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[*] posted on 14-8-2018 at 04:36 PM


Nevskoye Design Bureau offers LHD project to Russian Navy

Posted On Monday, 13 August 2018 18:02

The Nevskoye Design Bureau has offered a universal landing ship (UDK or LHD in English) project to the Russian Navy, the bureau’s head, Sergei Orlov, has said.


Project 11780 (pictured here) is an unrealized Soviet LHD project developed by the Nevsky Design Bureau during the 1980s. This design could serve as base for a future Russian LHD. Another design bureau, Krylov State Research Center, has developed another design on its own initiative. Picture via nevskii-bastion.ru

"We are offering a universal landing ship version with a displacement of about 30,000 tons and a large amphibious ship with a displacement of 6,000-7,000 tons to the Navy," he said.

Orlov added that the Nevskoye Design Bureau had not received any instructions from the Defense Ministry so far to start work on the universal landing ship. It is the designers’ own initiative.

The universal landing ship will be able to carry air cushion ships.

"We are still at the research and development stage in this field so far... Today, the entire concept of landing forces has changed. It is necessary to rethink what kind of a ship they need and how many helicopters, paratroopers and weapons this ship needs. Will it be possible to use the ship in civil life if necessary?" Orlov noted.

Besides, the Nevskoye Design Bureau is also offering a modernized version of the Ivan Gren large landing ship, which is longer and wider than the original ship, to the Russian Defense Ministry. "Having created two ships, the fleet can see the concept of a new large landing ship. Now we have a very clear idea of what we should do with the Ivan Gren," Orlov said.

Viktor Bursuk, the Russian Navy’s Deputy Commander-in-Chief for armaments, said earlier that the designing and construction of universal landing ships would get under way after 2020 not earlier than a new landing ship will be designed.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 21-9-2018 at 09:36 AM


Second Lada Class Submarine Launched in St. Petersburg

(Source: TASS; published Sept 20, 2018)


The Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg today launched Kronshtadt, the second Lada-class submarine for the Russian Navy, whose construction began in 2005 and was paused before resuming in 2013. (Admiralty Shipyard photo)

5years to complete a partially-built submarine? Wow! Blistering pace............:no: :no: :no:

ST. PETERSBURG --- A second diesel-electric submarine of project 677 (Lada class), The Kronshtadt, was launched in a special ceremony at the Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg on Thursday, a TASS correspondent reports.

"The importance of this event is hard to overestimate. The submarine began to be built in 2005. There have been some pauses in construction work and in financing, but the launch day has come at last. The delay in construction work allowed for using the experience gained in building and operating the submarine St. Petersburg.

“By all parameters this submarine surpasses its predecessor - project 636. We are certain that the future of non-nuclear submarine force of the Russian Navy should be pinned on project 677. There will be a large series," Admiralty Shipyards CEO Alexander Buzakov said at the ceremony.

Project 677 submarines of the Lada class belong with the fourth generation of diesel-electric subs. In the surface position its displacement is about 1,750 tonnes. The maximum speed under water is 21 knots. Lada has a crew of 35 and carries Kalibr cruise missiles.

The St. Petersburg is the lead ship of project 677. Its keel-laying ceremony took place in 1997. It was handed over to the Russian Navy in 1997 for experimental operation, which is due to end in 2019.

The Kronshtadt began to be built in 2005. At a certain point the project was paused to be resumed in 2013. Currently the Admiralty Shipyards is building another Lada class submarine - The Velikiye Luki.

(ends)

JSC "Admiralteyskie Verfi" Launched the Submarine "Kronshtadt"

(Source: Admiralty Shipyards JSC; issued Sept 20, 2018)

(Issued in Russian; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

SAINT-PETERSBURG, Russia --- At the Admiralty Shipyards JSC (part of the United Shipbuilding Corporation), a ceremony was held today for the launch of the diesel-electric submarine Kronstadt, a Project 677 Lada-class boat for the Russian Navy.

Alexander Buzakov, General Director of Admiralteiskiye Verfi, said that the launch of the ship was a significant event: "Today, we launch a ship laid down in 2005, but whose financing and construction were later suspended. This forced pause allowed us to take into account the experience of operating in the Northern Fleet the first submarine of this class, the St. Petersburg. Next year, we plan to sign contracts for the fourth and fifth boats of this class, and we believe that the future of the non-nuclear submarine fleet is behind the project 677!"

On behalf of the Commander-in-Chief of the Navy, the participants in the official ceremony were greeted by the Deputy Chief of the Shipbuilding Department of the Russian Navy's Main Command, Captain 1st Rank Mikhail Krasnopeev: "The whole history of the Admiralty Shipyards, beginning in the era of Peter the Great, shows that the company is able to build unique ships. And today's launch is a vivid confirmation of this. It is a great honor for Russian sailors to serve on such modern submarines."

The submarine "Kronstadt" - the second in the series of project 677 "Lada" - was laid in July 2005. In 2009, under the decision of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, the construction order was suspended until the transfer to the pilot operation of the main order of the series of submarines "St. Petersburg". The state contract to resume the construction of the ship was signed on July 9, 2013.

The submarine "Kronstadt" is built according to original design, corrected by the results of the pilot operation of the main ship. On the ships, the shipboard technical equipment control system, the electrical powerplant, and the navigation system have been deeply modernized. In the long term, the submarines of the Lada class are planned to be equipped with an anaerobic air-independent plant (AIP), developed by specialists of the MT Rubin Central Design Bureau.

The submarines of Project 677 Lada belong to the fourth generation of non-nuclear submarines and are now recognized as the most modern and promising domestic non-nuclear submarines, both from the point of view of combat effectiveness and other tactical and technical characteristics. JSC "Admiralteyskie Verfi" is the only shipbuilding facility of this class.

It is significant that the launch of the submarine "Kronstadt" takes place in the conditions of a large-scale reconstruction of the slip-completion plant, which is carried out within the framework of the Federal Target Program "Development of the Defense Industrial Complex for the period 2011-2020". Upon its completion, the company will create a modern specialized complex of a closed cycle for the construction of non-nuclear submarines, which will optimize the production process and expand the capabilities of the Admiralty shipyards in the construction of underwater orders. This reconstruction work is carried out without stopping the existing production, and do not affect the terms of execution of the contracts of the enterprise.

The tactical and technical characteristics of the submarine project 677 Lada:
-- underwater speed, in knots: 21
-- Underwater range at economic speed of 3 knots, in miles: 650
-- the maximum diving depth: 300 meters
-- surface displacement: 1,765 cubic meters
-- length: 66.8 meters
-- width: 7.1 meters
-- autonomy: 45 days
-- crew: 35 people
-- number of torpedo tubes: six
-- weapons: 6 missiles and 18 x 533mm torpedoes.

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[*] posted on 26-9-2018 at 01:52 PM


Russia Starts Development of New Generation Frigates

(Source: TASS; published Sept 24, 2018)

MOSCOW, September 24. /TASS/. Research and development for a new generation frigate of project 22350M has begun in Russia, the CEO of Severnaya Verf (Northern Shipyard), Igor Ponomaryov, has told TASS, in an interview.

'We participate in this work together with the Northern Design Bureau, but the frigate’s parameters and their number will be determined by the Defense Ministry. Work is in progress. I do not believe that four ships will be enough for the Navy, which needs the replacement of its blue water ships,' he said.

Project 22350M

Ponomaryov earlier said the updated frigates of project 22350 will carry more powerful weapons and be capable of performing the functions of guided missile destroyers. The Navy’s Commander-in-Chief Vladimir Korolyov said the Navy hoped to have four project 22350 frigates by 2020. After that the project would be upgraded.

According to the chief of the United Shipbuilding Corporation Alexey Rakhmanov, these ships carry more weapons and more effective ones than the current project 22350. The Navy’s Deputy Commander-in-Chief for Armaments, Vice-Admiral Viktor Bursuk said the Navy would like to have the first upgraded frigate of project 22350M in 2026.

In contrast to destroyers, frigates have smaller displacement and less powerful weapons. Although the tasks of these two classes of ships are largely identical, destroyers have better weapons and radio-electronic equipment for independent combat operations. Also, destroyers can be used operate as leaders of attack groups.

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[*] posted on 5-10-2018 at 01:48 PM


Russia's Ship Design Bureau Comes Up with Catamaran Aircraft Carrier Concept

(Source: TASS; published Oct 02, 2018)


A model of a future, conventionally-powered aircraft carrier was presented for the first time at Russia’s Army-2018 forum at the end of August. The proposed project has no name yet. (Tass photo)

MOSCOW --- The Krylov State Research Center has come up with a fundamentally new design concept of what may become Russia’s future semi-catamaran aircraft carrier, the center’s spokesman told TASS.

The model of a future non-nuclear multirole aircraft carrier was presented for the first time at the Army-2018 forum at the end of August. The proposed project has no name yet.

"The semi-catamaran design of the ship’s underwater part is the project’s key distinguishing feature," the spokesman said.

Normally catamarans have two parallel hulls and a superstructure platform connecting them. The proposed semi-catamaran hull will resemble a dovetail, bifurcating toward the stern.

The company’s spokesman said the new design pattern’s main advantage was a large flight deck (as wide as that of heavy aircraft carriers) and smaller displacement. The flight deck area is a crucial factor for the number of planes the ship can carry.

"An average displacement ship is capable of carrying a full-scale air wing," the specialist said.

No V-shape hull aircraft carriers have been built so far.

Parameters

The Krylov Center said the proposed aircraft carrier’s water displacement will be 44,000 tonnes, length - 304 meters, deck width - 78 meters, draught - 8.5 meters, full speed - 28 knots, and cruising range - 8,000 miles.

The ship’s air wing will consist of 46 aircraft: 12-14 Sukhoi-33 fighters, 12-14 MiG-29K/KUB fighters, four early warning and command aircraft and 12-14 Ka-27 helicopters.

Russia’s only medium class aircraft carrier The Admiral Kuznetsov having a far greater displacement (59,000 tonnes) carries the same air group - up to 52 planes and helicopters.

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[*] posted on 5-10-2018 at 07:06 PM


We're doomed. Best buy all the F-22 and reactivate the F-111. Does anyone know how many goats we need to sacrifice in order to get the Goon Squad to save us?
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[*] posted on 31-10-2018 at 11:46 AM


Russia’s only aircraft carrier is damaged when dock sinks, crane punches huge hole in ship

By: The Associated Press   6 hours ago


The Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft carrier is shown in the Barents Sea, Russia, in 2004. A Russian official says one person is missing and four have been injured in an accident that damaged Russia's only aircraft carrier. (AP Photo, File)

MOSCOW — Russia’s only aircraft carrier was damaged in a dock accident Tuesday that left one person missing and four injured, officials said.

A floating dock sank early morning in Murmansk, dropping a crane on the deck of the Admiral Kuznetsov carrier, the United Shipbuilding Corporation said.

The corporation’s chief, Alexei Rakhmanov, said the 70-ton crane left a hole of 215 square feet, but added that it didn’t damage any of the ship’s vital systems.

The accident happened as the ship was leaving the dock following repairs. Rakhmanov said it may have been caused by a sharp power surge that led to pumps' failure.

Four workers were injured and one is still missing, Murmansk governor Marina Kovtun said on state-owned Rossiya 24 television channel on Tuesday.

Rakhmanov said that accident wouldn't lead to a significant extension of the carrier's refurbishment. Following the repairs, the carrier is to be fitted with modern control systems and new weapons.

Rakhmanov acknowledged, however, that the loss of the huge, 80,000-ton dock would disrupt the planned modernization of other Russian navy ships. The dock is the only structure of that capacity that Russia has, and it wasn't immediately clear whether it could be lifted.

The Admiral Kuznetsov carrier was launched in 1985 and has repeatedly been plagued by technical problems.

While the ship with its turbines belching black smoke looks outdated compared with the U.S. nuclear-powered carriers, it allows the Kremlin to project power far away from Russia's shores.

Two years ago, the Admiral Kuznetsov was deployed to the eastern Mediterranean as part of Russia’s campaign in Syria, launching the first carrier-mounted attacks in Russia’s navy history.
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[*] posted on 31-10-2018 at 12:37 PM


Sunken Floating Dock In Murmansk Will Take At Least Six Months to Recover — source

(Source: TASS; published Oct 30, 2018)


PD-50, Russia’s largest floating dock, is seen here during ongoing repairs to the aircraft carrier Admiral Kutnezov before the accident, during which the carrier was also damaged. It will take over six months to recover and repair. (TASS photo)

MOSCOW --- The operation to recover the sunken floating dock PD-50 in Murmansk will be rather tricky and may take six months to one year to accomplish, a source in the defense-industrial complex has told TASS.

"The enormous size and displacement of the floating dock as they are, the operation to recover it will be rather tricky. A great deal will depend on whether it lies flat or on the side. The moment it sank the floating dock developed a list, so most probably it is on the side, which will complicate the operation. The experience of recovering a sunken nuclear submarine (The Kursk) indicates, that the operation to recover the floating dock may take at least six months or last for a whole year," the source said.

Apart from the PD-50 Russia has another floating dock, PD-1, of approximately identical parameters in Severodvinsk. It is capable of accommodating large surface ships, such as The Admiral Kuznetsov or The Pyotr Veliki.

The floating dock of the 82nd repair plant in Murmansk sank the moment The Admiral Kuznetsov was being pullout out. Four workers suffered hypothermia and were taken to hospital. One of them also had a stomach injury. One person went missing.

The Defense Ministry concluded the repair contract with the ship repair plant Zvyozdochka in April 2018, hoping to have it back in 2021.

The heavy aircraft carrying cruiser The Admiral Kuznertsov, project 11435, joined the Northern Fleet at the beginning of 1991. Its full displacement is 59,100 tonnes, and length, 306 meters. It is capable of developing a speed of 29 knots. The Admiral Kuznetsov is armed with up to 50 planes and helicopters and anti-ship and air defense missile systems and artillery pieces.

The Admiral Kuznetsov is the Russian Navy’s largest ship and sole aircraft carrier.

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[*] posted on 10-11-2018 at 01:32 PM


Russian Navy Has No Replacement for Sunken Drydock (excerpt)

(Source: Maritime Executive; posted Nov 07, 2018)

The Russian Navy does not have a domestic replacement with equivalent capacity for the giant floating drydock PD-50, which sank out from beneath the service's only aircraft carrier last month. According to United Shipbuilding Corporation CEO Alexei Rakhmanov, there are no other graving docks or floating drydocks in Russia with the capacity to handle the carrier, the aging Soviet-era vessel Admiral Kuznetsov.

The PD-50 was a key facility at the 82nd Shipbuilding Plant, located near the Northern Fleet's home port of Murmansk. The floating drydock was commissioned in the early 1980s, the same era as the Kuznetsov, and it allowed the Soviet Navy to service the carrier and other large vessels without building a new drydock on site.

On October 30, while the Kuznetsov was in drydock for a deep overhaul, an electrical fault caused the PD-50's ballasting system to malfunction, and its tanks filled asymetrically on the left (port) side. Its two cranes toppled over as it listed, and one of them landed on the Kuznetsov's deck. The Kuznetsov floated free without further damage, but the PD-50 sank to the bottom, coming to rest in about 30-100 feet of water. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Maritime Executive website.

https://maritime-executive.com/article/russian-navy-has-no-r...

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[*] posted on 15-11-2018 at 12:50 PM


Anti-Aircraft Carrier to be Out of Repair on Time

(Source: Russian Ministry of Defence; issued Nov 13, 2018)

Head of the United Shipbuilding Corporation Alexey Rakhmanov guaranteed the Ministry of Defence meeting the deadlines of ship's repairing, and that the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov would be repaired on time after the accident at the floating dock.

"Are you positive that this accident will not affect deadlines of the repair works," First Deputy Defence Minister Ruslan Tsalikov asked Alexey Rakhmaninov at the teleconference.

“Everything concerning damage as a result of sinking dock and collapsing mechanisms on the take-off deck of an aircraft carrier will not significantly influence the deadlines,” the USC Head replied, adding that the aircraft carrier does not have serious damage.

He stressed that repair of these damages would not affect meeting the deadlines.

"It is important that you are positive about meeting the deadlines and ensuring high quality," the First Deputy Defence Minister stated.

The PD-50 floating dock sank on October 30 in Murmansk during a planned exit of the heavy aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetzov. According to the preliminary information the ship's deck was damaged by a collapsed crane. The ship is now at the 35th Shipyard.

(ends)
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[*] posted on 16-11-2018 at 07:10 PM


Construction of First 'Russian LCS' Project 20386 Corvette Delayed

POSTED ON FRIDAY, 16 NOVEMBER 2018 09:51

The supply of the superstructure for the Derzky lead corvette of project 20386 is delayed because of untimely financing, FlotProm online publication said quoting Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard which has to produce the superstructure for Severnaya verf Shipyard.


Artist impression of the new Project 20386 Corvette for the Russian Navy

In October Severnaya verf said Sredne-Nevsky was already producing the superstructure.

Both shipyards signed a contract to produce composite superstructure for the corvette in March 2018. Sredne-Nevsly Shipyard said it would take six months to produce the technological pattern and 20 months to build the superstructure. Thus, the superstructure could be ready in May 2019. Now the deadline has been moved to late 2019.

"As there was no financing, Sredne-Nevsky Shipyard had to inform the customer about the delay and could begin the construction only in September after a part of the funds was received," the shipyard said. "The enterprise can accelerate the production provided uninterrupted financing," it added.

Project 20386 superstructure is 1.5 times bigger than predecessors. It has different geometry and the main construction materials. "The experience of construction and operation of project 20380 and 20385 corvettes was taken into account. The shipyard believes the use of domestic materials in the Derzky superstructure will make a big step in the development of Russian composite technologies," the shipyard said.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 16-11-2018 at 07:23 PM


Nuclear reactors loaded onto project 22220 Ural atomic icebreaker

POSTED ON FRIDAY, 16 NOVEMBER 2018 09:14

Experts of the Joint Stock Company Baltic Shipyard, an affiliate of the United Shipbuilding Corporation, and GK Spetstyazhavtotrans enterprise have loaded two Ritm-200 nuclear reactors onto the second project 22220 serial atomic icebreaker Ural, the USC press service said.


Artist impression of first of class nuclear powered icebreaker "Arktika" (project 22220)
Image: Atomflot

"This work was absolutely unique because for the first time ever the reactors were loaded onto the icebreaker in conditions of a sloping pile. Previously, floating cranes had been used to load and install the reactors on ships. That was done on the float near a building berth," the press service said.

The Baltic Shipyard developed a special loading gear, which helped to synchronize the descent of the reactors under a certain inclination with an accuracy of up to 1 mm. The shipbuilders used a module-type rigging gear to install the heavy small-size equipment on the vessel with a high degree of accuracy.

The use of a sloping pile opens up new technical opportunities for installing nuclear power plants and reducing the time of the ship’s construction on the float. It also cuts expenses in the outfitting period.

Ritm-200 is a new power plant developed by the I.I. Afrikantov Design Bureau for the ice-breaking fleet. Ritm-200 is part of the main power unit of an icebreaker. It comprises two reactors with the heat output of 175 megawatt each. The new power plant is compact and economical. It has a unique energy efficient integral composition, which makes it possible to install the main equipment directly inside the body of the steam-generating unit. Previously, nuclear reactors were installed on the Arktika and Sibir ice-breakers.

The project 22220 lead ship Arktika was laid at the Baltic Shipyard in November 2013. The first serial ice-breaker Sibir was laid in May 2015. The second serial icebreaker - the Ural- was laid in July 2016. The displacement of the project 22220 atomic ice-breaker is 33450 tons; the length is 173.3 m. Sailing speed is 22 knots. Maximum ice thickness which the ice-breaker can overcome in continuous motion is 2.8 meters. The crew comprises 74 men.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 09:44 AM


Russia to Build Two More Large Amphibious Assault Ships

(Source: TASS; published Dec 03, 2018)

MOSCOW --- Russia’s United Shipbuilding Corporation (USC) will build two or three more Ivan Gren-class large amphibious assault ships for the Russian Navy, Corporation CEO Alexei Rakhmanov said on Monday.

"A decision has been made to finalize the Ivan Gren project. In particular, there will be changes in the hull. There are plans to build at least two or more ships under the improved project," the chief executive said.

"There is no contract yet," he added.

As Rakhmanov said, the second ship of the first series, the Pyotr Morgunov, will be built actually in the same way as the lead ship Ivan Gren.

The CEO of the Yantar Shipyard (where the ships of this class are under construction), Eduard Yefimov, earlier told TASS that the Ivan Gren series won’t be continued and there are plans to develop a new project of a large displacement ship.

The Project 11711 large amphibious assault lead ship Ivan Gren was laid down at the Yantar Shipyard in Kaliningrad in December 2004 and put afloat in May 2012. It was accepted for service in the Russian Navy on June 20, 2018.

The second ship of this Project, the Pyotr Morgunov, being built at the Yantar Shipyard on the Baltic coast, is due to enter trials no later than March 2019. In June next year, the warship is expected to start shipbuilders’ sea trials.

Project 11711 warships are designed to land marines on a coastal area seized by the enemy and transport military hardware and equipment. The warship can carry 13 main battle tanks or 36 armored personnel carriers (infantry fighting vehicles), and also up to 300 marines. The amphibious assault ship can also transport a reinforced marine infantry company with organic military hardware and land it with the use of pontoons.

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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 09:45 AM


No contract, no funding, no money, just more Fantasy Island stuff from the Russians...........
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[*] posted on 8-12-2018 at 12:01 PM


Russian Cutting-Edge Frigate Live-Fires Cruise Missiles In Barents Sea Drills

(Source: TASS; posted Dec 06, 2018)


The Russian Navy’s frigate Admiral Gorshkov has fired Kalibr cruise missiles as part of the last phase of its sea trials – it is the Northern Fleet’s first warship armed with Kalibr missiles. (RUS MoD photo)

MOSCOW --- Russia’s cutting-edge frigate Admiral Gorshkov has destroyed a target with a Kalibr cruise missile at a distance of 700 km in the Barents Sea drills, the Northern Fleet’s press office reported on Thursday.

"The combat exercise was performed at one of the Northern Fleet’s combat training ranges in the Barents Sea. The missile was launched towards the Chizha range in the Arkhangelsk Region. The target, against which the fire was conducted, stayed a distance of over 700 kilometers," the press office said.

The data recording equipment has shown that the fire was conducted with the designed accuracy and with the confirmation of all the flight and technical parameters, the Fleet’s press office said.

Also, during the planned sortie, the frigate’s crew held anti-submarine warfare and air defense drills along with some ship damage control exercises.

The frigate Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Gorshkov arrived for the Northern Fleet from St. Petersburg on September 8. The frigate is the Northern Fleet’s first surface ship carrying Kalibr cruise missiles. The warship made numerous inter-fleet passages from the Baltic to the Barents and White Seas for testing air defense, missile and artillery systems, mine and torpedo armament.

Over the entire period of state trials, the warship performed 16 firing exercises, using the main missile complex.

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[*] posted on 9-12-2018 at 08:58 AM


How the mighty have fallen.

The name Admiral Gorshkov once adorned an aircraft carrier, now it is a small frigate.

That's the reality of the current Russian navy and it's shipbuilding program and capabilities.






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[*] posted on 9-12-2018 at 12:36 PM


Yup! Their low budgets only allow for smaller vessels, and the priority is the Submarine force.

Mind you, they stick the biggest cruise missiles possible on them, just so most Western news outlets can scream like little girls about the "Russians are coming............" Effective against third class non-opposition. What would happen against Peer oppos is a whole different question?
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[*] posted on 10-12-2018 at 06:07 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
... and the priority is the Submarine force.


Same the Chinese, they both must realize the surface fleet will go away in any real fight, which may be a reason for them to spend elsewhere (other than a lack of funds that is). Subs and stealth(ish) bomber with low signature weapons are their best bets to make the surface fleet 'useful' given they can't field 5th-gen carriers for most of the next two decades.
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[*] posted on 10-12-2018 at 09:26 PM


The Chinese Navy seems to have adopted Stalin's maxim, that quantity has a quality all of it's own.

They are certainly turning out enough warships to suggest that.

What are they up to now, 28 Type 054A frigates?






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[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 11:45 PM


Russian Navy to acquire 12 new Lada-class submarines

Nikolai Novichkov, Moscow - Jane's Defence Weekly

13 December 2018

AND the money for this is coming from where..............

The Russian Navy plans to procure 12 more Project 677 Lada-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs).

“We will continue to build the Project 636.3 Varshavyanka-class [Improved Kilo-class] SSKs and at least 12 of the newest Lada-class submarines,” the navy’s commander-in-chief, Admiral Vladimir Korolyov, told Russian media on 3 December.

According to the admiral, Russia’s naval shipbuilding industry is building two more Project 677 SSKs, Kronstadt and Velikiye Luki. “The Kronstadt submarine was launched in late September. Both SSKs will be delivered to the navy in 2021,” he said. An Admiralty Shipyards source told Jane’s that the contracts for the fourth and fifth submarines would be signed in 2019.

(130 of 214 words)
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[*] posted on 22-12-2018 at 03:15 PM


Russian Nuclear-Powered Missile Cruiser Enters Barents Sea for Combat Training Missions

(Source: TASS; published Dec 19, 2018)


The Pyotr Veliky is the Russian Navy’s sole operational Orlan-class heavy nuclear-powered cruiser. She entered service with the Russian Navy in 1998, and is the world’s largest non-carrier warship to be nuclear-powered. (RUS MoD photo)

MOSCOW --- The Russian Northern Fleet’s flagship heavy nuclear-powered missile cruiser Pyotr Veliky has entered the Barents Sea for accomplishing combat training missions, the Fleet’s press office reported on Wednesday.

This is the warship’s first sortie in the new combat training period, the press office said.

"The cruiser’s crew will practice some elements of the surface ship’s readiness at sea and carry out an attack against a submarine with the firing of anti-ship missiles," the Northern Fleet’s press office said.

"The cruiser’s crew will perform the combat exercise with the practical weapon, striking the target whose role will be played by one of the vessels of the Northern Fleet’s submarine force," the press office said.

After accomplishing its missions at sea, the Pyotr Veliky will return to the Fleet’s main naval base of Severomorsk.

The Pyotr Veliky is the Russian Navy’s sole operational third-generation Project 1144 ‘Orlan’ heavy nuclear-powered missile cruiser. It was laid down at the Baltiysky Shipyard on August 25, 1986 and floated out on April 25, 1989. On April 18, 1998, the warship entered service with the Russian Navy and the St. Andrew’s naval flag was hoisted aboard it.

Project 1144 ‘Orlan’ (NATO reporting name: Kirov class) battle cruisers are the Russian Navy’s first and sole nuclear-powered surface ships. The warships of this Project are the world’s largest non-carrier strike combat ships.

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[*] posted on 11-1-2019 at 01:25 PM


Admiral Kasatonov Frigate Finishes First Stage of Sea Trial in Baltic Sea

(Source: Russian Ministry of Defence; issued Jan 09, 2019)


Russia’s latest frigate, the Gorshkov-class ship RFS ‘Admiral Kasatonov’, has completed the first stage of her sea trials, which will resume after the Gulf of Finland is freed from ice in the spring. (RUS MoD photo)

Admiral Kasatonov the newest frigate, built for the Russian Navy at the Severnaya Verf enterprise, successfully completed the first stage of factory trials in the Baltic Sea testing grounds and returned to St. Petersburg.

Tests will continue after the improvement of the ice situation in the Gulf of Finland.

Earlier, the crew of the ship underwent comprehensive training at the Joint Training Center of the Navy and was ready to conduct all phases of the test program.

Project 22350 frigates are ships of the far sea zone, carriers of high-precision weapons. They are effectively operated both individually and as part of groups of the Russian Navy.

Frigate is 135m long, 16m wide with displacement of 5,000t. The cruising range is 4,500 nautical miles, endurance is 30 days. The crew is about 200 sailors.

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[*] posted on 25-1-2019 at 11:00 PM


Russian Navy to get two hydrographic vessels by 2019

POSTED ON FRIDAY, 25 JANUARY 2019 10:41

Russian Navy Commander-in-Chief Admiral Vladimir Korolev listened to the reports of Navy headquarters at a meeting in the Admiralty about the construction of hydrographic vessels with modern sea and oceanic research equipment, the Russian Defense Ministry said.


Alexander Rogotsky hydrographic vessel (Picture source : East Russia)

In particular, the reports concerned the construction schedule of small hydrographic boats of project 19910 capable of operating at a distance of 3000 miles from the deployment base. At present two vessels are being built and have to be handed over in 2019. The Nikolai Skosyrev is built by Vympel Shipyard in Rybinsk for the Northern fleet and the Alexander Rogotsky is built by the October Revolution Shipyard in Blagoveshchensk for the Pacific fleet.

"The Navy will continue to research the World Ocean to adjust navigation maps and study the weather in various latitudes. We are beginning a new stage of hydrographic fleet renewal. We continue batch production of big hydrographic boars and launched serial production of new-generation hydrographic vessels to provide hydrographic support to the fleets," Korolev said.

Project 19910 boats are designed for hydrographic research and to service navigational equipment in closed and coastal waters. Their main mission is to set and withdraw navigational sea buoys of all types, inspect, recharge and overhaul coastal and floating navigational equipment, engage in hydrographic missions, transport various cargoes for the operation of coastal equipment and hydrographic units to unequipped coast.

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[*] posted on 5-2-2019 at 04:50 PM


Missile Strikes on Syria Demonstrate Power Projection Capability of Russian Project 1166 Class

(Source: Forecast International; issued Feb 01, 2019)

The Ukrainian embargo on the supply of marine gas turbines to the Russian Navy has had a significant impact on the Project 1166 Gepard program. One possible outcome might well be a modification of the vessel’s design so that it uses an all-diesel powertrain. It is notable that the new Sri Lankan order is for a diesel-only ship and, given the way in which the Russian system works, this is likely to be the prototype for a Russian Navy-equivalent vessel. If so, this may move the probable acquisition date by the Russians up two or three years.

The 2015 cruise missile attack on the Syrian rebels has also raised the profile of the class and demonstrated that it offers a significant power projection capability in a small, inexpensive hull. The Sri Lankan acquisition followed this action, and the missile attacks may have had a bearing on the final Sri Lanka Navy decision in favor of this class. The important factor was that the ship purchased is “equipped for but not with” the capability to carry land-attack missiles should the necessity arise.

Positives and Negatives

An examination of the Project 1166 shows the class to have good endurance for its size and to be adequately equipped for a wide range of tasks, yet inexpensive enough to be purchased in large numbers. Recent events have shown that there is a growing role for a class of ship that has the endurance and presence capabilities of an offshore patrol vessel but also an enhanced combat capability. Project 1166 appears to fulfill this role to perfection. It is faster than an offshore patrol vessel and can reach the scene of an incident more quickly. As an added bonus, that same extra speed could be lifesaving in the case of a maritime disaster.

Set against its capabilities are the limitations of the Project 1166. One such limitation is that these vessels are a comparatively old design that dates from the early 1980s and reflects the design tradeoffs of that era. The ships have relatively large crews for their size and role, increasing operating costs and recruitment issues. Crew comforts and facilities also reflect the Soviet design era rather than the requirements of the present day. It has been reported that, following experiences with the Dinh Tien Hoang, the Vietnamese Navy demanded significant habitability improvements with the Ly Thai To.

Ship maintenance and support is another area that Russian shipbuilders have yet to address to Western standards. The Project 1166 equipment is all Russian and is not interoperable with Western-designed ships. Now, it is entirely possible to re-equip these ships with Western electronics and weaponry, but doing so could lead to integration problems and would likely sacrifice the low cost that is such a significant virtue of the Project 1166 class. These limitations suggest that the market for the Project 1166 will be restricted to existing operators of Russian-produced warships who seek to replace older tonnage. However, this may change if a Western-equipped version becomes available.

Outstanding Orders

Currently, the only confirmed outstanding orders for the vessel are the ASW-configured ships bought by Vietnam and the patrol-configured ship purchased by Sri Lanka. The design is being heavily promoted to Indonesia as a replacement for its large fleet of East German-built corvettes.

There is significant additional potential for this useful design. Russian sources have referred to an alleged plan to build up to eight ships of this class for service in the Baltic and Caspian seas. This may provide scope for additional construction in the medium term. At the moment, though, none of the additional ships proposed for the Russian fleet appear to have been ordered. This, combined with the Ukrainian turbine embargo, means that any additional Russian deliveries will not take place for at least another eight years – unless, of course, a diesel-engined version is produced.

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[*] posted on 7-2-2019 at 05:24 PM


Troubled Waters: Russian and Ukrainian Marine Turbines

(Source: Forecast International; issued Feb 05, 2019)

The unrest in the Donbass region of Ukraine and the annexation of Crimea have chilled relations between Ukraine and Russia. In terms of turbines, the current troubles have had far-reaching implications for both sides. Sanctions and reverse-sanctions have created a unique situation.

Prior to the current tensions, Ukraine was Russia’s primary producer of marine gas turbines. Zorya-Mashproekt, a hold-over from the Soviet era, is a company located in Ukraine that produces both industrial and marine machines. Its marine turbines are of strategic importance to the Russian Navy in particular, and that service was once Zorya-Mashproekt’s primary customer. The sale of turbines for military purposes has long been sanctioned, and Russia is currently looking inward to fill the gap in its capabilities.

Enter UEC Saturn.

Since the 1920s, Saturn has been producing aircraft engines ranging from early piston engines to jet turbines. Aviation has been its bailiwick; however, since the fall of the Soviet Union, the company has been actively pursuing industrial and marine turbines. To say that the current political climate was the catalyst to researching and developing these turbines is not exactly true. Company literature states that I&M turbine development has been active since 1993 – in other words, well before tensions with Ukraine. Despite the company’s prior interest in domestic machines, there must be a renewed sense of urgency to what NPO Saturn is trying to accomplish.

Sea Project 22350 Gorshkov

Reportedly, two Project 22350 frigates, the Admiral Golovko and Admiral Isakov, are sitting with no propulsion plants. Zorya-Mashproekt does power some ships of the class, but deliveries have ceased. New ships lying idle are a strategic hindrance to the Russian Navy; however, UEC Saturn is developing a new turbine. Believed to be called the M90FR, the new machine will be installed in the above-mentioned ships and future 22350 frigates. Development, though, does not end there.

UEC Saturn is reportedly also developing a turbine for hovercraft. These air-cushioned vehicles have long been in service with the Russian Navy, and with a new turbine, Russia likely has ambitions to build more of the amphibian craft.

There is a general movement in Russia, throughout many sectors, to look inward rather than depend on foreign technologies. With ships already built and awaiting powerplants, Russian gas turbine development is assuredly a major priority. Teething issues are expected with these new machines, which means they will likely enter service in the next decade.

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[*] posted on 14-2-2019 at 07:10 PM


Russia Navy looks to extend Akula SSN life

Tim Ripley, London - Jane's Navy International

14 February 2019

The Russia Federation Navy is aiming to keep its Project 971 Shchuka-B (NATO reporting name ‘Akula’) nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) in service for another 25–30 years, according to a senior Northern Fleet officer.

Speaking to the Russian Ministry of Defence’s Zvezda television network on 3 February, Captain 1st Rank, Pavel Bulgakov, Chief of Staff of the 24th Submarine Division at Yagelnaya Bay on the Kola Peninsula, said “with overhauls and maintenance these submarines can stay in operation at least another 25–30 years.”

He added that the Project 971 submarines were well suited to having their lives extended through upgrades. “That’s [the Shchuka-Bs] greatest strength,” Capt Bulgakov said.

(107 of 344 words)
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