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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 10:26 PM


DSEI 2019: UK Boxer bid goes for approval

Tim Ripley, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

10 September 2019

UK defence ministers hope to approve the purchase of more than 500 Boxer armoured vehicles in October, UK Defence Procurement Minister Anne-Marie Trevelyan has confirmed.

Speaking exclusively to Jane's at the DSEI exhibition in London on 10 September, Trevelyan said the target date for the Mechanised Infantry Vehicle (MIV) programme to receive its main gate approval is 22 October.

The business case for the purchase of an initial batch of 508 vehicles, valued at about GBP1.2 billion (USD1.48 billion), is currently under scrutiny by financial, commercial, and technical experts before receiving final approval by ministers next month.

"There is a sense of confidence in the department about Boxer," Trevelyan told Jane's , describing it as an "impressive vehicle" that was "at the heart of the British Army's transformation programme".

(153 of 421 words)
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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 09:31 AM


Patria AMV Chosen to Be Tested in Japan

(Source: Patria; issued Sept. 11, 2019)

Patria’s armoured modular vehicle AMVXP has been chosen to a one-year field testing in Japan after a competitive bidding. The Japanese Ministry of Defence will buy two vehicles from Patria for the tests.

Two other companies have also been selected to deliver their vehicles to the tests.

The final selection is to be expected after the trials.

“This is good news as it is a sign of the high quality and appreciation of Patria vehicles. In case Patria vehicles will be selected to Japan, we are ready for technology transfer project and to set up an assembly line there,” says Petri Jokinen, SVP, Sales and Marketing of Patria’s Land business unit.

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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 09:32 AM


Interesting to see what the other two are going to be?

Possibly BOXER and ???
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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 12:06 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Interesting to see what the other two are going to be?

Possibly BOXER and ???
There is a local vehicle under development isn't there?



Paddywhackery not included.
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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 04:27 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Mupp  
Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Interesting to see what the other two are going to be?

Possibly BOXER and ???
There is a local vehicle under development isn't there?


Yep, from Komatsu, same lot who developed and built the Type 96. Only had a cursory look at it, so not sure if it's still in the running, but I'd imagine it is. Actually looks fairly decent.

https://www.defensenews.com/land/2017/01/13/japan-unveils-ar...

https://www.army-technology.com/projects/komatsu-next-genera...
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[*] posted on 14-9-2019 at 02:56 PM


Royal Thai Army First to Receive Strykers

(Source: US Army; issued September 12, 2019)


The Royal Thai Army took delivery of its first batch of Stryker armored vehicles during an official Sept. 12, 2019 ceremony in Bangkok. The Strykers were purchased under the Foreign Military Sales program. (US Army photo)

BANGKOK --- Senior leaders with U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) and the Royal Thai Army (RTA) joined together for a Stryker handover ceremony Sept. 12, 2019 at the RTA Headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand. During the ceremony, the first batch of U.S. Army Strykers were presented to the RTA as part of a foreign military sales purchase agreement.

Gen. Robert B. Brown, commanding general of USARPAC, provided the opening remarks during the ceremony.

"I am very proud to be here today with our tremendous alliance; to have Thailand be the first to receive this excellent vehicle and to modernize the RTA and ensure their soldiers and citizens are protected and ready for any situation," said Brown.

Brown congratulated the RTA on the acquisition, and said he was looking forward to future training between both armies.

"We are excited to partner our Stryker units with the Royal Thai Army Stryker; both will improve and get better, both will help with peace and security, both will help save lives in many situations," said Brown.

"Congratulations on modernizing the Thai Army and receiving the first Strykers outside the United States; we are very excited to continue to work together, and [strengthen our alliance] towards a free and open Indo-Pacific, where all nations can enjoy prosperity and a brighter future."

Gen. Apirat Kongsompong, commander-in-chief of the RTA, followed Brown's remarks, and spoke on the symbolic nature of the Stryker handover.

"These Strykers will not only enhance the RTA capacity, but will also act as a tangible symbol of friendship, and a witness to the cordial relations between two countries that continue to strengthen alliances and partnerships," said Apirat. "Today's handover ceremony is an important step for the RTA modernization effort, and the development of RTA doctrine."

Apirat also thanked Brown for his work on the acquisition process, and said he hoped the U.S.-RTA alliance would continue to be strengthened in the future.

"On behalf of the RTA, I would like to extend my gratitude to General Brown and everyone who was involved in the success of this project," said Apirat. "It is my highest hope that this great synergy will be sustained into the future and we shall continue to strengthen our alliances, partnerships, and enhance regional strategic networks for the security of this region."

The U.S.-Thailand alliance is the longest U.S. treaty relationship in Asia. This alliance continues to be strengthened today through security cooperation events, military-to-military training events such as Cobra Gold and Hanuman Guardian, and the just concluded Indo-Pacific Armies Chiefs Conference and the Pacific Armies Management Seminar.

The Stryker agreement serves as a very visible symbol of the alliance, and provides the RTA with a mix of capabilities including infantry transport and reconnaissance; all in a platform that has been combat-tested with significant survivability and capability.

The Styker handover also demonstrates the U.S. Army's steadfast commitment to addressing the full spectrum of security challenges in the Indo-Pacific with our allies and partners.

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[*] posted on 16-9-2019 at 06:58 PM


The other vehicle down-selected for the Japanese competition is the PATRIA AMV, presumably in the XP version?
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[*] posted on 16-9-2019 at 10:42 PM


DSEI 2019: FFG offers Boxer armoured recovery mission module

Samuel Cranny-Evans, London - Jane's International Defence Review

13 September 2019


The recovery module developed by FFG for the Boxer. Source: FFG

Germany's Flensburger Fahrzeugbau Gesellschaft (FFG) has presented an armoured recovery mission module (ARM) for the Boxer at the 2019 Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition (DSEI 2019) in London. The kit is designed to be fitted to a Boxer drive module and provide operators with an organic recovery capability.

Christoph Jehn, FFG's project manager, told Jane's the ARM was developed as a private venture from 2017. The company noticed Boxer users struggling to recover stranded vehicles with the aid of other Boxers, Jehn added, and so decided to develop the bespoke mission module for the purpose.

The ARM is built from welded armoured steel and has an approximate weight of 13 tonnes; it is manned by two personnel and connects to the Boxer using standard mechanical interfaces. It requires a 24V connection that is used to charge the ARM's lithium ion batteries.

"The strength of the module is in the way that power is delivered to the crane and other mission critical systems," explained Jehn. It is technically possible for the ARM to operate away from a drive module or with the vehicle's main engine switched off, he added.

The recovery equipment includes a Capstan winch that is provided with a lightweight Kevlar cable, which means that just one crew member can operate the winch, according to Jehn. The cable is 60 m long and has a traction power of 0 - 200 kN, or 20 tonnes.

A pivoting, fixed boom crane is located on top of the module; it is 5.3 m long and has a reach of 4 m. Its maximum elevation is 60° and it has a maximum lifting capacity of 20 tonnes. Jehn estimated that this capacity is sufficient to lift all Boxer mission modules including the RCH155 module, which is armed with a 155 mm howitzer.

(325 of 572 words)
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[*] posted on 18-9-2019 at 09:05 AM


Japan selects contenders for Type 96 APC replacement

Samuel Cranny-Evans, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

17 September 2019

General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS), Patria, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries have been selected to provide wheeled armoured vehicles for a series of trials aimed at finding a replacement for the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force's (JGSDF's) Type 96 8×8 armoured personnel carriers (APCs).

Japan's Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Agency (ATLA) announced on 10 September that the vehicles provided by three contenders will be put through a year-long test process before a decision is made.

Finnish company Patria has been contracted to provide two examples of its 8×8 Armoured Modular Vehicle (AMV) XP, with Petri Jokinen, senior vice-president of sales and marketing within Patria's land business unit, saying on 11 September that if Patria is selected, "we are ready for [a] technology transfer project and to set up an assembly line there".

(154 of 410 words)
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[*] posted on 18-9-2019 at 07:56 PM


Posted here for convenience...…….applies to wheeled or tracked armour that have windows...………

DSEI 2019: OSG showcases new-gen ScreeneX technology

Peter Felstead, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

17 September 2019


OSG's ScreeneX display technology, which can be emplaced between layers of armoured glass, now has touchscreen technology. Source: OSG

Israel-based transparent armour supplier OSG showcased an upgraded variant of its digital ScreeneX display technology at the 2019 Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition (DSEI 2019), held in London from 10 to 13 September.

ScreeneX comprises an LCD digital screen that can be integrated into the armoured windscreens and windows OSG supplies to numerous tactical ground vehicles, but its latest iteration now features touchscreen technology. The screen is capable of displaying a variety of data, such as vetronics information, feeds from electro-optical and infrared sensors, command-and-control information, maps, and other graphic overlays.

The main aim of the technology, according to Oren Yaron, marketing director for OSG, is to improve the vehicle crew's situational awareness with a heads-up display. However, he added that ScreeneX "also gets away from having to have a laptop sitting on your lap", which can be an encumbrance during a tactical engagement requiring egress from the vehicle.

(174 of 247 words)
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[*] posted on 19-9-2019 at 11:11 AM


Qatar: Nexter Moves Closer to First Export Contract for VBCI

(Source: Defense-Aerospace.com; posted Sept. 18, 2019)



PARIS --- Negotiations between Qatar and Nexter on a €1.5 billion sale of VBCI wheeled armored vehicles have accelerated in recent weeks, the French website La Tribune reported Sept. 17, and a contract could be announced on December 18, Qatar’s National Day.

Qatar could finalize by the end of the year a contract to acquire 490 VBCI armored vehicles, a potential contract that was estimated by the Elysee Palace to be worth about 1.5 billion euros.

Doha would like to announce this contract on Qatar’s national day on December 18th. Initially, the contract was to have been signed in June but this goal proved too ambitious.

In parallel to a large contract signed in December 2017, during a visit by Emmanuel Macron and which also included 12 additional Rafale fighters, Qatar signed a letter of intent for the purchase of 490 VBCI to Doha. This would be the first export contract for the VBCI.

Very tough competition for equipment

Most of the delay in signing the contract is due to delays in selecting and integrating the VBCI weapons and options, according to La Tribune.

The vehicles will be armed with MBDA's medium-range missile (MMP), fitted to a turret provided by Norway’s Kongsberg A/S in place of Nexter’s original turret. In addition, Kongsberg; jointly with Thales, will also provide the vehicle’s communications suite, while Thales will provide the radar fitted to some versions.

This industrial scheme has been validated by Barzan Holdings, a company owned by the Qatari Ministry of Defense. Barzan and Nexter had created a joint venture, which will serve as the industrial main contractor for the delivery and maintenance of VBCIs.

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[*] posted on 21-9-2019 at 01:28 PM


Competition in sight to supply 2,600 infantry combat vehicles to Indian army

Posted On Friday, 20 September 2019 12:00

India is planning to fast-track the induction of some 2,600 Future Infantry Combat Vehicles (FICV). A harsh competition is beginning to win a part or the whole market, as reported by Mayank Singh in The Indian Express.


Will the indigenous WhAP be among the competing vehicles for the FICV market, provided a wheeled vehicle is preferred to a tracked one? (Picture source: Army Recognition)

Among those vying for the new $8 billion market being opened by the Indian army are Mahindra & Mahindra, Titagarh Wagons, Tatas, DRDO and Reliance Defence and Engineering. The foreign Original Equipment Manufacturers who have also evinced interest in participating in the project include Russian firms under the umbrella of Rosoboronexport, US-based General Dynamic and Germany’s Rheinmetall.

The Indian Army currently has some 49 Mechanised Infantry Battalions. According to former Major General SB Asthana, the future ICV will be used in all sectors that face a threat, including the crucial northern, western and eastern sectors. “It will swim crossing water obstacles, move across country and will even operate in the valleys of Sikkim and Ladakh.”

Keeping in mind the need for speed, the FICVs are planned as fast-moving military automobile vehicles with the ability to not only cross difficult terrains, but also defend themselves against enemy fire and the flexibility to drop infantry sections in the middle of a war zone. So far, India uses Soviet-designed BMP-1, BMP-2 and BTR-70 armoured personnel carriers. The mainstay has been BMP-2 Sarath manufactured by the Ordnance Factory Medak under a licence from Russia.

However, the FICV project is stuck, as sources say the industry and the end-user, Army, have not been able to agree on common ground. While the Ministry of Defence expects up to 90 per cent of investment to develop the FICV prototypes to come from the private industry, sources reveal the industry is reluctant to invest heavily without commitments from the Army.

Initial investment to develop two prototypes is estimated to be around Rs 800 crore, which the government wants the industry to bear. Industry on its part feels that globally, such developments are underwritten by the State.
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[*] posted on 22-9-2019 at 04:18 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Japan selects contenders for Type 96 APC replacement

Samuel Cranny-Evans, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

17 September 2019

General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS), Patria, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries have been selected to provide wheeled armoured vehicles for a series of trials aimed at finding a replacement for the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force's (JGSDF's) Type 96 8×8 armoured personnel carriers (APCs).

Japan's Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Agency (ATLA) announced on 10 September that the vehicles provided by three contenders will be put through a year-long test process before a decision is made.

Finnish company Patria has been contracted to provide two examples of its 8×8 Armoured Modular Vehicle (AMV) XP, with Petri Jokinen, senior vice-president of sales and marketing within Patria's land business unit, saying on 11 September that if Patria is selected, "we are ready for [a] technology transfer project and to set up an assembly line there".

(154 of 410 words)


Referring to my previous post, apparently Komatsu have left the military vehicle market altogether, giving it up earlier this year. With regards to which vehicle MHI might offer to the JGSDF, some searching around revealed possibly two vehicles. The first one is a prototype with only a scale model shown so far - unveiled about 5 years ago...

https://www.armyrecognition.com/eurosatory_2014_show_daily_n...

The other possibility is that the Type 16 MCV could be used as a baseline for a wheeled APC variant, though I'm not entirely sold on that platform being used in this role.

https://www.overtdefense.com/2019/09/19/japanese-mod-downsel...

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[*] posted on 22-9-2019 at 01:43 PM


Second linked article...... "A Patria AMVXP mortar carrier at DSEI 2019"...……...except that's NOT the Patria AMV XP, it's the Patria 6x6 APC, this is the AMV with NEMO 120mm mortar weapon system: -


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[*] posted on 26-9-2019 at 09:31 AM


Japan Lines Up Contenders for its New Armored Personnel Carrier

(Source: Forecast International; issued Sept 24, 2019)


The Japanese Ministry of Defence will buy two vehicles from three companies to evaluate them for about a year, with a final decision expected after the trials. Seen here is Patria’s candidate, the AMVXP. (Patria photo)

On September 10, the Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency (ATLA) under the Japanese Ministry of Defense announced that it had selected the three final contenders in a competition to replace the country’s aging fleet of Type 96 8×8 wheeled armored personnel carriers (APCs).

According to the statement, the Japanese government will now move forward over the course of the coming year to assess the feasibility of acquiring the Armored Modular Vehicle XP (AMVXP) provided by Finnish defense contractor Patria, the Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) 6.0 from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS,) or an unspecified 8×8 APC model designed and manufactured locally by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

The new announcement sheds renewed light on the status of the Ground Self- Defense Force’s wheeled APC procurement initiative – which had receded into a state of near-dormancy after the unexpected cancellation of the locally developed Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) in early 2018 – and carries significant implications for the future composition of Japan’s mechanized force structure.

For decades, the Japan GSDF has relied almost exclusively upon ground vehicle platforms designed and built locally by Japanese contractors. In the years subsequent to the conclusion of the Second World War, the new Japanese government sought to reconstruct the country’s manufacturing base and attain economic autonomy through the implementation of state-guided industrial investment and import-substitution policies.

The provisions of Japan’s 1947 Constitution narrowed the role of the country’s post-war armed forces strictly to one of territorial self-defense, and subsequent legislation likewise effectively forbade the country from pursuing international arms exports.

Nevertheless, the re-establishment of a national defense-industrial base was deemed a worthwhile investment by the Japanese government for strategic considerations as well as a means of providing domestic contractors with the opportunity to cultivate a robust heavy manufacturing infrastructure and generate the specialized knowledge base required to develop advanced systems and technologies in the future.

Although many early designs tended to derive significant design inspiration from an earlier generation of U.S. vehicle platforms, by the 1980s the Japanese defense industry was producing entirely indigenous ground vehicle systems of comparable technical sophistication to their U.S. and Western European counterparts, and the JGSDF had come to field a mechanized force structure composed overwhelmingly of domestic platforms.

In 1996, the GSDF introduced the Type 96 8×8 wheeled APC into active service. Designed and manufactured by Komatsu Ltd, the Type 96 reflected the prevailing design philosophies and tactical priorities of the late and immediate post-Cold War period. The primary operational function assigned to wheeled armored vehicles under these doctrines remained that of the troop transport, providing rapid mobility and deployment capacity to infantry forces acting in support of more robustly equipped breakthrough elements.

However, the experiences gleaned by international militaries from deployments to the irregular combat environments of the so-called new wars of the late 1990s, and later on the battlefields of Afghanistan and Iraq in the years subsequent to the 9/11 terror attacks, served as a powerful impetus for the broad re-evaluation of the required specifications for successful wheeled armored vehicle designs in the current era. The emergence and proliferation of inexpensive, but highly lethal, improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs) have steadily made the more traditional APC designs increasingly untenable on the modern battlefield.

The Japanese military’s limited overseas commitments in the form of non-combat operations mitigated some of the urgency of rectifying the Type 96’s apparent survivability shortfalls. Nevertheless, by the 2010s the Ministry of Defense had concluded that the time had come to seek out a replacement, and it subsequently launched the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) program in 2014.

Development under the program was once again spearheaded by Komatsu, acting in close coordination with ATLA. The new platform was to be oriented around the same conventional warfare mission profile as the Type 96 design, but was poised to integrate significant survivability improvements and modular potential that would also allow it to perform effectively in a far wider range of operational contexts and configurations than its predecessor. MoD documents indicated that the program derived design influences from successful equivalent platforms such as General Dynamics European Land Systems’ Piranha V series.

In January 2017, the first prototype of the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) was unveiled to the public. The new platform appeared to proceed apace through the early stages of its trials and testing process over the remainder of that year without any significant developmental complications. However, in April ATLA revealed that the launch date for the platform would need to be delayed by at least one year, owing to the vehicle’s consistently unsatisfactory performance in pivotal ballistics tests.

With the program’s developmental costs beginning to significantly exceed initial projections and any potential launch date for serial production of the new platform now residing well beyond the 2020 target initially set by the MoD, the decision was made only a few months later to cancel the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) program outright.

Faced with the prospect of either finding means to further extend the Type 96’s operational life-cycle or investigating the option of large-scale procurement or licensed production of a foreign APC design, the Japanese MoD has opted to at least investigate the latter option in light of the country’s increasingly time-sensitive requirement for the modernization of its wheeled APC capabilities.

In early 2019, Komatsu announced that it would cease participation in the armored vehicles business outside of the fulfillment of existing contracts – citing a combination of high developmental costs, slim profit margins, and the circumstances surrounding the collapse of the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) program.

The JGSDF has pursued procurement of select quantities of foreign-sourced armored in recent years, primarily to fulfill specialized functions within the service’s armored force structure. Acquisitions of this type most notably include the procurement of AAV7A1 tracked amphibious vehicles intended to form the basis of the service’s nascent marine contingent, as well as the purchase of eight Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles for deployment to peacekeeping operations in unconventional security environments.

Nevertheless, the uniquely challenging circumstances resulting from the collapse of the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) program may have inadvertently opened the door to the Japanese military’s first large-scale acquisition of a non-indigenous land vehicle platform in many years.

Each of the three vehicles shortlisted by the MoD presents its own tradeoffs for policy makers as they seek to fulfill the GSDF’s urgent strategic requirements in a timely manner while simultaneously adjusting for budgetary restrictions and remaining institutional preference for locally manufactured products.

Early press reports in the wake of the collapse of the Komatsu program indicated that the MoD had expressed interest in joining ARTEC’s Boxer program, but its absence in the final competition suggests that the vehicle’s high unit cost or heavy combat weight (in excess of 30 tonnes) may have been deemed unsuitable to Japanese requirements.

It remains uncertain as to what procurement model the Japanese MoD would choose to pursue in the event that the competition selects an option other than that on offer by MHI, with options ranging from wholesale importation to licensed-production arrangements, or some combination of both options.

In Patria’s statement regarding the AMVXP’s selection for the competition, the company emphasized its willingness to establish a local production line and technology-transfer arrangement in the event of its vehicle’s selection.

Patria’s AMV vehicle has achieved considerable market success in recent years as a result of similar licensed-production contracts, resulting in the production of a wide range of platform variants tailored specifically to meet the operational and industrial requirements of its various international customers. The most notable examples include Poland and South Africa, which used the AMV platform as the basis for their KTO Rosomak and Denel Land Systems Badger series armored vehicles, respectively.

GDLS’s LAV series and its many variants have likewise attained a strong market position over the past 15 years, becoming ubiquitous in the mechanized force structures of major industrialized countries such as Canada (LAV III) and the United States (Stryker,) among others.

Relatively less is known regarding the option put on offer by MHI for the competition. It is likely a more mature version of the 8×8 APC that the company revealed in 2014 at the Eurosatory Defense Exhibition. MHI also produces the GSDF’s 8×8 Type 16 wheeled tank destroyer, and the APC design is apparently derived from this basis.

Given that cost overruns were among the causes of the cancellation of the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved), the options to establish a licensed- production line or pursue local production could present their own challenges for the Japanese government. The GSDF typically only acquires a small quantity of new-build armored vehicles per year – for example, only receiving about two dozen of its high-priority Type 16 Maneuver Combat Vehicles (MCVs) annually. Particularly for an increasingly time-sensitive requirement, the potential cost inefficiencies of establishing a new low-rate production line for a Type 96 successor could become a source of contention among Japanese policy makers.

Nevertheless, the option may be deemed the best available compromise in providing the military with a capable and field-proven vehicle design while at the same time patronizing and supporting local Japanese industries, somewhat analogous to the industrial policy pursued under previous Japanese defense programs such as the Mitsubishi F-2 fighter.

Local press reports indicate that the testing phase for the vehicles on option will continue through 2019, with subsequent development of platform variants suited specifically to Japan’s requirements scheduled for FY21 subsequent to the conclusion of the assessment period.

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[*] posted on 27-9-2019 at 12:12 PM


Production model EITAN complete with 30mm turret and IRON FIST APS..………….via VPZ at Sturgeon House...………



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[*] posted on 27-9-2019 at 12:17 PM


By the way, the IRON FIST APS now has a three-round launcher as an option...…...ASCOD preliminary turret for the Czech competition...……………

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[*] posted on 28-9-2019 at 02:50 PM


More on this...……….

Three contenders for replacement of Japanese Type 96 APC

Posted On Friday, 27 September 2019 12:40

On September 10, the Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency (ATLA) under the Japanese Ministry of Defense announced that it had selected the three final contenders in a competition to replace the country’s aging fleet of Type 96 8×8 wheeled armored personnel carriers.


Japanese Type 96, the ageing APC to be replaced (Picture source: Army Recognition)

According to the statement, the Japanese government will now move forward over the course of the coming year to assess the feasibility of acquiring the Armored Modular Vehicle XP (AMVXP) provided by Finnish defense contractor Patria, the Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) 6.0 from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS,) or an unspecified 8×8 APC model designed and manufactured locally by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

The admission of foreign contenders beside a local one is a novelty that fits in the more and more openness to new external roles the Japanese forces might play, no longer restricted to defending the national territory, a forward stipulated in the 1947 Constitution.

In the 2010s, the Ministry of Defense decided the Type 96 needed to be replaced, and it subsequently launched the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) program in 2014. In January 2017, the first prototype of the Wheeled Armored Vehicle (Improved) was unveiled to the public. Let’s pass over the difficult story of the programme development cost, leading to its collapse and now to its re-launch.

Each of the three vehicles now shortlisted by the MoD aim at fulfilling urgent strategic requirements within budgetary constraints… and remaining institutional preference for locally manufactured products. Let’s notice that ARTEC’s Boxer is not included in the final selection process.

It remains uncertain as to what procurement model the Japanese MoD would choose to pursue in the event that the competition selects an option other than that on offer by MHI, with options ranging from wholesale importation to licensed-production arrangements, or some combination of both options, defense analyst Thomas Dolzall wrote.


Patria AMVPX (Picture source: Army Recognition)

In Patria’s statement regarding the AMVXP’s selection for the competition, the company emphasized its willingness to establish a local production line and technology-transfer arrangement in the event of its vehicle’s selection, a strategy already demonstrated throughout several sales to foreign countries. GDLS’s LAV series and its many variants have likewise attained a strong market position over the past 15 years. Relatively less is known regarding the option put on offer by MHI for the competition. It is likely a more mature version of the 8×8 APC that the company revealed at Eurosatory 2014 defense exhibition. MHI also produces the GSDF’s 8×8 Type 16 wheeled tank destroyer, and the APC design is apparently derived from this basis.


Mitsubishi Type 16 (Picture source: Mitsubishi)
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[*] posted on 5-10-2019 at 02:55 PM


Romania Asks EUR 8.5 Mln Penalties from US Company for Delays in Delivering Armored Vehicles

(Source: Romania Insider; posted October 04, 2019)

Romania’s Defense Ministry has issued a EUR 8.5 million invoice to US defense contractor General Dynamics, representing penalties for delays in delivering the Piranha V armored vehicles for the Romanian Army.

“The Weapons Department has started the procedure for issuing the invoice for penalties given the delays in delivering the products. Almost eight months have passed because we should have had the first 36 units delivered at the beginning of February,” defense minister Gabriel Les told Mediafax.

The Defense Ministry has also concluded that the armored vehicles didn’t meet the minimum required specifications, and refused them

Romania’s former defense minister Mihai Fifor signed the contract with US group General Dynamics for the delivery of 227 Piranha V armored vehicles, in January 2018. The first 36 such vehicles should have been delivered by the end of 2018, Fifor said at that time.

Moreover, 197 of the 227 transporters should have been assembled in Romania, at the Bucharest Mechanical Plant – UMB. The total value of the contract is EUR 895 million.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 08:43 PM




Stryker A1 MCWS: The Stryker A1 Medium Caliber Weapon System is the next generation of the Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle Dragoon (ICVD), which is currently in theater with the Army’s 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Europe. Featuring a lethal 30mm cannon mounted on a combat-proven Double-V Hull chassis, the Stryker A1 Medium Caliber Weapons Systems was successfully live fired in August 2019. It provides a solution for the Army’s operational need for greater lethality in the Stryker fleet. This low-risk, proven solution is ready to meet the Army’s program timelines.

I'd have thought that the new double V-hull plus 30mm RWS and the Israeli APS GD also sell, would provide the Kiwis with a very useful upgrade of their LAV-III's...…………..
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