The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3
Author: Subject: JAPANESE Navy, 2017 onwards
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-8-2019 at 04:54 PM


US Fighter Jets Eyed As First Users of Retrofitted Izumo Carrier (excerpt)

(Source: The Asahi Shimbun; published August 21, 2019)

By Takateru Doi

The Japanese government has been caught in a lie over its plans to retrofit the Izumo destroyer and effectively transform the vessel into an aircraft carrier.

Officials initially presented the project as simply one that would strengthen the nation's ability to defend outlying islands and secure the safety of Self-Defense Force pilots by reducing their flight times.

When Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya was asked by opposition lawmakers in March if U.S. fighter jets would be allowed to use the Izumo, he stated that only if the aircraft had no closer landing points while flying out at sea.

It now turns out that Japanese officials then informed their U.S. counterparts that U.S. fighter jets would likely be the first to use the Izumo for landings and take-offs.

Improvements to the Izumo deck and other measures to allow aircraft to land and take off from the ship will finish in fiscal 2020. Another MSDF destroyer, the Kaga, will also be retrofitted, with plans calling for completion in fiscal 2022.

The government has also approved a plan to purchase U.S.-made F-35B fighter jets which have short take-off and vertical landing capabilities. The F-35B jets will be mainly used on the Izumo and Kaga, but the aircraft will not be deployed until after fiscal 2024.

That leaves open the possibility of at least a three-year period when the Izumo would be capable of being used as an aircraft carrier, but with the Air SDF having no such aircraft in its arsenal. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Asahi Shimbun website.

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201908210022.html

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-10-2019 at 11:40 AM


US Department of State approves potential sale of follow-on support for JMSDF’s Aegis-equipped destroyers

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

04 October 2019

The US Department of State has approved a potential USD140 million Foreign Military Sale (FMS) of follow-on technical support (FOTS) sustainment and services for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's (JMSDF's) eight Aegis-equipped destroyers, the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced on 1 October.

The Japanese government had requested FOTS sustainment and services in support of the JMSDF's four Kongo-, two Atago-, and two Maya-class guided-missile destroyers, said the DSCA, adding that the potential sale, which still needs to be approved by the US Congress, also includes one Japanese Computer Test Site (JCPTS).

The DSCA said that the proposed sale is "critical" to ensure that the JMSDF's Aegis destroyer fleet and the JCPTS "remain ready to provide critical capabilities in the defence of Japan".

(148 of 369 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 09:12 AM


Japan launches second Soryu-class submarine equipped with lithium-ion batteries

Kosuke Takahashi, Tokyo and Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

06 November 2019


KHI launched on 6 November the 12th and final Soryu-class SSK on order for the JMSDF. The boat is also the second of the class to be equipped with lithium-ion batteries. Source: KHI

Japan's Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) has launched the second Soryu-class diesel-electric attack submarine (SSK) for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) equipped with lithium-ion batteries.

The 84 m-long boat, which has been named Toryu (with pennant number SS 512), entered the water on 6 November in a ceremony held at KHI's facilities in Kobe.

Toryu is also the 12th and final submarine of the Soryu class and the sixth to be built by KHI, with the other six having been built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The boat was laid down in January 2017 and is expected to enter service with the JMSDF in March 2021.

The launch comes after GS Yuasa, a Kyoto-based developer and manufacturer of battery systems, announced in February 2017 that Japan would become the first country in the world to equip SSKs with lithium-ion batteries in place of lead-acid batteries.

At the time the company said the batteries, which store considerably more energy than the lead-acid batteries, would be mounted on the final two Soryu-class boats for the JMSDF: SS 511 ( Oryu ), and SS 512 ( Toryu ).

According to Jane's Fighting Ships , the Soryu class has a beam of 9.1 m, a hull draught of 8.4 m, and a displacement of 2,947 tonnes when surfaced and of 4,100 tonnes when submerged.

The previous boats of the class have been fitted with two Kawasaki 12V 25/25 diesel generators and four Kawasaki Kockums V4-275R Stirling air-independent propulsion (AIP) engines, and use lead-acid batteries for energy storage.

Each of the platforms has a top speed of 20 kt when submerged and of 12 kt when surfaced.

The Soryu class is equipped with six 533 mm bow tubes that can fire the Japanese-developed Type 89 heavy-weight torpedo. The boats are also capable of deploying the UGM-84C Harpoon medium-range anti-ship missile against surface targets.

(332 of 739 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 965
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 12:16 PM


God help them if a Li-Io battery catches fire...they won't be putting it out with hoses and halon.



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
magnify
Member





Posts: 288
Registered: 28-5-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 03:33 PM


Not all lithium-ion batteries are thermally dangerous or toxic, lithium iron-phosphate batteries don't suffer from thermal runaway and it's matrix is a rock mineral that's non-toxic if damaged and breathed. The lithium stays bound within the molecule. It also has a fast recharge speed in tens of minutes, as opposed to hours, but still does not over heat or degrade. Plus delivers an almost constant discharge rate until it is drained. It's also less prone to performance loss from over-discharging and repeated partial charging.

Consumer batteries commonly use thermal-runaway dangerous types of Li-ion because they have a higher energy density per unit volume and weight, plus generally cost a bit less. Though of late the cost is little different. You can bet the sub's Li battery is lithium iron-phosphate based. (LiFePO4)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-11-2019 at 09:35 AM


Japanese Navy May Have Gained Tactical Edge with New Submarine (excerpt)

(Source: Forbes Magazine; posted Nov 12, 2019)

By H I Sutton

In a ceremony on November 6, Japan launched its latest submarine, the Toryu, its second to be equipped with lithium-ion batteries. Japan is the first country to field this game-changing technology in submarines.

So, what is the big deal? We are familiar with lithium-ion batteries in our smartphones, laptops and other consumer goods. They have a higher power-density than traditional batteries, and they can be made smaller and in novel shapes which better fit the space given to them. Yet the submarine community has been slow to adopt this technology.

This is for good reason. As we know from Samsung's woes with the Galaxy Note 7, lithium-ion batteries are prone to catching fire. Battery fires aboard submarines can quickly turn lethal. Recently 14 elite Russian submariners lost their lives due to a fire in the battery compartment of their submarine. Those were traditional, safer, lead-acid batteries. Japan must have found a way to make lithium-ion batteries safe enough to send to sea.

The first 10 Soryu class boats used traditional heavy-duty acid batteries like almost every other submarine in the world. Even nuclear submarines have a bank of lead-acid batteries as back up.

But the Japanese submarines also have an Air-Independent Power (AIP) system. This uses closed-cycle ‘Stirling’ diesel engines to generate electricity to turn the propeller while the submarine is submerged. This means that submarines can patrol longer without surfacing, thus preserving their stealth. AIP is itself seen as cutting-edge technology so it's telling that Japan has stepped beyond this with lithium-ion batteries. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Forbes Magazine website.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/hisutton/2019/11/12/japanese-na...

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ADMK2
Member





Posts: 980
Registered: 11-5-2017
Location: Brisvegas
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-11-2019 at 06:23 PM


‘Cutting edge’... Yeah, the first Stirling engine was created in 1816...

Gentleman ‘the state of modern journalism...’




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1    3

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 76.6% - SQL: 23.4%]