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Author: Subject: Artillery in the 21st Century
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[*] posted on 5-7-2019 at 08:14 PM


China refurbishes old 152mm howitzers with modern add-ons

Posted On Friday, 05 July 2019 08:16

China has revitalized a type of howitzer that has been utilized by the People's Liberation Army (PLA) arsenal for more than 50 years by upgrading it with modern equipment, Liu Xuanzun reports in Global Times.


A Type-66 cannon-howitzer system attached to a brigade under the PLA 77th Group Army fires its 152mm shells during a live-fire training exercise on southwest China's Western Sichuan Plateau from August 8 to 11, 2018 (eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Hu Jing, Li Chengde and Sun Zhenqi)

The 152mm Type 66 cannon-howitzer is one of the most widely used pieces of artillery in the Chinese army, and the PLA has developed new tactics and equipment to let this old weapon efficiently serve even after 50 years of practical deployment, China Central Television (CCTV) reported on Wednesday, June 3.

Fully manually operated, the 152 millimeter Type 66 howitzer is inexpensive compared to the 155 millimeter PLZ-05 self-propelled howitzer, which has a similar caliber but is highly automated, a military expert who asked not to be named told the Global Times on Thursday, noting this enabled the PLA to mass produce the Type 66.

The aging howitzer can now not only shoot normal explosive shells but also advanced laser terminal guidance shells, CCTV reported, noting that these shells can track targets after they are fired, making them as accurate as missiles. Electromagnetic jamming shells and flare shells are also included in theType 66's arsenal. Reconnaissance drones and aiming assistance radars are also deployed together with the 152mm howitzers, "which gives the artillery wings and eyes," Jin Shuaishuai, an officer at the PLA 73rd Group Army artillery force, told CCTV.

Unlike a self-propelled howitzer, the 152mm howitzer needs a truck to tow it around, and because it is fully manual, it is slower than the automatic ones, said the CCTV report. But in modern warfare, these characteristics also give it a unique advantage over more advanced technologies: electromagnetic jamming will not work against the weapon, the state broadcaster quoted Zhong Puxing, another PLA artillery officer, as saying.
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[*] posted on 9-7-2019 at 10:44 AM


Indian army to buy Excalibur rounds for its new M-777A2 155mm howitzers

Posted On Monday, 08 July 2019 14:48

The Indian army intends to buy Excalibur guided long-range artillery shells compatible with the 145 M-777A2 howitzers it purchased in November 2016 from BAE Systems three years ago, the first batch of which was inducted into the artillery in November 2018 after extensive field trials.


Excalibur guided munition for 155mm howitzers (Picture source: Raytheon)

"The Indian Army is planning to acquire the Excalibur artillery ammunition from the Americans under the emergency procurement procedures," government sources were quoted as saying by ANI. The Excalibur precision-guided projectile is co-developed by Raytheon Company and BAE Systems Bofors. It is a GPS and inertial-guided munition capable of being used in close support situations within 75–150 meters of friendly troops or in situations where targets might be prohibitively close to civilians to attack with conventional unguided artillery fire. The shells have a multi-function fuze that can be programmed to explode in the air, once it hits a hard surface, or after it penetrates inside a target.

The delivery rate of the M-777A2s is five guns per month till the complete consignment is received by mid-2021.
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[*] posted on 10-7-2019 at 09:42 PM


The Paladin’s howitzer barrel just got a whole lot longer

By: Todd South   1 day ago


An M109A6 Paladin howitzer

The head of the Army’s effort to extend ranges of everything from howitzers to strategic missiles said that recent testing showed adding six feet to the howitzer cannon didn’t affect mobility and the piece can still operate in dense urban terrain.

Col. John Rafferty shared that item along with other updates on the Long-Range Precision Fires Cross-Functional Team’s efforts at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Armament Systems Forum in June.

The current barrel length of the M109 howitzer is about 29 feet. The new 58-caliber barrel that the Army Test and Evaluation Command ran through the urban paces this spring is six feet longer.

“It actually can do just fine in dense urban terrain,” Rafferty said.

He did admit that engineers are still working out transmission questions for the Paladin Improvement Program, which is how the Army is making self-propelled howitzers ready for the modern battlefield.

A longer barrel means that the explosion can have contact with the projectile for more time, increasing the pressure and then velocity of the round, which equals greater distances.

Two videos shown at the event demonstrated 155mm firings at both the 70-kilometer and 62-km range with different munitions. Rafferty called those “great for morale” for the team but noted that they’re still trying to resolve the “precision” part of LRPF.

That’s because it’s more about defining accuracy at those ranges, which is still being worked out, he said.

To that end, the Extended Range Cannon Artillery program has work being done on multiple munitions. One is the XM1113, a rocket assisted projectile, and updated requirements for the M5409, the RAP currently in the Army’s inventory.

And to make those rounds hit on target, they’re also working on the Precision Guidance Kit and autoloader upgrades. The PGK has to work at double the distances it did in the past and the autoloaders, while part of past projects, never had to address fuzing projectiles or fuze settings, Rafferty said.

The team is pressing for a technology demonstration of that improved autoloader by late 2021.

But those artillery pieces, while challenging to develop, are only a small piece of the LRPF’s larger portfolio. And all of it is being driven by the Army’s target of having multi-domain operations a realistic way of warfighting ready by 2028.

Much of that is being driven by what’s being seen on multiple fronts. A 2018 RAND report noted that Russian cannons have 50 to 100 percent greater range than current U.S. cannons.

Those objectives include doubling range to beyond 70km for artillery, double rate of fire to six to 10 rounds per minute for those systems and engaging moving targets with those munitions in GPS-denied environments.

They also plan to have an advanced lightweight armament system with a technology demonstration planned for the end of this year.

To get ahead of that deadline, Rafferty said that his team is expected to deliver many of the capabilities by 2023.
“For us, there isn’t a moment to lose,” he said.

At the strategic level, the long-range hypersonic weapon and the strategic long-range cannon complement each other in fires planning.

The hypersonic weapon is expected to travel great distances at high speeds to defeat enemy defenses and hit a mix of hard or strategic targets such as radars, communication vehicles or even area targets with an “exquisite munition” that delivers “tremendous kinetic energy,” the colonel said.

In the fires commander’s back pocket, though, will be the strategic cannon with 1,600-km range. That cannon is being built to fire a “volume of more affordable munitions,” Rafferty said.

By using the two together, the Army expects to penetrate and disintegrate the anti-access, area-denial systems in use by China and Russia.

And it’s not just for the Army.

“We’re not entering strategic fires for the first time since the Pershing (missile) for ourselves,” Rafferty said.

The plan is for the Army to have those arrows in their quiver to open entry for the joint force to then get into the fight.

The colonel declined to discuss recent developments with the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Force Treaty, which limited those missile ranges for Russia and the United States.

He said only that the Precision Strike Missile is being engineered to reach the 499-km range and that is planned for fielding in 2023, also.

Once fielded there are three “spirals” or developments that the Army will quickly seek — cross-domain fires, meaning the PSM can hit maritime or land-based targets; enhanced lethality, which would make the missile able to hit multiple targets with one missile; and range, the potential to reach farther distances if needed.
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[*] posted on 10-7-2019 at 10:10 PM


The two things I really want to see in ADF service sooner rather than later is the LRASM and Precision Strike Missile, particularly if the anti-shipping capability holds up, and it can be ship launched.



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new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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[*] posted on 11-7-2019 at 07:24 PM


Saab continues to invest in ARTHUR

Christopher F Foss, London - Jane's International Defence Review

10 July 2019


Artist’s impression of Saab ARTHUR WLR integrated into an ARTEC Boxer 8x8 platform, with the antenna in raised position. Source: Saab

Saab Surveillance is continuing to self-fund development of its ARTHUR (ARTtillery HUnting Radar) Weapon Locating Radar (WLR) to meet emerging requirements, a company official revealed at the IQPC Future Artillery conference held in London in May.

Bard Frostad, Saab Surveillance's senior military advisor, said 80 ARTHUR WLR systems have been exported to at least 12 countries (one not being disclosed), including Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Greece, Italy, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom with operational use seen in Afghanistan and Iraq. Those deployed by Canada and Denmark in Afghanistan have since been returned to Sweden.

ARTHUR is designed to detect incoming conventional tube artillery and fire, artillery rockets, and mortar bombs, providing friendly forces with a warning of incoming fire. According to Saab, the system has had 95% availability in operations.

During a typical operating sequence, ARTHUR detects threats, filters, and prioritises them, then transmits this information to the artillery command and control system (ACCS), which allocates an artillery battery to engage the threat. It can also be used to adjust for variables during artillery fire.

Since its introduction to service with Norway and Sweden more than 20 years ago, the ARTHUR WLR has been upgraded to improve its detection range and target tracking capacity.

The current ARTHUR Mod C WLR has an instrumented range of 60 km, operates over an arc of 120°, and can track more than 100 targets per minute.

Frostad said Saab is developing the ARTHUR WLR Mod D, which will feature several improvements, including an instrumented range of up to 100 km, an accuracy of 0.15% of range, and will cover an arc of 120°.

According to Saab, the Mod D leverages a combination of technologies fielded in other systems to reduce development cost and risk, and spiral development would be used for further growth via upgrades or new parts as necessary.

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[*] posted on 16-7-2019 at 11:23 AM


BAE Systems to design ERCA prototype for US Army

Ashley Roque, Washington, DC - Jane's Defence Weekly

15 July 2019

In the US Army’s bid to develop a Strategic Long-Range Cannon programme, BAE Systems has been tapped to design an Extended Range Cannon Artillery (ERCA) prototype.

The company announced on 15 July that it had received a USD45 million contract to design an ERCA Increment 1 prototype that will increase the range and rate of fire on current, as well as future, M109A7 self-propelled howitzers. To achieve this increase, ERCA will be integrated onto the M109A7 and the M109A7’s current 39-calibre turret will be replaced with a 58-calibre, 30 ft long gun barrel, the company said.

“ERCA is a significant technological step forward for the army’s artillery portfolio,” Scott Davis, the vice-president of programmes for BAE Systems’ Combat Vehicles business, said in a statement.

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[*] posted on 16-7-2019 at 12:35 PM


BAE gets green light to build extended-range cannon prototype for US Army

By: Jen Judson   7 hours ago


The M109A6 Paladin 155mm self-propelled howitzer along with the M992A2 Field Artillery Ammunition Supply Vehicle provides the primary indirect-fire support to armored brigade combat teams. (U.S. Army)

WASHINGTON — BAE Systems has been given the go-ahead to build the U.S. Army’s Extended Range Cannon Artillery prototype through a $45 million contract award, according to a July 15 company statement.

Under the Army’s program, BAE will increase the range and the rate of fire on the current and future M109A7 self-propelled howitzers — otherwise known as Paladin Integrated Management.

The ERCA program is one of the Army’s near-term efforts within its No. 1 modernization priority — long-range precision fires — as adversaries have developed their own cannon artillery that out-ranges American capability.

The service stood up Army Futures Command roughly a year ago with cross-functional teams assigned to carry out the service’s top six modernization priorities as a means to break free from historically sluggish procurement habits. The Long-Range Precision Fires Cross-Functional Team has focused heavily on extending the range of cannon artillery.

BAE’s M109A7 howitzers will, in part, convert to ERCA cannons through the development of "power distribution software and hardware integration solutions,” according to the company statement.

The current 38-caliber turret will be replaced with a 58-caliber version to accommodate a 30-foot gun barrel from which the ERCA projectile will be fired.

The program aims to extend the range of artillery “while maintaining the weight found in current systems to minimize performance impacts to the chassis,” the company statement notes.

BAE is also under contract to develop precision guidance kits with anti-jamming capabilities, which is compatible with existing and new long-range rounds to include the M109 howitzer.

The company will work on the prototype at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, and BAE’s facilities in York, Pennsylvania; Sterling Heights, Michigan; and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Other efforts within the ERCA program include developing an improved projectile that can reach beyond 40 kilometers in range. The Army is developing the XM113 rocket-assisted projectile to answer that call, which could end up in soldiers’ hands in less than a few years.

The Army also has its eye on an autoloader for the cannon, which would dramatically increase its volume of fire.

The service tested a modified M109 Paladin at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, in December 2018 designed to carry more propellant with a roughly 30-foot-long cannon.

The ERCA cannon is a step ahead of a bigger program to develop a strategic, long-range cannon that could shoot 1,000 nautical miles, or 1,852 kilometers.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2019 at 11:07 PM


This is the only illustration of this new Israeli, under development, gun system that I've ever been able to find...……….fully automatic, unmanned turret, most people think? What it eventually turns out to be, may be something completely different.....early days yet!


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[*] posted on 19-7-2019 at 02:01 PM


WEB EXCLUSIVE: Army Looks to Add Autoloader to Extended Range Cannon

7/18/2019

By Connie Lee


An M109A6 Paladin howitzer self-propelled gun
Photo: Army

The Army is examining options to add an autoloader to the extended-range cannon artillery system, according to the director of the long-range precision fires cross-functional team.

The extended long-range cannon, or ERCA, is designed to extend the range of the Paladin self-propelled howitzers to 70 kilometers, which is double its current capability. The move is part of the Army’s effort to improve its fires capabilities to counter adversaries that can outgun current systems. The first ERCA prototype will begin testing from October to January at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, Col. John Rafferty told reporters July 17 during a media day at Joint Base Meyer-Henderson Hall, Virginia.

The service has an “incremental strategy” for the system and plans to field it in a battalion in 2023. A second battalion will be fielded in 2024 with an autoloader, he noted.

“We're working on ... ‘How much do we need to know before you make the decision? Whether we want to produce prototypes of each one of these ... autoloaders or is there a way that we can make a smart decision earlier and then move faster to deliver the autoloader?” he said.

Adding the device would help the artillery system shoot up to 10 rounds per minute and reduce the crew needed to operate it, Rafferty noted.

“In large-scale ground combat operations, we need to be able to mass and deliver a volume of projectiles,” he said.

The Army is looking at two potential options for the autoloader, Rafferty said. One is provided by a vendor and one is designed by the government, he noted, declining to name the vendor.

There are multiple potential designs that can fill the role of an autoloader, Rafferty noted. For example, one resembles as “Coke can dispenser” that has a belt feeding into a magazine. Others have proposed designs that resemble a “robotic arm grabbing a projectile,” he said.

Additionally, the Army awarded BAE Systems a $45 million contract this week for the ERCA increment one prototype, according to a company announcement. Under the contract, BAE will integrate the extended-range cannon artillery system onto an M109A7 Paladin Integrated Management, replacing the 39-caliber turret with a 58-caliber, 30-foot long gun barrel. This will “improve the rate and range of fire with the development of power distribution software and hardware integration solutions,” the announcement stated.

Rafferty said the service is performing developmental testing on new projectiles as well.

“One of the big things to emphasize is ... it requires new projectiles to go that far,” he noted. “It takes new propellant … a new cannon and new fuse to get the accuracy we want … at 70 kilometers.”
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[*] posted on 23-7-2019 at 07:40 PM


U.S. Army designates new 155mm self-propelled howitzer as M1299

Posted On Monday, 22 July 2019 14:34

The U.S. Army officially confirmed that it will designate the newest 155mm self-propelled howitzer (SPH) as M1299. The Extended Range Cannon Artillery (ERCA gun) program evolved in the XM1299 prototype, now standardized as M1299.


XM1299 self-propelled howitzer firing test (Picture source: U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground)

The U.S. Army’s extended-range artillery system has been designed to increase the range and rate of fire on current and future M109A7 Paladin self-propelled howitzers. Compared to its predecessors, an M1299 system is receiving two leading-edge technologies: new XM1113 rocket-boosted shell and a longer 58 caliber tube, which increases the range from 38km to 70km+, and 100 km within the forthcoming four years.

In addition, the M1299 will have a fully automated ammunition loading system which increases the rate of fire from 3 rpm to 10 rpm. Removing the crew from the gun radically opens up the design space. The M1299 also receives a communications system that can work in GPS-denied environments.

Many elements of the howitzer can be automatically modeled to support design decisions: gunfire shock response, electrical power draw, internal ballistics, etc.

Building on mobility upgrades, the M1299 will also increase the lethality of self-propelled howitzers: new SPHs provides a “10x” capability through a combination of an increased range, increased rate of fire, increased lethality, increased reliability and greater survivability.
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[*] posted on 27-7-2019 at 12:25 AM


U.S. National Guard has tested Hawkeye 105mm mobile artillery system

Posted On Thursday, 25 July 2019 14:48

On July 23, 2019, U.S. soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 122 Field Artillery, Illinois Army National Guard, tested the Hawkeye 105mm mobile artillery system, as part of Exercise Northern Strike 19, one of the largest reserve component exercises. This event is hosted annually at Camp Grayling Joint Maneuver Training Center and Aleena Combat Readiness Training Center, as well as over the skies of northern Michigan and Lake Huron.


Sgt. Joshua Bourbonnais of Test Platoon, 2nd Battalion, 122 Field Artillery, Illinois Army National Guard sights in the Hawkeye 105mm Mobile Weapon System during a simulated drill on Camp Grayling, Mich. 23 July, 2019. (Picture source Maj. W. Chris ClyneU.S. DoD )

The goal of Exercise Northern Strike 19, is to maximize the full-spectrum combat readiness of National Guard units through realistic, cost-effective joint fires training in an adaptable environment, with an emphasis on cooperation between joint and coalition forces.

The Hawkeye is a mobile artillery system based on the high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (Humvee) fitted with a U.S. Army standard M20 105mm cannon mounted at the rear of the vehicle. This artillery vehicle is called 105mm Mobile Weapon System (MWS) and HAWKEYE by the manufacturer, AM General.

The AM General Hawkeye is based on a M1152A1 Humvee with a crew cab at the front and cargo platform at the rear fitted the 105 mm howitzer. The 105 mm cannon uses a hybrid soft recoil technology allows weapon to be paired with AM General HMMWV. The vehicle was unveiled by AM General during the Association of the United States Army's Annual Meeting and exhibition in October 2016.

The 105 MWS battery is organized to suppress, neutralize, and destroy both ground forces and structures in an indirect and direct fire mode. The system allows the weapon to move, shoot, and move again without relying on heavy equipment or large number of troops/logistic support. The HMMWV platform provides unparalleled off-road mobility over all types of terrain to support this mission.

The AM General Hawkeye uses the MG 9000 digital fire control system which incorporates Northrop Grumman’s LN-270 Inertial Navigation System, Weibel Scientific’s MVR-700C Muzzle Velocity Radar System, Sekai Electronics’ DFS-02 Direct Fire Camera System, Sensor Systems’ S67- 1575-76 Global Positioning System antenna and Mandus’ DK 10 Gunner’s Display Unit.

In firing position two hydraulic jacks are lowered on the ground at the front of the vehicle and two large spades at the rear. A total of 4 to 6 ammunitions can be carried on the vehicle. To increase the number of ammunition another Humvee in cargo variant can be used to carry additional ammunition.

The HMMWV/Hawkeye Howitzer 105mm howitzer can be ready to fire in less than 2 minutes with a total crew of 4 soldiers. It can fire standard NATO 105 mm ammunition with a maximum range of 11.5 km with conventional projectile and 15.1 km with rocket assisted projectile.
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[*] posted on 31-7-2019 at 08:04 PM


New American Brutus 155mm 6x6 self-propelled howitzer shown at Northern Strike 2019

Posted On Wednesday, 31 July 2019 07:38

During the U.S. military exercise Northern Strike 2019, a Joint National Training Center accredited exercise, sponsored by the National Guard Bureau, the experimental Brutus 155mm self-propelled mobile gun was presented on July 25, 2019, on Camp Grayling, Michigan, United States.


A static display of the experimental Brutus 155mm Self-propelled gun at Northern Strike 19 on Camp Grayling, Mich. 25 July. (Picture source U.S. DoD)

The Brutus 155mm self-propelled mobile gun is jointly developed by the companies AM General and The Mandus Group. The Brutus mounts the same cannon as the M777 to a hydro-pneumatic, soft Recoil system for mounting on FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles truck).

In February 2018, the U.S. Army announced it was again interested in exploring available options for a new mobile howitzer to replace its existing 105mm and 155mm towed types. The need soon appeared to develop a new 155mm system that would be available in both short- and long-barrel variants and come in a package better suit the demands of different types of Army artillery units.

In November 2018, the U.S. Army has tested the truck-mounted artillery system, low-recoil 155mm howitzer Brutus at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as reported by Joseph Trevithick on The Drive. The new somehow self-propelled howitzer would meet the service’s requirements for a lighter weight mobile option to replace existing howitzers in its Stryker armored vehicle-equipped, light infantry, and airborne units.

The 155mm Brutus uses the same technology as the Hawkeye, a soft-recoil howitzer developed by the American Companies Mandus Group and AM General, which allows a cannon to fire from a lighter platform.

The Brutus 155mm mobile self-propelled howitzer is mounted on a 6x6 modified chassis of M1083 five-ton FMTV type with outriggers to help stabilize it when firing. The FMTV truck series is the standard tactical truck throughout the U.S. Army.

In December 2018, the U.S. Army has released video footage showed a test firing with the Brutus.

VIDEO: Fort Sill MFIX 2019 Brutus: https://youtu.be/0Hmglztt9_Y
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[*] posted on 2-8-2019 at 09:42 AM


Jordan receives M119 howitzers

Mohammed Najib, Ramallah - Jane's Defence Weekly

01 August 2019

The United States has donated 12 howitzers and 24 Humvees to the Jordan Armed forces (JAF), the US embassy in Jordan announced on 31 July.

“Recently, the Jordan Armed Forces concluded a live-fire training with howitzers received from the US,” the embassy said in a video posted on its Facebook account that showed JAF personnel firing 105 mm M119 light howitzers. “The howitzers provide the JAF with a system that can be rapidly deployed in Jordan’s defence and are another example of the critical Jordanian-US military partnership.”

It added that the howitzers would be used by the Quick Reaction Force, have a maximum range of 19.5 km, and can fire up to six rounds a minute for two minutes or three rounds a minute for 30 minutes.

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[*] posted on 16-8-2019 at 08:53 PM


American ERCA Extended Range Cannon Artillery autoloader for self-propelled howitzer

Posted On Friday, 16 August 2019 08:48

American ERCA (Extended Range Cannon Artillery) autoloader for self-propelled howitzer is being tested for the first time at Yuma Proving Ground. The ERCA will provide faster and safer firing capabilities.


The ERCA Extended Range Cannon Artillery autoloader was tested from a prototype of M109A7. (Picture source US DoD)

The ERCA (Extended Range Cannon Artillery) itself is a massive undertaking in that everything is under development at the same time and it’s a platform that needs to be compatible with multiple howitzer configurations, multiple projectiles and multiple missions.

The ERCA program has been testing various components of its system for about four years. The newest component undergoing testing is a five-round limited capacity autoloader. It holds five projectiles and five propellant charges.

In the past ERCA Howitzer Test Bed (HTB) systems have been built on modified M109A6 Self Propelled Howitzers. Testing of the limited capacity autoloader is being conducted from a prototype M109A7 which has been modified and integrated with the ERCA Armament System.

The Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) has been instrumental in everything for ERCA development for the last three and a half years. The ERCA program was started on October in 2015 and since 100 test events on the ERCA program across multiple platforms were performed.

YPG Munitions and Weapons, ERCA Test Officer, Gilbert Moreno, has been a part of about 90 of those test events—he’s seen ERCA is all of its stages, “It started off with the propellant, projectile and gun tube and it evolved from that into a full weapon.”

Another part of the team are the gunners, who if this was a war zone, their position would be manned by soldiers. Artillery Gunner, Michael Gomez, has worked on the ERCA project about a year. His team consists of four gunners, they offload the ammunition, prepare it and then load it into the magazine, “The customer shows us their procedures and the steps to do, and our part is figuring how we can make it safe for us.”

Once the gunners insert the propellant into the autoloader magazine, the ERCA Autoloader Team takes over operations.

The ERCA Autoloader Team monitors and controls the autoloader system from the safety of a remotely located connex box. “It’s doing everything by itself, all we are doing is monitoring the health of it, checking that it is updating us with what it’s currently doing, and making sure that it’s saying that everything is okay,” responds Dave Gatter, a Control Systems Engineer and member of the ERCA Autoloader Team.
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[*] posted on 23-8-2019 at 09:57 AM


Aselsan developing 155 mm Course Correction System

Christopher F Foss, London - Jane's International Defence Review

22 August 2019

Turkey’s Aselsan is developing the Atom 155 mm Course Correction System (CCS) to meet potential artillery requirements for the Turkish Land Forces Command (TLFC).

This would be a direct replacement for the existing 155 mm nose-mounted artillery fuze and would provide the weapon with an increase in accuracy that, according to Aselsan, “gives a circular error of probability (CEP) of less than 50 m, independent of range, as it reduces the dispersion”.

The CCS can be fitted to any 155 mm artillery projectile with a standard NATO two-inch deep well fuze, and it is activated at a distance of about 60 m from the muzzle of the weapon.

(108 of 409 words)
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[*] posted on 25-8-2019 at 08:35 PM


Japanese army unveils its new Type 19 155mm 8x8 wheeled self-propelled howitzer

Posted On Saturday, 24 August 2019 10:21

During the edition 2019 of its Firepower event which takes place every year at the end of August in the East Fuji Maneuver Area, the Japan Ground Self Defense Forces (JGSDF) has unveiled the Type 19, a new 155mm wheeled self-propelled howitzer based on a MAN military truck chassis.


New Japanese-made Type 19 155mm 8x8 wheeled self-propelled howitzer in a live demonstration at the Firepower event of the Japan Ground Self Defense Forces. August 2019. (Picture source Internet)

The new Japanese Type 19 155mm wheeled self-propelled howitzer seems very similar to the French-made CAESAR manufactured by the French Company Nexter Systems. The main advantages of that type of artillery system are that it has similar firepower to existing towed and self-propelled artillery systems with greater strategic mobility and quicker in/out of action times.

The Type 19 is based on a MAN Military 8x8 military truck chassis with the crew cabin at the front and one 155mm howitzer mounted at the rear. According to our first analysis, the crew cab seems to be fitted with armor to provide protection against firing of small arms 7.62mm calibers and artillery shell splinters.

The Type 19 has a crew of five with three soldiers seated in the crew cab and two additional seats in a cabin located in the middle of the truck chassis.

As for the French CAESAR, the Type 19 seems to be equipped with a main fire-control computer located in the crew cab but at the rear on the left is the gun display unit for the crew when the system is deployed in the firing position. When the system is deployed in the firing position a large spade is hydraulically lowered at the rear to provide a more stable firing platform. The rear four wheels are raised clear of the ground so that the large spade absorbs all the firing stresses.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2019 at 08:39 PM


More pics via LoooSeR on Sturgeon House forums...……….







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[*] posted on 25-8-2019 at 10:49 PM


Could this be a potential upgrade path for Army's M777A2? A way to keep the towed guns relevant, and more mobile? What are the downsides to something like this over a traditional towed system like Army have now? It seems like a logical upgrade path to take some risk out of the unprotected towed artillery role. Then again, why not just ditch the towed guns and go all SPH...
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[*] posted on 26-8-2019 at 11:30 AM


I would have thought that there are a number of points to consider:

- The development push for both tracked and truck-mounted artillery is to go for automatic/semi-automatic systems usually turret-mounted. It also appears that the turrets may be unmanned?

- These new systems may be some years away (Israeli truck system circa 2030 or so? The USA system possibly a lot sooner, i.e. 2025 or so?)

- You then have a choice....wait for the best, auto systems OR go with what is available now?

- On top of this is the hoary question of whether one goes for the super ranges being talked about in the USA in particular. Obviously there is a cost impact for the Long Gun versions allied to the automatic systems, married to ultra-long-range shells of one kind or another. M-109-A7 or the Korean equivalent may not be good enough...……….? 100kms range anyone......?

- Whatever we choose, we won`t have large numbers with current manning levels, especially if we also go for long-range rockets (for which there is a good business case in my opinion) ….circa 350-500kms range possibly?

- Does the need for both rockets and artillery cause one to only consider the highest number of automatic systems (for arty in particular) due to limited manning available? Max the weapon systems with the least manning...…

- Do we have any Reserves that could possibly use the M-777`s as a force back-up OR,
- Do we just stick them into store as War Reserve, OR,
- Do we sell them off?
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[*] posted on 26-8-2019 at 06:05 PM


I was just doing some reading about US Army efforts in this area, and it looks like their experimental system (Brutus) is using a manual loading soft recoil system rather than a auto/semi-auto reload turreted solution. A lot less technically impressive than CAESAr or other comparable solutions. It looks like it is the same barrel as the M777, 39 cal (at the moment), but everything else is replaced. It's not a particularly impressive system in a technical sense, but would certainly get the job done, and done quickly and cheaply.

From the looks of it, the JSDF solution is semi-auto? Maybe that kind of solution or similar could be fitted to the M777? More of an engineering issue than anything, I'm sure it's possible. Honestly, I'm not really worried about the method of reload, more so the ability of the gun to get into and out of action and displaced as quickly as possible, with as cheap a solution as possible. As long as the crew are as well protected as is technically feasible, given the chassis (an up-armoured MAN solution would fit the bill well enough) then it would be a significantly better solution than what the Army has now.

With the manning issues, it looks like this kind of system in particular has a lower requirement compared to a towed gun. Aren't M777A2's operated by at least 7-11 personnel? If this kind of setup only requires the mentioned 5, there is already a decent saving there across the fleet, meaning either more gun systems could be purchased to increase the artillery capability, or personnel positions placed into other needed areas - rocket artillery, support etc.

As far as the Reserves go, use them. US Army National Guard are expected to be able to operate more complex equipment and get less training days per year than Army Reserve. I think Reserves are under utilised, under invested and under appreciated, if they need more training, give it to them. If they need more money, then give it too them. Reality is, the ADF as a whole needs more bodies and more money the less stable the region gets, and the Reserves are going to have to be a part of that system and be as deployable and as capable in specific roles as their regular counterparts. Give them back their artillery guns, give them more training time and more focused purpose and they could be just as capable.

I dunno, I'm just brainstorming. I'd have to have a better sense of budgets, program costs, R&D costs etc to establish whether something like this would be worth it for the ADF. There is nothing stopping the Army and BAE from developing a localised version, I mean, more jobs, local defence industry growth etc, the only barrier would be money.
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[*] posted on 3-9-2019 at 09:21 AM


Japan displays new SPH prototype, more elements of road-mobile EW system

Kosuke Takahashi, Tokyo - Jane's Defence Weekly

02 September 2019


The JGSDF displayed a prototype of the Type 19 155 mm/52-calibre wheeled SPH at the ‘Fuji Firepower 2019’ exercise. Source: JGSDF

The Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) unveiled a prototype of the Type 19 155 mm/52-calibre wheeled self-propelled howitzer (SPH) at this year's edition of the 'Fuji Firepower' exercise conducted from 22-25 August, a JGSDF spokesperson told Jane's on 2 September.

The long-range howitzer, which is integrated into an 8×8 MAN tactical military truck, is expected to replace the JGSDF's ageing fleet of FH-70 towed artillery systems, said the Japanese Ministry of Defense (MoD)'s Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency (ATLA), adding that the new system will be operated by five personnel.

The JGSDF spokesperson said that the service will take delivery of the first seven Type 19 SPHs from domestic manufacturer Japan Steel Works, which has already delivered five Type 19 prototypes to the ATLA, by the end of fiscal year 2019 (FY 2019) ending on 31 March 2020.

The designation 'Type 19' means that the system is expected to be delivered to the JGSDF during FY 2019.

The JGSDF has already requested JPY4.7 billion (USD44.3 million) from the government to procure a second batch of seven Type 19 SPHs for FY 2020, following the acquisition of the first batch for JPY5.1 billion.

Meanwhile, the 'Fuji Firepower 2019' exercise, which was held at the East Fuji Maneuver Area (EFMA) near Gotemba, Shizuoka Prefecture, saw the JGSDF displaying more elements of its road-mobile Network Electronic Warfare System (NEWS), which has been developed for analysing electronic waves and conducting electronic warfare (EW).

The NEWS system is made up of several, specially equipped EW vehicles designed to perform electronic reconnaissance while degrading the command, control, and communications networks of adversaries.

(290 of 593 words)
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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 11:43 AM



Image via BAE Systems.

DSEI 2019: BAE unveils new ‘Archer’ mobile Howitzer

By George Allison - September 10, 20196

BAE Systems have unveiled a new ‘Archer’ Mobile Howitzer at DSEI today that it says is highly adaptable to diverse terrains and battlefield conditions.

The firm say that the key is a modular design that allows it to be integrated onto different truck chassis and then seamlessly introduced into existing vehicle fleets.

“The ARCHER’s modularity makes it a cost-effective solution that provides critical battlefield capabilities. The ARCHER system displayed at DSEI 2019 is mounted on a Rheinmetall RMMV HX2 8×8 truck – meaning it could be common to systems already in service with the British Army.”

The original ARCHER, first delivered to the Swedish Armed Forces in 2013, is mounted on a Volvo A30 6X6 articulated hauler.

“This new international version of the ARCHER can be easily integrated onto a variety of different chassis, allowing the customer to specify the vehicle best suited to their needs,” said Ulf Einefors, director of marketing and sales at BAE Systems Weapon Systems business in Sweden.

“We’re pleased to display this new version at DSEI to demonstrate the versatility that ARCHER could add to any allied military force.”

In a release, BAE say that the long-range, self-propelled ARCHER brings speed, mobility, and high rates of fire to support ground troops.

“From the safety of ARCHER’s armored cabin, a three-person crew needs less than 30 seconds to deploy or displace the system, making ARCHER the ultimate shoot-and-scoot artillery system. As the most advanced wheeled 155mm, 52-calibre system in operation today, ARCHER features a 21-round auto-loader and onboard ballistic calculation.”

The system can fire up to eight rounds per minute at ranges approaching 40 kilometres with conventional 155mm ammunition and 60 kilometres with precision guided munitions such as Excalibur.
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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 11:22 PM


Low-cost launcher [DSEI19D1]

10 September 2019



Arnold Defense is launching a new version of its Fletcher weapon system at DSEI − the Multiple Launch Hydra System (MLHS) − which is being shown installed on the Mercedes-Benz UNIMOG LTTV platform on Jankel's Stand N6-350. A Fletcher rocket launcher is also being shown on the BAE Systems Stand S4-200/S4-240 mounted on the Level Peaks M205 tripod with a Capco mount plate.

This new version has a total of 23 launcher tubes for 2.75in/70mm solid propellant laser-guided rockets such as the BAE Systems Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS), which is already in quantity production. According to Arnold Defense, the MLHS is set to transform the surface defence world by delivering low-cost, high-capacity surgical strike capability.

The latest Fletcher MLHS includes the platform, a pod of 23 2.75in/70mm laser-guided rockets, and a laser designator. The latter could either be mounted on the platform, or the targets could be designated by another land-based designator, or even an air-based laser designator integrated into a helicopter, an unmanned aerial vehicle or an aircraft.

Arnold Defense has manufactured more than 1.25 million 2.75in rocket launchers since 1961 for the US market and many overseas customers. These include the M260 (7-round) and M261 (19-round) launchers deployed on US Army helicopters, thermal coated LAU-68 (7-round) and LAU-61 (7-round) digital rocket launchers used by the US Navy, plus the LAU-131 and SUU-25 flare dispensers. Recent developments include the ultralight LWL-12 that weighs just over 27kg empty, and a new four-round launcher.

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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 06:56 PM


More pics of the ARCHER on MAN 8x8.....from BAE

Small this SPH is NOT...….







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[*] posted on 13-9-2019 at 11:37 AM


From DSEI 2019...…………

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