The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2    4  5
Author: Subject: Indian Navy 2017 onwards
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-4-2018 at 04:59 PM


India to retender naval replenishment ship project

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar, Alameda, California - Jane's Navy International

18 April 2018

Key Points

- India is expected to retender its fleet support ship project
- Revised programme is meant to incorporate greater involvement by local companies

The Indian Navy’s five-unit fleet support ship (FSS) project is set to be retendered globally after an expected collaboration agreement between India’s Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL) and South Korea’s Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) fell through.

Industry sources told Jane’s that workshare and local content issues appear to have been major stumbling blocks that led to the failure. Under the national ‘Make in India’ push, the Indian Ministry of Defence (MoD) wants all five ships to be built in-country.

(125 of 432 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-4-2018 at 08:17 PM


Indian shipyards unveil designs for country’s ASW corvette programme

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar, Alameda, California - Jane's Navy International

20 April 2018

Two companies shortlisted for the Indian Navy’s 16-ship anti-submarine warfare shallow water craft (ASWSWC) programme have unveiled imagery of their respective proposals at Defexpo India 2018, held in Chennai from 11 to 14 April.


A CGI of CSL's proposal for India's ASW corvette programme.

GRSE has unveiled a design similar to this. (Source withheld)

The programme calls for a 70 m waterjet-powered corvette that displaces 700 tonnes and can be deployed for maritime security, coastal anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and minelaying operations.

Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) and Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE) emerged as the two lowest bidders in the programme, and as such, production for the programme would be evenly split between the two companies based on the lowest bidder’s cost.

CSL’s design has a length of 74 m, a beam of 10.5 m, and a top speed of 25 kt. GRSE has not released specifics of its proposal, but its design shares common features with that presented by CSL, including its weapon and funnel positions. Both designs feature an RBU 6000 ASW rocket launcher, a small calibre cannon, and torpedo tubes.

(187 of 227 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 24-4-2018 at 09:05 PM


Russia, India prepare contract for four project 11356 frigates

Posted On Tuesday, 24 April 2018 09:40

The deal to build four project 11356 frigates for India is to be completed in June, a military-diplomatic source told TASS. The Izvestia daily writes about one of the largely produced post-Soviet warship.


Talwar-class frigate of the Indian Navy, INS Teg, during sea trials in Russia.

The framework intergovernmental agreement to build a new series of project 11356 frigates for India was signed in October 2016. It stipulated that two warships would be built in Russia and two in India with partial localization of production.

India has been ordering project 11356 warships for nearly 20 years and is currently operating six of them. The Baltic shipyard began to build the first troika of Talwar-class frigates in 1999 and commissioned them in 2003-2004. The order for the second troika was handed over to Yantar shipyard in Kaliningrad. The frigates were laid in 2007-2008 and built in 2012-2013.

Project 11356 frigate was designed on the basis of border guard cruiser of project 11351 which in its turn developed from project 1135.

The previously antisubmarine warships became multirole. They are armed with powerful missiles, including antiaircraft Shtil and eight-cell vertical launchers 3S-14E which can fire antiship missiles Club 3M-54E (export option of Kalibr). The air defense was armed with Kashtan missile guns, but the second troika had them replaced by standard six-barrel AK-630 guns.

The second troika was armed with antiship BrahMos missiles fired from the same 3S-14E vertical launchers. BrahMos is an Indian missile produced jointly with NPO Mashinostroeniya according to P-800 Onix missile (export option Yakhont).


Hulls of the Project 11356 frigates "Admiral Istomin" and "Admiral Kornilov" under construction at PJSC "Baltic Shipyard Yantar". Picture taken on 14.11.2017 (c) kaliningradblog.livejournal .com

According to the logic of the Russian surface fleet buildup in the 2000s, project 22350 frigates (the Admiral Gorshkov) had to comprise its backbone. The lead ship was laid in 2006. It was armed with Poliment-Redut antiaircraft missile complex which controlled all air defense means in a single contour. The warships have not been commissioned yet because of long delays in streamlining new armaments. Therefore, the military began to look for a replacement.

In 2010 they decided to order Yantar shipyard to build three project 11356 frigates with minimal changes. The main one was an antiaircraft complex (export version Shtil-1) with vertical launchers instead of rail. In 2011 an order for another three warships arrived. All the six frigates had to join the Black Sea fleet.

The first troika has been handed over to the customer. The Admiral Grigorovich and the Admiral Essen are operating in the Black Sea fleet and engaged in the Russian operation in Syria. The Admiral Makarov is still in the Baltic Sea mostly because of continuing trials of a new antiaircraft 9M317MA missile with an active homing warhead.

Two frigates of the second troika were laid in 2013 - the Admiral Istomin and the Admiral Butakov. The third one, the Admiral Kornilov, has not been officially laid so far.

The new contract rules out the use of already laid hulls, according to the source. The uncompleted second troika of frigates for the Russian Navy is still at Yantar shipyard due to the conflict with Ukraine over Crimea and Donbass in 2014. Gas-turbine power plants for the warships were produced by Ukrainian Zorya-Mashproekt in Nikolayev, which was the center of competence in the former Soviet Union. Kiev blocked turbine supplies for the Russian military in 2014.

Russia is currently developing its own gas turbines at an accelerated pace at the Rybinsk facility of Saturn Company. It will also produce power plants for project 22350 frigates which also suffered from politics.

ERRRR y'all invaded and conquered part of the Ukraine! :no:

The contract for the second troika for the Russian Navy has not been terminated, but suspended. The military numerously stated the frigates will be completed with Russian-made engines as they appear and become operational. The deadline depends on the readiness for serial production of the equipment. The Yantar shipyard has already mastered rhythmical production of the warships.

The power plants for the Indian deal can be purchased in Ukraine via New Delhi. Anyway, the Indian commission for defense procurement appropriated 76 million dollars to buy two gas turbines. They will be handed over to Russia for the construction of the first pair of frigates by a new contract, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 08:13 PM


India reveals P-17A frigate configuration

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar, Alameda, California - Jane's Navy International

25 April 2018


A scale model of the Project 17A (P-17A) frigate at Defexpo 2018. Source: R Sanjeev

That's the strangest "76 mm Oto Melara gun" mounted on the front! :no:

Indian naval shipbuilder Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Limited (MDSL) unveiled a scale model of the Project 17A (P-17A) frigate at the Defexpo 2018 exhibition.

MDSL is building four ships in the class, while the remaining three are being constructed by Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE).

The P-17A platform has been described as an enlarged, stealthier variant of the three-ship Project 17 (P-17) Shivalik class frigates. The new ships are 149 m long, with a beam of 17.8 m, a draught of 5.15 m, a displacement of 6,673 tonnes, and a crew complement of 226.

The platform will be powered by two General Electric LM2500 gas turbines, and two MAN 12V28/33D STC diesels driving two shafts in a combined diesel or gas (CODOG) arrangement. Top speed is given as 28 kt, while range is 5,500 n miles at 16–18 kt or 1,000 n miles at 28 kt.

The ship will be armed with launchers for the Indo-Israeli Barak-8 or Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile (LR-SAM) missile system, two of which are mounted forward while another two are installed with two clusters mounted forward and two mounted abaft the funnel, and one eight-cell BrahMos missile launcher unit located forward.

Anti-submarine weapons comprise a pair of rocket launchers that are an indigenous modification of the RBU 6000, and a pair of triple-tube torpedo launchers.

Armament includes a 76 mm Oto Melara gun and a pair of AK-630M close-in weapon systems sited at aft above the hangar. The ships will be equipped with two anti-torpedo decoy systems, and what appear to be four decoy launchers.

Sensors include the Elta MF-STAR radar for the LR-SAM housed in an enclosed mast, a number of unspecified navigation radars, and a bow-mounted sonar.

(308 of 457 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 08:29 PM


India bolsters Andaman and Nicobar territories with third Mk IV landing craft

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

25 April 2018

Key Points

- The Indian Navy has commissioned its third Mk IV landing craft
- Programme is part of New Delhi’s plan to improve capabilities at India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands

The Indian Navy has commissioned a third Mk IV landing craft utility (LCU) platform that was built by state-owned shipyard Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE).

The vessel, which has been named INLCU L53, was commissioned on 25 April at Port Blair in a ceremony officiated by Vice Admiral Bimal Verma, commander-in-chief of India’s Andaman and Nicobar Command. It is part of an INR21 billion (USD310 million) contract for eight LCUs signed between GRSE and the Indian government in September 2011.

(134 of 392 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-5-2018 at 02:10 PM


India interested in Russian Project 11661 Gepard-class frigates

Posted On Saturday, 12 May 2018 10:48

Moscow and New Delhi have started consultations on the potential construction of frigates for India on the basis of the Russian Project 11661 Gepard-3.9 frigate, the FlotProm online media organization reported.


Gepard-5.1 Frigate VPNS Dinh Tien Hoang of the Vietnam's People Navy during the Republic of Singapore Navy International Maritime Review (IMR) on 15 May 2017.

"The talks began in the winter of 2018 in India and are at the initial stage. Consultations were held as part of the work of the bilateral intergovernmental commission and were attended by representatives of the [Russian] Industry and Trade Ministry and Russian shipbuilders," the media organization reported with reference to a source in the Russian defense industry. "The number of ships, their versions and the area of their construction have not been chosen yet," the media organization said. "A propulsion unit for the ships was on the agenda. India has not chosen the producer of the engines for the frigate yet," the media organization reported.

The Project 11661 Gepard-3.9 frigate is designed to patrol the state maritime border and the economic zone, support maritime operations and be present in areas of national interest.

The Zelenodolsk Shipyard in the Volga area started the construction of Project 11661 frigates in 1990.

The Project 11661 frigate has a displacement of 1,500 tons. It is equipped with artillery, anti-ship, air defense and antisubmarine warfare weapons.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 965
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 13-5-2018 at 07:37 PM


I'm sure Russian yards would love to supply Gepards, after all I am sure they need the foreign exchange from a customer who pays on time.



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-5-2018 at 07:08 PM


IN commissions first indigenously built floating dock

Jane's Defence Weekly

30 May 2018


The IN’s first indigenously designed and built floating dock, entered service on 25 May. Source: Indian Navy

The Indian Navy (IN) has commissioned its first indigenously designed and built floating dock to repair and service its major platforms.

Referred to as Floating Dock Navy-2 ( FDN-2 ), the 185 m-long and 40 m-wide platform was inducted into the service on 25 May in a ceremony held at Port Blair, the capital of India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands and headquarters of the IN-headed tri-service command.

The platform is equipped with “state-of-art automated systems with all modern facilities to ensure quality and swift repairs of warships”, said the IN in a 27 May statement.

FDN-2 , which is now the second floating dock in service with the IN, has the capability to lift ships and submarines of up to 8,000 tons displacement, which includes almost the entire range of the IN’s combat assets.

“The floating dock is designed for berthing alongside a jetty, or moored in calm waters, enabling planned and emergency docking operations for ships,” stated the IN, adding that FDN-2 will be based alongside FDN-1 at Port Blair and is expected to “substantially enhance” the repair and refit facility for IN warships deployed in the archipelago.

FDN-2 was launched in June 2017 at the Larsen & Toubro (L&T) shipyard at Kattupalli near Chennai. It has high-capacity ballast pumps along with an advanced automated ballast control system, and is provided with a hauling-in system to handle a ship's docking and undocking operations, according to L&T.

(260 of 363 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 31-5-2018 at 07:05 PM


Indian Navy commissions fourth Mk IV landing craft

Gabriel Dominguez, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

30 May 2018


The IN commissioned its fourth Mk IV LCU on 25 May. Source: Indian Navy

The Indian Navy (IN) has commissioned its fourth Mk IV landing craft utility (LCU) platform built by state-owned shipyard Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE).

Named IN LCU L54 , the 62.8 m vessel entered service in a ceremony held on 25 May at Port Blair, the capital of India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands and headquarters of the IN-headed tri-service command.

The platform, which is part of an INR21 billion (USD310 million) contract for eight LCUs signed between GRSE and the Indian government in September 2011, was launched at GRSE’s facility in Kolkata in March 2015, and now joins three other vessels of the class – L51, L52, L53 – that entered service in March 2017, August 2017, and April 2018, respectively.

The remaining four LCUs of the class, all of which have been launched, are in advanced stages of construction in Kolkata and are scheduled to be inducted over the next year and a half, according to the IN.

The class has a crew of 46, including five officers, and is fitted with “state-of-the-art equipment and advanced systems” such as a locally designed integrated bridge system (IBS) and an integrated platform management system (IPMS), the IN said.

Each of the vessels has a standard displacement of 830 tonnes and is capable of transporting up to 160 troops, armoured vehicles, and other military equipment such as containerised mission modules for amphibious and sealift operations.

Based at the Andaman and Nicobar Command (ANC), these vessels will also be deployed for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) missions and limited search-and-rescue duties when required.

Each of the LCUs is powered by two German-built MTU 16V 4000 M53 diesel engines, and can attain a top speed of 15 kt, with a standard range of 1,500 n miles at 12 kt.

(321 of 414 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-6-2018 at 07:12 PM


Indian Navy issues RFIs for unmanned surface, underwater vessels

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar, Alameda, California and Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

01 June 2018

The Indian Navy has issued two separate requests for information (RFIs) for unmanned underwater and surface vessels.

The RFI for unmanned surface vessels (USVs) indicate a requirement for 12 vehicles with replaceable mission modules and a simulator that can assist in training for a variety of roles, including mine countermeasures (MCM) and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions. Each vehicle should be no longer than 12 m.

Meanwhile, the RFI for submerged systems calls for eight high endurance autonomous underwater vehicles (HEAUVs) of modular design with dedicated mission modules for operations that also include MCM, ASW, and oceanographic data collection, and one simulator.

(125 of 267 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-6-2018 at 07:19 PM


Shangri-La Dialogue: India, Singapore establish framework to enhance naval co-ordination, logistics

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

31 May 2018

Key Points

- India and Singapore have taken steps to improve naval engagements between the two countries
- The move comes amid a wider plan by New Delhi to enhance defence partnerships with countries in Southeast Asia

The Indian Navy (IN) and the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) have established a new framework that would enhance naval co-operation between the two services.

A ceremony to ratify the framework, which is known as the ‘Implementing Arrangement between the Republic of Singapore Navy and the Indian Navy Concerning Mutual Co-ordination, Logistics, and Services Support’, was held on 1 June.

It was attended by Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and his Indian counterpart, Narendra Modi.

(135 of 428 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 09:43 AM


India’s Plan To Buy Helicopter Carriers Falters

by Neelam Mathews - June 12, 2018, 7:03 AM


An AV-8B parked on the deck of Spanish LHD Juan Carlos 1 during its visit to Mumbai last week. (Photo: Neelam Mathews)

A visit to Mumbai's port by the Spanish multi-purpose warship Juan Carlos 1 has highlighted India’s requirement for four similar vessels, also known as landing helicopter docks (LHDs).

The Spanish warship builder Navantia is a bidder for the Indian requirement, in partnership with domestic company Larsen & Toubro (L&T). But the procurement process has been disrupted by the financial problems of rival bidder Reliance Naval and Engineering, which is partnered with French warship builder DCNS.

The Indian Navy issued an RFP for the LHDs in late 2013, but no action was taken on the proposals. The requirement was reaffirmed in May 2017 and fresh bids invited. The financial and technical tests have been completed and the two commercial bids were submitted. However, the opening of the bids has been delayed as Navantia is currently the sole contender for a contract where competition is required. Reliance has been disqualified because of the strict clause about financial stability in India’s Defense Procurement Policy.

The situation is causing concern. “Why should a company be penalized through no fault of its own, particularly since this is an issue of precedence for the Navy?” said a senior retired naval officer.

Ensuring security of sea lanes in the Indian Ocean region and an upgrade of the Navy's disaster management, amphibious warfare, and neighboring island protection capability is supposedly a priority for the Indian Ministry of Defence (MoD).

In particular, the security of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands in the Bay of Bengal is of concern.

The Indian Army already has a brigade of around 3,000 amphibious troops, but the Navy’s current fleet is not equipped for such operations. The LHD requirement calls for a diesel-electric propulsion ship that is 200 meters long with a draft of 8 meters when fully loaded. It will be required to carry six main battle tanks; 20 infantry combat vehicles; 40 heavy trucks; and more than 900 troops. The ship would be defended by a point defense missile system; a close-in weapon system; an anti-torpedo decoy system; chaff; and machine guns. It would also be able to operate helicopters weighing up to 32,000 pounds.

Speaking to AIN during the visit of Juan Carlos 1 to Mumbai, Esteban García Vilasánchez, president of Navantia, said: “India has been able to see the ship for the first time since it was commissioned in 2010. The first impression counts and it has been good for the Indian Navy.”

But unlike the Juan Carlos 1, from which eight helicopters can take off simultaneously, India’s ship will have “much fewer” said Jayant Damodar Patil, senior executive vice president defense business for L&T. He added that the Indian Navy wants to use its current inventory of helicopters. Since the Indian LHD does not require a ski jump, it is expected to cost less than its Spanish counterpart. Patil said that L&T would do further work on the design, taking advantage of Navantia’s experience, and then manufacture the hull at its shipyard near Chennai.

The Indian Navy has been looking for a replacement for its aging Kamov Ka-28 and Westland Sea King helicopters for many years. It released a request for information for a large purchase of utility and multirole helicopters last August. The MoD has also signaled that it might make an interim purchase of up to 24 Sikorsky S-70B Seahawks.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 11:48 PM


Indian Navy destroyer INS Delhi receives extensive combat systems makeover during MLU

Kerry Herschelman, London - Jane's Navy International

06 July 2018



The Indian Navy’s Project 15 destroyer INS Delhi is receiving a major combat system upgrade as part of its ongoing mid-life upgrade (MLU).

Imagery analysis suggests Delhi had entered its MLU cycle at Naval Dockyard Mumbai by May 2017 and work is currently ongoing.

Under the destroyer’s MLU programme, a significant portion of legacy Russian-origin combat systems are being replaced by indigenously sourced kit, in addition to other ship system and habitability upgrades.

The KH 35E Uran anti-ship missile system, including the Garpun-Bal missile targeting radar, is being replaced by the Brahmos missile system and an unspecified surface surveillance radar (SSR).

(125 of 419 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-7-2018 at 06:37 PM


Plans for India’s second indigenous aircraft carrier continue to stall

Rahul Bedi, Delhi - Jane's Navy International

09 July 2018


INS Vikramaditya (foreground) pictured in company with INS Viraat in early 2014. Viraat was formally decommissioned in March 2017, leaving the IN with just one carrier in operation. Source: Indian Navy

The Indian Navy’s (IN’s) longstanding plan to build and commission its second indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC-2) into service by 2030–32 has been further postponed due to steadily declining budgets, technological hurdles, and, above all, enduring delays by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) in approving the programme.

The proposed 65,000–70,000 tonne conventionally powered ‘flat top’ carrier – tentatively named Vishal (Grand) – capable of embarking 50–60 fixed- and rotary-wing platforms, attaining speeds of up to 30 kt, and projected to cost INR800–900 billion (USD11.65–13 billion) – is part of the IN’s Maritime Capability Perspective Plan (MCCP).

First announced in 2005 and later updated for the 15-year period until 2027, the MCPP envisages the IN fielding three carrier battle groups (CBGs): one for each seaboard and one in reserve. For the IN, CBGs incorporate its ‘sea control’ approach to regional power projection, helping shape the regional security environment and countering Chinese plans of fielding 5–6 carriers in the strategically vital Indian Ocean Region (IOR).

“The government needs to urgently take a call on approving the IAC-2, as that will determine whether or not China dominates India in the IOR,” former IN chief of staff Admiral Arun Prakash told Jane’s. If not, India will end up playing a subsidiary role in this region, he added.

The IN currently has just one aircraft carrier in operation: the 44,000-tonne refurbished Kiev-class carrier INS Vikramaditya (ex- Admiral Gorshkov ), with its MiG-29K/KuB (Fulcrum-D) fighter group. INS Viraat (ex-HMS Hermes ), the service’s second 23,900-tonne Centaur-class carrier, was decommissioned in March 2017 following 30 years of service.

By 2018–19, Vikramaditya was to have been supplemented by INS Vikrant, the 37,000-tonne Project 71 carrier with a short take-off but arrested recovery (STOBAR) configuration that has been under construction since 2009 at Cochin Shipyard Limited, southern India.

(322 of 864 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 965
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 11-7-2018 at 12:40 PM


A clear case of India's defence ambitions vastly outrunning both their budget and their industrial capability.



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ADMK2
Member





Posts: 985
Registered: 11-5-2017
Location: Brisvegas
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-7-2018 at 03:07 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
A clear case of India's defence ambitions vastly outrunning both their budget and their industrial capability.


I’m shocked their projects are delayed...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-7-2018 at 03:55 PM


Sarcasm? I'm shocked.....................:lol: :lol: :lol:
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 22-7-2018 at 03:29 PM


INS Vikrant to commence sea trials in early 2020

A press release by the Indian Ministry of Defense says its indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant will commence sea trials in early 2020.


Indian Navy [CC BY 2.5 in or CC BY 2.5 in], via Wikimedia Commons

Defence secretary Sanjay Mitra recently went on board the ship at Kochi to inspect on its construction.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 25-7-2018 at 11:30 AM


The F/A 18 can safely operate from Indian aircraft carriers with significant payload: Boeing

By Manu Pubby, ET Bureau|

Jul 24, 2018, 05.22 PM IST


Image courtesy Boeing, Copyright © 1995 - 2018

NEW DELHI: After conducting detailed capability studies and simulation analysis, US aerospace manufacturer Boeing has said that it is confident that the F/A 18 Super Hornet Block III can safely operate from Indian aircraft carriers, with a `significant’ weapons payload.

The Super Hornet is in contention for an Indian Navy requirement of 57 new fighter jets to operate from its carriers, with the French Rafale M expected to be its main competitor. The new jets are required to operate from the under construction INS Vikrant that is expected to start its sea trials at the earliest by 2020.

A senior Boeing executive told ET that talks are on with both the navy and the airforce (which has a requirement for 116 new fighter jets under Make in India) and that the Super Hornet would in the near future demonstrate its capability to take off from a ski jump.

The Indian Navy is facing a unique problem in replacing its Russian origin MiG 29K fighter jets that have been saddled with technical issues. The INS Vikramaditya as well as the under construction Vikrant are designed as ski jump carriers – in which an aircraft takes off with the assistance of an elevated ramp.

However, the twin engine aircraft available for this task globally are designed for flat top carriers with the help of a catapult that gives them a boost for the take-off phase. Boeing however says that according to its internal studies the Super Hornet will be able to operate from the ski jump without any modifications to either the carrier or the jet itself.

“We have answered queries from the Indian Navy and the simulation analysis is done. At some point we will also take off from a US Navy ski jump. We feel very comfortable that we will pass the requirements with a meaningful and significant payload,” Dan Gillian, Program Manager F/A-18 at Boeing says.

The US company says that with 116 of the F/A 18 Block III jets on order from the US Navy, the program will have a production run for the next 15 years. It has also promised to build a world class production line for the fighter jets in India if selected for the twin contracts.

Boeing is looking to leverage its partnership with Indian manufacturers Mahindra and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited to present a proposal under the Make in India initiative. “HAL has built airplanes for years and Mahindra too has manufacturing knowhow. A public private partnership will bring it together and we will build a brand new first class facility in India. It will help India build its next plan for the advanced multirole combat aircraft as well,” Gillian says.

While a timeline is tough to assign, the Indian Navy would require to induct the jets for its second aircraft carrier under construction by 2020-22 while the air force is desperately looking for replacements to the MiG jets by 2025. At present, the air force and navy procurement plans are being processed independently, even though at least two jets – Rafale and F/A 18 – are common to both competitions.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DEW
Member





Posts: 225
Registered: 11-11-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-7-2018 at 08:50 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
The F/A 18 can safely operate from Indian aircraft carriers with significant payload: Boeing

…Boeing however says that according to its internal studies the Super Hornet will be able to operate from the ski jump without any modifications to either the carrier or the jet itself.

“We have answered queries from the Indian Navy and the simulation analysis is done. At some point we will also take off from a US Navy ski jump. We feel very comfortable that we will pass the requirements with a meaningful and significant payload,” Dan Gillian, Program Manager F/A-18 at Boeing says.



Damn!

There goes our secret plan to have No.1 Squadron fly from Adelaide and Canberra in a daring "Doolittle" scenario. :lol:
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-7-2018 at 07:45 PM


India’s ocean surveillance ship starts harbour trials

Rahul Bedi, Delhi - Jane's Navy International

27 July 2018



India’s indigenously designed classified missile tracking and ocean surveillance ship (OSS) is undergoing harbour trials at Vishakhapatnam on the country’s east coast, ahead of starting sea trials by the end of the year, security sources told Jane’s.

Thereafter, the 15,000-tonne vessel will be handed over to the National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO), India’s sole technical intelligence agency, to gather electronic intelligence (ELINT) and monitor domestic strategic missile and under-development ballistic missile defence (BMD) programmes.

Accompanying NTRO personnel on board the OSS will be technicians and scientists from the government-run Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) responsible for India’s multiple missile programmes.

(125 of 580 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 3-8-2018 at 09:29 PM


PICTURE: LCA Navy conducts arresting hook test

03 August, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

The Hindustan Aeronautics LCA Navy fighter has passed a milestone with the engagement of an arresting hook in taxi tests.

The work involved LCA Naval Prototype 2 contacting an arresting wire with the aircraft moving at “moderate taxi-in speeds,” says HAL.

HAL says that this is the first of several tests at INS Goa that will develop the type’s arrestor hook capability.

“Carrier compatibility trials (CCT) of naval aircraft are slated to be carried out at shore-based test facilities built at Indian Naval Base Goa,” says HAL. “CCT involves completion of extensive shore-based trials before embarking on an actual deck. This trial is the stepping stone towards completion of CCT trials of LCA Navy.”


Hindustan Aeronautics

New Delhi operates a single aircraft carrier, the Russian-built Vikramaditya, from which RAC MiG-29Ks operate. A second locally built carrier, INS Vikrant, is set to enter service in the early 2020s, after years of delays. Both of these vessels use ski-jumps to launch jets, which limits aircraft performance. A third carrier is planned, which is to be equipped with electromagnetic aircraft launch systems (EMALS).

The aircraft that will operate from the new carriers has yet to be determined. New Delhi is looking to obtain 57 multirole carrier-borne fighters (MRCBF) for its future flattops. This competition is likely to attract Boeing with the F/A-18 E/F, Dassault with the Rafale, and Saab with its proposed Gripen Maritime.

In addition, India’s Aeronautical Development Agency continues work on the LCA Navy Mk 2, based on the Tejas platform.

The LCA Navy fighter being used for arresting wire tests is based on the Tejas Mk. 1, and is powered by a General Electric F404 engine. It features a strengthened airframe, landing gear, and the tailhook.

If developed, the LCA Navy Mk. II would be a major update of the original Tejas design, and use the more powerful F414 engine.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 09:39 AM


New Delhi approves procurement of six next-generation OPVs for Indian Navy

Rahul Bedi, New Delhi - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

14 August 2018

India’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved the procurement of six indigenously designed and built next-generation offshore patrol vessels (NGOPVs) for the Indian Navy (IN) for INR49.41 billion (USD706.4 million) to enhance maritime security.

The MoD’s Defence Acquisition Council (DAC), which is headed by Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, sanctioned the procurement of the platforms on 13 August, which are to be fitted with state-of-the art sensors to perform multiple bluewater and littoral protection roles.

The Indian government’s Press Information Bureau (PIB) said in a statement that the NGOPVs’ tasks will include maritime interdiction, surveillance, mine warfare, anti-piracy missions, seaward defence, protecting offshore assets, and conducting counter-infiltration operations.

(131 of 508 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-8-2018 at 12:47 PM


First home-grown submarine launched, missile operationalised after 2 decades of development

An official associated with the mission on Sunday told 'The Express' that three rounds of the world-class missile were tested during the first phase user trial and it was a roaring success.

Published: 19th August 2018 11:18 PM | Last Updated: 20th August 2018 01:42 AM

By Express News Service



BHUBANESHWAR: Making its mark as a military superpower in South East Asia region, India has finally operationalised its first home-grown nuclear capable Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM), after nearly two decades of its development.

Kept under wraps for several years and inducted in the Navy a couple of months ago, the SLBM, code-named B-05 was secretly test fired back-to-back from indigenously built nuclear-powered submarine INS Arihant off Visakhapatnam coast on August 11 and 12.

An official associated with the mission on Sunday told 'The Express' that three rounds of the world-class missile were tested during the first phase user trial and it was a roaring success. While two tests were conducted on August 11, one was put under trial the next day in full operational configuration.

"All three missiles were fired from the submarine positioned nearly 20-meter deep inside the sea, about 10-km off the Vizag coast. It perfectly followed the pre-designated trajectory before zeroing on the target with high accuracy reaching close to zero circular error probability,-" the official confirmed over phone from New Delhi.

The successful mission has made India a member of the very exclusive club of six nations which have the triad of firing nuclear-tipped missiles from land, air and undersea. Other countries having the capability include Russia, USA, France, UK and China. Though India has a declared no-first-use policy, it is developing a nuclear doctrine based on credible minimum deterrence.

Developed by Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), the 10-meter long B-05 has a strike range of about 750 km and weighs ten tonne. The two-stage missile uses solid propellant and can carry a payload of about 1000 kg. The tests also confirmed the successful induction of INS Arihant submarine.

The 111-metre-long, 15-meter tall and 11-metre broad submarine is capable of carrying six torpedoes of 533 mm and 12 B-05 missiles or four K-4 missiles. Having a 100-member crew, the advanced technology vessel is powered by an 83 MW pressurised light-water reactor with enriched uranium fuel.

There is also provision to launch non-nuclear tipped Brahmos supersonic cruise missile as well as the 1,000-km.

Nirbhay which can be configured for both nuclear and non-nuclear warheads.The tests, sources indicated, would pave the way for an early induction of 3,500-km range K-4 missile, which is under developmental trials. Apart from the cruise variants of B-05 and K-4 missiles, DRDO is also developing 5,000-km range K-5 and 6,000-km range K-6 which would add more teeth to the arsenal.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17920
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 24-8-2018 at 07:03 PM


Rostec Begins Modernization of the Indian Vikramaditya Aircraft Carrier

(Source: Rostec; issued Aug 22, 2018)

Following the program of military-technical cooperation with India, Technodinamika holding company (part of Rostec State Corporation) has begun executing installation supervision of marine hydraulic systems on the Indian Navy aircraft carrier Vikramaditya. This project is another step towards the development of military-technical cooperation between India and Russia.

Within the project, installation supervision, commissioning and sea trials of Vikramaditya aircraft carrier are planned.

"Installation supervision of marine hydraulic systems at Vikramaditya is an important step in the upgrade of what is currently the most powerful aircraft carrier of the Indian Navy," saidCEO of Technodinamika, Igor Nasenkov. "The Vikramaditya project is extremely promising taking into account the long-term development program of the Indian aircraft fleet, under which by 2027 it will acquire two more ships."

The GS-1MF and GS-3 marine hydraulic systems are used for refueling, cleaning and pressurization of hydraulic systems of aircraft and helicopters which form part of the air-capable wing of the Vikramaditya aircraft carrier.

The Vikramaditya aircraft carrier is a deep modernization of the Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier, and designed to replace the Viraat carrier, which reached the end of its service life.

The International Military-Technical Forum ARMY2018 is taking place from 21 till 26 August in the Patriot Congress and Exhibition Center in the town of Kubinka. In 2017, the forum was attended by over 1,200 organizations and businesses demonstrating more than 18,000 exhibits. 78 defense enterprises and holding companies from 14 countries—Armenia, Belarus, India, Kazakhstan, China, Pakistan, Slovakia, Thailand, Turkey, France, Estonia, Czech Republic, South Africa, and Korea—presented their products. Seven countries were represented by national exhibits (Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, China, Pakistan, Slovakia, and South Africa).

The forum was attended by representatives from 114 foreign countries and 65 official military delegations, including 35 high-level delegations. There were more than 300representatives of foreign military departments.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2    4  5

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 87.8% - SQL: 12.2%]