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Author: Subject: Artillery in the 21st Century
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[*] posted on 24-5-2018 at 06:30 PM


Slovakia procures domestically produced Zuzana 2 155 mm SPHs

Jiri Kominek, Prague - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

23 May 2018


Slovakia procures domestically produced Zuzana 2 155 mm SPHs. Source: Konstrukta-Defence

The Slovak government on 23 May approved a Ministry of Defence (MoD) request for a EUR175 million (USD206 million) procurement of 25 ShKH Zuzana 2 155 mm self-propelled howitzers (SPHs) for the Slovak armed forces.

The MoD will award the contract to Slovak defence company Konstrukta-Defence, with initial deliveries scheduled to commence in 2018 and to be completed in 2022.

The contract includes crew training, spare parts and ammunition, and also calls for the maximum involvement of Slovakia's domestic defence industry.

“Based on evaluations made by the NATO planning team, we are forming a heavy mechanised brigade based on those recommendations and [the procurement of new SPHs] will ensure the necessary firepower for the brigade,” Slovak Defence Minister Peter Gajdos informed media on 23 May following the government procurement decision.

The Slovak armed forces currently field 16 ShKH Zuzana 155 mm SPHs with a 45 calibre-length barrel.

Unlike its predecessor, the ShKH Zuzana 2 155 mm SPH fields a 52 calibre-length barrel, has a full 360-degree turret traverse, a new armoured cab, and a reduced crew of three made possible by greater automation.

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[*] posted on 11-6-2018 at 08:37 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Nexter moves forward on guided 155mm shells

11th June 2018 - 06:00 GMT | by Grant Turnbull in Paris

Following in the footsteps of ammunition manufacturers such as Orbital ATK and Raytheon, French armaments company Nexter Munitions is pressing forward with the development of a range of guided 155mm artillery rounds.

The company will showcase several of its newest ammunition types at this year’s Eurosatory including a fuse kit for 155mm shells known as SPACIDO, as well as a completely new guided round featuring pop-out fins called MENHIR.

SPACIDO has now finished industrial development and is awaiting customers to start serial production. The solution is similar to Orbital ATK’s Precision Guidance Kit in that it allows soldiers to quickly swap out the fuse on existing, unguided shells and place the new fuse on to increase accuracy.

Nexter Munitions officials noted that this new fuse improves round dispersion, mainly in range. The technology works by measuring the round’s velocity as it leaves the barrel with a radar, an RF link passes that data in real-time to the fuse to correct the trajectory.

The fuse has pop-out flaps that act as air brakes, rather than actuated fins that steer the round onto the target. For this reason the round dispersion is reduced in range rather than azimuth.

Officials noted on a recent visit to Nexter Munitions facility near Bourges, France, that SPACIDO can reduce the dispersion by a factor of three, allowing artillery to be used closer to soldiers and in built up areas. The cost is believed to be around three times more than a standard round, but less rounds would be fired owing to its accuracy.

In addition, Nexter is developing a fully-guided 155mm round known as MENHIR, similar in capability to Raytheon’s Excalibur or Leonardo’s Vulcan offering. The initial Mk1 version of MENHIR will feature GPS/Inertial guidance and pop-out fins that will give a <10m circular error probable (CEP) performance at a maximum range of 30km.

For the new munition, the company is also trialling different warhead liners – of varying materials and configurations – that can determine the shape and direction of the fragmentation blast. With this capability, Nexter foresees that the ammunition could be used ‘within 100m’ of friendly troops and suitable for urban warfare.

In addition, the guided shell will have 7kg of high explosive, which officials stated is more than many other guided-shell offerings. It will also feature a vertical descent capability and a delayed fuse for penetrating certain targets.

An upgraded Mk2 variant is also in the works, which will likely have an increased range of 60km and integrate a semi-active laser-based guidance system to bring the CEP down to <2m.

The company also manufactures the BONUS round, a round that features an electro-optic unit with two submunitions for targeting heavy armoured vehicles. BONUS fires an explosive formed penetrator at 200m above an armoured vehicle to penetrate the weak top armour.

The company is also moving along with new types of 120mm ammunition for main battle tanks, including a new multi-purpose round and armoured-piercing fin-stabilised discarbing sabot (APFSDS) munition.

Nexter’s solution for the latter is known as Solution Hardened Armour Defeat, or SHARD. The aim of this development is to get better terminal effect on target than with current APFSDS rounds that use tungsten or depleted uranium.

This could potentially include new dart design and materials, with a medium-term solution likely seeing an increase in propellant to boost round velocity and terminal effect. A completely new generation of APFSDS that utilises a new design and materials could be 5-6 years away, according to officials.

A programmable multi-function round, known as M3M, is also in the works and will allow tank crews – via a data link – to quickly switch a fuse from airburst, impact, or delay, depending on the operational scenario. Multi-function 120mm rounds are increasing in popularity, principally as it allows tank crews to carry less types of rounds and reduce logistical burden.

The US Army, for instance, is funding the development of the Orbital ATK Advanced Multi-Purpose 120mm round that will ultimately replace four different rounds currently in service.

Nexter is also continuing the development of a larger 140mm tank round, with the company previously firing an APFSDS round from a modified Leclerc MBT. More firing trials are planned soon for the 140mm round, which will be longer in length to the shells that have been fired previously.

Since the merger of Italy’s Simmel Difesa and Belgium’s Mecar with Nexter Munitions in 2014, the company is now one of the top four ammunition manufacturers in Europe, along with BAE Systems, Rheinmetall and Nammo.

Nexter’s tie up with German company Krauss Maffei-Wegmann could also present more opportunities for the French company to expand its supply of ammunition to users of German equipment such as the Leopard 2 or PzH2000 self-propelled howitzer.

Germany, for example, has shortlisted Nexter Munitions along with Rheinmetall to supply 155mm ammunition for the PzH2000, according to officials.
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[*] posted on 12-6-2018 at 06:29 PM


India completes trials of licence-built FH-77B howitzer

Rahul Bedi, New Delhi - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

12 June 2018

India’s state-run Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) has successfully completed the final round of trials of its licence-built, upgraded Dhanush FH-77B 155m/45 cal towed howitzer, paving the way for the imminent induction of the gun into the Indian Army (IA).

OFB officials told Jane’s on 11 June that from 2-7 June a total of six Dhanush howitzers in battery formation accurately fired 50 rounds each in India’s northwestern Pokhran region to a range of 38 km.

“We have effectively completed Dhanush’s user exploitation trials that were the last in an extended series,” said S K Singh, general manager of the OFB’s Jabalpur-based Gun Carriage Factory (GCF), which is responsible for integrating the howitzer.

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[*] posted on 12-6-2018 at 07:11 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Mac Jee from Brazil presents Armadillo TA-2 rocket launcher

Posted On Monday, 11 June 2018 19:35

Brazilian Company Mac Jee participates at Eurosatory 2018 Defense and Security International Exhibition that takes place in Paris (France), and is one of the highlights of the Brazilian Pavilion, presenting its Armadillo TA-2 rocket launcher. The pavilion is coordinated by the Brazilian Defense and Security Industries Association (ABIMDE) and the Brazilian Trade and Investment Agency (Apex-Brasil).


Armadillo TA-2 rocket launcher mounted on Humvee M1152. (Picture source Mac Jee)

Armadillo TA-2 is a manual or automatic rocket launching system designed for complete retraction in its vehicle during the non-offensive phase of a mission.

The launching platform, patented by the company, operates at 360o and carries three modules, each containing sixteen 70-mm rockets, totaling 48 shots – it also has 48 additional rockets inside an automatic reloading compartment. The development of the system began in 2015 and should be finalized at the end of this year.

The prototype is already being built and will be installed in the vehicle of the American company AM General, model M1152 HMMWV. After assembly, the Armadillo TA-2 is undergoing testing at the CAEX (Army Assessment Center) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The expectation is that the system will be produced in scale from 2020 at the new Mac Jee plant in Capivari (SP), Brazil, which will have capacity for 50 to 100 units of the system.

"We had the idea of creating and patenting a simple, compact system capable of meeting the demand for smaller cars fitted with rocket launchers for the Armed Forces," explains the CEO of the company, Simon Jeannot.

Mac Jee is currently working on new versions of its rocket launcher system: Armadillo SHORAD and Armadillo ATGM.
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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 11:17 AM


Eurosatory 2018: Nammo presented its new ramjet propulsion for artillery shells

Posted On Tuesday, 12 June 2018 21:36

Stelios Kanavakis
Senior Defence Analyst

At this year’s Eurosatory exhibition, Nammo unveiled for the first time the new ramjet propulsion system for 155mm artillery shells.


Nammo's ramjet propulsion 155 mm artillery shell will offer precision fire at distances in excess of 100 km. (Picture source Army Recognition)

This new project is Nammo’s effort to expand its well-established portfolio of products with a new solution that would deliver effective precision fire, in large quantity and at distances above 100 km, surpassing by large the products offered currently in the market.

The company is developing this technology with a focus in the Norwegian and NATO Armed Forces. Although there is no firm requirement, through the interaction with customers Nammo has understood that there’s a need for such a technology.

The technology to allow such a capability is ramjet propulsion. A ramjet air-breathing engine that utilizes air intake as compressor and surrounding air in the combustion process. The engine is self-regulated, giving the shell a maximum speed of around 3 Mach, for a sustained period of 50 seconds, upon the shell’s exit from the barrel.

As mentioned earlier, the concept is under development and the first flight of the projectile is expected in the 2019-2020 period in order to have them operational between 2023 and 2024.

The same technology will also be used in other company products, such as its missiles. Nammo is developing such a product, which will feature an engine with a burning time of almost 100 seconds. The demo flight of this missile is expected to take place in 2021.

Considering the high speed of the shell, many of the parts found on a typical guided shell will have to be redesigned. That includes the fuse and the guidance unit, which will be redesigned to fit their purpose.
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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 06:37 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Nammo goes to extreme lengths with new ammo

13th June 2018 - 08:00 GMT | by Beth Maundrill in Paris

Nammo could deliver its 155mm extreme range ramjet-powered artillery round as soon as 2023, according to the company.

Testing is currently ongoing for the round, which has a range of up to 100km, and the company is expecting to carry out a live firing of the projectile in 2019/2020.

For the live demonstration, the round will be fired from a standard L52 or L55 gun, according to Erland Orbekk, VP technology at Nammo.

The ramjet propulsion system uses an air breathing engine which means the air intake is utilised as a compressor, there are no moving parts and it is a self-regulated engine.
Nammo is using HTP3 with additives as fuel for the propulsion system.

The company is also working on a missile that uses the ramjet technology with a flight demonstration planned for 2021.

These programmes are being developed in accordance with Norwegian weapons platforms and future armed forces requirements.

However, there are not yet any firm requirements according to Thomas Danbolt, VP large calibre ammunition at Nammo.

Danbolt noted that the 100km range development follows on from the completion of the development of a new 155m IM HE-ER solution which was fired at over 40km multiple times, including from a K9 Thunder self-propelled howitzer.

He noted that with the new 100km range round there would be the possibility to cover 25 times the range that is possible with a conventional M107 HE projectile, which is in use with the US Army. The M107 has a 20km range.

Danbolt added that the future of the extreme range line of products would most likely include a precision strike capability.

As well as working with the Norwegian military the company said it is in discussion with a number of different armies and users regarding the extreme range technology.
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[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 02:54 PM


Leonardo Signs Defence Systems Collaboration Agreement with Konstrukta Defence in Slovakia

(Source: Leonardo; issued June 12, 2018)


The agreement will see Leonardo's precision-guided Vulcano round integrated into Konstrukta's Zuzana 2 artillery system, with the two companies going on to jointly market the products internationally. (Leonardo image)

ROME --- Leonardo has signed a collaboration agreement with Slovakia's Konstrukta Defence, a leading provider of artillery systems, that will see the two companies working together in the precision-guided ammunition field.

The agreement will see Leonardo's precision-guided Vulcano ammunition integrated onto Konstrukta's ZUZANA 2 155mm/52 cal artillery system, with the two companies going on to jointly market the products internationally. Leonardo and Konstrukta will also explore further collaboration with a view towards developing common defence European capabilities.

The partnership is in line with the goals of the European PeSCo (Permanent Structured Cooperation) initiative, which aims to improve the operational capabilities of member states by pooling resources and developing military equipment in a collaborative manner. Both Italy and Slovakia are members of PeSCo.

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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 06:53 PM


Thales introduces artillery version of TopAxyz

14th June 2018 - 12:30 GMT | by The Shephard News Team

Thales has launched an artillery version of its TopAxyz inertial navigation unit for mobile artillery systems, the company announced on 11 June.

The system has been designed to meet the requirements of land forces' increasing need to digitalise the different types of artillery pieces that are compatible with new fire control and weapon management systems with architectures supporting modern deployment concepts.

TopAxyz helps to reduce mission execution time and is able to operate autonomously even if the GPS signal is lost. It uses Pixyz 22 tri-axis ring laser gyro technology for stability, and features advanced ITAR-free inertial sensors for accuracy of position, heading, attitude and airspeed data, even in the presence of electronic countermeasures.

The unit’s actual navigation performance function to indicate precise vehicle position in real time allows commanders to take C4I decisions with greater confidence to achieve the best operational scenarios while reducing the risk of friendly fire.
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 07:07 PM


Nammo rolls out its ‘extreme range’ artillery

By: Jen Judson   20 hours ago



PARIS — Norwegian ammunition company Nammo has rolled out what it’s calling an “extreme range” artillery concept using ramjet propulsion that it hopes will meet the emerging long-range precision fires requirements for a variety of countries, including the United States.

Nammo has combined its experience in both ammunition and rocket-propulsion technology, and it’s merging those capabilities to create an artillery shell capable of reaching more than 100 kilometers in range without changing the gun on a standard 155mm howitzer, according to Thomas Danbolt, company vice president of large caliber ammunition, who spoke at Eurosatory, one of the largest land warfare conferences in Europe.

The company displayed a model of the artillery shell at the exposition.

The development makes sense at a time where countries around the world are seeking farther standoff ranges for their fires capabilities as they contemplate having to penetrate territory that is built up to deny access by land, sea and air.

The U.S. Army, in fact, has made Long-Range Precision Fires its top modernization priority and is pursuing technology to extend cannon artillery. The service is also developing technology to get after extremely long ranges like hypersonics and ramjet technology.

The artillery shell that Nammo has developed uses ramjet technology. Typically, a solid-fuel rocket motor has oxygen as part of the rocket fuel, but through an air-breathing capability, it can pull outside air into the rocket so the motor can burn much longer than a traditional rocket motor, thus extending its range, Danbolt explained.

The range of artillery hasn’t changed much for roughly 50 years, Danbolt said. Standard M107 shells fire at a range of 20 kilometers. By adding base bleed technology, which reduces drag on the shell without extending its base, the range can be improved by about 10 kilometers, and an additional 10 can be achieved through highly explosive insensitive munition technology.

Danbolt used a map of Paris to show the importance of extending the range of the current systems.

While artillery is capable of reaching 40 kilometers, that roughly covers Paris alone at 4,000 square kilometers. However, Nammo’s new artillery shell capability can reach 25 times that area, “meaning that one gun system suddenly can be much more flexible and cover much more ground and can potentially be used in a totally different way than the traditional six guns on a firing line in a battery,” Danbolt said.

In the United States, Nammo is already involved in some range extension-technology efforts, Danbolt told Defense News in an interview at the expo. The company provides the base bleed for the Excalibur guided-artillery shell, for instance.

Nammo is also involved in the XM1113 Insensitive Munition High Explosive Rocket Assisted Projectile program, that takes a 155mm artillery round and extends the cannon range to more than 40 kilometers by providing rocket-assist capability, he added.

And the company is providing the U.S. Army with development and qualification hardware for its cannon artillery extension efforts, such as base bleed and rocket-assist projectiles, Danbolt said.

To bring its new long-range artillery shell with ramjet propulsion into the U.S. market, Nammo is seeking American partners, Danbolt said. “We are in dialogue with a potential partner” that could achieve that goal, he noted.

Nammo plans to test several long-range precision fires capabilities in the coming years, particularly its new extreme-range artillery projectile. The projectile will go through a flight demonstration in the 2019 or 2020 time frame, according to Erland Orbekk, company vice president for ramjet technology.
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 08:29 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Yugoimport offers fire support solutions

Christopher F Foss, Paris - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 June 2018


The Yugoimport Shumadia 4-round MRL, which fires guided rockets to a maximum range of up to 285 km. Source: Christopher F Foss

The complete range of Serbian company Yugoimport’s truck-mounted self-propelled (SP) artillery systems was displayed for the first time outside the country at Eurosatory 2018.

Firing trials for company’s latest 155 mm/52 calibre SP artillery system, the Aleksandar, began recently but it is not expected to be qualified for production for several years.

The 8×8 system has a fully enclosed protected crew cab at the front and the remote-controlled mount armed with a 155 mm/52 calibre weapon is at the rear.

Behind the ordnance is the magazine with 12 rounds of ready-to-use 155 mm ammunition with another 12 rounds in reserve.

The Aleksandar is being marketed with a standard 23 litre chamber, which meets the NATO Joint Ballistic Memorandum of Understanding (JBMoU) or a larger 25 litre chamber.

The maximum range of the latter version is 37.5 km when firing a 155 mm extended range full bore (ERFB) projectile, which can be increased to 49 km using an ERFB-base bleed (ERFB-BB) projectile.

When firing the velocity enhanced artillery projectile (VLAP) that uses a combination of rocket assist and base bleed, a maximum range of 62 km is claimed.

In common with all artillery projectiles, the maximum range depends on factors including ambient weather conditions and the height at which the weapon is deployed.

The Aleksandar has a high rate of fire with a multiple round simultaneous impact (MRSI) capability of four 155 mm projectiles at a range of 25 km.

The weapon is fired remotely from inside the cab, which also contains the computerised fire control system (FCS) and land navigation system.

The ordnance is fitted with muzzle velocity radar that feeds information into the FCS.

(299 of 462 words)
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[*] posted on 16-6-2018 at 09:22 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Eurosatory 2018: Yugoimport offers fire support solutions

Christopher F Foss, Paris - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 June 2018


The Yugoimport Shumadia 4-round MRL, which fires guided rockets to a maximum range of up to 285 km. Source: Christopher F Foss

The complete range of Serbian company Yugoimport’s truck-mounted self-propelled (SP) artillery systems was displayed for the first time outside the country at Eurosatory 2018.

Firing trials for company’s latest 155 mm/52 calibre SP artillery system, the Aleksandar, began recently but it is not expected to be qualified for production for several years.

The 8×8 system has a fully enclosed protected crew cab at the front and the remote-controlled mount armed with a 155 mm/52 calibre weapon is at the rear.

Behind the ordnance is the magazine with 12 rounds of ready-to-use 155 mm ammunition with another 12 rounds in reserve.

The Aleksandar is being marketed with a standard 23 litre chamber, which meets the NATO Joint Ballistic Memorandum of Understanding (JBMoU) or a larger 25 litre chamber.

The maximum range of the latter version is 37.5 km when firing a 155 mm extended range full bore (ERFB) projectile, which can be increased to 49 km using an ERFB-base bleed (ERFB-BB) projectile.

When firing the velocity enhanced artillery projectile (VLAP) that uses a combination of rocket assist and base bleed, a maximum range of 62 km is claimed.

In common with all artillery projectiles, the maximum range depends on factors including ambient weather conditions and the height at which the weapon is deployed.

The Aleksandar has a high rate of fire with a multiple round simultaneous impact (MRSI) capability of four 155 mm projectiles at a range of 25 km.

The weapon is fired remotely from inside the cab, which also contains the computerised fire control system (FCS) and land navigation system.

The ordnance is fitted with muzzle velocity radar that feeds information into the FCS.

(299 of 462 words)


More on extending range of 155mm artillery from USA



http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/06/15/new-army-artillery-do...

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[*] posted on 19-6-2018 at 09:15 AM


Russian Army fields latest artillery fire direction vehicles

Dmitry Fediushko, Moscow - Jane's International Defence Review

18 June 2018


The PRP-4A Argus artillery fire direction vehicle can detect and recognise moving tank-sized threats up to 12 km away. Source: Dmitry Fediushko

The Russian Army is replacing its legacy artillery fire direction vehicles with the new PRP-4A Argus platform, Jane’s has learnt.
“The artillery men of the Central Military District [TsVO] and Southern Military District [YuVO] are mastering the vehicles,” a military source told Jane’s .

The PRP-4A is based on the tracked BMP-1 infantry fighting vehicle with a combat weight of 13.8 tonnes. It is operated by a four-person crew, comprising the commander, a radar operator, a topographical surveyor, and driver.

The vehicle is fitted with a radar station, periscopic laser rangefinder, range-gated imaging system and range-finding thermal imager.

The vehicle can detect a moving tank-sized target and an individual soldier at distances of up to 12 km and 7 km respectively using the radar. The periscopic laser rangefinder can recognise up to three tank-type targets at distances of up to 10 km. The PRP-4A can recognise large stationary targets, such as buildings, at a distance of 25 km.

“The vehicle can detect a concealed, stationary tank-type target with its engine shut down at a distance of [over 2 km],” the source said.

The PRP-4A’s circular error probability does not exceed 20 m with the use of the optical-electronic subsystems and 40 m with the use of the radar, the source added, noting that it can come into action within two minutes of coming to a halt.

The vehicle is armed with a Kalashnikov PKTM 7.62 mm machine gun and four smoke dischargers.

(266 of 330 words)
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[*] posted on 19-6-2018 at 06:30 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Excalibur Army showcases BM-21 MRL upgrade

IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

18 June 2018

Richard Fowler

Czech company Excalibur Army displayed a prototype of its new BM-21 MT multiple rocket launcher (MRL) platform at Eurosatory 2018 in Paris. The BM-21 MT 4x4 is an upgrade to legacy BM-21 Grad systems currently in service using a new Tatra chassis, armoured cab, and artillery-related systems.


The Excalibur Army BM-21 MT 4x4 replaces the BM-21's Russian-designed Ural truck chassis with one designed by Tatra, although with a number of other upgrades. (IHS Markit/Richard Fowler)

Excalibur also disclosed that the platform has a crew of three – a driver plus two artillery positions – and that the MRL can be fired in volley or single-round firing modes from the cab and also via remote control from a nearby sheltered location.

Excalibur states that the entire platform carries and is capable of firing 40 122 mm high-explosive fragmentation rockets within a 20-second timeframe. Reported range is said to be 40.1 km.

The BM-21 MT 4x4 is primarily designed for indirect fire, although direct fire can be achieved within a set range using new traverse and elevation sensors.

(174 of 235 words)
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[*] posted on 20-6-2018 at 09:14 PM


Nexter details 155 mm Katana precision-guided projectile

Christopher F Foss, Paris - Jane's International Defence Review

20 June 2018

Nexter Munitions has revealed fresh details about its Katana family of 155 mm precision guided munitions (PGMs), which is under development as a private venture.


A full-scale model of the Nexter Munitions 155 mm Katana precision guided projectile. (Christopher F Foss)

Previously known as the Menhir, the Katana PGM features two sets of four control surfaces positioned on its ogive as well as four fins at its base which unfold at launch. An additional pair of stabilisers are also deployed towards the end of its flight.

The first-generation projectile is referred to as the Katana Mk 1 and is equipped with a guidance package comprising an inertial measurement unit/global positioning system (INS/GPS), which is expected to achieve a maximum range of up to 60 km with a circular error probable (CEP) of under 10 m.

The Mk 1 projectile is presently under development and is expected to be ready for production within 24 months.

This would be followed by the Katana Mk 2a projectile which will have a similar range but will feature a guidance system comprising an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). This version is expected to be ready about 48 months after the release of the Mk 1 projectile.

The company is also developing the Katana Mk 2b projectile which will have a range in excess of 60 km and feature semi-active laser (SAL) guidance, with expected rollout approximately 48 months after the Mk 2a release.

These projectiles will be armed with a 6 kg high-explosive (HE) insensitive munition (IM) warhead, and will be compatible with existing 155 mm/52 calibre ordnance that meet Joint Ballistic Memorandum of Understanding (JBMOU) standards.

(285 of 337 words)
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[*] posted on 26-6-2018 at 06:06 PM


US Army tests radar with new generation semiconductor

Posted On Monday, 25 June 2018 12:53

The element of surprise can be a critical weapon, and nothing removes it from the playbook of enemy forces quite like radar. Radar units send out pulses of high-frequency electromagnetic waves that reflect off objects, and modern radar systems are sophisticated enough to track even small, rapidly moving objects like rockets and mortar and artillery shells.


US Army Yuma Proving Ground is hosting an operational test of the Marine Corps' AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR). Specifically under evaluation is the Block 2 version of the system, which searches for ground-based weapons fire.(Picture source: U.S. Army)

U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) has long experience testing these systems. Currently, the proving ground is hosting an operational test of the Marine Corps' AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR). Specifically under evaluation is the Block 2 version of the system, which searches for ground-based weapons fire. The version of the G/ATOR under test now uses Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) for its semiconductor in the transmit/receive modules: a system coming for test at YPG later this year uses more efficient Gallium Nitride (GaN). "This operational assessment is set up to make a fielding decision on four GaAs systems," said Maj. Peter Young, operational test project officer. "We have these initial four systems that will be delivered to the Marines this fall, and this test is to evaluate their operational readiness."

The portable unit's upright rectangular face weighs in at a relatively light 3,000 pounds, significantly less than that of comparably sized radars. Much of the weight savings comes from the system being cooled by ambient air, even in torrid desert heat. "This is an expeditionary radar--it will go anywhere the Marines go," said John Karlovich, program manager. "It is a pretty capable system that has legs to pace the threat for decades to come."

About 40 Marines from various installations across the country participate in the testing, broken down into two radar teams and a target processing center that feeds information from the radar into a fire direction center to coordinate counter-fire against the location from which the 'hostile' round or rocket originated.

"They're emplacing and displacing the radar based on tactical scenarios," said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Abraxas Patton, G/ATOR Block II project officer. "We're using YPG as our 'enemy,' having them fire on a pretend friendly force. The radars are set up to detect these incoming rockets, artillery, and mortars so we can counter-fire on them to protect friendly forces."

Two YPG weapons operation crews supporting the test move frequently throughout a typical day to test the radar's ability to track fires from different locations, requiring careful coordination. The diverse expertise of YPG's weapons operators mean the G/ATOR can be readily put through its paces against all types of indirect fire, from mortars and rockets to artillery shells. In some test scenarios, the system was exposed to all of these simultaneously, or in close succession from multiple locations over the course of the day. Hundreds of rounds were fired. "YPG can shoot everything I want to shoot," said Young.

The operational test was originally slated to be part of a large operational exercise at a Marine Corps installation. When the exercise was significantly scaled back in scope, the testers chose YPG, which had been home to developmental testing of the system for nearly a year, as a backup location. The testers appreciated YPG's flexibility, vast range space, and expertise and capability in firing every kind of threat the radars are expected to guard against in a combat situation. "We've been to several other test centers, and YPG is by far the best," said Patton. "The professionalism and responsiveness of the personnel supporting us are phenomenal. This is a culmination of a long, challenging development program," added Karlovich. "It really is a quantum leap in capability for any radar that isn't an active array. It's pretty exciting!"
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[*] posted on 28-6-2018 at 09:20 PM


Estonia has signed a contrat to purchase K9 155m howitzers from South Korea

Posted On Thursday, 28 June 2018 08:22

The press service of Estonian Ministry of Defense announced on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, that Estonia has signed a contract with South Korean Defense Company Hanwha to purchase 12 K9 Thunder 155mm self-propelled howitzers for a total amount of €46 million.


South Korean K9 Thunder 155mm self-propelled howitzer at Defense Exhibition in South Korea. (Picture source Army Recognition)

In February 2017, it was announced that Estonia has showed interest to acquire K9 Thunder 155m self-propelled hwoitzer from South Korea that could enter in service with Estonian armed forces by 2021 with a final delivery for 2026. At the end of August 2017 the Estonian government submitted a request to South Korea to make a price offer for 12 K9 Thunder howitzers. The new artillery systems will equip one artillery battalion of the Estonian Defence Forces (EDF). The request alos included an option for the purchase of 12 more similar howitzers to arm a second battalion.

In January 2018, The Estonian government has received an offer to purchase 12 K9 Thunder-type howitzers from the government of South Korea.

Turkey has licensed the design of the K9 and used it to develop their indigenous self-propelled howitzer, the T-155 Firtina.

Finnish Ministry of Defence (MoD) confirmed on 17 February 2017, the purchase of K9 Thunder 155 mm self-propelled howitzers from South Korea. On Wednesday, December 20, 2017, Norway’s defence ministry has announced the purchase of the K9 155 artillery self-propelled howitzers designed and manufactured by the South Korean Company Hanwha Land Systems.

In July 2017, Indian Company India's Larsen & Toubro and Hanwha Techwin (HTW) of South Korea signed a contract to produce the K9 155mm/52 Caliber Tracked Self-Propelled howitzer for the Indian Army under the name of Vajra-T, an enhanced version of the K9 Thunder, manufactured according to specific requirements of the Indian Army including desert operations.

The K9 Thunder is a South Korean Self-Propelled 155 mm Howitzer (SPH) developed by Samsung Techwin. The development program of this 155 mm/52-caliber self-propelled howitzer has been underway since 1989. In 1996 the first prototype of this new artillery system was tested. The contract for the new K9 artillery system was awarded to Samsung Aerospace Industries (SSA) by the Korean Government on 22 December 1998.

The main armament of the K9 Thunder consists of a 155 mm/52 caliber ordnance with a maximum firing range of 40 km. A total of 48 projectiles and their associated charges are carried for ready use. Internally an automatic loading system takes projectiles from the storage position and places them onto the ammunition tray ready for ramming

The K9 Thunder has a maximum rate of fire of 6 rounds per minute and is capable of multiple-round simultaneous-impact firing. It is able to fire three rounds in 15 seconds, each in different trajectories, so that all of the shells arrive on target at the same time. Sustained rate of fire is 2 rounds per minute. It is compatible with standard NATO 155-mm ammunition. Maximum range of fire is 30 km with standard HE projectile and 40 km with rocket-assisted projectile.
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[*] posted on 29-6-2018 at 02:04 PM


The press service of Estonian Ministry of Defense announced on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, that Estonia has signed a contract with South Korean Defense Company Hanwha to purchase 12 K9 Thunder 155mm self-propelled howitzers for a total amount of €46 million.

Once again I will refrain, with difficulty, from commenting on exactly how far our procurement people had their heads up their arse when they went looking for SPGs.




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[*] posted on 29-6-2018 at 05:12 PM


Go on, I dare you to say something! :lol: :lol: :lol:

It is such a diabolically silly and stupid piece of our near-term Military history, that it'll deserve repeated mention through the succeeding years!
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[*] posted on 30-6-2018 at 01:52 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Go on, I dare you to say something! :lol: :lol: :lol:

It is such a diabolically silly and stupid piece of our near-term Military history, that it'll deserve repeated mention through the succeeding years!


My “favourite” quote from that time was when we were offered cut price Dutch PZH-2000’s.

‘No, thanks. We aren’t sure of the support costs...’ on a less than $100m purchase..

Oh but you are happy to spend $15 BILLION on Phase 3 of LAND 400 PLUS the support costs...

They could have bought a brand new fleet of PZH-2000’s every 12 months for the entire life of the capability and never perform a major service on the bloody things once for less than that!

I’ve got a feeling they just stuffed around so long they couldn’t end up articulating a decent reason to the Rudd - Gillard - Rudd government why we needy such a ‘shooty / killy’ capability at a time when they were all about HADR / flower handing out amd so we got screwed on it...






In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 2-7-2018 at 08:09 PM


BAE Systems pursues extended range 155 mm ammunition

Christopher F Foss, London - Jane's International Defence Review

02 July 2018

BAE Systems Land UK is developing a new 155 mm extended range (ER) high-explosive (HE) projectile to meet potential home and export market requirements.

The 155 mm ER HE projectile features a screw on base bleed (BB) unit that leverages from the company’s development and production of the 4.5 in HE projectile for the Royal Navy, and could enter production in 30 months.


The new BAE Systems Land UK 155 mm extended range HE projectile fitted with base bleed unit and Rokar Silver Bullet PGK. The Rheinmetall MCS can been seen on either side. (Christopher F Foss)

According to the company, the initial 155 mm ER HE projectile will have a range of more than 40 km when fired from a 155 mm/52 caIibre ordnance or over 30 km when fired from a 155 mm/39 calibre ordnance as currently fitted to the BAE Systems Land UK AS90 self-propelled (SP) artillery system and 155 mm M777 lightweight towed howitzer.

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[*] posted on 3-7-2018 at 01:34 PM


Russia reactivates heavy artillery

Dmitry Fediushko, Moscow - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

02 July 2018

The Russian armed forces are reinforcing their artillery, reactivating 2S7M 203 mm Malka self-propelled howitzers (SPHs) and 2S4 Tyulpan 240 mm self-propelled mortars, military and industrial sources have told Jane's .

“In late June, a Central Military District [CMD] artillery unit based in the Kemerovo region received 12 refurbished 2S7M SPHs,” a military source said, adding that the Eastern and Southern Military Districts also use the Malka.

“These SPHs are now being completely overhauled, with the inner surface of the gun barrels being restored. The upgraded 2S7M SPH is linked to the 1V12M modernised 1V12M command vehicle, which uses a GLONASS navigation unit,” an industrial source told Jane's , adding that the SPHs are being overhauled by the Volgograd-based Titan-Barrikady enterprise.

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[*] posted on 3-7-2018 at 08:33 PM


Japan develops new self-propelled howitzer

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

03 July 2018

Japan is progressing its programme to develop a 155 mm/52-calibre wheeled self-propelled howitzer (SPH) to replace Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force’s (JGSDF’s) ageing FH-70 towed artillery system, the Japanese Ministry of Defense (MoD) has announced.

In a statement in late June, the MoD’s Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency (ATLA) said that it has recently taken delivery of five prototypes of the wheeled SPH system, which was developed by domestic land systems company, Japan Steel Works. ATLA gave no designation for the new system.


An image of a prototype of Japan’s new wheeled self-propelled howitzer featuring an 8x8 MAN tactical truck. (Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency)

ATLA said it will now evaluate and test the SPH, which is based on 8x8 chassis, before potential orders of the platform.

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[*] posted on 3-7-2018 at 08:49 PM


Rostec brings Tornado-G salvo fire weapons to international market

Posted On Monday, 02 July 2018 13:38

Rostec State Corporation said it offered Tornado-G salvo fire weapon on the international market and expects high demand. Tornado-G has to replace Grad which are operational in over 60 countries of the world, Rostec said.


Tornado-G MLRS (Picture source: Army Recognition)

SPLAV production amalgamation of Rostec’s Tecmash was licensed to display Tornado-G abroad. The weapon is expected to be of interest for potential customers and can in future replace Grad. At present Tornado-G is operational in Russian army units. It has never been displayed abroad before.

Tornado-G develops Grad which has been operational in many countries for over 50 years and confirmed its failure-free reliability. It operates five times faster than the predecessor and has bigger firepower. It enjoys a high control speed and can abandon its position even before the projectile reaches the target. It ensures crew safety, mobility and effectiveness. "We hope the weapon will enjoy high demand of foreign customers," Rostec arms cluster Industrial Director Sergey Abramov said.

Tornado-G is a Russian upgraded salvo fire weapon and a development of Grad. It differs from the predecessor by higher fire efficiency, more powerful missiles, automatic targeting, geolocation and navigational systems. The weapon can operate fully autonomously. Tornado-G fires a two-time bigger warhead which increases the destruction power from two to six times.

Tornado-G fires 122mm projectiles and is designed to destroy adversary troops, armor, artillery and mortar batteries, as well as command posts. It can fire salvo and solo missiles. "Tornado-G is an efficient and reliable weapon to replace Grad. SPLAV initiated a further upgrade to expand the range of combat missions. Its technical solutions will upgrade military hardware," Tecmash CEO Vladimir Lepin said.
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[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 12:06 PM


Systematic to supply Danish artillery system fire-support capability

Giles Ebbutt, Plymouth - Jane's International Defence Review

05 July 2018


The Danish Army will deploy its new SitaWare-based digital fires capability on the Tatra-based 8x8 version of the Caesar 155 mm SP howitzer it is procuring. Source: Christopher F Foss

Danish software house Systematic has been awarded a contract by the Danish Defence Acquisition and Logistics Organisation (DALO) to deliver a new fire-support capability for the Danish Army’s latest artillery systems. The contract value was not released.

The new function builds on the Fire Support Module developed by Systematic for its SitaWare Headquarters command-and-control (C2) software. The company claims it will significantly shorten the sensor-to-shooter engagement cycle.

“The threat posed by counter-battery fire on the modern battlefield necessitates the ability for artillery systems to ‘shoot-and-scoot’ while maintaining accurate targeting,” Hans Jørgen Bohlbro, Systematic’s vice-president, defence product management, said. “One of the benefits of the new function is the ability for artillery systems to conduct fire missions quickly and redeploy before they can be engaged by enemy fires.”

The new capability enables fire mission data – first generated by a forward observer and passed to the gun crew via a joint fires cell or similar element – to be digitally transferred into an artillery fire-control system (FCS), where the ballistic calculations are made.

Although the process will do away with a man-in-the-loop for entering the fire support data into the FCS, there will always be operator verification before the fire mission is carried out.
SitaWare consists of three interoperable and scalable segments: Sitaware Headquarters, designed for use in command posts (CP) and headquarters (HQ) at battalion level and above; SitaWare Frontline, a battle management system intended principally for use in vehicles; and SitaWare Edge for the dismounted user.

The Danish Army is adopting the complete software suite in its Army Tactical Communications Network (ATCN) programme, the first phase of which will see a digitised battlegroup by 2019. For fire support the forward observers and gun crews will be equipped with SitaWare Frontline, while the fires co-ordination component will use SitaWare Headquarters.

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[*] posted on 8-7-2018 at 10:49 PM


Interesting, plenty of armies still investing in wheeled SPG instead of tracks.

Australia of course couldn't do either.
:fake sniffle:




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