The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3  
Author: Subject: AOR's, Transports & Auxilliaries
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-7-2019 at 09:25 AM


Bundeswehr selects new replenishment tanker

Nicholas Fiorenza, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

29 July 2019

The Generalinspekteur der Bundeswehr (German Chief of Defence Staff), General Eberhard Zorn, selected a new replenishment tanker on 17 July, the German Navy announced on its website on 26 July.


Launched in 1974, the German Navy's Spessart is one of two Type 704 replenishment tankers that will be replaced on a one-for-one basis by the Type 707. (Bundeswehr/Christin Krakow)

The two new Type 707 replenishment tankers will be able to carry 15,000 m3 of fuel and 20 containers, compared with 11,500 m3 and two containers for the two Type 704 Rhön-class tankers Rhön and Spessart they will replace. Therefore, they will be bigger, with a length of 170 m and a planned displacement of over 20,000 tonnes, compared with 130 m and 14,200 tonnes, respectively, for the Rhön class.

(100 of 303 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-9-2019 at 09:43 PM


South Korean shipyard launches landing platform dock for Myanmar Navy

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

04 September 2019



South Korean company Dae Sun Shipbuilding & Engineering has launched a landing platform dock (LPD) on order for Myanmar.

The vessel, which has an overall length of approximately 125 m, first began appearing on satellite images opposite Busan Port in 2018, and is believed to have been launched around July 2019.

A series of verifications with multiple industry and government sources done by Jane’s since late August have confirmed that the vessel bears the pennant number 1501, and is destined for the Myanmar Navy as an ‘amphibious assault ship’.

Based on satellite imagery analysis, the LPD has an overall beam of about 22 m, with a flight deck that can accommodate up to two Mi-17 helicopters.

(140 of 218 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 08:35 PM


Solid support at sea [DSEI19D2]

RICHARD SCOTT

11 September 2019



Spanish shipbuilder Navantia (Stand S9-270) and UK-based ship design and systems engineering house BMT (Stand S3-140) have unveiled their ship design proposal for the UK’s £1.5 billion Future Solid Support (FSS) competition.

Up to three FSS ships are planned to replace the Royal Fleet Auxiliary’s (RFA’s) ageing solid support ships RFA Fort Austin, RFA Fort Rosalie and RFA Fort Victoria. The new capability is primarily required to deliver ammunition and stores at the necessary tempo and volume to support future carrier-based Maritime Task Groups.

FSS technical proposals were returned to the UK Ministry of Defence in July, with final commercial proposals submitted last week. A contract award is planned for mid-2020, with the first vessel due into service in 2026.

Navantia’s plan is to build and assemble the FSS ships at its Puerto Real shipyard near Cádiz in southwest Spain.

However, the company says it is keen to maximise UK industry involvement, and has set a target to place more than £400 million of work with the UK supply chain.

According to Navantia, its teaming with BMT − which is taking the role of technical partner for the FSS bid − is designed to capitalise on both companies’ capabilities and experience so as to assure low technical risk and on-schedule delivery. For example, Navantia has previously delivered the auxiliary oiler replenishment (AOR) vessel Cantabria to the Spanish Navy, and is currently completing the build of two similar AORs − the future HMAS Supply and the future HMAS Stalwart − for the Royal Australian Navy.

For its part, BMT has an established pedigree in the design of afloat support ships through its AEGIR family. Variants of AEGIR are in service with the UK (Tideclass tanker) and Norway (the logistic support vessel HNoMS Maud).

Navantia’s stand is hosting an interactive zone dedicated to the FSS bid. In addition, a supplier engagement event will run on 13 September in South Gallery suite SG3.

(320 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 10:53 PM


Volume replenishment [DSEI19D2]

RICHARD SCOTT

11 September 2019



Ship design and systems engineering house BMT (Stand S3-140) has raised the curtain on a new multirole support and logistics vessel design at DSEI.

Known as ELLIDA, this latest concept complements the existing AEGIR and SALVAS families to complete the triumvirate of afloat support and logistics vessels designs developed by BMT.

Variants of the generic AEGIR design are already in service in the UK and Norway, while the SALVAS concept is intended to meet requirements for a specialist utility auxiliary ship able to undertake tasks such as salvage and towing, diving support, submarine rescue, maintenance and repair, and humanitarian aid/disaster relief.

The ELLIDA concept is underpinned by the experience gained by BMT in the design of the five AEGIR vessels now in service (four Tide-class tankers with the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, and HNoMS Maud with the Royal Norwegian Navy).

However, the new multirole support ship design has been developed to meet a different set of requirements, according to BMT’s chief naval architect Andy Kimber. ‘‘With AEGIR, the design is driven by bulk lift for replenishment operations,’’ he explained. ‘‘ELLIDA is a volume carrier − primarily focused on logistics and Ro-Ro transport – and so adopts a new twin-shaft hullform.’’

The first member of the ELLIDA family being shown by BMT is a 195m multirole and logistics vessel. This ‘high-end’ variant is designed to provide the capabilities needed in future global operations, offering the flexibility of a large hull with internal vehicle and stowage decks, weather deck stowage/cargo handling, and accommodation for a 250-strong embarked military force. The design also includes 2-tonne replenishment at sea (RAS) stations for solid stores (fitted port and starboard), a stern well dock with space for two landing craft, a two-spot flight deck and a single-spot hangar.

ELLIDA has also taken careful consideration of the need to optimise the flow of people and stores. ‘‘The design features wide passageways and stairwells to allow fully equipped troops to move and muster without congestion,’’ Kimber noted. ‘‘We have also looked at the logistics routeways to ensure that these could also support RAS operations.’’

(345 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 10:37 PM


DSEI 2019: BMT unveils multirole support ship design concept



Kate Tringham, London - Jane's Navy International

12 September 2019



BMT's new ELLIDA multirole support and logistics vessel design in display at DSEI in London. Source: IHS Markit/Kate Tringham
Ship design and systems engineering house BMT has extended its family of afloat support and logistics vessel designs with the addition of a third offering, dubbed ELLIDA.

ELLIDA was showcased for the first time at the 2019 Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition (DSEI 2019) in London, and joins BMT's two existing naval auxiliary platforms: SALVAS and AEGIR. SALVAS is a utility auxiliary designed for a range of tasks including salvage and towing, diving support, submarine rescue, maintenance and repair, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) operations, while the AEGIR design, which is in service in the United Kingdom and Norway, is a replenishment ship.

Speaking to Jane's on 11 September at DSEI, Andy Kimber, BMT's chief naval architect, said ELLIDA fills a capability gap in BMT's naval auxiliary portfolio by adding a ship focused on logistics and ro-ro transport that is based around volume rather than weight.

"So what we have is a platform with a very large internal vehicle deck," Kimber explained. "On this particular version it's about 700 lane metres of internal vehicle storage and it has a dock at the back for two landing craft and it can carry 350 troops. The idea is that it's a ship that carries logistics equipment, but it's also multirole so we've been exploring what other suitable capability we can get from that platform given that it's essentially a vessel with lots of space on it."

The 200 m ship features a large vehicle deck through the middle of the platform, a stern well dock with space for two landing craft, and a lower vehicle deck that could alternatively be reconfigured for stowage. There is also a forward deck area that can carry containers or more vehicles and a large two-spot flight deck at the back with a single spot hangar.

(326 of 639 words)

View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-9-2019 at 03:18 PM


The new French navy tanker start construction in early 2020

© ATLANTIC CHANTIERS

Published on 13/09/2019 by Vincent Groizeleau



Two new series of large vessels for the National Navy will begin construction in the coming months. First with the first of five new defence and intervention frigates (FDI), the first sheet of which is planned to be cut at the end of October at the Naval Group site in Lorient, and then the start of production of the four-building programme. (BRF), to succeed the last Durance-type tankers.

Conducted under the European banner by the Joint Organisation for Armament Cooperation (OCCAR), the BRF contract was notified on 30 January to a group of companies made up of the Atlantic Shipyards (agent) and Naval Group. The amount of the contract, which also includes the maintenance of the boats in operational condition for six years, amounts to nearly 1.7 billion euros.

The future logistics units of the French fleet, known in Saint-Nazaire according to the hull numbers C35, D35, E35 and F35, are an evolution of the new Italian tanker, the Vulcano, made by Fincantieri. The latter must also build the front part of the French BRF, the sections being then towed to Saint-Nazaire to be assembled to the rear parts, which will be produced locally. The Atlantic Shipyards will provide the armament of the whole, then the tests, Naval Group taking care of the part related to the weapons system.

Construction of the front part of the first BRF is due to start in early 2020 (the subcontract with the Italians has not yet been signed) while the rear section will be started in Saint-Nazaire about six months later, around summer 2020. The C35 is scheduled to be delivered to the French Navy from the end of 2022. This will be followed by its first sistership, the D35, which is expected to be completed before the end of 2025, followed by the E35 and F35 in mid-2027 and early 2029. Dates that could for the last two months evolve depending on the load plan of Saint-Nazaire.

Larger than the Italian Vulcano, the French BRF will measure 194 meters long, with a width of 27.4 meters, a gauge of 28,700 GT and a heavy port of 14,870 tons. Their full tonnage will reach 31,000 tons (about 16,000 light), making them the heaviest units in the fleet after the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle.

As for the equipment, we know that these buildings will be equipped with Safran's Paseo XLR optronic systems. The decision on the main radar (2D or 3D) and the armament has still not been formalized. The issue is indeed sensitive because the BRF should define the new standards of self-protection of second-tier vessels of the National Navy. Choices that will be made could result from the equipment of many other new units, such as future patrollers and mine hunters. The ideal, for many, is a combination of medium-calibre cannon (between 30 and 40mm (Thales and Nexter pushing the RAPIDFire Naval in particular hoping to take advantage of BRF to finance its development), and surface-to-air systems at very short range Simbad RC (with Mistral 3 missiles) from MBDA. But this must fit into a very constrained budget envelope. However, given the time taken to make a decision (it was originally due to be acted on this summer), it seems that the arbitrations are particularly complicated.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 28-9-2019 at 05:16 PM


Kongsberg Unveils Vanguard – A Game Changer in Naval Operations

(Source: Kongsberg A/S; issued Sept 26, 2019)



The concept combines long experience in both the maritime and naval sectors to design a platform that meets modern threats and demands for safety, security, economy and environment.

The Vanguard couples Kongsberg’s knowledge, technology and systems together with the competence coming from the Norwegian maritime and offshore industry. The Vanguard fulfils the needs of coastal nations for both military and civilian operations, such as search & rescue, harbor and assets protection, subsea survey, exercising authority and sovereignty, anti-access/area-denial, anti-submarine warfare and mine clearance, and detection and disposal.

VIDEO: Kongsberg Vanguard: https://youtu.be/XeX3DdTFRKo

Vanguard, by design, is highly adaptable and capable of fulfilling a multitude of roles. It is designed with a multi-role hangar for air, surface and sub-surface assets. Easily interchangeable mission modules and extensive use of unmanned vehicles enables quick change of operational roles. The Vanguard is also based on an open architecture to integrate and take advantage of new technology as it becomes available.

To offer extremely capable yet affordable military vessels, Vanguard is based on civilian and commercial ship design, combined with flexible military mission packs. This approach represents significant cost savings as compared to traditional military bespoke solutions.

“The Vanguard by Kongsberg represents a game changer in naval operations. Combining our experience from the maritime, offshore and naval sectors, this innovative concept provides an adaptable and affordable solution to meet the operational needs of coastal nations,” says Eirik Lie, President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-10-2019 at 02:59 PM


Kongsberg unveils Vanguard warship design that could ‘rock the market’

By: Andrew Chuter   5 hours ago


Design work on the Vanguard platform was led by Norwegian maritime consultancy Salt Ship Design. (Kongsberg)

OSLO, Norway — Are you a navy looking to spend less when buying and operating warships? Norwegian defense company Kongsberg reckons it may have the answer.

Kongsberg has taken the wraps off a new multirole warship design that the company says extensively uses commercial systems and can be built in commercial yards for substantially less money and in less time than traditional warships.

With warship procurement becoming eye-wateringly expensive, Kongsberg’s defense and aerospace arm is pitching its Vanguard design as a way to save money via a 50 percent life-cycle cost reduction.

Vanguard will have what is effectively a plug-and-play capability, enabling the multipurpose vessel to pack containers — that meet this International Organization for Standardization’s guidelines — with equipment to swap missions as diverse as hydrographic survey to anti-submarine, area-denial and other roles in a matter of hours.

Kongsberg doesn’t traditionally build or design warships. The Norweigian company is better known in the defense sector for pioneering the use of remote weapons for land vehicles and development of the surface-to-surface Joint Strike Missile for use on the F-35 fighter jet.

Design work on the platform was led by Norwegian maritime consultancy Salt Ship Design. It’s the company’s first major military program, having previously focused on complex commercial ship design work in the offshore energy sector, among other markets.

Kongsberg and Salt have been collaborating on the project for more than two years. Salt executives said conceptual work was more or less finished, and they are now engaged in initial design work.

Vanguard has been fitted out with Kongsberg equipment like a commercial bridge system overlaid with military specifications. But company officials said the flexibility to install other systems to meet customer requirements is a key element of the program.

Baseline ship equipment is predominantly supplied by Kongsberg Defence Systems. Its sister operation, Kongsberg Maritime, is a major player in the commercial maritime sector and earlier this year acquired Britain’s Rolls-Royce Commercial Marine.

Frank Tveiten , Kongsberg’s vice president of naval integrated defense systems, said Vanguard has sparked the interest of potential customers and shipyards.

“We have tested it in the market with very positive reactions. The baseline warship fitted with Kongsberg systems and sensors is substantially cheaper than other warships. It’s going to rock the market a little bit,“ he said.

Tveiten said the economies stretched beyond procurement with manning levels as low as 16-20 people, and a speed requirement that results in very low fuel consumption.

Build time for a Vanguard in a commercial yard could be as little as two years, according to the Salt executives.

Kongsberg executives said Vanguard would suit emerging navies as well as interest some larger navies looking to increase offshore patrol, corvette and frigate numbers without breaking the bank.

Senior Norwegian naval officers at a Kongsberg briefing in Oslo on Sept. 26 said they are interested in the concept but were guarded about whether Vanguard could be a contender to replace the Navy’s Helge Ingstad frigate, which was written off after a collision with an oil tanker last year.

Chief of the Navy Rear Adm. Nils-Andreas Stensones said there is a gradual move to the use of commercial systems onboard warships, and that Norway’s experience with Coast Guard vessels and other ships using similar systems had been positive.

“We have had a very good experience when it comes to the Coast Guard over the last 30 years. Also, our new supply ship is built to civilian standards with some military adaptions, and the experience so far is good,” Stensones said. “We see that in many areas we can use civilian technology to great benefit. We see [the use of] commercial equipment sliding gradually to the more high-end applications, but how far [one[ can go with that we don’t know yet."

“The cost of building military-specified platforms today is becoming prohibitively expensive. If you can reduce the cost of the platform, you can invest more in weapons and sensors. It’s finding the best balance,” he added. “Whether we will end up with this concept [Vanguard], I don’t know. The hardest part is the training. If you have a mission module onboard, you also need a trained crew — that may be the biggest challenge.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-10-2019 at 07:40 PM


Indonesia lays keel for second purpose-built hospital ship

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

14 October 2019

Key Points

- Indonesia has laid down the keel for a second purpose-built hospital ship
- The vessel is on track to be delivered to the navy by October 2021

Indonesian state-owned shipbuilder PT PAL has laid down the keel for the country's second purpose-built naval hospital ship.
The vessel, which is scheduled to be delivered to the Indonesian Navy (Tentara Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Laut: TNI-AL) in 2021, was laid down on 14 October at PT PAL's facilities in Surabaya.

The hospital ship is being built according to the landing platform dock (LPD)-like multirole vessel design, of which six are in service with the TNI-AL.

(128 of 414 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-10-2019 at 05:00 PM


Fincantieri Signed a contract with chantiers de l'Atlantique within the FR-LSS program

Posted On Friday, 25 October 2019 13:32

Fincantieri has been awarded an order from Chantiers de l’Atlantique (CdA) for the construction of the forward sections of four vessels based on the Italian “Vulcano” design.


Fincantieri contracted for FLOTLOG forward sections deliveries (Picture source: Fincantieri)

The Italian Group will build the forward sections of the 4 LSS vessels for the French Navy based on the Italian “Vulcano” design. The forward sections will be built in Castellammare di Stabia (Naples), as for the “Vulcano” vessel, with deliveries to Chantiers de l’Atlantique scheduled between 2021 and 2027.

The contract is part of the FLOTLOG (Flotte logistique) program, which provides for the construction of four Logistic Support Ships (LSS) for the French Navy by the temporary consortium between Chantiers de l’Atlantique and Naval Group under the Franco-Italian LSS Program led by OCCAR (Organisation for Joint Armament Co-operation) on behalf of DGA, the French Armament General Directorate, and its Italian counterpart, NAVARM.

In this context, Chantiers de l’Atlantique and Naval Group agreed to outsource the construction of the forward sections of the four vessels to Fincantieri.

The LSS project, as well as the one for the other vessels of the multi-year program for the renewal of the Italian Navy’s fleet, features a high level of innovation providing a considerable degree of efficiency and flexibility in serving different mission profiles.

The LSS combines the capacity to transport and transfer to other transport vessels liquid loads (diesel fuel, jet fuel, fresh water) and solid loads (emergency spare parts, food and ammunitions).

The first two French units are scheduled to be delivered by 2025. The LSS will replace the Marine Nationale’s single-hulled Durance-class replenishment ships which entered service in the 1970s and 80s.

The Italian version of the LSS is 193 meters long and will be equipped with a hospital and healthcare capabilities with operating rooms, radiology and analysis rooms, a dentist’s office and hospital rooms that will be capable of hosting up to 17 seriously injured patients.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
JimWH
Member





Posts: 73
Registered: 27-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-10-2019 at 07:38 PM


I know it's not the most important part.... but my lord the bridge on that thing is ugly.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-11-2019 at 09:09 AM


Pakistan Navy commissions 3,000-ton survey ship Behr Masah

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

07 November 2019

The Pakistan Navy (PN) has commissioned a new 3,000-ton survey ship named PNS Behr Masah .

The 80.8 m-long vessel, which was built in China by Jiangsu Dajin Heavy Industry, entered service in a ceremony held on 4 November at the Karachi Naval Dockyard, which was also attended by Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral Zafar Mahmood Abbasi.


The PN commissioned the 3,000-ton survey ship PNS Behr Masah in a ceremony held on 4 November at the Karachi Naval Dockyard. (Pakistan Navy)

The contract for the construction of Behr Masah , which is now the largest survey vessel operated by the PN, was signed in mid-2017, with the ship being launched in December 2018.

The vessel, which is reportedly capable of operating at sea for 50 days, has been equipped with “state-of-the-art equipment” and is capable of undertaking “hydrographic, oceanographic and geographical surveys as well as seafloor mapping from shallow to ocean depths”, said the PN in a statement published on its Facebook page the same day.

(167 of 291 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-11-2019 at 01:34 PM


MAN Engines to Power French Naval Logistic Vessels; 32/44CR engines bound for tanker newbuilds from Chantiers de l’Atlantique

(Source: MAN Energy Solutions; issued Nov. 05, 2019)

A temporary consortium formed by Chantiers de l'Atlantique and Naval Group has been awarded a contract for four Logistic Support Ships (LSS). As part of the deal, MAN Energy Solutions will supply the Chantiers de l’Atlantique shipyard with a total of 16 engines in connection with the building of the four refuelling tankers for the French Navy.

Each vessel will feature a diesel-electric propulsion system with two shaft lines and propellers. MAN’s scope of supply covers 2 × MAN 12V32/44CR engines (2 × 7,200kW) + 2 × MAN 8L32/44CR engines (2 × 4,800kW) resiliently mounted on baseframes. Delivery for the four new [vessels] is scheduled between 2022 and 2029.

Wayne Jones OBE – Chief Sales Officer and Member of the Executive Board, MAN Energy Solutions – attended the signing ceremony in Saint-Nazaire and said: “This is a real stamp of approval for our Company as this is a sizable contract with what is probably one of the most active navies in Europe. It is also very pleasing to work once again with Chantiers de l’Atlantique, one of Europe’s major shipyards. We thank both organisations for placing their trust in us and look forward to our continued fruitful relationship.”

The order is part of a Franco-Italian LSS Programme led by OCCAR*, the International Organisation for Joint Armament Co-operation, on behalf of DGA, the French Armament General Directorate, and its Italian counterpart, NAVARM.

The tankers each have a fuel capacity of 13,000 m3, with a mission to provide logistical support to French and allied navies’ combat vessels. They will carry fuel for vessels, jet fuel for aircraft, weapons and ammunition, spare parts, as well as food.

The tankers have been designed to support the aviation group attached to the aircraft carrier, ‘Charles de Gaulle’.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-11-2019 at 01:38 PM


Halifax Shipyard Launches Canada’s Second Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship

(Source: Irving Shipbuilding; issued Nov. 10, 2019)


The Royal Canadian Navy's second Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship, the future HMCS Margaret Brooke, on the barge from which she was floated in Halifax Harbour for the first time. (Irving photo)

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia --- The Royal Canadian Navy’s second Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Margaret Brooke, was launched today, Nov. 10, 2019, at Halifax Shipyard.

The launch of the second of six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, marks a significant milestone for Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.

The 103-metre future HMCS Margaret Brooke transitioned from Halifax Shipyard’s land level facility to a submersible barge on Nov. 8, 2019 and launched in the Bedford Basin today.

The ship is now pier side at Halifax Shipyard where work continues to prepare the ship for sea trials and handover to the Royal Canadian Navy late next year.

The future HMCS Margaret Brooke joins Canada’s lead AOPS, the future HMCS Harry DeWolf, pier side at Halifax Shipyard. The future HMCS Harry DeWolf is in the final stages of construction and is preparing for initial builder sea trials at the end of November.

Inside Halifax Shipyard’s facilities, the Royal Canadian Navy’s third and fourth AOPS, the future HMCS Max Bernay and the future HMCS William Hall, are under construction. The first two major sections of the future HMCS Max Bernay are scheduled to be moved outside in spring 2020.

Canada’s NSS was created to replace the current surface fleets of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard. Over the next few decades, Halifax Shipyard will build six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, two AOPS for the Canadian Coast Guard, and 15 Canadian Surface Combatants for the Royal Canadian Navy.

As a result of the NSS, Irving Shipbuilding has become one of Atlantic Canada’s largest regional employers, with thousands of Canadians now working in skilled, well-paying jobs. Halifax Shipyard, long at the centre of Canadian shipbuilding, is now home to the most modern, innovative shipbuilding facilities, equipment, and processes in North America.

Halifax Shipyard is also continuing its legacy as the Halifax-class In-Service Support Centre of Excellence, with HMCS Charlottetown currently in the graving dock for an extensive docking work period.

“Congratulations to our more than 2,000 shipbuilders on today’s successful launch of the future HMCS Margaret Brooke. It is exciting to have two Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships in the water and closer to being in use by the Royal Canadian Navy’s sailors,” said Kevin McCoy, President, Irving Shipbuilding.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
redcoat
Member





Posts: 49
Registered: 5-6-2017
Location: UK
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-11-2019 at 10:54 PM


Can someone suggest how BMT's new ELLIDA multirole support and logistics vessel design is any better than (or even as good as) the Dutch JSS
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-12-2019 at 10:17 PM


Damen building landing ship for Nigerian Navy

Erwan de Cherisey, Paris - Jane's Defence Weekly

10 December 2019


A computer-generated image of Damen's LST 100 landing ship that is being built in Sharjah for the Nigerian Navy. (Damen)

The Nigerian Navy has ordered a landing ship from Damen, it was confirmed on 9 December, when a ceremony was held at the Albwardy Damen Shipyard in Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates to mark the start of construction.

The Nigerian Navy released photographs of its commander, Vice Admiral Ibok-Ete Ibas, attending the keel-laying ceremony for an LST 100 and said the ship is expected to be completed in May 2020.

The LST 100 is the 100 m-long version of a new range of landing ships offered by Damen, which says the model has a deadweight displacement of 1,000-1,300 tonnes, a range of 4,000 n miles, and an endurance of 15 days.

It has both stern and bow ramps, as well as a flight deck for a medium helicopter. There is 540 m² of space on the roll-on/roll-off deck and another 420 m² on the cargo deck. It can carry 235 troops as well as the 18 crew. Two davits for launching and recovering landing craft and a 25 tonne cargo crane are options.

Captain Suleman Dahun, the spokesman for the Nigerian Navy, told Jane's that the ship will restore the service's sealift capability by replacing the decommissioned German-built Type 502 landing ships NNS Ambe and NNS Ofiom that were acquired in the late 1970s. Cpt Dahun added that the new ship would be used to project Nigeria's naval power and deliver humanitarian assistance in support of the country's foreign policy.

"The bid for this project was highly competitive as several other shipbuilding companies tendered for her construction," Vice Adm Ibas was quoted as saying during the ceremony. "The selection of Damen Shipyards to execute the project was based on its track record of high-quality shipbuilding capacity [and] engineering, as well as a belief in the company's ability to adhere to the timeline for delivery of the ship."

(333 of 509 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-12-2019 at 01:25 PM


Italian Navy logistic support ship starts sea trials

Luca Peruzzi, Genoa - Jane's Navy International

19 December 2019

The Italian Navy’s new logistic support ship (LSS) Vulcano (A 5335) embarked on its first sea trials in the Gulf of La Spezia in early December, marking a significant milestone for the programme.


Vulcano started first at-sea trials on 5 December. (Giorgio Arra via OCCAR)

The LSS was built by Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri under a contract awarded by European defence procurement organisation OCCAR in May 2015 on behalf of the Italian Ministry of Defence.
Vulcano was launched in June 2018, and was planned to be delivered in September 2019. However, progress slowed after a fire broke out on the LSS in July 2018, causing major damage to the superstructure aft and flooding spaces below.

(127 of 162 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-12-2019 at 10:07 PM


Indonesian shipyard lays keels for two tank landing ships

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

20 December 2019

Key Points

- An Indonesian shipbuilder has laid down two more tank landing ships for the country’s navy
- The vessels will further improve the mobility of Indonesia’s armoured vehicles



Indonesian shipbuilder PT Bandar Abadi has laid down two more Teluk Bintuni-class tank landing ships (LSTs) on order for the Indonesian Navy (Tentara Nasional Indonesia – Angkatan Laut, or TNI-AL).

The keels for both vessels were laid down on 19 December at the company’s facilities in Batam. The event was confirmed by Terafulk Ship Design, which is collaborating with PT Bandar Abadi on the project, in a statement on the following day.

(125 of 508 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-12-2019 at 02:36 PM


Netherlands moves closer to Combat Support Ship contract

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

20 December 2019

The Dutch government has given the green light to the acquisition of a new afloat support ship for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN).

This follows the conclusion of negotiations between the Defence Materiel Organisation and Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding for the EUR375 million (USD417 million) programme.

A so-called D-letter was submitted by the cabinet to parliament on 19 December authorising the acquisition of the new combat support ship (CSS), to be named HNLMS Den Helder . This paves the way, subject to parliamentary approval, for the award of a design and build contract to Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in early 2020.

(126 of 469 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-12-2019 at 03:18 PM


Dutch Cabinet Decides to Build Combat Support Ship Zr.Ms. Den Helder

(Source: Damen Schelde Shipbuilding; issued Dec. 20, 2019)


An artist’s impression of the second combat support ship, Zr.Ms. Den Helder, which the Dutch Cabinet approved for construction on Dec. 19; her design will be based on that of the Dutch Joint Support Ship Zr.Ms. Karel Doorman. (Damen image)

On 19 December the Cabinet of the Netherlands’ Government has submitted a so-called D-letter to the Parliament to begin the construction of the Combat Support Ship Zr.Ms. Den Helder.

The D-letter, part of the Defense Materiel Process (DMP), is the conclusive letter announcing the procurement decision for a large military project. With this new ship, the supply capacity of the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) will once again expand to two ships.

The construction of this new, essential vessel for the RNLN’s fleet will be undertaken by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS).

Director of DSNS Hein van Ameijden is pleased with this move from the cabinet, and awaits the verdict of the Parliament. “De Schelde has been the most important supplier to the Ministry of Defence and the Royal Netherlands Navy for 140 years. Our specialty is in delivering complex naval vessels on time and within budget, always working with a broad chain of Dutch suppliers.”

This month marks ten years since the last contract for a large Dutch naval vessel was awarded. Van Ameijden: “Fortunately, we have a healthy export market, so that in the intervening years we were able to maintain the level of expertise in the Netherlands. Together with our Dutch partners we have built ten frigates for international customers. In addition, at this moment we are building a complex ice breaker for the Australian Government. That is why we are now ready and equipped for the upcoming projects for the Royal Netherlands Navy."

The new Combat Support Ship (CSS) is based on the design of the Joint Support Ship Zr.Ms. Karel Doorman. By taking an existing design as a basis, it is possible to deliver the ship in 2024. The almost 200-meter-long ship will have a 75-person crew and can also take an additional 75 people on board. There is room for several helicopters and around twenty containers.

The engineering of the CSS largely takes place in the Netherlands and a large number of components will be delivered by Dutch suppliers. The CSS is built by Damen in Romania, after which the ship’s final components and the combat management system will be installed in Den Helder.

In addition to the Combat Support Ship, DSNS will build the new frigates replacing the M-frigates of both the Belgian and Dutch navies. The yard was also selected last week, together with its Swedish partner Saab Kockums, for the next phase in the replacement programme of the Walrus class submarines.

Damen Shipyards Group operates 36 shipbuilding and repair yards, employing 12,000 people worldwide. Damen has delivered more than 6,500 vessels in more than 100 countries and delivers around 175 vessels annually to customers worldwide. Based on its unique, standardised ship-design concept Damen is able to guarantee consistent quality.

Damen’s focus on standardisation, modular construction and keeping vessels in stock leads to short delivery times, low ‘total cost of ownership’, high resale values and reliable performance. Furthermore, Damen vessels are based on thorough R&D and proven technology.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-12-2019 at 12:57 PM


Myanmar Navy commissions its first LPD amphibious assault ship

Anthony Davis, Bangkok - Jane's Defence Weekly

26 December 2019



The Myanmar Navy (MN) has commissioned its first-ever landing platform dock (LPD) amphibious assault ship.

Named UMS Mottama (with pennant number 1501), the 122 m-long South Korean-built ship entered service in a high-profile ceremony held on 24 December at a Yangon naval wharf to mark the 72nd anniversary of the MN.

Presided over by Myanmar Armed Forces’ (Tatmadaw’s) commander-in-chief, Senior General Min Aung Hlaing, and MN commander Admiral Tin Aung San, the ceremony also involved the induction of a new coastal transport ship, UMS Myitkyina , along with two 27 m-long fast patrol boats, two seagoing tugs, and two 20 m-long riverine patrol vessels, according to the Office of the Commander-in-Chief of Defence Services.

(114 of 498 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-1-2020 at 11:38 PM


Dangerous Doors and Fire Hazards: Norway’s Largest Naval Ship Flagged As Unsafe and Banned from Sailing

(Source: RT; posted Dec. 28, 2019)


Built in South Korea like the Royal Navy’s Tide-class fleet oilers, the Royal Norwegian Navy’s Maud has been found to have defects and technical faults that make it unsafe, and has been banned from sailing until these are repaired. (RNN photo)

The Royal Norwegian Navy’s newest ship cannot leave the dock as numerous safety hazards were discovered aboard the NATO vessel after being commissioned in May with much fanfare.

Having cost 2.2 billion Norwegian krones (US$246 million), the logistics and supply ship KNM Maud is Norway’s largest naval vessel ever built. It has an operating room, a hospital for 44 beds and a hangar for two helicopters.

However, the ship cannot embark on voyages after global risk-assessment firm DNV GL deemed it too unsafe to sail. The ban will last until many of the vessel’s deficiencies are fixed, which is expected to happen sometime next year.

After examining the KNM Maud and interviewing the crew, the company rolled out a laundry list of red flags. Among the problems uncovered are the heavy doors which pose a “danger” to the crew, and the absence of proper lighting on board, which makes it hard to walk around the ship in the dark.

Much of the new and expensive medical equipment turned out to be faulty or outdated. In particular, an oxygen generator in the operating room could potentially pose a “major” fire hazard, a report by DNV GL said, citing interviews with the crew.

The firm also found no signs that the vessel had undergone any maintenance for two years while docked at the shipyard in South Korea where it was being built. The delivery of the KNM Maud to Norway was delayed several times as the shipyard underwent bankruptcy, and due to a number of workplace incidents during construction which left three workers dead and several injured.

Defense Minister Frank Bakke-Jensen told Aftenposten on Monday that all problems with the ship will be tackled during its test run.

“This happens in all major acquisitions. KNM Maud is under a warranty, and the shipyard is focused on implementing its warranty obligations,” he said, stating that all deficiencies on board will be addressed “as soon as possible.”

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-1-2020 at 11:43 PM


These various problems reflect what happened with the UK "Tide Class", and also reflect to slightly different extent what happened with Australian Gas Projects being completed prior and at the same time of the Tanker builds. The Yard was in varying levels of confusion and despair, and was being (mis-)managed by Appointee's of the various Banks and Financial Institutes.

The first tranche of personnel they got rid of, were the Managers and Supervisors at ALL levels, hence gutted the capacity of the Yard to Project Manage it's way out of a wet tissue bag!

Obviously, they got rid of them because they were ones paid the most, longest served and hence needed to be paid the most in redundancy, etc.

ALL of the TIDE class were variously repaired, renovated and re-worked, as applicable, in a UK Yard for a number of months (9-12 if memory serves me right?)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
R38
Member





Posts: 47
Registered: 9-12-2017
Location: UK
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-1-2020 at 05:21 PM




ALL of the TIDE class were variously repaired, renovated and re-worked, as applicable, in a UK Yard for a number of months (9-12 if memory serves me right?) [/rquote]

Not quite. On arrival in the UK they were fitted with military equipment etc. Approx 9 months each. Then they joined the fleet. .

Now they are going through their first in service docking periods. These were expected to last 8 weeks but are lasting 6 to 9 months because of all the build problems that are being encountered.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20927
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-1-2020 at 05:58 PM


Yes, the prime task was to fit military equipment BUT they also rectified various problems identified, or left them to the service docking period.

It's all a bit moot. The way these vessels were built was shoddy at best, ill-managed by the builder.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1    3  

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 78.2% - SQL: 21.8%]