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Author: Subject: ASW/ASuW Maritime Warfare helicopters
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[*] posted on 26-4-2019 at 10:55 PM


Poland signs for AW101 helicopters

Gareth Jennings, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

26 April 2019

Poland has signed for AgustaWestland AW101 helicopters to satisfy its anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) requirements.


Seen here in UK Royal Navy service, the AW101 has been selected by Poland, primarily in an anti-submarine role but also with a secondary combat search-and-rescue role. (IHS Jane’s/Patrick Allen)

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and Defence Minister Mariusz Blaszczak signed the contract for four helicopters at PZL-Świdnik's facility in eastern Poland on 26 April. According to the Leonardo subsidiary, the value of the deal, which includes logistics, support, training, and a medical equipment package, is PLN1.65 billion (USD430 million).

As previously reported by Jane's , Leonardo will provide PLN400 million of industrial offsets under the deal, which Poland will use to drive employment, national exports, and defence industrial development.

Neither the Polish Ministry of National Defence (MND) nor Leonardo disclosed a delivery timeline for the new helicopters, which will replace the Warsaw Pact-era Mil Mi-14 'Haze' ASW helicopters in service with the Polish Navy.

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[*] posted on 26-4-2019 at 11:01 PM


Interestingly enough, I wonder, perhaps totally left field, if the Brits haven't done a back-door deal for some of the first Type 23's to be retired from RN service? The Upgraded versions are good for at least 10 years of service, and might get the Polish Navy out of the crack of piss poor warships they currently have.

The much-rumoured acquisition of the Upgraded OHP's from the RAN certainly doesn't appear to have happened............in any shape or form.



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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 09:39 AM


Raytheon and Kongsberg unveiled lethal version of MH-60 Romeo armed with Naval Strike Missiles

May 12, 2019 in Aviation, Missiles & Bombs, News


Raytheon and Kongsberg unveiled lethal version of MH-60 Romeo armed with Naval Strike Missiles
Photo by James Drew @StrikeWriter

Raytheon Missile Systems, partnered with Kongsberg Defence and Aerospace, has unveiled a lethal version of MH-60 Romeo multimission helicopter armed with two Naval Strike Missiles.

Media specialist James Drew has posted a photo of an advanced helicopter with Naval Strike Missiles that was unveiled during the Sea Air Space Exposition at the Gaylord National Convention Center in National Harbor.

“Potentially the most lethal MH-60R Seahawk on the planet, armed with twin 100-nautical-mile, air-launched Naval Strike Missiles,” he said on Twitter.

The Naval Strike Missile is a long-range, precision strike weapon that can find and destroy enemy ships at distances up to 100 nautical miles away. The stealthy missile flies at sea-skimming altitude, has terrain-following capability and uses an advanced seeker for precise targeting in challenging conditions.

The MH-60 Romeo multimission helicopter will receive two Naval Strike Missile (NSM) in a helicopter-launched application.

According to Jane’s Defence Weekly, the Indian Navy appears poised to become the first customer for the helicopter-launched Naval Strike Missile. The missile will be integrated into Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky MH-60R multimission helicopters that India is looking to acquire under a Foreign Military Sale (FMS) case.

The MH-60R is equipped with a highly sophisticated combat system designed to employ Hellfire air-to-surface missiles and the Mark 54 anti-submarine torpedo. The primary missions of the helicopter is anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare. Secondary missions include search and rescue, logistics support, personnel transport and medical evacuation.
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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 11:05 AM


This is of obvious relevance to the RAN and it's SeaHawks...........:cool:
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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 03:13 PM


Targeting may be an issue with a 100km range, especially in well-traveled waters



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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 03:28 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
Targeting may be an issue with a 100km range, especially in well-traveled waters


Make that 160 km range


Cheers.


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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 03:56 PM


100 NAUTICAL MILES.............
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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 07:32 PM


That will be about 185 km.



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[*] posted on 13-5-2019 at 10:02 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
This is of obvious relevance to the RAN and it's SeaHawks...........:cool:


I remember Abe years back mentioned RAN had short and long ranged anti-surface weapon requirements for it’s maritime helos...

We’ e had the short covered for a while now. Perhaps the long range capability is, finally coming to fruition?




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[*] posted on 14-5-2019 at 09:33 AM


Bidding Opens for South Korea's 12 Maritime Helicopters

(Source: The Korea Times; posted March 13, 2019)

By Jung Da-min

The Defense Administration Program Administration (DAPA) has kicked off an open bid for South Korea's second batch of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters.

The bid for the Republic of Korea Navy's new ASW helicopters runs from May 2 until Aug. 16.

The U.S. aerospace and defense giant Lockheed Martin and Italian giant Leonardo are expected to be competing for DAPA's batch-2 program featuring the acquisition of 12 helicopters for about 950 billion won ($802 million).

In 2016, DAPA purchased eight helicopters for the deployment plan of 20 with Leonardo, deploying its AW159 Wildcat in 2017.

DAPA was going to sign a direct commercial sales (DCS) deal with Leonardo for 12 more Italian multi-mission helicopters last year, as no other competitors participated in the biddings in June and October.

Soon after the Nov. 14 deadline for the second bidding last year, however, the U.S. government sent a letter of price and availability for Lockheed Martin's MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, giving Seoul the option of a Foreign Military Sales (FMS) deal with Washington.

DAPA now has a choice between the DCS deal and the FMS deal, based on renewed proposals by Leonardo and Lockheed Martin, respectively.

"The companies' proposals shall first be evaluated to select the eligible entities. DAPA will then conduct a test and evaluation, and negotiations on the selected systems," the procurement agency said in its latest announcement on the bid. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Korea Times website.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/05/205_268768.ht...

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[*] posted on 11-6-2019 at 10:29 AM


Seoul Makes Third Try For Naval Helicopter Bids

Jun 11, 2019

Kim Minseok and Bradley Perrett | Aviation Week & Space Technology

Twice last year, the South Korean defense ministry requested proposals for a naval helicopter requirement. Twice the only bidder was Leonardo, offering the AW159 Wildcat. Now the ministry is making one last attempt at getting a contest. If it fails, the country will have to haggle with Leonardo for a noncompeted contract.

Lockheed Martin’s Sikorsky subsidiary or Airbus could offer competition, but neither is confirming that it will put up a fight for the program, MOH 2, which calls for 12 anti-submarine helicopters. One key challenge for them is that the budget looks matched to the Wildcat but not the Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk or the NH90, which is mostly made by Airbus. Another is that the South Korean navy already has Wildcats.

- Twelve anti-submarine rotorcraft are required
- The budget looks like a challenge for Sikorsky and Airbus

Airbus says it is considering how to respond to the latest request for proposals (RFP). Sikorsky did not reply to Aviation Week’s request for comment.

The first RFP for MOH 2 was issued in June 2018 and the second in October 2018. Both were voided because only Leonardo offered a bid, the company says, confirming that it plans to offer the Wildcat again. Under defense procurement law, the ministry must try three times for a competition, hence a third request for bids was issued on May 10.

Even before the nearly yearlong wait for envelopes that never arrived, the program was delayed by lobbying to adapt the Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) Surion for the mission. After repeated assessments, the ministry finally decided to import helicopters.


South Korea has eight Wildcats, ordered in 2013. Credit: Republic of Korea Navy

The ministry has budgeted 950 billion won ($800 million) and wants delivery to begin in 2020-24, according to local media reports. The value looks consistent with Leonardo’s price of 589 billion won for eight Wildcats that South Korea ordered in 2013 for the MOH 1 program, the first stage of an overall requirement called MOH. The ministry will presumably see savings in support and training if it chooses the same type for MOH 2.

The ministry’s purchasing office, the Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA), said in March it was open to direct commercial purchase or buying through the U.S. government’s Foreign Military Sales process, as would be used for the MH-60R, the current version of the Seahawk in production for the U.S. Navy. But the Sikorsky type is costly. In April, the U.S. government approved a sale of 24 MH-60Rs to India, estimating the cost at $2.6 billion. The company’s difficulty in meeting the South Korean budget may explain why it did not respond to the first two RFPs.

In November 2018, the U.S. government advised the defense ministry of price and availability for MH-60Rs, broadcaster SBS said at the time. Sikorsky could conceivably offer a simplified and cheaper version of the Seahawk.

Airbus says it is “currently studying the RFP and reviewing its options to assess how it can best support the customer’s requirements. ”The company makes no mention of any specific helicopter type that it could offer. In 2017, South Korea’s DAPA expected the NH90 to be a candidate.

The Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, a Seoul-based think tank, has reportedly estimated unit costs as 78.7 billion won for the MH-60R, 66.8 billion won for the NH90 and 53.4 billion won for the Wildcat. Exactly what was included in those figures is unknown.

Helicopters bought under MOH 1 and MOH 2 are intended to serve alongside 23 Lynx helicopters made by Leonardo’s predecessor company Westland and KAI. The navy wants to upgrade the newest of these, 12 Lynx Mk. 99As, presumably for service into the 2030s. But the 11 Lynx Mk. 99s, survivors of 12 built almost 30 years ago, will be both well-worn and unmodernized in the 2020s. So the winner of MOH 2 may be well positioned to supply a further batch of a dozen helicopters next decade. The overall MOH requirement envisages eventual acquisition of 40 helicopters, including Lynx replacements.

Leonardo highlights commonality with the Lynx as reducing support costs for the Wildcat fleet. But the company has emphasized that the Wildcat is a basically new type, not a new version of the Lynx, however similar the two may look.

Similarly, Sikorsky can point to the MH-60R’s commonality with South Korea’s utility, rescue and VIP versions of the H-60; the country bought 112 such helicopters between 1990 and 1999. But the MH-60R, a complex naval aircraft, has many features absent from older H-60 versions.

Leonardo says the Wildcat has an advantage in that it is easy to support at sea, requiring only eight mechanics per helicopter.

The company did not cite comparative figures. It also claims a performance advantage for the Wildcat’s Seaspray 7000E radar, which has an active, electronically scanned array and is made by Leonardo.

Endurance may be an issue. Lockheed Martin says the MH-60R can operate for up to 3.5 hr., although the load is not defined. According to Leonardo, the Wildcat cannot fly 3.5 hr. even when not carrying a torpedo; its endurance with one torpedo is 2 hr.

Another issue is the limited size of the flight decks on some of the warships with which the MOH 2 helicopters must operate. When the Surion was considered for MOH 1, KAI offered to pay to modify the ships for safe operation of that type. The Wildcat is smaller than the Surion, but the MH-60R is larger.
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[*] posted on 14-6-2019 at 03:14 AM


Indonesia designates two Panther helicopters for anti-submarine operations

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

13 June 2019


Then Indonesian Navy chief Admiral Ade Supandi at the commissioning ceremony of the service's first two Panther helicopters in 2017. Source: TNI-AL

Key Points

- Indonesia has designated two of its AS 565 Panther naval helicopters for anti-submarine warfare duties
- Nine other airframes are currently being fitted for multimodal missions and will replace the service's fleet of ageing BO 105 helicopters

Only two of the Indonesian Navy's (Tentera Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Laut: TNI-AL's) 11 Airbus Helicopters AS 565MBe Panther helicopters are equipped for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations, a military source told Jane's on 11 June.

The rest of the helicopters in the fleet are currently being configured for multimodal operations, and will progressively replace the TNI-AL Naval Aviation Fleet's squadron of ageing BO 015 utility helicopters.

"In the future, the remaining nine helicopters might be installed with ASW equipment like the dipping-sonar, but for now, only two airframes in the fleet have been dedicated for ASW operations," the source said.

Indonesia ordered 11 new AS565 MBe Panther helicopters in 2014 as part of efforts to improve the TNI-AL's embarked aviation and ASW capabilities. According to information provided by Airbus Helicopters, the Panther variant that has been supplied to the TNI-AL has an increased maximum take-off weight over its predecessors, at 4,500 kg, compared with 4,300 kg for earlier versions of the AS 565.

The aircraft is equipped with two Safran Arriel 2N engines that have been optimised for 'hot and high' conditions, and enables the helicopter to reach a top speed of 165 kt and a range of 780 km. The aircraft is also equipped with Airbus Helicopter's latest-generation tail rotor and a four-axis autopilot to help reduce crew workload.

Under a collaboration agreement between Airbus Helicopters and state-owned Indonesian company PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PTDI), all 11 airframes were delivered in the 'green' state to PTDI's facilities in Bandung where they received their service liveries, and underwent further outfitting, including installation of mission equipment.

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[*] posted on 4-7-2019 at 02:18 PM


China's New Ship-Borne Chopper to Raise PLA's Ability to New Level: Military Specialists

(Source: Global Times; issued July 03, 2019)


A model of the Z-20 helicopter, a Chinese copy of the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk, is being tested by the Chinese Navy aboard one of its destroyers; local media reports it is fitted with a reinforced landing gear and foldable rotor blades. (Twitter photo)

China's latest vessel-borne helicopter will take the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy's combat capability to a new level, Chinese military experts said on Tuesday after a full-sized model of the navy variant of the Z-20 utility helicopter was allegedly spotted testing on a warship for the first time.

Citing a photo that surfaced on Chinese social media, Weapon magazine reported, via its social media account, on Saturday that the Z-20 navy variant was on board a Chinese destroyer and its characteristic appearance made it clearly identifiable.

Generally the same helicopter as the army version, the vessel-based navy version can additionally minimize its size in the hangar through design features like foldable rotor blades, judging from the photo. It might also feature extra anti-corrosion capabilities and stronger landing gear, said Weapon magazine affiliated with the state-owned China North Industries Group Corporation, a major manufacturer of Chinese military equipment and weapons.

Having a full-sized model on board for testing means the PLA is studying the practical adaptability of the Z-20 on ships, testing for things such as how the helicopter would enter and exit the hanger and how much space it would actually take up, Li Jie, a Beijing-based naval expert, told the Global Times on Tuesday.

Compared to other in-service shipboard helicopters, the Z-20 has a good takeoff weight (while remaining not oversized on ships) and can better adapt to situations at seas, Li said.

Often compared to the US' UH-60 Black Hawk, the Z-20 is a 10 ton-class medium-lift utility helicopter that can adapt to different terrain and weather, military experts told the Global Times previously.

It would have the capabilities to fly on destroyers, amphibious landing docks, amphibious assault ships and aircraft carriers, undertaking a wide range of tasks including anti-submarine warfare, reconnaissance missions, transportation as well as search and rescue on the high seas, Li said, noting that the helicopter will play an important role in the multidimensional and digitalized battlefield.

The Z-20 will help the Navy reach a higher level of effectiveness, Li noted.

The helicopter is seen by many military enthusiasts as a member of China's most advanced "20 series" aircraft, with the others being the J-20 stealth fighter jet, the Y-20 large transport plane and the H-20 strategic bomber.

The army version of the Z-20 has reportedly entered trial service, but the alleged commissioning has not yet been officially confirmed.

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[*] posted on 13-7-2019 at 08:10 PM


State approves half-billion MH-60R helo sale to Greece

By: Jen Judson   13 hours ago


U.S. Navy MH-60R Seahawk helicopter assigned to the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 70 shoots an AGM-114N Hellfire missile during exercise Baltic Operations in the Baltic Sea on June 14. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theodore Green/Navy)

WASHINGTON — The State Department has cleared a possible $600 million foreign military sale of seven MH-60R Seahawk Multi-Mission helicopters to Greece.

Congress was notified of the sale July 12, according to an announcement posted to the Defense Security Cooperation Agency’s website. Congress is required to approve the deal.

The sale will include 10 APS-I 53(V) Multi-Mode Radars, 18 T700 GE-401 C engines as well as other radar, targeting and communications systems and equipment.

The order would also include 1,000 AN/SSQ-36/53/62 Sonobuoys, 100 Advanced Precision Kill Weapons System rockets, 30 MK 54 Torpedoes and M-2400 guns.

The principal contractor is Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems in Owego, New York.

The government in Greece announced it intended to buy the helicopters in February as part of a modernization effort.

Greek officials have recently sought closer ties to the U.S. military at the same time U.S. relations with Turkey have soured over its acquisition of the Russian S-400 air defense system.A
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[*] posted on 31-7-2019 at 09:08 PM


Leonardo flight tests Wildcat weapon wings

31 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Dominic Perry London

Leonardo has begun flight testing new weapon wings for the AW159 Wildcat helicopter, which will carry anti-ship missiles for the UK Royal Navy.

Performed using a RN Wildcat HMA2 (ZZ513), the trials began on 2 July from the manufacturer's facility in Yeovil, in the southwest of England.


Rick Ingham

Flights have so far been in a clean configuration, at low and high speeds, and at high altitudes; this phase of testing is "nearly complete", says Leonardo.

Future evaluations will take place with dummy weapons installed, eventually moving to further integration activities – including firing campaigns – for both the MBDA Sea Venom and Thales Defence Martlet munitions.


Rick Ingham

Each wing can accommodate either 10 Martlet or two Sea Venom missiles. The design also provides additional lift for the helicopter in forward flight, taking some effort from the main rotor.

Work is being conducted by the airframer under a £90 million ($110 million) contract signed in 2014 that will see all 28 of the RN's Wildcats gain the weapons wings.

Both missiles are being developed under the Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapons programme and are due to achieve initial operating capability on the Wildcat in 2020. France is also acquiring the Sea Venom, which it calls ANL.
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[*] posted on 1-8-2019 at 08:23 PM


India to buy 24 MH-60R Seahawk naval helicopters late in 2019

Posted On Wednesday, 31 July 2019 15:25

The Indian Defense ministry is expected to move forward with the procurement of 24 MH-60R Seahawk naval helicopters by this year’s end, Franz-Stefan Gady reports on The Diplomat.


Lockheed Martin-Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk (Picture source: U.S. Navy)

India is expected to sign a $2 billion-plus contract for the procurement of 24 Lockheed Martin-Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk multirole naval helicopters. “The LOR (letter of request) and LOA (letter of acceptance) procedures [are on track] and we should be ready by the end of the year,” Admiral Karambir Singh was quoted as saying by The Economic Times on July 25.

The helicopters will be directly bought from the U.S. government under a Foreign Military Sales (FMS) agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense to expedite the procurement of the new helicopters. Let’s remind that India’s Defense Acquisition Council (DAC) approved the procurement of 111 armed light naval utility helicopters (NUH) and 24 naval multirole helicopters (NMRH) for the Indian Navy under the Indian Ministry of Defense’s new strategic partnership policy in August 2018.

The MoD in February issued a new Expression of Interest (EOI) officially relaunching the entire NUH procurement process, following the breakdown of negotiations over the purchase of 16 U.S.-made Sikorsky S-70B-x helicopters, although their acquisition had already been cleared in 2014 by the DAC. The new EOI calls for 16 helicopters directly bought from abroad, and the remaining 95 to be manufactured in India. The 24 NMRHs will now be directly purchased from the United States and not fall under the MoD’s strategic partnership policy.

The U.S. State Department cleared the possible sale of 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters in April 2019 for an estimated $2.6 billion, Franz-Stefan Gady recalls. The FMS deal includes 30 APS-153(V) Multi-Mode radars, 60 T700-GE-401C engines, 24 Airborne Low Frequency System (ALFS), 1,000 AN/SSQ-36/53/62 sonobuoys; 30 MK 54 torpedoes; 10 AGM-114 Hellfire missiles; 38 Advanced Precision Kill Weapons System (APKWS) rockets; and 70 AN/AVS-9 Night Vision Devices, in addition to other equipment and parts.
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[*] posted on 2-8-2019 at 09:31 AM


German Navy selects NH90 to replace Sea Lynx

Gareth Jennings, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

01 August 2019


The German Navy has selected the NHIndustries NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopter (NFH) to replace ageing Westland Mk 88A Sea Lynx anti-submarine warfare/anti-surface warfare helicopters. Source: Airbus Helicopters

The German Navy (Deutsche Marine: DM) has selected the NHIndustries NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopter (NFH) to replace its ageing Westland Mk 88A Sea Lynx anti-submarine warfare/anti-surface warfare (ASW/ASuW) helicopters, the Bundeswehr announced on 1 August.

Having previously selected the German-specific Sea Lion variant of the NH90 NFH to replace its Westland Mk 41 Sea King maritime helicopter, the DM is to now receive a German version of the French NFH Caiman, named Multi-Role Frigate Helicopter (MRFH).

“This ensures a smooth transition and synergies in later operations,” the Bundeswehr said.

As noted by the Bundeswehr, the helicopter selection was made at the end of 2018 with the support of the Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology, and In-Service Support (BAAINBw). The representative of the Inspector General of the German Armed Forces, Vice Admiral Joachim Rühle, approved this proposal on 29 July, and the new helicopters are to be delivered from 2025.

Although no prospective contract value or numbers were given, a Germany Navy source has disclosed that 31 NH90 helicopters will replace the 21 Sea Lynxes.

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[*] posted on 2-8-2019 at 02:52 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
German Navy selects NH90 to replace Sea Lynx

Gareth Jennings, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

01 August 2019


The German Navy has selected the NHIndustries NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopter (NFH) to replace ageing Westland Mk 88A Sea Lynx anti-submarine warfare/anti-surface warfare helicopters. Source: Airbus Helicopters

The German Navy (Deutsche Marine: DM) has selected the NHIndustries NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopter (NFH) to replace its ageing Westland Mk 88A Sea Lynx anti-submarine warfare/anti-surface warfare (ASW/ASuW) helicopters, the Bundeswehr announced on 1 August.

Having previously selected the German-specific Sea Lion variant of the NH90 NFH to replace its Westland Mk 41 Sea King maritime helicopter, the DM is to now receive a German version of the French NFH Caiman, named Multi-Role Frigate Helicopter (MRFH).

“This ensures a smooth transition and synergies in later operations,” the Bundeswehr said.

As noted by the Bundeswehr, the helicopter selection was made at the end of 2018 with the support of the Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology, and In-Service Support (BAAINBw). The representative of the Inspector General of the German Armed Forces, Vice Admiral Joachim Rühle, approved this proposal on 29 July, and the new helicopters are to be delivered from 2025.

Although no prospective contract value or numbers were given, a Germany Navy source has disclosed that 31 NH90 helicopters will replace the 21 Sea Lynxes.

(200 of 451 words)


I am Jack's complete lack of surprise....
I always thought it was a bit disingenuous that the German's even bothered with a competition.
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[*] posted on 2-8-2019 at 03:18 PM


Yup, dead cert winner...……….they already have shit service-ability rates, this will just add to them...…..
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[*] posted on 15-10-2019 at 07:23 PM


Images emerge of naval variant of China's Z-20 helicopter

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

14 October 2019


Images have emerged on Chinese online forums showing a naval variant of China’s Z-20 helicopter in flight. Source: Via lt.cjdby.net/

The first clear images of a naval variant of China's Z-20 tactical helicopter have emerged on Chinese online forums. The platform features several significant differences from the variant used by the People's Liberation Army Ground Force (PLAGF), more details of which emerged during the 5th China Helicopter Exposition held in Tianjin from 10-13 October.

The naval variant, which is being commonly referred to as Z-20F and is to be operated by the PLA Navy (PLAN), features a revised undercarriage arrangement, with the tail wheel moved forward to a position behind the cabin, and shorter struts for the forward undercarriage. The more compact undercarriage footprint has been designed to cope with landing on the small area of a ship's flight deck.

The tail is hinged forward of the tail rotor to reduce the length of the aircraft when stowed in a ship's hangar. It can be assumed that the main rotor blades also fold, as does the horizontal stabilator fitted below the tail rotor, which has a distinctive notch in the centre that differs from the PLAGF's variant.

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[*] posted on 17-10-2019 at 10:07 PM


ADEX 2019: South Korea closes in on MOH 2 decision

Jon Grevatt, Seoul - Jane's Defence Industry

17 October 2019


Leonardo’s AW159 helicopter (pictured) and Lockheed Martin’s MH-60R are bidding for the Republic of Korea Navy’s programme to procure a second batch of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters. Source: Republic of Korea Navy

South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) is preparing to select a platform to meet a Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN) requirement for additional anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopters.

The programme - named the Maritime Operation Helicopter batch-two (MOH 2) procurement - features the acquisition of 12 helicopters for about KRW900 billion (USD804 million). Under the MOH batch-one programme, Leonardo supplied eight AW159 Wildcat twin-engine multimission helicopters to the RoKN in 2016.

Bidding for the MOH 2 programme are two candidates: the AW159 and Lockheed Martin's MH-60R Seahawk Romeo maritime multimission helicopter. Jane's understands that a preferred tenderer is expected to be identified by DAPA by mid-2020.

Leonardo's Brian J McEachen, vice president of Asia-Pacific government campaigns, told Jane's at the 2019 Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition (ADEX) that the company's MOH 2 bid will leverage economies of scale - in terms of maintenance, infrastructure, and training activity - linked to the batch-one supply of eight AW159 aircraft.

He added that the company would also look to integrate local capabilities onto the helicopter. This has already been achieved through the first batch, said McEachen, supporting the integration of South Korean firm LIG Nex1's K745 Blue Shark anti-submarine torpedo.

In May 2019, the Philippine Navy (PN) also took delivery of two AW159 helicopters, with the Blue Shark part of the export. The aircraft are expected to be deployed from the PN's two new Jose-Rizal-class frigates, which are under construction at South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries.

Lockheed Martin's Sikorsky MH-60R proposal is framed through the United States Foreign Military Sales (FMS) mechanism, confirmed Lockheed Martin's Mark Zavack, senior manager, mission systems business development.

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[*] posted on 20-10-2019 at 10:06 AM


Yep, totally not based in stolen IP and purloined technology, it's the product of many highly skilled Chinese aeronautical scientists working in alignment with President Xi's 'Thoughts on National Defence through Plagiarism"

See, it's got five rotor blades, not four like that inferior Sikorsky copy of our glorious Chinese helicopter. Our's is therefore 25% better


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Images emerge of naval variant of China's Z-20 helicopter

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

14 October 2019


Images have emerged on Chinese online forums showing a naval variant of China’s Z-20 helicopter in flight. Source: Via lt.cjdby.net/

The first clear images of a naval variant of China's Z-20 tactical helicopter have emerged on Chinese online forums. The platform features several significant differences from the variant used by the People's Liberation Army Ground Force (PLAGF), more details of which emerged during the 5th China Helicopter Exposition held in Tianjin from 10-13 October.

The naval variant, which is being commonly referred to as Z-20F and is to be operated by the PLA Navy (PLAN), features a revised undercarriage arrangement, with the tail wheel moved forward to a position behind the cabin, and shorter struts for the forward undercarriage. The more compact undercarriage footprint has been designed to cope with landing on the small area of a ship's flight deck.

The tail is hinged forward of the tail rotor to reduce the length of the aircraft when stowed in a ship's hangar. It can be assumed that the main rotor blades also fold, as does the horizontal stabilator fitted below the tail rotor, which has a distinctive notch in the centre that differs from the PLAGF's variant.

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It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
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[*] posted on 25-10-2019 at 09:13 AM


First Sea Lion helicopter delivered to Germany

24 October, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Dominic Perry Donauworth

Airbus Helicopters has handed the first of an eventual 18 NH90 Sea Lion naval rotorcraft to Germany, with an additional two examples to arrive by year-end.

Destined to replace the German navy's 21-strong fleet of aged Westland Sea King 41s, the Sea Lion has been developed from the baseline NFH variant produced by the NH Industries (NHI) consortium.


Airbus Helicopters

They are the first NH90s to feature avionics improvements allowing them to be flown in instrument flight rules conditions in civil airspace; the capability will be later introduced to the rest of the fleet.

Deliveries are due to run until 2022 while the Sea Kings will be progressively retired by 2023. Captain Thorsten Bobzin, chief of German naval aviation, says that although it has has a stated strength of 21 Sea Kings "some have already been used for spare parts".

The inventory of the aged Westland type will be reduced to 16 aircraft by year-end, and then cut further as the Sea Lion comes on line.

Germany intends to use the Sea Lions for search and rescue operations in the North and Baltic Sea regions, personnel transportation and special forces support missions.

Initial deliveries are in a so-called “step one” configuration, but an enhanced step two standard, featuring an improved Mode 5 identification friend or foe transponder, will arrive from 2021.

Berlin selected the navalised NH90 as its Sea King successor in 2013 as part of negotiations to restructure its original commitment for 122 TTH troop transports plus 80 Tiger attack helicopters destined for its army.

Wolfgang Schoder, chief executive of Airbus Helicopters Deutschland - which is building the helicopters at its Donauworth plant - hails the “remarkable performance” that enabled delivery “exactly on time and on budget”.

“We are very happy but it is only the start - we have 17 more to deliver which will happen over the next three years," he says.
Germany currently operates 72 TTHs, with a further seven on order, according to Cirium fleets data.

It has additionally selected the NH90 TTH to replace the 22 Westland Sea Lynx 88s operated by the navy. However, a contract has yet to be finalised.

Airbus Helicopters is the largest shareholder in the NHI venture, which also includes Leonardo Helicopters and Fokker.
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[*] posted on 25-10-2019 at 08:35 PM


German navy calls for quick Sea Tiger contract signature

25 October, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Dominic Perry Donauworth

Germany needs a rapid acquisition of new naval helicopters under its Sea Tiger programme if the service is not to face a capability gap, the head of naval aviation and industry representatives have reaffirmed.

In August, the German defence ministry signaled that it had selected the NH Industries NH90 to replace the navy’s 24-strong fleet of aged Westland Sea Lynx 88s which are due to be removed from service in 2025.

Captain Thorsten Bobzin, commander of German naval aviation, points out that the duration of the Sea Lynx’s service life is “tightly defined” and therefore difficult to extend further.

To match that retirement deadline, a contract signature is required over the next 12 months, said Bobzin who was speaking in Donauworth at an event to mark the delivery of the navy’s first Sea Lion helicopter, another version of the NH90.

That view is supported by industry. Eberhard Scholl, vice-president NH90 NAHEMA programme at Airbus Helicopters – the largest shareholder in the NHI consortium – describes the navy’s 2025 deadline as a “critical timeframe”.

“If I work backwards, we would need to deliver the first aircraft at the beginning of 2024,” he says.

Similarities with the Sea Lion, the first of which was delivered in around five years from contract signature, and the French navy’s NH90 Caiman ASW helicopter, should simplify the development, says Scholl, but notes that Germany will not be able to add additional capabilities.

Discussions between industry and Germany’s BAAINBw procurement agency are “just starting”, says Scholl, but is working towards a possible contract signature next year.

Germany had also been considering the Leonardo Helicopters AW159 and Sikorsky MH-60R for the anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare mission, but eventually selected the NH90 due to fleet commonality considerations, says Bobzin.

All the contenders met “80% of the requirements”, he says, but rather than focusing on addressing those shortcomings “I started looking at the timeline where I could not really afford to go through a lengthy process of deciding”.

With the Sea King already being replaced with the NH90 by 2023, logistics and training structures were already in place to support the acquisition of additional examples, he says.

“The German navy has for a number of years been suffering from operating types of aircraft that nobody else in the armed services is flying.

“They were all very small fleets and have been operating for a long time. By now coming into a single helicopter fleet we are gaining 48 helicopters of the same make.”

The navy intends to acquire 31 examples of the NFH variant under the Sea Tiger programme, maintaining its policy of embarking two helicopters on each frigate in future, with a single unit to be reserved for test and evaluation activities.

Germany is buying 18 naval NH90s under the Sea Lion effort.
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[*] posted on 1-11-2019 at 07:07 PM


German Navy Plots An Aviation Transformation Path

Nov 1, 2019

Tony Osborne | Aviation Week & Space Technology

Germany has kicked off a refresh of its naval air arm with a new fleet of helicopters and ambitions for a greater aviation presence at sea. The handover of the first NH90 Sea Lion to German defense procurement agencies on Oct. 24 not only represents the first new helicopter to be delivered to the German Navy since the mid-1990s but also what defense officials hope will be an end to the dark days of limited serviceability that has often brought the reliability of the German armed forces into question by its allies.

Currently, the German Navy’s air fleet is dominated by the Westland-built Sea King and Lynx Mk. 88 naval helicopters; however, in recent years, both types have struggled with spares shortages and serviceability issues.

- 18 Sea Lions are replacing the Westland Sea King
- German Navy wants 31 Sea Tigers to replace the Lynx
- NH90 beat competition from Wildcat and MH-60

During 2014, the entire Lynx fleet was grounded due to the discovery of cracks in the tail boom, abruptly leaving the navy without its primary anti-submarine warfare helicopter for several months. The 18 Sea Lions-—a derivative of the NATO Frigate Helicopter (NFH) version of the NH90—will replace the Sea Kings and are primarily tasked with search and rescue (SAR), naval transport and resupply missions.

Deliveries of the Sea Lion will run until mid-2022, when naval officials hope they can begin also replacing the Lynx with another version of the NH90, which Germany is naming the Sea Tiger, a helicopter equipped with anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare systems like those equipping the French Navy’s NH90s Caiman Marine ASW platforms.


The Sea Lion helicopters will be tasked with the SAR and naval transport mission, including resupply of ships at sea. Credit: Patrick Heinz/Airbus Helicopters

The German Navy announced it had selected the NH90 as a Lynx replacement in July, and both naval officials and Airbus are hopeful they can be on contract in 2020. Such a contract is subject to parliamentary approvals, however.

Airbus officials say they are in the process of preparing the offer for the additional 31 helicopters. Together, the Sea Lion and Sea Tiger fleets will give the German Navy a fleet of 49 NH90s. Add that to the German Army’s planned fleet of 82 land-based tactical transport versions of the helicopter, and by the late 2020s, Germany will be the largest operator of the NH90 anywhere.

The plan to purchase 31 Sea Tigers represents a significant increase on the Lynx fleet, which originally numbered 24. The increase reflects an “ambition” to be able to equip 15 of Germany’s surface combatants with two helicopters each, with only minor “amendments” required to enable the larger helicopters to operate from some of the vessels, says German naval air service commander, Capt. Thorsten Bobzin. An increased presence at sea fits with Germany’s ambitions to be a stronger pillar of European defense, particularly in securing maritime trade routes.

Bobzin said both the AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat and the Sikorsky MH-60R had been briefly considered for the requirement, but the NH90 was selected, in part because of the potential risks of introducing an entirely different platform to the fleet.

“All three aircraft could do 80% of the tasks we wanted them to do,” explains Bobzin, but “we could not really afford to go through a lengthy process of deciding.”

The German Navy had been “suffering” from “operating types of aircraft that nobody else in the armed forces are flying,” he adds.

Commonality with the German Army’s fleet of NH90s was a strong deciding factor, as was commonality with neighbors Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Bobzin says the navy will also stick to existing configurations both in terms of onboard systems and weapons for the helicopter.

Parked alongside each other, the Sea Lion and Sea Tiger will be virtually identical. While this brings advantages for crew training and systems such as flight-training devices, Bobzin says it is unlikely that Sea Lion and Sea Tiger crewing will be interchangeable because of the challenges associated in keeping complex SAR and ASW flying skills current.

In the meantime, Bobzin must balance the introduction of the Sea Lion while maintaining the Sea King for SAR duties. The navy is already scaling back the Sea King fleet, removing several from service this year and parting them out for spares. Engineers are also scouring other former operators, including the UK, for parts to keep the type operational until 2023.

The German Navy is making strides to add rotary-wing unmanned aerial systems to its ships as well, last year ordering the Skeldar V-200 for an urgent operational requirement for use from its Braunschweig-class corvettes. Bobzin says there likely will also be a UAV component to the Maritime Airborne Warfare System (MAWS), the proposed future maritime patroller that Berlin hopes will replace its Lockheed P-3 Orion fleet in the 2030s. The French and German governments both pledged in October to launch a MAWS feasibility study in early 2020.
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