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Author: Subject: AOR's, Transports & Auxilliaries
buglerbilly
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[*] posted on 13-6-2017 at 04:01 PM
AOR's, Transports & Auxilliaries


Published: Monday, 12 June 2017 12:16

MAST Asia 2017: Mitsui Unveils Japanese MLP Concept
 
At MAST Asia 2017 (Maritime Air Systems & Technologies), the naval defense exhibition currently held in Tokyo, Japanese company Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (MES) unveiled its Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) concept.

 
Mitsui MLP
  
Mitsui's MLP is designed for large scale transportation of LCACs, MBTs, vehicles, cargo and equipment, with multi-mission and modular features. In addition to its aviation operations and amphibious capabilities, this MLP can act as an offshore base.

The design differs from the American MLP which comes in two variants: The Expeditionary Transfer Dock (ESD) variant for amphibious operations and the Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) variant focusing on aircraft operation. Mitsui's design appers to combine both roles on a single design.

Unlike the ESB, there is no aviation hangar forward. There are four helicopter spots on the "almost" flat top. There is an elevator for stores and equipment next to spot #2. There is also a ramp allowing vehicles access between the two main decks.


[img]MLP Operational Image. Image: MES[/img]
  
The Japanese MLP concept measures 240 meters in length, 39 meters in width and 7 meters in draft for a displacement of 21,000 tons and a speed of 15 knots. The maximum complement of the vessel is 240 people.

According to Mistui, the main missions of the MLP include island defense as well as humanitarian assistance / disaster relief.

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) is reportedly looking to boost its amphibious capabilities in order to protect its Southern Islands. MES, which delivered "Osumi" and "Shimokita" LPDs to the JMSDF a few years ago, also unveiled a new LPD and a new LHD design at MAST Asia. Navy Recognition will be covering these designs soon.

MLP designs and the "sea basing" concept in general seems to be getting popular outside of the US. You may recall from our LIMA 2017 coverage that the Royal Malaysian Navy is also exploring (and using to some extend) this concept.
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[*] posted on 15-6-2017 at 10:12 PM


Davie prepares Resolve-class oiler for delivery, eyes new conversions on the horizon

David Carl - IHS Jane's Navy International

15 June 2017


The Polar-class 3 icebreaker MV, which may be converted into an icebreaker for the Canadian Coast Guard. Source: Federal Fleet Services

Quebec-based shipyard Chantier Davie has almost completed its Project Resolve auxiliary oiler replenishment (AOR) conversion, company executives have told Jane’s.

The Resolve-class AOR, a converted Greek container ship, is an interim solution to provide the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) with a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) capability until the new Queenston-class Joint Support Ships are completed in the early 2020s. The RCN lost its own RAS capability in 2014 with the retirement of the last Protecteur-class AOR, and the delay in procuring Joint Support Ships led to a capability gap that the Resolve class will help alleviate. The Greek container ship was acquired for CAD30 million (USD23 million) and the conversion will cost approximately CAD400 million.


The accommodation block installed on the Resolve-class AOR. (Federal Fleet Services)

In the meantime, the RCN has been leasing three auxiliary vessels and crew from Chile and Spain. The Chilean vessel, Almirante Montt , operates on Canada's Pacific coast, while Spanish vessels Patino and Cantabria operate on the Atlantic coast.

Davie’s Resolve class has a displacement of 26,000 tons, an overall length of 182.5 m, and can carry up to eight small craft such as rigid-hulled inflatable boats or fast rescue craft. There are two hangers for two embarked CH-148 Cyclone helicopters and a landing deck capable of supporting heavy-lift helicopters such as the CH-147 (CH-47) Chinook. The AOR has a crew of 150 and can also carry up to 350 passengers as part of a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) complement. The vessel has capacity for up to 10,500 m3 of marine diesel and 1,300 m3 of aviation fuel.

Fraser Spencer, CEO of Federal Fleet Services, and Alex Vicefield, a director at Davie, told Jane’s that Project Resolve is more than 90% complete. “The steelwork is now complete, construction of the accommodation area on board is finished, the supplementary engine has been installed, and the bridge is almost done,” Spencer said.

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[*] posted on 17-7-2017 at 12:56 PM


Bourbon joins autonomous vessel project

14th July 2017 - 11:30

by The Shephard News Team



Bourbon has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Automated Ships to support the development of an autonomous, fully-automated prototype vessel for offshore operations, in collaboration with project lead Kongsberg.

The vessel, named Hrönn, will be a light-duty, offshore utility ship for the offshore energy, hydrographic, scientific and offshore fish-farming industries.

The monohulled vessel of steel construction will be capable of also being used as a remotely operated vehicle and autonomous underwater vehicle support ship and standby vessel, providing firefighting support to an offshore platform working in cooperation with manned vessels.

Kongsberg will deliver all major marine equipment required for the design, construction and operation of Hrönn, including systems for dynamic positioning and navigation, satellite and position reference, marine automation and communication. Its vessel control systems including K-Pos dynamic positioning, K-Chief automation and K-Bridge ECDIS will be replicated at an onshore control centre, allowing for full remote operation of Hrönn.

In the second phase of the project, ASL and BOURBON will join forces to search the subsidies to finance the effective construction of the prototype.

Hrönn's sea trials will take place in Norway's automated vessel test bed in the Trondheim fjord and will be conducted under the auspices of DNV GL and the Norwegian Maritime Authority.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2017 at 01:01 PM


Autonomous ships, the future of Naval logistics, at least in part.

Imagine one of these suckers in AOR form wandering around, or static in friendly waters, waiting for a warship to call it out...........

Amphibious warfare is another potential beneficiary..........

IF you can develop it sufficiently, to a high enough degree of autonomy, a vessel could potentially be available at-sea for far greater periods than a manned vessel.

Rolls Royce is another party very active in this area.
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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 08:30 AM


Or the arsenal ship concept might become en vogue again!
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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 01:21 PM


The downside of autonomous vessels is no crew to warn of, or fight off a pirate attack, by whoever might try and identify as a 'pirate'.

Imagine Chinese 'pirates' capturing a US autonomous AOR passing through the South China Sea.

It gets captured, examined and the 'pirates' then scuttle it.




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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 01:41 PM


BUT you could also turn an autonomous vessel into a sailing death trap for anyone else sailing near, approaching at high speed, swimming underwater, or hovering over the top and/or approaching by air...............there is always counter-strike to any method of attempted take-over...............simply take the approach everything near you is hostile......unless a frequency-hopping, coded transmission tells you otherwise.
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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 01:43 PM


Fincantieri cuts steel for Italian Navy LHD

17th July 2017 - 10:30

by The Shephard News Team



Fincantieri has cut first steel for the Italian Navy’s Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) at its Castellammare di Stabia shipyard in Italy, the company announced on 12 July.

The vessel is being delivered as part of a wider programme to renew the Italian Navy's fleet, which will also include seven multipurpose offshore patrol ships and a logistic support ship.

The LHD will have a maximum speed of 25 knots, and will be equipped with a combined diesel and gas turbine plant. It will be able to accommodate more than 1,000 people on-board.

The LHD will provide transport and landing of troops, military vehicles and logistic equipment. With a wide embarkment area within dock-garage and hangar-garage and a continuous open deck, the LHD will be able to receive wheeled vehicles, containers and helicopters in both ports and unprepared areas via landing craft.

The LHD will also feature a fully equipped hospital, complete with operating rooms, radiology and analysis rooms, a dentist’s office, and hospital rooms.

The vessel will be delivered in 2022.
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[*] posted on 27-9-2017 at 02:13 PM


COTECMAR begins Colombian Navy’s fifth landing craft, soon to deliver Honduras’ first

Daniel Wasserbly - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

27 September 2017

Colombia’s state-run Science and Technology Corporation for the Development of Naval, Maritime, and Riverine Industries (COTECMAR) in mid-September began cutting steel on a fifth landing craft unit for the Colombian Navy, and a first export of the type is due for delivery to Honduras on 1 November.

The vessel for the Colombian Navy, which will be its fifth of a planned eight, is slated to be delivered by 31 July 2018, Captain Carlos Andres Delgado Agudelo, COTECMAR’s lead programme manager, told Jane’s .


COTECMAR's first BAL-C amphibious vessel for Honduras. (Daniel Wasserbly/IHS Markit)

COTECMAR has nearly finished another such vessel, valued at USD13.5 million, for Honduras – which for export it has called the Short Range Logistic Support Ship (Buque de Apoyo Logístico y Cabotaje: BAL-C).
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[*] posted on 3-11-2017 at 09:40 PM


South Korea launches fourth and final LST-2 tank landing ship

Gabriel Dominguez and Daksh Nakra - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

02 November 2017


South Korean shipbuilder HHI launched on 2 November the fourth and final LST-2 tank landing ship for the RoKN at its Ulsan dockyard. Source: RoKN

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) launched on 2 November the fourth and final LST-2 tank landing ship for the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN) at its Ulsan dockyard, the company said in a press statement.

The 127 m-long vessel, which has been named Nojeokbong (with pennant number 689), will be delivered to the service in November next year and commissioned in 2019, according to HHI.

The third of the class, Ilchulbong , was launched in October 2016 and is expected to be commissioned in 2018. The first two ships of the class, Cheonwangbong and Cheonjabong , entered service with the RoKN in November 2014 and August 2017, respectively.

According to specifications provided by HHI, the class has a standard displacement of 4,900 tonnes and a crew of 120.

Each of the vessels can carry landing craft, tanks, Korea amphibious assault vehicles, and up to 300 fully-equipped soldiers, and features a flight deck that can take up to two helicopters, including the UH-60A.

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[*] posted on 11-2-2018 at 07:13 PM


Russia, Egypt Discussing Mistral LHD Equipment Deal

Posted On Friday, 09 February 2018 17:21

Talks are under way to discuss the delivery of additional Russian-made equipment for Egypt’s Mistral-class amphibious assault ships, Russian presidential aide for military and technical cooperation Vladimir Kozhin told the Kommersant business daily.


ENS Anwar El Sadat (L1020). Egyptian Navy picture.

"Active work under the Mistral deal is in progress. The parties are discussing the delivery of additional equipment for them, including weapons and control systems," Kozhin said.

"We have an advantage among others who want to get these orders and we hope that the Egyptian partners will assess this. The talks are still going on but everything will be clear in 2018," he added.

According to Kozhin, work is currently in progress to draw up a contract for the delivery of Russian-made Kamov Ka-52K (NATO reporting name: Hokum-B) helicopters for the Egyptian Mistral ships. Russia won the relevant tender in May 2017.

The Mistral-class amphibious assault ships are designed to transport troops. They can be also used as command ships. The ships of the type built by France can carry up to 16 heavy or 32 light helicopters and up to 900 servicemen with armored vehicles and landing boats.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 27-3-2018 at 08:07 PM


Turkey’s Indigenously-Built Warship to Be Ready In 2019

(Source: Anadolu Agency; posted March 24, 2018)

ISTANBUL --- The construction of Turkey’s first indigenously built “multipurpose amphibious assault ship,” the TCG Anadolu, which can be configured as a light aircraft carrier, in Istanbul is gathering pace, according to the head of a Turkish business body.

“Approximately 90 percent of the [building] blocks are at the end of production,” Metin Kalkavan, who is the chairman of Istanbul, Marmara, Aegean, Mediterranean and Black Sea Chamber of Merchants, told state-run Anadolu Agency. “Immediately after the manufacturing phase, fittings will be carried out,” he added.

Kalkavan said the production of the ship, which comprises of 114 blocks, would boost the capacity of the Turkish naval forces. “We will be the 10th state to have such a ship. There are only five or six producers in the world,” he said.

The highly-anticipated attack ship will increase the operational capability of the Turkish navy, he added. The ship, which is 68 percent indigenous, is expected to hit the seas in February 2019.

“After that, we will complete the tests and deliver it. The value of the project is over 1 billion euros,” Kalkavan added.

TCG Anadolu is an amphibious assault ship of the Turkish navy that can be configured as a light aircraft carrier. The ship is 232 meters in length, 32 meters in width and 55 meters in height.

The construction of the ship began in 2016. The vessel is intended to meet the various needs and requirements of the Turkish Armed Forces, such as sustaining long-endurance, long-distance military combat or humanitarian relief operations, while acting as a command center and flagship for the Turkish navy.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 4-4-2018 at 05:32 PM


The Armed Forces Ministry Receives Its First Offshore Support and Assistance Vessel

(Source: French Armed Forces Ministry; issued March 29, 2018)

(Issued in French; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


“Loire,” the first of four French Navy BASH offshore support ships ordered from the Kership shipbuilding joint venture, has been handed over to the DGA procurement agency; a second will follow this summer. (DGA photo)

PARIS --- French Armed Forces Minister Florence Parly traveled to Lorient to welcome the arrival of a new naval vessel. The Directorate General of Armament (DGA) on March 22, 2018 took delivery on behalf of the Navy Loire, the first of four Bâtiments de Soutien et d'Assistance Hauturiers (offshore support and assistance vessels, BSAH) ordered from Kership, a joint venture between Naval Group, Kership and the Piriou shipyards.

The second BSAH, Rhône, is nearing completion at the Concarneau shipyard, and is expected to be handed over in the summer. The last two ships of the series, Seine and Garonne, will be delivered in 2019.

Loire is assigned to the port of Toulon, as is Seine. The Rhone and Garonne will have Brest as their home port.

The BSAH will provide three types of missions: support forces (towing of large tonnage vessels, accompanying of surface and submarine vessels, training forces, ...), maritime backup (rescue at sea, assistance to ships in distress, fight against maritime pollution ...) and regional support (maritime works, support for maritime investigations, transport and supplies).

Using civilian technologies proven in offshore activities, the BSAHs are 70 meters long, 16 meters wide and displace 2,960 tonnes fully laden. Their power output is 5,200 kilowatts. They embark a crew of 17 sailors and 12 additional staff. They are able to implement remotely-piloted underwater vehicles.

The draft 2019-2025 Military Program Law, currently being debated in Parliament, provides for an accelerated effort to modernize the equipment of the armed forces. Regarding its vessels, the Navy will receive nuclear attack submarines and more modern escort vessels with the delivery of the new Barracuda submarines as well as FREMM and FTI frigates.

The number of escort ships will increase from 17 to 19, and the number of fleet supply ships from three to four, with an accelerated replacement of two years for the latter.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 16-4-2018 at 08:48 PM


Pakistan Navy’s new fleet tanker completes first sea trials

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

15 April 2018


Moawin, seen here during its first sea trials. Source: STM

Key Points

- The Pakistan Navy’s new fleet tanker with underway replenishment capabilities has conducted its first sea trials
- Platform is on track for delivery in 2018 and will replace an older vessel of the same name

A new fleet tanker on order for the Pakistan Navy has completed its first sea trials.

The 158 m vessel sailed towards the Indian Ocean from the Port of Karachi under its own power in late-March 2018 as part of the trials, and the ship is undergoing further tests to validate its performance parameters ahead of an expected delivery in 2018.

Keel for the tanker was laid down in March 2014 and the platform was subsequently launched by Pakistan’s state-owned company, Karachi Shipyard & Engineering Works (KSEW), in August 2016.

The project is a collaboration between the Pakistani Ministry of Defence Production, which has appointed KSEW as the country’s build partner, and Turkish technology and systems engineering house Savunma Teknolojileri Mühendislik ve Ticaret (STM).

The vessel, which will be in service as PNS Moawin with pennant number 39 once commissioned, has an overall length of 158.4 m and displaces approximately 16,400 tonnes at full load.

Moawin has a top speed of 20 kt and will be in service as Pakistan’s largest-ever indigenously built naval ship.

The platform has two deck cranes and two replenishment-at-sea (RAS) masts, one each on the port and starboard sides, which allows it to refuel two vessels simultaneously via the alongside connected replenishment (CONREP) method.

The vessel also features a flight deck to support vertical replenishment (VERTREP) operations, and this can accommodate a single aircraft such as the Sea King helicopter to facilitate the transfer of stores between ships. For improved visibility, at-sea replenishment operations can be co-ordinated from a separate superstructure built amidships.

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[*] posted on 25-6-2018 at 06:20 PM


Colombian Navy launches latest amphibious ship

Erwan de Cherisey, Paris - Jane's Navy International

22 June 2018

The Colombian Navy launched its fifth amphibious landing vessel (BDA), ARC Bahia Colombia , in Cartagena on 15 June.

ARC Bahia Colombia is the sixth BDA and built by Colombia’s state-owned shipbuilding company COTECMAR and the fifth of the MK II series . Honduras received another version of the ship modified for logistics and humanitarian support known as BAL-C.

ARC Bahia Colombia is the first example of the new rapid reaction unit (URR) variant, which, while retaining amphibious operations capabilities and logistic support, has been designed for use as a support vessel for maritime interdiction duties, Vice Admiral Javier Diaz Reina, CEO of COTECMAR, told Jane’s .

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[*] posted on 25-6-2018 at 06:35 PM


Colombian Navy commissions new hydrographic multipurpose vessel

Erwan de Cherisey, Paris - Jane's Navy International

22 June 2018

There are a large number of new, or near new, Supply Boats sitting idle in various places, all available for immediate purchase..............makes me wonder why we still Lease some?

The Colombian Navy commissioned a new hydrographic multipurpose vessel into service on 14 June.

Originally built as an offshore supply vessel (OSV) by Chinese shipyard Fujian Mawei Shipbuilding, ARC Caribe was procured by Colombia in December 2017 and modified to meet navy requirements. While the ship will primarily perform hydrographic and oceanographic investigation duties, it will also be able to provide support services to Colombia’s offshore oil exploitation platforms and logistics support to the navy fleet.

ARC Caribe has an overall length of 59.6 m, a beam of 15.2 m, and a displacement of 2,195 tonnes. It can achieve a top speed of 12.5 kt.

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[*] posted on 26-6-2018 at 11:56 AM


Launch of the Navy’s New Logistic Support Ship, Vulcano

(Source: Italian Navy; issued June 24, 2018)

(Issued in Italian; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


Lit in the colors of the Italian flag, the Italian Navy’s future logistic support ship, Vulcano, was launched on Saturday at Fincantieri’s Muggiano shipyard, near La Spezia. (IT Navy photo)

The launch ceremony of the LSS "Vulcano" logistic support ship unit was held today at the Muggiano site of the Naval Integrated Shipyard.

In the presence of the Minister of Defense, Elisabetta Trenta, welcomed by the Chief of Staff of the Navy, Admiral Valter Girardelli, and the managing director of Fincantieri, Giuseppe Bono, the launch of the logistical support ship (LSS) Vulcano, ordered from Fincantieri as part of Naval Modernisation Plan, took place today.

The Chief of Defense Staff, General Claudio Graziano, the President of Fincantieri, Ambassador Giampiero Massolo, and civil and religious authorities also attended.

In her speech, the (new) Minister of Defense stressed: "we need a naval instrument that ensures constant presence aimed at controlling our waters, the security of our sea lanes, monitoring maritime activities, deterring attacks, fighting illegal activities, international cooperation and training."

The ship’s Godmother was Mrs. Maria Teresa Piras, which had played the same role at the launch of Vulcano’s main hull section at the Castellammare di Stabia shipyard. She is the widow of the Lt. Emilio Attramini, who died in the Monte Serra incident.

Talking about the new ship, Admiral Girardelli said " Vulcano demonstrates once again the excellence of Italian products and the high professionalism, competence, capability and preparation of our industry."

Vulcano is 192 meters long and will reach a top speed of 20 knots. Her fundamental characteristic is her very high degree of innovation, that makes her extremely flexible in the various mission profiles, and with a high degree of efficiency. In particular, it presents a dual employment profile, combining both typically military missions as well as community support missions such as disaster relief. In addition, it has a low environmental impact, thanks to her advanced auxiliary propulsion systems with low emissions of pollutants (electric motors).

The Chief of Defense Staff, General Graziano, added "Vulcano will play a role in extending the projection capacity of our military instrument, through her characteristics of strategic versatility and operational flexibility, to the advantage of naval training engaged in international operational."

The LSS is a fleet logistic support ship also equipped for health emergencies, thanks to a fully equipped hospital, with operating rooms, X-ray, medical analysis lad, dental surgery, and intensive care ward for up to 17 seriously-ill patients.

The ship is able to combine transport and transfer capacities to other naval units of liquid (diesel, aviation fuel, fresh water) and solid (spare parts, food and ammunition) goods, and to carry out repair and maintenance operations at sea on other vessels.

Defense systems are limited to a command and control capability in tactical scenarios, communications and non-lethal (passive) defense systems. The ship is however able to embark even more complex and capable defense systems, and to become a platform for intelligence-gathering and electronic warfare systems.

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[*] posted on 2-7-2018 at 08:27 PM


Brazil commissions helicopter carrier

Victor Barreira, Rio de Janeiro - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

29 June 2018


The Brazilian Navy commissioned the helicopter carrier PHM Atlantico in the UK on 29 June. The ship is due to reach its homeport, Arsenal do Rio de Janeiro, on 25 August. Source: Marinha do Brasil

The Brazilian Navy commissioned the multi-purpose helicopter carrier PHM Atlantico (A140) on 29 June in the United Kingdom.

The ship, formerly the UK Royal Navy's HMS Ocean (L12), was purchased by the Brazilian Navy through a BRL381.081 million (USD98.76 million) deal on 19 February.

HMS Ocean was commissioned in September 1998 and decommissioned on 27 March at HM Naval Base Devonport in Plymouth. In the Royal Navy the ship will be replaced by the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales (R 09).

The helicopter carrier package for Brazil includes an Artisan 3D search radar, KH1007 surface surveillance radar system, four 30 mm DS30M Mk 2 remote weapon systems and four Mk 5B landing craft.

However, the three original 20 mm Mk 15 Block 1B Phalanx close-in weapon systems, the torpedo defence systems and 7.62 mm M134 machine guns were removed from the ship before its transfer to Brazil.

The ship displaces 21.578 tonnes, is 203.43 m long and has a range of 8,000 n miles. It has been undergoing maintenance work by Babcock and BAE Systems since February.

Scheduled to reach its homeport, Arsenal do Rio de Janeiro (AMRJ), on 25 August, PHM Atlantico will undergo operational sea training under the Royal Navy’s Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) programme.

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[*] posted on 2-7-2018 at 08:30 PM


Quote:
...purchased by the Brazilian Navy through a BRL381.081 million (USD98.76 million) deal...


Dang!:dork:




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[*] posted on 27-7-2018 at 09:44 AM


The Ministry of the Armed Forces Receives Its Second Offshore Support and Assistance Vessel

(Source: French Armed Forces Ministry; issued July 25, 2018)

(Issued in French; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


The BSAH series of maritime utility vessels are designed to carry out a wide range of maritime missions in support of the navy fleet as well as of civilian populations and of civil authorities. (French MoD photo)

A new vessel will reinforce and modernize the capabilities of the French Navy: the Bâtiment de Soutien et d’Assistance Hauturier (offshore support and assistance vessel, BSAH) Le Rhône has just been handed over at the naval base in Brest.

An extremely versatile ship, capable of performing towing missions as maritime backup, the Rhone should be admitted to active service in late 2018, after a long-term deployment.

The Directorate General of Armament (DGA) has just taken delivery of the Rhone, the second unit in the series of four support and offshore ships (BSAH) for the Navy. The BSAH contract was awarded by the DGA in August 2015 to the joint venture Kership, created by Piriou and Naval Group.

The BSAH is a versatile vessel designed to carry out three types of missions: the support of the forces (towing of large displacement ships, escort and support for the benefit of submarines, training of the forces, ...), the maritime safety and security (rescue at sea, assistance to ships in distress, fight against maritime pollution ...) and tasks of secondary support of the forces (towing, anchoring and maintenance of the mooring boxes, lifting of wrecks, etc.). These missions were hitherto provided by five vessels of three different types (Tugboats, Tug Boat, Regional Support Vessels).

Using proven civilian technologies for this type of vessels, the BSAHs are 70 meters long, 16 meters wide and move at full load of 2960 tons with a power output of 5200 kilowatts. Their crew is made up of 17 sailors, and they can board up to 12 additional personnel with their equipment, for the execution of their missions. They are able to implement remotely-operated underwater vehicles.

The 2019-2025 Military Program Law, which was promulgated on July 13, 2018, provides for an accelerated effort to modernize the equipment of armies.

Schedule of deliveries of BSAH:
-- The Loire - received in March 2018 - Naval base of Toulon
-- The Rhone - received in July 2018 - Naval Station Brest
-- The Seine - scheduled delivery in 2019 - Toulon Naval Base
-- The Garonne - expected delivery in 2019 - Naval base of Brest

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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 11:37 AM


French Navy Polar Logistic Support Vessel L'Astrolabe is Now on Active Service

Posted On Sunday, 12 August 2018 10:05

The French Navy (Marine Nationale) L'Astrolabe, France's new Polar Logistic Support Vessel (Navire Logistique Polaire or PLV) entered "Active Duty" in late June 2018 and is now able to conduct operational missions. The PLV is based on Reunion island and is conducting missions for the French Southern and Antarctic Lands (TAAF) administration, the French National Antarctic Program (IPEV) and the French Navy.


L'Astrolabe PLV, France's new Polar Logistic Support Vessel. Picture: French Navy

In June 2015, French Minister of Overseas announced that a 50 Millions Euros contract was awarded to Piriou shipyard for the construction of one PLV. This contract was awarded through the collaboration between several French ministries: Overseas, research and defense. The PLV was delivered by the shipyard in July 2017.

Over the last few months, the Astrolabe has carried out its first Antarctic Logistics Support Mission (MSLA), a freight and passenger transport mission between Australia and the French scientific base in Terre Adélie. Back in Reunion, the vessel will also perform sovereignty missions in the South Indian Ocean. It is about to patrol in the EEZ of the French Southern Territories (Amsterdam, Crozet, Kerguelen ...).

The PLV is a logistics ship and patrol icebreaker, with an overall length of 72 meter and width of 16 meters that can accommodate up to 60 people on board, carrying 1,200 tons of cargo and accomodate one helicopter.

Classified as ICE BREAKER 5, it is designed to navigate continuously in a layer of 60 to 80 cm thick ice. Its high fuel and food autonomy enables it to carry out missions lasting 35 days at 12 knots.

Its helicopter platform, 35-ton crane and rear gantry provide a real versatility, including for scientific operations.
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 12:36 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
French Navy Polar Logistic Support Vessel L'Astrolabe is Now on Active Service

Posted On Sunday, 12 August 2018 10:05

The French Navy (Marine Nationale) L'Astrolabe, France's new Polar Logistic Support Vessel (Navire Logistique Polaire or PLV) entered "Active Duty" in late June 2018 and is now able to conduct operational missions. The PLV is based on Reunion island and is conducting missions for the French Southern and Antarctic Lands (TAAF) administration, the French National Antarctic Program (IPEV) and the French Navy.


L'Astrolabe PLV, France's new Polar Logistic Support Vessel. Picture: French Navy

In June 2015, French Minister of Overseas announced that a 50 Millions Euros contract was awarded to Piriou shipyard for the construction of one PLV. This contract was awarded through the collaboration between several French ministries: Overseas, research and defense. The PLV was delivered by the shipyard in July 2017.

Over the last few months, the Astrolabe has carried out its first Antarctic Logistics Support Mission (MSLA), a freight and passenger transport mission between Australia and the French scientific base in Terre Adélie. Back in Reunion, the vessel will also perform sovereignty missions in the South Indian Ocean. It is about to patrol in the EEZ of the French Southern Territories (Amsterdam, Crozet, Kerguelen ...).

The PLV is a logistics ship and patrol icebreaker, with an overall length of 72 meter and width of 16 meters that can accommodate up to 60 people on board, carrying 1,200 tons of cargo and accomodate one helicopter.

Classified as ICE BREAKER 5, it is designed to navigate continuously in a layer of 60 to 80 cm thick ice. Its high fuel and food autonomy enables it to carry out missions lasting 35 days at 12 knots.

Its helicopter platform, 35-ton crane and rear gantry provide a real versatility, including for scientific operations.


Yep. Looks like the product of some real joined-together thinking. How do they do that? :(
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 01:28 PM


We like to Lease vessels instead of buy, as leasing "seems" to be easier to achieve than buying a vessel will ever be?

The fact that a 2-3 years ago a disastrous plunge in the world Oil & Gas prices also SEVERELY impacted vessel leases downwards didn't, if rumours are to be believed, manage to get us any reduction?

We don't have any expertise to specify a vessel for this (Southern Ocean) Service, and we also seem incapable of asking the French, Danes or Norwegians for assistance in both specification and design.

As mentioned frequently over the years on this board, we still have a need for Antarctic-capable vessels, whether these be warships or auxiliaries, as long as they are capable of defending themselves beyond an LMG on a pintle-mount, operate and support a helicopter, and can launch USV's as well as UUV's in severe temperature conditions.............there are a range of French, Dutch, Danish or Norwegian designs to cover this need..................
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[*] posted on 14-8-2018 at 07:56 AM


And, what I was alluding to was their ability to engage across ministries and departments to deliver the capability. Defence/Navy, Border Force/Coast Guard, ANARE, CSIRO (if they still exist) all have requirements, and Australia Inc. should have the capability to operate in this space.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2018 at 11:32 AM


‘You’re on your own’: US sealift can’t count on Navy escorts in the next big war

By: David B. Larter   1 day ago


The cruiser Chancellorsville and the roll-on/roll-off container ship John P. Bobo are underway during Valiant Shield 2018, a biennial, U.S. only, field-training exercise. The U.S. has been integrating more sealift ships into its training as it grapples with how to reinvigorate its old logistics trains. (MC2 Kenneth Abbate/Navy)

WASHINGTON — In the event of a major war with China or Russia, the U.S. Navy, almost half the size it was during the height of the Cold War, is going to be busy with combat operations. It may be too busy, in fact, to always escort the massive sealift effort it would take to transport what the Navy estimates will be roughly 90 percent of the Marine Corps and Army gear the force would need to sustain a major conflict.

That’s the message Mark Buzby, the retired rear admiral who now leads the Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration, has gotten from the Navy, and it’s one that has instilled a sense of urgency around a major cultural shift inside the force of civilian mariners that would be needed to support a large war effort.

“The Navy has been candid enough with Military Sealift Command and me that they will probably not have enough ships to escort us. It’s: ‘You’re on your own; go fast, stay quiet,’” Buzby told Defense News in an interview earlier this year.

Along with Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne at Military Sealift Command, who would get operational control of the whole surge force in a crisis, Buzby has been working to educate mariners on things that might seem basic to experienced Navy personnel but are new to many civilian mariners.

Losing ships and qualified mariners would rapidly put enormous pressure on U.S. logistics trains if the nation had to support a major war effort overseas. With far fewer qualified and trained mariners than existed during World War II, combined with an all-but-extinct commercial shipbuilding sector in the United States, sealift would rapidly become a massive strategic liability if Russia or China were able to begin sinking ships in numbers as Germany did during both World Wars.

Today, the Maritime Administration estimates that to operate both the surge sealift ships — the 46 ships in the Ready Reserve Force and the 15 ships in the MSC surge force — and the roughly 60 U.S.-flagged commercial ships in the Maritime Security Program available to the military in a crisis, the pool of fully qualified mariners is just barely enough.

They need 11,678 mariners to man the shops, and the pool of available, active mariners is 11,768. That means in a crisis every one of them would need to show up for the surge, according to a recent MARAD report to Congress. By contrast the U.S. had about 55,000 active mariners in the years prior to World War II, with that number swelling to more than 200,000 at the height of the war, according to most sources.

That means that significant losses among the available pool of mariners would likely dissuade some from volunteering (bad) and would mean the loss of mariners with critical skills needed to operate the fleet for months or even years in a major contingency (worse). And even without losses, MARAD estimates the country is about 1,800 mariners short if any kind of rotational presence is needed. (To read more on this, click the link below.)

Electronic warfare

To try and offset these daunting challenges, MSC and the Maritime Administration are getting their mariners to think more like sailors when it comes to digital emissions. U.S. Navy ships have for decades had to be conscious of electronic sniffing equipment that can identify U.S. warships by the specific electronic emission made by a big fire-control radar or military communications gear.

Often U.S. ships will turn off all systems except a small commercial navigation radar to appear to be, electronically, just a commercial vessel, or even go dark all together. That kind of electronic trickery is going to be vital to preserving the sealift fleet if it has to operate with Russian or Chinese military on the prowl in the Atlantic of Pacific theaters, Buzby said.

“Adm. Mewbourn at Military Sealift Command and I have talked a lot about this and we have been trying to get the word out to people that we are going to have to do things differently,” Buzby said.

“Turn your navigation lights off, turn your [Automatic Identification System] off, turn your radars off, tell your crews not to use their cell phones — all those [Emissions Condition] things that we in the Navy are familiar with that are completely foreign to a merchant mariner and are seen as an imposition.

“But it harkens back to some of the hard lessons we learned in World War II where in 1942 the Germans were sinking us left and right,” he noted.

As MARAD and MSC has dug into the issue, they’ve been amazed by vulnerabilities that have arisen, Buzby said.

“Even some of the equipment that’s on ships now automatically transmits data,” he said. "We put new cargo-control consoles on our Kaiser-class oilers at MSC, and one of the things we discovered soon after was that those things are talking constantly.

“When we thought we were setting EMCON on the ship, these consoles were just merrily sending signals out and we had no idea that they were doing that. Diagnostic functions, those kinds of things. So we had to figure out how to turn that off. And its [much more prevalent] on our commercial ships.”

Military Sealift Command is focusing more on operating inside contested waters, said Tom Van Leunen, the command’s spokesman.


Navy Maritime Prepositioning Force ship Jack Lummus during a Group Sail off the coast of Guam, Oct. 4, 2017. The U.S. has been increasingly focusing on how to move logsitcs to and from large theaters such as the Asia-Pacific and Europe. (MCC Joan Jennings/U.S. Navy)

“We are operationalizing the force, that’s been Adm. Mewborne’s focus since he got here. We’re focused on preparing mariners for the more complex operational environment,” Van Leunen said.

As part of those efforts, the command has developed a basic and advanced operations course for its mariners and has been participating in more fleet exercises, he said.

Mewborne’s efforts on “mariner resiliency” have been setting the right tone, Buzby said. The effort focuses on containing electronic emissions, becoming physically fit to be able to combat damage over long periods and a sobering reminder at the end, he added.

“The last bullet point on one of the slides is ‘Learn how to swim,’” he said. “It’s to that point. There’s not going to be a bunch of destroyers around us as we take those ships over there. We’re going to be hitting the sea buoy, cranking it up and going hell-bent for leather, hoping to stay undetected.”
4th Battle of the Atlantic

The lessons from World War II are on the minds of many in the U.S. military’s high command when it comes to logistics.

The head of U.S. Naval Forces Europe, Adm. James Foggo, has already declared the renewed competition with Russia “The Fourth Battle of the Atlantic,” referring to the standoff with Germany in the first and second World Wars, and the standoff with Russia during the Cold War.

But with the expansion of NATO to former Soviet satellite states, the Battle of the Atlantic will sprawl from the Eastern Seaboard all the way to the Baltic and Black seas, areas that Russia has fortified with anti-access, area denial weapons and other capabilities in recent years.

In an Oct. 5 presentation at the Atlantic Council, Foggo pulled up an image of the immense landing and sustainment force on the beaches of northern France in 1945 to demonstrate what was made possible by containing German submarine activity in the Atlantic.

“Operation Overlord. Look at all that stuff,” he said, pointing at the picture. "That would not have happened if we had not won the Second Battle of the Atlantic. That battle raged during the first few years of the war and the Germans almost brought us to our knees using the Wolf Pack tactics.”

To that point, Foggo said that focusing on logistics is a vital part of the upcoming NATO exercise Trident Juncture, happening in and around Norway in October and November.

“We have 45,000 soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines; over 60 ships; 120 aircraft, and 10,000 vehicles,” Foggo said. "So we are really testing our response to an Article 5, our ability to move rapidly ... and even more importantly, we are testing our ability to conduct operations in the ‘Sixth Domain’ of warfare and that is logistics, which is so important.

“When you have 45,000 soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines, and all of their kit, you’ve got to get it there. So that’s several lifts of aircraft, several [roll-on/roll-off] or sealift ships that have to get in, you have to put the vehicles on the ground.”

But while the alliance continues to scrape the rust off its large-scale logistics trains, the question of whether the mariners will show up to man the lift vessels is an open one, and one that Buzby thinks about from his office at the MARAD.

“We are going into a contested environment, so we are going to have attrition to deal with, in both ships and the people who sail on them,” Buzby said. "Who knows, that might dissuade some people.

“The tradition of the Merchant Marine is we go to sea no matter what, damn the torpedoes. Most of us believe that our people will not be dissuaded. But until they walk up the gangway, you never know.”
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