The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2    4
Author: Subject: AOR's, Transports & Auxilliaries
R38
Member





Posts: 47
Registered: 9-12-2017
Location: UK
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-1-2020 at 09:44 PM


Agreed
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 21000
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 18-1-2020 at 04:06 PM


Seaspan lays Keel for Royal Canadian Navy’s First Joint Support Ship, HMCS Protecteur

Posted On Friday, 17 January 2020 12:03

On January 16, 2020, Seaspan Shipyards and its more than 2,800 employees were proud to host the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Member of Parliament for North Vancouver, and Vice-Admiral Art McDonald, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, for a ceremonial keel-laying event for the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) future Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Protecteur.


Artist's rendition of JSS at sea (Picture source: Government of Canada)

The keel-laying event is a significant milestone in a ship’s construction during which a newly minted coin is placed near the keel where it will remain for the duration of the ship’s life. The coin is said to bring good luck for the builders and all those who sail in the vessel.

The future HMCS Protecteur, the first of two joint support ships to be built by Seaspan as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS), will be able to conduct a full range of military operations in high-threat environments. The fourth vessel to be designed and built by Seaspan under the NSS and the largest naval ship by length ever built in Canada, the future HMCS Protecteur is scheduled for delivery in 2023.

In 2019, Seaspan delivered Sir John Franklin and the Capt. Jacques Cartier Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels (OFSVs) to the Canadian Coast Guard. These were the first two large vessels built and delivered under the NSS. Seaspan will deliver a third OFSV to the Coast Guard – the future John Cabot – in summer 2020.

In addition to building and delivering state-of-the-art ships, Seaspan is also delivering significant socio-economic benefits as a result of the NSS. Seaspan has helped to rebuild a marine industrial sector, creating thousands of jobs, leveraging a supply chain of more than 600 suppliers and generating more than $1 billion in economic activity across Canada.

At over 173 meters in length and with a design displacement of nearly 20,000 tonnes, the vessels will be among the largest ships built on Canada’s West Coast once complete. They will be capable of reaching speeds higher than 20 knots (37 km/h), with a range of 10,800 nm (20,000 km) with the ice-edge capability to access Nanisivik Naval Facility in the summer navigation season.

The vessels will have a multi-purpose covered deck with the ability to carry up to 10,000 tonnes of ship fuel, 1,300 tonnes of aviation fuel, 1,100 tonnes of ammunition as well as 1,000–1,500 lane meters of deck space for carrying vehicles and containerized cargo. The vessels will also have hospital facilities as well as a large helicopter deck with two landing spots for the CH-148 Cyclone helicopters, hangar space for four helicopters, and a roll-on/roll-off deck for vehicles onto a dock.

The JSS will have a crew of up to 199 personnel plus its air detachment and mission personnel for a total of 239 onboard accommodations.

The first of class, HMCS Protecteur, is scheduled for a 2023 delivery with HMCS Preserver expected to follow in 2025.


Canadian Navy’s future HMCS Protecteur (Picture source: Seaspan)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 21000
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 23-1-2020 at 01:01 PM


Shipbuilders to build five more Project 23130 logistic support tankers for Russian Navy

Posted On Wednesday, 22 January 2020 12:10

The Russian Navy will receive five more Project 23130 logistic support tankers similar to the vessel Academician Pashin that entered service with Russia’s Northern Fleet on January 21, Chief of the Auxiliary Fleet Service in the Defense Ministry’s Transport Support Department Sergei Yepifanov said on Tuesday.


Project 23130 logistic support tankers for Russian Navy (Picture source: TASS)

"As for the prospects of these vessels, the Russian defense minister made a decision in 2019 on building five more tankers of this Project," he said at the ceremony of hoisting the flag aboard the tanker Academician Pashin in the northwestern Murmansk Region.

The same-type tanker will join the Northern Fleet in 2024, he said, without specifying where the other four tankers of this Project would be delivered after they were built.

"This tanker is meant not specially for the Northern Fleet but for the entire Navy. All the tankers are universal and multi-functional and are intended for all the fleets. They have an unlimited range of their operation and feature an ice-class hull," he added.

The new sea tanker Academician Pashin with improved technical characteristics entered service with the Northern Fleet’s logistics and rear support forces on Tuesday.

The solemn ceremony of hoisting the flag of the Russian Navy’s auxiliary fleet took place aboard the tanker at the Northern Fleet’s main naval base of Severomorsk with the participation of Fleet Commander Vice-Admiral Alexander Moiseyev.

The new logistics support vessel underwent trials in the Barents Sea where such combat ships as the heavy nuclear-powered missile cruiser Pyotr Veliki and the frigate Admiral Gorshkov provided assistance for the tanker’s trials at various stages. During one of the tests, the new tanker refuelled three combat ships at a time.

The Project 23130 medium-sized sea-going supply tanker Academician Pashin has been built at the Nevsky Shipyard on order from Russia’s Defense Ministry. The tanker is equipped with a diesel single-shaft propulsion unit and a bow thruster and is an Arc4 ice-class vessel. The crew and passenger rooms and the service premises are located in the aft-end living superstructure.

The vessel is equipped with mechanisms for the transfer of liquid and dry cargoes while on the move at sea. The vessel’s cargo system can simultaneously transport eight types of cargoes. The tanker is 130 meters long and 21 meters wide, develops a maximum speed of 16 knots and has an endurance of 60 days. It displaces 9,000 tonnes and has a crew of 24.

© Copyright 2020 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 21000
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 09:27 AM


Japan launches third Hibiki-class ocean surveillance ship

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

03 February 2020


The third Hibiki-class ocean surveillance ship on order for the JMSDF was launched on 15 January. Source: JMSDF

Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (E&S) has launched the third Hibiki-class ocean surveillance ship on order for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

Named Aki (with pennant number AOS 5203), the small waterplane area twin hull (SWATH) vessel entered the water on 15 January in a ceremony held at the company's facilities in the Japanese city of Tamano, Okayama Prefecture.

In May 2018 the Ministry of Defense (MoD) in Tokyo told Jane's that the 67 m-long ship was being built for JPY18.3 billion (USD164 million) under a contract awarded to Mitsui E&S that same year.

The ship, which has a full-load displacement of 3,048 tonnes, is expected to be commissioned in March 2021. It will feature a more advanced Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System (SURTASS) than that fitted onto the first two ships of the class - JS Hibiki (AOS 5201) and JS Harima (AOS 5202) - which entered service in 1991 and 1992, respectively.

An MoD spokesperson told Jane's in May 2018 that the new ship is intended to "further enhance Japan's capability to gather acoustic information in the seas amid increasing and expanding submarine activities by neighbouring countries".

The Hibiki class has an overall beam of 30 m, a top speed of 11 kt, and a standard range of 3,800 n miles, according to Jane's Fighting Ships. The vessels, each of which has a crew of 40, also feature a flight deck for helicopter operations.

(262 of 294 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 21000
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 21-2-2020 at 09:01 AM


Damen awarded contract for new RNLN support ship

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

19 February 2020


An artist’s impression of the new combat support ship, Den Helder, to be built by Damen for the RNLN Source: Damen

The Netherlands' Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) has contracted Damen Shipyards Group for the construction of a new combat support ship (CSS) for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN).

To be named HNLMS Den Helder , the new vessel will restore the dedicated afloat support capability lost when the replenishment vessel HNLMS Amsterdam was decommissioned as a savings measure in December 2014.

The contract was signed by the DMO and Damen on 19 February, and calls for delivery in the second quarter of 2024. Following trials and work up, Den Helder is expected to achieve operational status with the RNLN in the second quarter of 2025.

The design of Den Helder is derived from that of the RNLN's joint support ship HNLMS Karel Doorman . Approaching 200 m in length and displacing 22,000 tonnes at full load, the new ship will have a crew of 75, plus accommodation for an additional 75 people on board. Two replenishment-at-sea stations will be fitted for the transfer of fuel, dry stores and ammunition, and there will be space to carry approximately 20 containers as deck cargo.

A flight deck and hangar facility provide for the operation and support of rotary-wing aircraft. Two rigid-hull inflatable boats will be carried for boarding and rescue operations and passengers.

There will also be provision to carry two 9.5 m FRISC (Fast Raiding, Interception and Special forces Craft) interceptors.

A diesel-electric propulsion system is specified, with twin shafts each driving fixed pitch propellers. Maximum speed will be over 18 kt.

The design process has paid close attention to reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (to meet IMO Tier III regulations on nitrogen oxide emissions). According to the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the combination of propulsion system, hull shape and propeller design reduces fuel consumption by around 6% compared to Karel Doorman .

(327 of 454 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 21000
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 26-3-2020 at 02:10 PM


India signs deal with Turkey’s TAIS Shipyards for five fleet support vessels

Posted On Wednesday, 25 March 2020 14:29

India's state-owned Hindustan Shipyard Limited (HSL) and TAIS, a consortium of five Turkish shipbuilders, have signed an INR160 billion (USD2.1 billion) deal to jointly design and build five 45,000-tonne fleet support vessels for the Indian Navy.


A rendering of the Indian Navy’s future Fleet Support Ship (Picture source: TAIS)

The Turkish consortium won the tender for 5 fleet support vessels for the Indian navy in May of last year. But the formal deal was signed during President Erdogan’s visit to Islamabad last month. This decision came after being put on hold for months over tensions between New Delhi and Ankara.

TAIS will carry out the modernization of the local shipyard, the design of the ships, engineering services, planning and management of production, preparation of shipbuilding material specifications and main materials.

Support Vessels are capable of acting as underway supply points or as coastal supply points where harbor installations are not available or safe enough. They provide fuel, food, ammunition and spare parts to ensure the continued operational readiness of Task Groups at all times.

In addition, they support Task Groups with their special repair facilities and feature on-board hospital for disaster relief operations. They act as Command Platforms for various types of Tasks Groups and provide navies with a tactical advantage.

The construction of the first vessel was initially scheduled to begin by the end of 2020, with the first vessel expected to be delivered to the Navy in 2024.


A rendering of the Indian Navy’s future Fleet Support Ship (Picture source: TAIS)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2    4

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 70.6% - SQL: 29.4%]