keep the same or improved service-life and sea-keeping capabilities...

That would be quite an engineering feat I imagine...

bug2 - 21-11-2017 at 01:47 AM

Second Air Warfare Destroyer Enters Sea Trials

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 20, 2017)


Australia’s second Air Warfare Destroyer, the future HMAS Brisbane, has gone to sea for the first hase of its sea trials. (AWD photo)

The Australian Defence Force’s second Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD), NUSHIP Brisbane, has commenced its first phase of sea trials, which will test the ship’s hull, propulsion and navigation systems.

The initial trial phase, which will occur over the coming months, will be followed by a more advanced phase of sea trials next year to test the ship’s combat and communications systems.

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, said this achievement is a further demonstration of industry’s role as a fundamental input into capability for Defence.

“Over the past decade, more than 5000 people from across the Department of Defence, ASC, Raytheon Australia and Navantia have dedicated millions of hours of effort to the AWD program,” Minister Pyne said.

“With more than 60 per cent Australian industry capability, the AWD program is a true example of a home-grown capability.

“Through the AWD program, we have created a local workforce with specialist shipbuilding and complex systems integration skills that will form the foundation for future shipbuilding projects in Australia.”

The start of Brisbane’s sea trials phase follows the commissioning of HMAS Hobart earlier this year, with both events reinforcing the success of the Government-led reform, an initiative that set the AWD program on track to meet cost and schedule targets.

“As part of the AWD reform initiative, the Commonwealth worked directly alongside industry to remediate the program,” Minister Pyne said.

“This resulted in an injection of Commonwealth expertise and shipbuilding management from Navantia, as well as project management oversight and de-risking activities from Raytheon Australia.

“Working together with ASC’s quality shipbuilding workforce, this new structure has put the AWD program on a path to long-term success.”

(ends)

Second Air Warfare Destroyer Enters Sea Trials

(ADW Alliance; issued Nov 20, 2017)

The second Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Brisbane has entered the first phase of sea trials which will take place over the coming weeks, marking further progress towards her delivery to the Royal Australian Navy next year.

This first phase of sea trials will test the ship’s propulsion, manoeuvring, control and navigation systems and will be followed by a more advanced phase of sea trials next year to test Brisbane’s combat and communications systems.

“More broadly, the AWD program continues to meet or exceed our milestone targets since the Government’s successful reform initiative, demonstrating our contribution to industry’s role as a fundamental input into Defence capability,” said Mr Evans.

“Our workforce of more than 1,700 in Adelaide has improved and evolved the production and set to work of these ships, with our whole team working hard to achieve this milestone ahead of post-reform schedule targets,” said Paul Evans, AWD Alliance General Manager.

AWD Program Manager Commodore Craig Bourke also acknowledged the collaboration between industry and Government on the program. “The AWD program has built the foundation of Australia’s shipbuilding and systems integration industry, with more than 60 per cent Australian Industry Capability to date,” he said.

The AWD enterprise partners include the Department of Defence, Raytheon Australia as the combat systems integrator, ASC as the shipbuilder and Navantia as the shipbuilder manager, all whom emphasised the commitment of the AWD workforce.

Raytheon Australia Managing Director Michael Ward commended the team on today’s achievement. “As the combat systems integrator for the AWD program, Raytheon Australia has applied its highly skilled Australian workforce of 350 architects, systems engineers and project managers to the AWD program over the last decade,” he said.

“Raytheon Australia is responsible for the integration of ten major subsystems, including the Aegis Weapon System, which is provided through Foreign Military Sales, and associated delivery of more than 3,500 major pieces of combat system equipment required to establish the warfighting capability of the AWD. This will contribute to making the AWD the most sophisticated warship ever operated by the Royal Australian Navy.”

“The commencement of Brisbane's sea trials is a source of tremendous pride for Raytheon Australia and our home-grown Australian workforce that has built a national asset in complex combat system integration,” said Mr Ward.

ASC Shipbuilding Chief Executive Officer Mark Lamarre said that today’s milestone signifies further progress across the program. “Today marks another big step forward on the journey of delivering three complex surface combatants to the Royal Australian Navy, with the commencement of Builders Sea Trials for the second future destroyer Brisbane,” he said.

“Fundamentally, shipbuilding is about people – talented, skilled and experienced people. Our shipbuilding team and their immense skill, capability and pride continues to deliver and demonstrate our strength as a highly capable, sovereign shipbuilder,” he said.

“In collaboration with our Alliance partners, including Navantia, we are excited by this great achievement – it is something we should all be proud of, and continues to show the way forward for future shipbuilding in Australia,” said Mr Lamarre.

Navantia Australia’s Managing Director Donato Martínez commented on the sense of pride felt throughout the workforce noting today’s achievement. “It is always an exciting moment for a shipbuilder when a new vessel goes to sea for the first time. Following the commissioning of HMAS Hobart earlier this year, the sea trials phase for Brisbane demonstrates the success of the Adelaide shipbuilding enterprise,” said Mr Martínez.

“We are proud of the role Navantia has played in meeting the goals of the AWD reform initiative and we look forward to successfully delivering a highly capable warship to the Royal Australian Navy next year,” said Mr Martínez.

Mid-next year, Brisbane will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy to join her sister ship, HMAS Hobart, and will be followed in quick succession by the delivery of the third and final Air Warfare Destroyer, Sydney, in 2019.

-ends-

Should we keep building these "canoes"?

DEW - 21-11-2017 at 07:17 AM

I think there is some merit to the idea that if the Gov. is serious about a BMD capability, their opportunity is now.

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/sea-5000-less-risk-capabil...

bug2 - 21-11-2017 at 11:52 AM

Quote: Originally posted by DEW  
I think there is some merit to the idea that if the Gov. is serious about a BMD capability, their opportunity is now.

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/sea-5000-less-risk-capabil...


Good idea but with almost no chance of being pursued by this regime & government.

His latter comments about ASW Corvettes are, well, very quaint, and totally irrelevant to today's potential threat environment.

DEW - 21-11-2017 at 03:35 PM

Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Good idea but with almost no chance of being pursued by this regime & government.


The other aspect is the lost chance to amortise the horrendous cost overruns in the early part of the program.

ARH - 21-11-2017 at 04:24 PM

Pity no move was made on the fourth destroyer. The entire history of ADF procurement is one missed opportunity after another.

bug2 - 21-11-2017 at 04:26 PM

Agreed, opportunity missed..............again.

Austal in Trading halt

jacktar - 22-11-2017 at 01:21 PM


SEA1180?

ASX Compliance Pty Limited
ABN 26 087 780 489
Level 40 Central Park
152 -158 St Georges Terrace
Perth WA 6000


www.asx.com.au
Customer service 13 12 79
Phone:
08 9224 0000
MARKET RELEASE
22 November 2017
Austal Limited
TRADING HALT

The securities of Austal Limited (the “Company”) will be placed in Trading Halt Session State at the request of the Company, pending the release of an announcement by the Company. Unless ASX decides otherwise, the securities will remain in Trading Halt Session State until the earlier of the Commencement of normal trading on Friday 24 November 2017 or when the announcement is released to the market.
Security Code: ASB

Anjuli Sinniah
SENIOR ADVISER, LISTINGS COMPLIANCE (PERTH)

22 November 2017
Ben Secrett
Senior Adviser, Listings Compliance
Australian Securities Exchange
Level 40, Central Park
152 –158 St Georges Terrace
Perth WA
6000
By email:
ben.secrett@asx.com.au
tradinghaltsperth@asx.com.au
Dear Ben,
Request for trading halt

Austal Limited
Pursuant to Listing Rule 17.1, Austal Limited (ASX:ASB) (Austal) requests a trading halt in its securities pending an announcement in relation to a material government shipbuilding contract. The Company requests that the trading halt takes effect immediately and continues until the release of the relevant announcement, or no later than commencement of trading on Friday 24 November 2017 (whichever is earlier).
Austal is not aware of any reason why the trading halt should not be granted or of any other information necessary to inform the market about the trading halt.

Yours sincerely,
Adrian Strang
Company Secretary
Austal Ltd

DEW - 22-11-2017 at 03:37 PM

Quote: Originally posted by jacktar  

SEA1180?


Fingers crossed.

Of course, in a gutsy play, the CEO has linked what appears to be the very survival of Henderson to the success of their bid. Things could go badly very quickly for their shares if they were unsuccessful.

ADMK2 - 22-11-2017 at 11:00 PM

They may have done it because they are expecting bad news though as well.

The famous ‘late Friday afternoon announcement’ and all that...

DEW - 23-11-2017 at 07:23 AM

"continues until the release of the relevant announcement, or no later than commencement of trading on Friday 24 November 2017 (whichever is earlier)."

Certainly sounds like the announcement will be today (Thursday).

unicorn - 23-11-2017 at 04:59 PM

I'm no fan of Austal, but I hope they get the nod as they are partnered with Fassmer offering an OPV with a proper hangar and capabilities for an embarked helo, the only one of three to do so.

DEW - 23-11-2017 at 05:31 PM

Total silence… Now this is getting weird.

Usually these announcements are meant to make the evening news.

No announcement and without an extension to the halt Austal shares go back on the block tomorrow 10:00 am EDT. Malfeasance awaits.

Perhaps the Govt is waiting for a better day to announce. A day when they are more on the front foot. Perhaps someone messed up, and perhaps Austal has been hung out. (And this is how you would treat a loser, not a winner).

Perhaps Pyne couldn't make the photo op.

ADMK2 - 23-11-2017 at 07:17 PM

Quote: Originally posted by DEW  
Total silence… Now this is getting weird.

Usually these announcements are meant to make the evening news.

No announcement and without an extension to the halt Austal shares go back on the block tomorrow 10:00 am EDT. Malfeasance awaits.

Perhaps the Govt is waiting for a better day to announce. A day when they are more on the front foot. Perhaps someone messed up, and perhaps Austal has been hung out. (And this is how you would treat a loser, not a winner).

Perhaps Pyne couldn't make the photo op.


Turnbull will want to be there for this is as he needs any positive press he can get and he was busy with the DFAT White Paper release and investigating a leaking Cabinet today.

I think he will make the announcement flanked by Pyne and Payne tomorrow, but I think it was decided on Tuesday when Cabinet and the NSC met.

Germans to build Aust patrol boat

Exsandgroper - 24-11-2017 at 06:43 AM

Germans to build Aust patrol boat

LISA MARTINAustralian Associated Press7:07AM November 24, 2017

German ship designer Lurssen is expected to win the bid for Australia's $3 billion offshore patrol vessel project.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is expected to make the announcement in Canberra on Friday.

Lurssen's bid was successful in a three way race against another German designer Fassmer and Dutch firm Damen, AAP understands.

Western Australian ship builder Austal is expected to be named the builder for 10 of the 12 vessels at its Henderson shipyard from 2020, while the first two are expected to be manufactured in South Australia from next year by the government-owned shipbuilder ASC.

The split build was designed to avoid the so-called "valley of death" in South Australian ship building, when expertise and jobs are lost between major projects.

Austal was actually teamed up with the Fassmer bid and Austal shares went into a trading halt on Wednesday ahead of the announcement.

The new vessels will replace the existing Armidale Class patrol boats.

Cheers,
Hope she is right. fool me Lurssen ship not Fassmer

DEW - 24-11-2017 at 07:56 AM

Quote: Originally posted by Exsandgroper  
Germans to build Aust patrol boat
Hope she is right. fool me Lurssen ship not Fassmer


Sounds about right, or believable. Total dog's breakfast!

But bits for everyone!

unicorn - 24-11-2017 at 08:37 AM

Did Fassmer win or did Lurssen? It says Austal is building Lurssen ships, but Austal teamed with Fassmer. :spin:

Australian ship builder Austal winner in deal to build Navy ships

RORY CALLINAN
The Australian 8:04AM November 24, 2017

European ship builder Lurssen and Australian ship builder Austal are reported to be big winners in the deal to build the Navy’s new offshore patrol vessels.

An announcement to be made today is expected to confirm Lurssen will work with Austal to build 10 of the 12 ships in West Australia, according to reports in the WA media overnight.

Austal, which had partnered with German company Fassmer in a bid, put its shares into a trading halt on Wednesday.

Federal Cabinet’s national security team met on Tuesday to decide which of the three short-listed contenders would be the winner of contract to build the 12 ships.

Designs from European shipbuilders Fassmer, Lurssen and Damen had been short-listed for the bid process.

Fassmer a family owned and operated German company had teamed with Austal.

Both Lurssen and Damen had partnered with a subsidiary of engineering firm Civmec and government owned Australian ship builder ASC on their bids.

The vessels are required to be mostly to be used for policing type missions but must also to be on call for primary defence force maritime patrol and response duties.

Their build is due to start in Adelaide from 2018 and then transfer to Western Australian when the Future Frigates construction starts in Adelaide in 2020.

A debate has been ongoing over whether the boats should have enough space to store a helicopter.

One school of thought held that helicopter storage was not needed as the boats would carry UAVs, while another has argued the helicopter would provide better mission capability enabling the transport of personnel for boarding missions, search and rescue and medical evacuation.

A report by defence analyst Ben Coleman earlier this year suggested Damen’s vessel had a landing platform capable of handling only UAVs while Fassmer and Lurssen’s designs had landing pads that could take some of Australia’s helicopters.

jacktar - 24-11-2017 at 09:19 AM

I expect all will be revealed soon.

The Company will host an investor call on Friday 24 November 2017 – details of that call will be included in the announcement referred to above. The company requests that the voluntary suspension takes effect prior to the commencement of trading on Friday 24 November 2017 and continues until the conclusion of the investor call on 24 November 2017 or no later than commencement of trading on Tuesday 28 November 2017 (whichever is earlier).

The Company will advise ASX when the investor call concludes.

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