The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3  ..  5
Author: Subject: Russian Navy, 2017 onwards
buglerbilly
Member





Posts: 1238
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-7-2017 at 11:21 AM
Russian Navy, 2017 onwards


Project 20385 Gremyaschiy-class corvette launched at Northern Shipyard

Nikolai Novichkov, St Petersburg - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

04 July 2017


The lead ship of the Project 20385 Gremyaschiy-class corvettes was launched at Russia's Northern Shipyard in St Petersburg. Source: Nikolai Novichkov

Russia's Northern Shipyard (Severnaya Verf), a subsidiary of the United Shipbuilding Corporation (USC), has launched the lead ship of the Project 20385 Gremyaschiy-class corvettes, Jane's has learned.

According to the shipyard's director general, Igor Ponomaryov, the Project 20385 corvette designed by USC subsidiary Almaz Central Marine Design Bureau has a "pivotal advantage" over the previously delivered ships of the class. "The ship is armed with a state-of-the-art weapons suite and features a radar-absorbing coating that reduces the corvette's signature," Ponomaryov said. Gremyaschiy will have a new multipurpose radar system fitted with active and passive phased antenna arrays. The corvette's superstructure, produced by the Sredne-Nevskiy Shipyard, a subsidiary of USC, is made of composite materials that reduce its radar signature.

The head of the Russian Navy's shipbuilding department, Rear Admiral Vladimir Tryapichnikov, said at the launch ceremony that the Project 20385 series will comprise four corvettes. "Then, we will switch to the building of Project 20386 corvettes," he said, adding that Gremyaschiy will be earmarked for the Pacific Fleet.

The corvette's harbour acceptance test is scheduled for August, with its delivery to Russia's Ministry of Defence by the end of 2018.

According to the Northern Shipyard, the Project 20385 corvette has a displacement of 2,500 tonnes, a length of 106 m, a width of 13 m, a speed of up to 27 kt, a cruising range of 3,500 n miles, an endurance of 15 days, and a crew of 99 naval servicemen.



(264 of 370 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
buglerbilly
Member





Posts: 1238
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-7-2017 at 06:42 PM


Rostec develops new anti-submarine weapon

Rahul Udoshi - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

09 July 2017

Russian state corporation Rostec unveiled an export version of the Techmash-designed Zagon-2 guided anti-submarine weapon, designated the Zagon-2E, at the International Maritime Defence Show (IMDS), which took place in St Petersburg from 28 June to 2 July.

The Zagon-2/2E is an air-launched anti-submarine depth charge that can be used to target submarines on the sea surface, at periscope depth, or at underwater cruising depths down to 600 m. Released from a fixed-wing platform such as an Il-38 and Tu-142M or from a naval helicopter such as the Ka-27, the weapon descends on a parachute. Once it hits the water surface, the parachute is jettisoned and the Zagon-2/2E's sonar system is activated, which guides the weapon toward the target using a motion control system featuring external guide planes.

(150 of 215 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
buglerbilly
Member





Posts: 1238
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 3-8-2017 at 05:19 PM


Russia Shows Concept For New Helicopter Carrier

by Vladimir Karnazov - August 2, 2017, 7:08 AM


Officials inspect a model of the Priboi landing ship at the IMDS’2017 naval show in St Petersburg. (Photo: Vladimir Karnozov AIN)

Russia is now planning to build its own helicopter-equipped landing ships, following the collapse in 2014 of the deal to buy two Mistral-class warships from France. A scale model of the design was displayed at the recent International Maritime and Defense Show (IMDS’2017) in St. Petersburg. A scale model of a large, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was also displayed, but the Russian navy is thought to favor building a smaller aircraft carrier.

The scale models were displayed by the State Scientific Center named after Krylov, a think-tank on future warships for the Russian navy. The 23,000-metric-ton landing ship design is labeled the Priboi, and would carry 10-12 Kamov Ka-52K Katran naval strike helicopters. The Ka-52K was originally developed for the Mistral-class warships. They have now been sold to Egypt, which has ordered about 50 Ka-52s in both land- and ship-based versions.

The Priboi is powered by a gas turbine and features a characteristic “half trimaran” layout with a flight deck measured 200 x 34 meters. Although the Priboi is still only a concept, it has already won endorsement from vice-admiral Victor Bursuk, the Russian navy commander responsible for procurement. He said at IMDS’2017 that the navy would receive two such ships by 2025. The concept would be developed into a draft design “within months,” he added. Krylov is offering an export version of the Priboi that uses diesel-electric propulsion.
Since development of the Ka-52K is far more advanced than the Priboi, the Russian navy may choose to initially operate this helicopter from the Ivan Gren, a smaller (6,600-metric-ton) landing ship which is now undergoing sea trials.

Krylov has also developed the Shtorm (Storm) concept for a large nuclear-powered aircraft carrier (displacement 100,000 tons). However, this expensive ship - estimated costs with aircraft included reportedly comes to 350 billion Roubles ($5.8 billion) - does not seem appealing to the navy. At IMDS’2017 Bursuk said funding for development work on a new aircraft carrier will be provided in the State Armament Program 2018-2025, a draft of which is being prepared for governmental validation due later this year. Bursuk hinted that the Shtorm is not under consideration by saying “we are making extra efforts to determine shape and specification of the future aircraft carrier”.

In response, Krylov’s center is offering “a smaller, cheaper carrier” that might cost one third the price of the previous concept, while having “almost the same air wing” (about 60 aircraft). The developer admits it has yet to win the navy’s approval of that new concept. The latter is described to be comparable in size to the Admiral Kuznetsov, the only operational carrier with the Russian navy. The new concept is for a ship with conventional propulsion of four gas-turbines to attain top speed of 25 knots. This is considered sufficient to support takeoffs and landings of MiG-29K/KUB multirole fighters already in service and a yet-to-be-developed navalized version of the Sukhoi T-50/PAKFA.

Since the PAKFA has been selected as the base to develop exportable Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) jointly with India, Moscow wants New Delhi to consider a navalized version of this jet for future carriers of the Indian navy. The latter operates the ex-Russian carrier INS Vikramaditya, and expects its indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant to enter service next year. India’s third carrier is viewed as a much larger ship armed with either the Dassault Rafale-M or the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, but this might change if Moscow offers something better.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-9-2017 at 08:02 PM


Analysis: Russia’s multiple corvette programmes

1st September 2017 - 01:09 GMT | by Alex Mladenov, Krassimir Grozev in Sofia

The Russian Navy has run multiple ship procurement programmes in the corvette class with the current fleet recapitalisation covering the simultaneous procurement of four different types – Project 20380 (with its sub variants known as 20385 and 20386), 21631, 22800 and 22160.

According to Andrey Frolov of the Moscow-based Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies (CAST), the corvettes are considered as the main type of class in production for the Russian Navy.

As Frolov maintained, the current emphasis in building small combat ships is a direct consequence from the difficulties experienced with the completion of bigger ships such as the Project 22350 and 11356 frigates. Frolov called the two frigate programmes as being ‘de-facto frozen’ due to the lack of gas turbines for the vessels propulsion systems.

Following the crisis in Crimea from 2014, Ukraine stopped deliveries of gas turbines for powering both frigate projects. Russian industry is still struggling to organise the production of turbines in this class and there is no certainty when such capability will be available in the future.

Frolov also notes that the programme for the building of Project 20380 corvettes is a slow undertaking. Designed by Almaz Central Naval Design Bureau, the Russian Navy refers to these as small patrol ships with a displacement of 1,800t, length of 104.5 m and range up to 3500 nautical miles at an economic speed of 14 kt.

Armament includes one 100mm A-190 gun, two 30mm AK-630M six-barrel guns, eight X-35 (AS-20 ‘Kayak’) anti-ship missiles, a Redut SAM system and 330mm anti-submarine torpedoes. There is a landing desk for a Ka-27PL ASW helicopter.

Five such corvettes were commissioned between 2008 and 2017 – four of these assigned to the Baltic Fleet and one to the Pacific Fleet. The sixth ship in the series was launched on 28 July 2017 and upon completion in late 2018 it will go to the Pacific Fleet.


A Project 21631 underway (Photo: Gorky shipyard)

Four more Project 20380 corvettes are currently in production and there are plans for ordering two more in future. All these ships are destined for equipping the Baltic and Pacific fleets.
Project 20385 is a slightly modified derivative of Project 20380, with the number of missiles for the Redut SAM system increased from 12 to 16, while the X-35 anti-ship missiles have been replaced by eight cells for vertical launch systems capable to accommodate the Kalibr (SS-N-27 ‘Sizzler’) cruise missiles for attacking ground targets or the P-800 (SS-B-26 ‘Strobile’) supersonic anti-ship missile.

Two such corvettes are currently in the building phase destined for the Pacific Fleet and two more are planned.

Project 20386 is a follow-on development of Project 20385 with a new superstructure. The keel of the first ship in the series was laid in October 2016 and is slated for commissioning in 2021.
According to the Russian naval classification system, Project 21631 corvettes are referred to as a small missile ships.

Displacement is 650t, length is 74.1m and range is 2500 nautical miles at an economic speed of 12kt. The armament is represented by one 100mm A-190 gun in addition to an AK-630M-2 Duet air defence system, Gibky SAM system and eight Kalibr cruise missiles in vertical launchers.

‘At the end of the day, the smaller and more affordable ships proved to be the main carriers of long-range strike weapons such as the Kalibr system. In addition, their production can be set up at multiple shipyards around Russia, including those situated in the central part of the country,’ said Frolov.

The size of these ships allows the use of the water transport system in the European part of Russia consisting of a network of interconnected rivers, lakes and channels which are used to connect Black, Baltic, White and Caspian seas.

As many as five Project 21631 ships have been commissioned so far – three for the Caspian Flotilla, one for the Black Sea Fleet and another one for the Baltic Fleet. The sixth ship in the series, named Vishniy Volochok is expected to be commissioned in the coming months.

There are four more Project 21631 ships in construction at present in addition to contracts inked for the procurement of another two hulls.

The Project 21631 corvettes were used on multiple occasions to strike ground targets in Syria with their Kalibr cruise missiles from both Caspian and Mediterranean seas. At the same time, due to their small size, these ships are deemed as ill-suited for prolonged missions in open seas.

In a bid to fix this shortcoming, Almaz has initiated design works on a new class of small corvette order by the Russian MoD. It is provided with a better sea-going performance making it suitable for prolonged missions in the open seas.

Dubbed Project 22800, its displacement is 800t and length is 65m. The armament comprises of one 76mm AK-176M gun in the nose, two 30mm AK-306 six-barrel guns on the rear in addition to a Palash SAM system and eight Kalibr cruise missiles.

The first Project 22800 ship was launched on 29 July 2017 at Pella shipyard in St Petersburg and for commissioning by the year-end.


A Project 20380 corvette at Amur Shipyard (Photo: Amur shipyard)

A total of five ships are in production in St Petersburg (Pella) and Feodisia (Zaliv shipyard) in Crimea and there is a contract inked for the procurement of six more examples. The Russian MoD plans to order a total of 24 Project 22800 ships.

Frolov criticised the Project 22800 since these ships are unsuitable to provide meaningful blue-water capabilities to the Russian navy due to the limited reach of their air defence systems. This would restrict the Kalibr-armed ships to operate in close proximity to the shore or enter into safe rivers and lakes in the European part of Russia.

According to Frolov, it will be necessary to initiate another programme for the procurement of larger ships as the Project 22800 corvettes are considered an interim solution for strengthening the long-range strike capabilities of the Russian Navy.

Project 22160 is the fourth corvette programme undertaken by the Russian Navy. Known as a modular patrol ship as per the Russian combat ship classification, its displacement is 1,500t, length is 94m and range is 6000 nautical miles at economic speed.

The armament is represented by a 76mm AK-176MA main gun, Gibki SAM system and an optional missile module with eight Kalibr cruise missiles. There is a landing desk and hangar provided for basing a Ka-27 helicopter. The main mission of the ship is to patrol the Russian territorial waters in peacetime, while in wartime it will be tasked with protection of the Russian ports.

The first Project 22160 ship is expected to be launched in the coming months at Gorky shipyard in Zeleni Dol. There are four more ships in production at present with another one contracted. The Russian Navy has already announced plans to build an inventory of 12 Project 22160 ships.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-10-2017 at 10:23 PM


Approval of GPV 2018-2025 Project Will Determine Future of Aircraft Carrier for Russia’s Navy

(Source: TASS Defense; published Oct 12, 2017)

MOSCOW --- The forthcoming approval of the State Armament Program for 2018-2025 (GPV 2018-2025) is to determine the future of several projects, including the ones intended for Russia`s Navy. The expert of the Izvestia newspaper Ilya Kramnik sees into the prospective of the implementation of the most ambitious programs.

Several lofty statements about the building of large-capacity ships for Russia’s Navy were made in Summer 2017, first of all, the one by Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the service Viktor Bursuk regarding the plans to deliver two indigenous landing helicopter docks (LHD) before 2025. In July 2017, the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin issued a decree to authorize the basic concepts of Russia’s state policy in the naval area through 2030. They set the retaining of the second place in the world in terms of combined combat potential as a top priority for Russia`s Navy and, in particular, envision the development of aircraft-carrying ships.

At the MAKS 2017 international aerospace show in July, Deputy Defense Minister Yuri Borisov informed about the probable building of an aircraft carrier armed with short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft for Russia’s Navy.

Considering the sluggishness of the naval shipbuilding, the range of options for future developments is likely to be a very limited one. Unfortunately, the unrealized ambitious plans to build a new dry dock in Kronstadt and to carry over the manufacturing capacities of the Admiralty Shipyards to the Kotlin Island significantly reduce the space to maneuver.

According to the Izvestia, the implementation of limited programs to upgrade certain shipyards will allow building of LHDs, not a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. For instance, the Northern Shipyard in Saint Petersburg that is slate to receive a new covered building berth will be able to build ships with a displacement of up to 25,000 t, according to the known project of the enterprise modernization. A wide cooperation of enterprises should be established to build LHD-type super-large ships.

Therefore, the conditions to build an aircraft carrier in Russia will have been provided by no earlier than mid-2020, and the ship is understood to be built by parts. Therefore, Russia’s industry will have to follow in the steps of the British shipyards that cooperated the efforts of the whole branch during the building of the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers.

Regarding the current situation with the shipbuilding capacities and the existing plans to update them, the first Russia’s LHD is believed to be laid down no earlier than 2019, while the building of the second ship of the type may start in 2021-2022, if everything goes to plan.

The Izvestia newspaper says that a new generation STOVL aircraft might make its maiden flight no earlier than 2025-2026. This project is not expected to be of a top priority, as the Naval Aviation and the Aerospace Forces (VKS) have more urgent issues to be solved.

Considering the announcements made by the representatives of the MoD and the known requirements of the service, an LHD of an aircraft carrier design with a standard displacement of 25,000 tonnes and an air wing of 20-25 medium helicopters is believed to be built for the Navy. The ship might get some anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities also. The building of such a surface combatant will provide the experience required to build an aircraft carrier (in the case of the positive decision) and beef up the export potential of the branch, as a number of foreign countries are interested in the acquisition of aircraft carrying ships of this class.

The retaining of Russia’s sole aircraft carrier, the 'Admiral Kuznetsov', in service is not challenged by the authorities. However, the financing of its upgrade seems to be not expedient, as it may exceed RUB60-70 billion. Considering the ship`s age, such a measure is not practical, as it will extend its service life by 10-15 years only, while a new aircraft carrier can serve not less than 40-50 years.

The most practical solution is to conduct a repair of the 'Admiral Kuznetsov' in order to extend its service life without additional expenses and to finish the development of a new aircraft carrier that will be able to enter the service, when the 'Admiral Kuznetsov' has been phased out.

Regarding the current condition of the indigenous shipbuilding, the dreams to build such large-capacity ships without heavy investments in the branch can be compared with the dreams to implement a space program without a spaceport, Ilya Kramnik, an expert of the Izvestia newspaper, concludes.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 29-11-2017 at 08:10 PM


Images of Russian Project 955A SSBN reveal design changes

Richard Scott - IHS Jane's Navy International

28 November 2017


Although the propulsion elements were covered during the ceremony, this image of Russia’s new Project 955A SSBN clearly shows the revised tail arrangement. Source: Jane's

Photographs from the rollout of the first Project 955A ‘Borey-A‘ nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) Knyaz Vladimir for the Russian Federation Navy have revealed a number of design changes from the three earlier Project 955 ‘Borey’ boats Yuri Dolgoruky , Alexander Nevsky, and Vladimir Monomakh .

Knyaz Vladimir was officially ‘launched’ from the building shed of Sevmash (part of United Shipbuilding Corporation) in Severdvinsk on 17 November. Delivery to the navy is planned for 2018.

Developed by the Rubin Central Design Bureau for Marine Engineering (also part of the United Shipbuilding Corporation), the original Project 955 design was drawn up in the early 1990s.

According to a report by Russian news agency TASS, the key drivers for the updated design were improved quietening, better habitability, increased manoeuvrability, improved sensor performance, and the introduction of updated electronic equipment.

One noticeable change is the shape of the fin (sail) structure.

Whereas the original Project 955 fin exhibits a distinctive forward slant at the leading edge, Knyaz Vladimir has a more traditional ‘blunt’ fin leading edge but with a faired step at the base to reduce hydrodynamic flow noise.

TASS has also reported the development of a new anechoic coating designed to reduce target echo strength.

Another notable change is the repositioning of the towed array cable duct from the top of the rudder to the horizontal fin surface. This is most likely explained by the move to fully articulating rudder surfaces in place of the hinged rudders fitted to the earlier Project 955 boats.

Analysts have noted that each of the earlier Project 955 boats in fact had slightly different rudder shapes. The move to a fully articulating rudder design reflects the desire to improve the manoeuvrability of the design.

(312 of 366 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-1-2018 at 08:41 PM


Russia to acquire 10 minesweepers in new arms programme

Karl Soper - Jane's Navy International

04 January 2018

The Russian Federation Navy is planning to acquire 10 Alexandrit-class (Project 12700) minesweepers by 2027 and 30 by 2035, according to Deputy Chief of the Naval Shipbuilding Directorate Captain Mikhail Krasnopeyev.


The Russian Navy's first Alexandrit-class minesweeper, <I>Alexander Obukhov</I> , was commissioned on 9 December 2016. (Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard)

The timetable for the 10 minesweepers coincides with Russia’s impending state armament programme for 2018-27.

First-of-class Alexander Obukhov was laid down in 2011 and commissioned in late 2016. It is assigned to Russia’s Baltic Fleet. Four additional Alexandrit-class hulls are at different stages of construction at Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard in St Petersburg: three keels were laid in 2017, while a fire during construction has delayed delivery of the second vessel.

As recently as 2016, Commander-in-Chief Admiral Vladimir Korolev said the navy had already contracted for a total of eight Alexandrit-class minesweepers and would ultimately procure 40 hulls. However, Capt Krasnopeyev told official Russian news agency TASS on 26 December that the navy will have 30 of the minesweepers by 2035. He added that development of a larger displacement minesweeping ship is under consideration. The navy, he said, will make the decision to build a new minesweeper based on its operational experience with the Alexandrit-class ships.

Designed by the Almaz Central Marine Construction Bureau, the Alexandrit-class ships are of glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) construction.

(226 of 345 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2018 at 01:18 PM


Russian Navy receives frigate Admiral Makarov

Nikolai Novichkov - Jane's Defence Weekly

05 January 2018


The Project 11356 frigate was handed over to the Russian Navy at the end of 2017. Source: TASS

The Project 11356 frigate Admiral Makarov , built by the Yantar Shipyard (a subsidiary of Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation: USC) in Kaliningrad, has been handed over to the Russian Navy, USC stated on 26 December.

The ship will be based in Sevastopol.

Admiral Makarov was laid down on 29 February 2012 according to a design developed by the Severnoye Design Bureau and was launched on 2 September 2015. It is the third Project 11356 frigate built by the Yantar Shipyard for the Russian Navy.

(108 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1070
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 6-1-2018 at 02:15 PM


Laid down in February 2012, handed over December 2017, that's...not impressive.

For all it's rhetoric, if you take away the nuclear subs and the ground based ballistic missiles, the Russian Federation's navy isn't particularly impressive, especially at out of area deployments.

For example they have real issues building ships larger than corvettes, their larger ships are poorly maintained, they have a few showpiece projects like the 'stealth fighter' program and the SSBNs and the new tanks and APCs but the rest of their kit isn't all that flash.

In most areas (aircraft engines excepted) the Chinese seem more capable. After all I don't see Russia building carriers...





It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2018 at 05:49 PM


Putin's naval policy seems to be Nukes (SSN & SSBN) and Frigates or Corvettes, little bigger apart from some Amphibious stuff......................all the littlies seem to be equipped for Land-attack as a priority with not a Hell of lot of anti-air/missile defence? The combo PANTSIR-ME with twin 30mm gatlings and missiles on the same CIWS seems to be some attempt to (half) address this?

I agree on the build rate, you can see where the Indians learnt it from..............even hard-cash export vessels are typically 2 years late.

The Chinese, I agree, have passed them in both quantity and quality of build & warship types, and appear to be following Western policy and standards than any Russian attempt. Whether the Chinese have succeeded beyond quantity, and that their warships and missile systems are effective, remains to be seen?

View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1070
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 7-1-2018 at 11:26 AM


Yeah, you can have all the flash kit in the world and no idea how to use it.

The Gulf militaries being an excellent example. Not to mention the issues the US 7th Fleet's had in the last year.

The only ones to have seen the Chinese operating in realistic drills at sea are the US, mostly via subs, and they aren't publically sharing




It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-1-2018 at 12:04 PM


True..............the Russians problem are exacerbated by the fact they will half their Defence Budget for the next few years at least, so all of their piss-and-pomp about this super duper submarine, or that great missile system has to be treated with an air of caution and doubt, they quite simply cannot afford most of what they have got..............sanctions can serve a purpose occasionally!

Lack of money is also a (small?) part of the reason for Russian slow build times, that and crass inefficiency.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1070
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 8-1-2018 at 07:09 PM


Let us not forget the entrenched and systemic corruption.

Communist and quasi-communist societies aren't known for their high rating on the Transparency International ranking scale.




It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-1-2018 at 03:46 PM


Modernized Ka-27M Enters Service with Baltic Fleet

(Source: Russian Ministry of Defence; issued Jan 11, 2018)



First modernized Ka-27M helicopter has arrived at the Baltic Fleet Air Force base.

In the near future, the second such helicopter will enter the service with the base. After this, the pilots will start learning to operate the new rotary wing aircraft.

Following all required preliminary events, the naval pilots will start test flights and landings on deck of warships.

The Ka-27 is multipurpose helicopter. Its ASW and search-and-rescue modifications are used at the Baltic Fleet.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-1-2018 at 09:26 PM


Work on Project 23560 destroyer detailed design to begin in Russia after 2020

Posted On Monday, 15 January 2018 10:13

Work on the detailed design for the future Project 23560 Leader-class destroyer is planned to begin in Russia after 2020, a source in Russia’s defense industry told TASS.


Scale model showing the Project 23560E "Shkval-class" Destroyer (export variant of Leader-class) at Army 2016 exhibition. Twelve ships of the 10,000t "Leader class" are planned to enter service from 2023-25, split between the Northern and Pacific Fleets. They will all be nuclear powered. They will be fitted with the ABM-capable S-500 SAM and Kalibr (SS-N-27) cruise missile.

The ship will be built by the Northern Shipyard in St. Petersburg in northwest Russia, the source added.

"Work on the detailed design for the Leader-class destroy with a nuclear power plant will begin after 2020. The construction of the lead ship is expected to start in 2025," the source said.

According to the source, Project 23560 destroyers will be built by the Northern Shipyard.

As the source said, the shipyard is planned to build two landing helicopter docks and then launch the construction of the destroyers. TASS does not have any official confirmation of this information.


Scale model showing the Project 23560E "Shkval-class" Destroyer (export variant of Leader-class) at Army 2016 exhibition. Twelve ships of the 10,000t "Leader class" are planned to enter service from 2023-25, split between the Northern and Pacific Fleets. They will all be nuclear powered. They will be fitted with the ABM-capable S-500 SAM and Kalibr (SS-N-27) cruise missile.

President of Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation Alexei Rakhmanov said during a visit to the Northern Shipyard on November 29, 2017 that the shipyard would be able to build destroyers and landing helicopter docks for the Russian Navy after 2020.

Rakhmanov also said that the shipyard was building a new 75-meter high slipway. It will allow organizing the production of various maritime constructions and warships of 250x70 meters in size at the biggest construction site.

The future Project 23560 Leader-class destroyer is expected to replace the Project 956 and Project 1155 ships that make up the mainstay of the Navy’s general-purpose ocean-operating forces.

The Project 23560 destroyer will have a nuclear power plant. It will be armed with Kalibr (NATO reporting name: SS-N-27 Sizzler) and Oniks (SS-N-26 Strobile) missile systems or their versions and a shipborne version of the S-500 air defense missile system able to ensure ballistic missile defense.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-1-2018 at 09:27 PM


They "may" start design work in two years BUT the build will have to wait until sanctions are removed, if ever..........................this is not going to be a cheap warship, especially as it's a Nuke powered vessel.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
JimWH
Member





Posts: 73
Registered: 27-5-2017
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-1-2018 at 09:55 AM


Oh yeah, that looks awesomely stable. I'm sure the metacentric height on that beast is nice and low.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 24-1-2018 at 08:24 PM


Payment disputes over Russia’s latest ‘cable-cutting’ submarine

Bruce Jones, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

23 January 2018

What's the betting somebody, somewhere has walked off with a few million.............. :no:

The Russian Ministry of Defence (MoD) and Zvezdochka shipyard have filed counter-lawsuits against each other over the long-term refit and rebuild of the original Delta-IV-class nuclear submarine Podmoskovye , the independent Interfax and state-owned TASS news agencies have reported.

Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center JSC, part of the United Shipbuilding Corporation, is claiming RUB6.8 billion (USD120 million) against the MoD, which in turn claims RUB3.7 billion from Zvezdochka. A RUB22.8 billion contract was awarded in 2004 covering the upgrade, but Zvezdochka claims that it only received RUB16 billion. The shipyard alleges that part payments were not made in full, while the MoD insists that advanced payments were made from 2004 to 2017.

(135 of 301 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 10:10 PM


Russian Navy Project 11711 Landing Ship LST Ivan Gren to Complete Trials

Posted On Monday, 05 February 2018 17:59

The Ivan Gren lead big landing ship of project 11711 will resume in February the trials which were suspended in late December 2017 and complete them this month, spokesman of the Yantar shipyard Sergey Mikhailov said.


Landing ship of project Project 11711 Ivan Gren during trials in the Baltic. Picture by Alex Akentyev.

"It is planned to complete government acceptance trials of the Ivan Gren by the end of February after which the shipyard will do the final finishing and prepare the warship for handover to the customer. The flag is likely to be hoisted on the Ivan Gren in the first quarter of the year," he said.

Chairman of the acceptance team of the Ivan Gren decided on December 26 to suspend acceptance trials. Shipyard project Managing Director Roman Fedyunin said the "reason was a number of exposed problems whose elimination demands a decision of the customer and naturally time."

"The Navy created a taskforce to draft proposals and decisions and it is to complete the work in the first half of February. Acceptance tests will resume after that and the Ivan Gren will make several more sorties," Mikhailov said.

The Ivan Gren is the lead warship of project 11711 designed by the Nevskoe bureau. It was laid by Yantar shipyard in December 2004 but floated only in May 2012 because of a big number of changes to the technical assignment made by the Navy at the initial construction stage. Factory trials began in June 2016. The Ivan Gren sailed out to the Baltic Sea on November 30, 2017 for acceptance trials.

The warship can carry 13 main tanks, 36 APC or IFV or 300 marines. It can deliver a reinforced marine company with hardware and land it on pontoons. The weapons include 30mm six-barrel antiaircraft guns and the warship carries in hangars two Ka-29 combat-transport helicopters.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-2-2018 at 08:13 PM


Russian submarine production secured until 2027

Krzysztof Kuska, Poznan - Jane's Defence Weekly

06 February 2018

They have a defence budget that has effectively halved, yet they've increased their Sub building.............slight disconnect here? :thumbdown:

Russia’s State Armaments Programme 2018-27 foresees the construction of submarines until 2027, the deputy defence minister has said.

Yuri Borisov on 31 January visited nuclear submarine builder JSC PO Sevmash, part of United Shipbuilding Corporation on the implementation of the State Defence Order 2018, to discuss the Yasen and Borey submarine classes.

According to Sevmash and the Russian Ministry of Defence, the volume of work producing submarines has increased.

(93 of 94 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-2-2018 at 08:31 PM


Russian Frigates to be Fitted with UUVs and USVs

Posted On Monday, 12 February 2018 09:53

The latest and future Russian distant sea zone frigates of projects 22350 and 22350M will be equipped with unmanned surface and underwater craft for reconnaissance and inspection of vessels, operations on the seabed and studies of sea hydrology. Experts believe the craft will considerably enhance the effectiveness of frigates, the Izvestia daily writes.


Project 22350 Admiral Gorshkov frigate

The main Navy command said the decision to equip project 22350 and 22350M frigates with robotic complexes had been made. The military and shipbuilders are specifying the number and types of craft to be deployed on the latest warships.

The daily said the frigates will carry unmanned boats for reconnaissance of maritime objects and the coast. They will also remotely inspect suspicious vessels.

The latest frigates may also have unmanned underwater craft to submerge to a depth of several hundred meters for surveillance and underwater works. They will be controlled from the warship.

Frigates of project 22350 are designated to fight submarines and warships in oceans and seas. The warships with a displacement of close to 5000 tons and the length of 135 meters develop a speed of 29 knots. They are armed with 130mm artillery gun A-192 and Onix and Kalibr missiles. Project 22350M is an upgrade, which makes the frigates several thousand tons heavier due to new radars and armaments.


Kronstadt catamaran USV

The Russian Defense Ministry has been actively designing surface and underwater robots of late. In particular, a series of unmanned boats were created by the industry on the basis of speedboats and small catamaran. They usually have a side-view sonar for surveillance. The technology to control unmanned boats from a warship with an aerial retransmitting drone has been mastered since 2014 at a Defense Ministry range in Ladoga Lake.

Expert Mikhail Barabanov said all navies in the world are paying much attention to robotized systems. "Our shipbuilders follow the world trends and are sometimes ahead of them. Thus, there are no examples in the West of the serial engagement of anti-mine robotized systems on major surface warships," he said.


The Gavia Defence UUV

Barabanov believes the upgraded frigates will also engage drones. "The hydrography and surveillance can be very useful.

Drones are engaged for that. For example, many navies acquired Gavia (Icelandic unmanned underwater vehicle). The Russian Navy also bought several batches of it. Unmanned boats are very fashionable today. They are used by warships for reconnaissance, inspection and tracking of surface targets," he said.

The first frigate of project 22350, the Admiral Gorshkov, was laid in early 2006 and is currently undergoing trials. The warship is to join the Northern fleet. Three other frigates of the project are at various construction stages, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-2-2018 at 08:58 PM


Russian Navy begins aerial refuelling training for its combat pilots

Gareth Jennings, London - Jane's Navy International

20 February 2018

The Russian Navy is training its combat pilots in the techniques of aerial refuelling for the first time in recent history, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) disclosed on 19 February.


For the first time in the recent history of Russia, naval pilots have practiced in-flight refuelling on Su-30SM aircraft. (Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation)

Pilots from the Naval Aviation Directorate and the Baltic and Black Sea Fleets flying Sukhoi Su-30SM ‘Flanker’ and Su-24 ‘Fencer’ combat aircraft recently conducted more than 100 contacts with Ilyushin Il-78 ‘Midas’ tankers.

While Western navies have utilised air-to-air refuelling (AAR) for their combat aircraft for many decades now, this has been done to extend the operating radius of their carrier-based fighter and attack platforms. This has typically been done by fitting ‘buddy-buddy’ refuelling pods to carrier-based aircraft, and through the use of land-based tankers when feasible.

(117 of 504 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 9-3-2018 at 09:39 PM


Status-6: Russia's new intercontinental nuclear armed & powered autonomous torpedo

Posted On Thursday, 08 March 2018 10:14

Practically invulnerable underwater combat robots with intercontinental range have been created for the Russian Navy to operate in oceans and at adversary coast. They can be engaged both against warships and strategic coastal facilities. A unique compact nuclear power plant has been created for them and special submarine carriers are being constructed. The vehicle is called Status-6. President Vladimir Putin presented its capabilities to parliament. Experts believe the underwater vehicles are a major deterrence and retaliatory weapon, the Izvestia daily writes.


The Status-6 (NATO: KANYON) intercontinental, nuclear-armed, nuclear-powered, undersea autonomous torpedo

"Russia designed unmanned underwater vehicles capable of moving at major depths, I would say very deeply, and to intercontinental distances with a speed exceeding that of submarines, latest torpedoes and all types of high-speed warships several times," Putin said.

The vehicles have low noise, high maneuverability and are practically invulnerable. They can carry both conventional and nuclear warheads to destroy a wide range of targets, including aircraft carriers, coastal fortifications and infrastructure.

The unique innovative nuclear power plant is the trump card of the weapon. Its trials were completed in December 2017. In size it is 100 times smaller than the reactors of modern submarines but still has "super high power". "The results of the trials made it possible to begin creating a completely new strategic weapon armed with nuclear high-yield charges," Putin said.

https://youtu.be/zrMdm13exWE
Russian MoD video showing Rubin's Klavesin-2R-PM UUV (first) and the nuclear-armed Kanyon/Status-6 long range torpedo/drone

Status-6 is a self-propelled underwater craft to be carried by two submarines under construction - the Khabarovsk and the Belgorod. Open sources said each submarine will carry three-ten underwater craft. They resemble a big 20-meter long torpedo with a diameter of close to 1.5 meters. The range is up to 10 thousand kilometers. The craft has several compartments. It is likely a universal platform which can carry various modules depending on the mission. They can be nuclear or conventional charges, radio-electronic warfare or reconnaissance means.

Status-6 can engage in various missions ranging from destruction of important economic facilities on the coast up to the fight with aircraft-carrying forces. There are no weapons in the world at present which can counter the craft operating at major depths and at high speed.

Expert Dmitry Boltenkov said the low-noise and high-speed underwater robots are ideal warship hunters. "It is the dream of any admiral as the craft can covertly approach a formation of warships and destroy it by one nuclear charge. It turns heavy aircraft carriers into helpless targets," he said.

Boltenkov believes Status-6 is an excellent deterrence. "The presence in our navy of such autonomous underwater craft with a major range makes a retaliatory nuclear strike at coastal areas inevitable. The prospects to sustain unacceptable damage will calm down the hotheads," he said.

In Cold War time the Soviet Union considered the idea of the so-called Sakharov torpedo to carry a mighty thermonuclear charge. In case of war it had to be engaged at the US coast and trigger super powerful tsunami. However the project was abandoned because of technical difficulties, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 09:33 PM


Russian Navy to get Containerized AUV Mission Module

Posted On Thursday, 26 April 2018 11:03

An underwater system accommodated in a standard sea container is being designed for the Russian navy. It will include an unmanned craft and operator workstations for its remote control. Any warship, including the latest modular corvettes, can carry the container or it can be installed ashore. Experts believe the complex will expand the use of underwater vehicles by the Russian Navy. In particular, it will make seabed survey and mine search more efficient, the Izvestia daily writes.


The Project 20386 corvette features a modular mission bay at the stern, somewhat similar to the U.S. Navy's LCS

The Defense Ministry told the newspaper the container complex was being designed and would comprise an unmanned underwater craft and controls. It will be mounted on warships and auxiliary vessels.

The drone will be the backbone of the complex of the Klavesin family created by Rubin Design Bureau jointly with the Institute of Maritime Studies of the Far Eastern branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It is likely to be Klavesin-1R for engagement by surface ships. The container can be placed on deck of an icebreaker or a rescue vessel. Upon arrival to the site the shipboard crane would float the drone for operation.

The craft can be used for search and survey of pinpoint and long objects, seabed mapping and sounding. It has various equipment comprising side-view radars, electromagnetic finder, digital video system, acoustic surface contour recorder to search for seabed objects, and temperature and electric conductivity sensors.

The first Klavesin has been test operated in the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic to search for seabed objects and conduct shelf survey.


Rubin's Klavesin-2R-PM UUV. Picture: JSC "Central Design Bureau" Rubin "Marine Engineering

Klavesin-1R resembles a torpedo of yellow color which is close to six meters long and less than a meter in diameter. It weights two and a half tons. Drone range is up to 300 km and autonomous operation is 120 hours. The operational depth is up to 6 thousand meters.

All leading world navies are actively engaging unmanned underwater craft. Russia is a leader in the sphere, expert Vadim Kozyulin said. The drones engage in a broad range of missions. "Unmanned underwater craft can be engaged in reconnaissance, protection, fairway mine clearance, seaport defense. It is easier for them to detect adversary submarines and underwater vehicles," he said.

Sea drones are likely to be initially used in reconnaissance and mine clearance. They can also service the underwater network which is being created in the Arctic. The container complexes also have a peacetime mission to search for submerged objects, inspect pipelines and communications, Kozyulin said.

Klavesin-2R is the second generation of the family and is bigger and heavier than the predecessor. It will hardly fit into a container. Nuclear submarines are likely to carry it. Such craft will likely be installed on upgraded nuclear submarines of project 949AM and reequipped special-designation nuclear submarine BS-64 the Podmoskovye, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 20735
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 10:09 PM


Russian Navy to Lay Fiber Optic Cables to Connect Arctic and Far East

Posted On Wednesday, 25 April 2018 18:16

The Russian Defense Ministry began preparations to lay a transarctic communications line for the Navy and coastal troops. The fiber-optic cable will connect the Arctic and the Far East. It will begin in Severomorsk and go via Anadyr and Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky to Vladivostok. The new line will transmit major volumes of information real-time. Experts believe the transarctic line will increase the national defense capability, the Izvestia daily writes.


Artist impression of Project 15310 ocean-going cable ship of the Russian Navy. The ice-class Volga and Vyatka cable-laying ships will be engaged in underwater work. Their construction is being completed by Zaliv shipyard in Kerch. The Volga is likely to be commissioned in 2019 and the Vyatka a year later. Picture by Curious via forums.airbase.ru

The Defense Ministry told the newspaper the new fiber-optic line would expand the possibilities of operational Navy command. The structural scheme of the underwater system has been designed and preparatory work began early this year.

Wired telecommunications are undeveloped in the Arctic at present and the transarctic cable will remedy the situation. It will go through the zone of responsibility of two fleets - the Northern and Pacific which are in charge of the longest maritime borders of the country.

The 12.7 thousand kilometer-long line is conditionally divided into two sections - the Arctic and the Far Eastern. The first one is close to 5.7 thousand kilometers and the second one is 7 thousand km long. There will be several types of the line sections: without relays, with underwater relay and with laser pumping to increase the light stream. The technology would depend on the relief and hydrogeological situation. Resistance to very cold temperatures is an obligatory requirement to the hardware and optic fiber. The talk is about the creation of a broad telecom network on the coast and islands of the Arctic and Pacific Oceans. It will connect all military facilities and naval bases in hard-of-access areas. The trunk line is to be commissioned in 2025.

The Northern fleet will create an experimental area to test the technologies of connecting the coast and the islands. The transarctic cable will considerably increase the national defense capability, expert Dmitry Boltenkov said. "It would be possible to monitor the situation from Norway to China in real time. If stationary hydro-acoustic complexes to survey the underwater situation are plugged into it, the objects found in the Arctic Ocean will be immediately reported to Vladivostok, Severomorsk and Moscow. The telecom system will increase the efficiency of ground forces and fleet command," he said.

The ice-class Volga and Vyatka cable-laying ships will be engaged in underwater work. Their construction is being completed by Zaliv shipyard in Kerch. The Volga is likely to be commissioned in 2019 and the Vyatka a year later.

The ships will be equipped with a plough to lay the cable and an underwater craft to maintain and service the line. They will be able to lay the communications line at a depth of 3 thousand meters at a speed of two knots (3.7 km/h). They will also service the system, as their equipment can quickly find the place of damage and, if necessary, surface the cable or equipment for repairs or urgent replacement, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1    3  ..  5

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 83.3% - SQL: 16.7%]