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Author: Subject: Philippine Navy, 2017 onwards
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[*] posted on 24-8-2017 at 04:34 PM
Philippine Navy, 2017 onwards


PH Navy to Get US-Donated Radar System on Aug. 22

(Source: Philippines News Agency; issued August 19, 2017)

By Priam Nepomuceno

MANILA --- The Philippine Navy (PN) will formally take possession of its first-ever tethered aerostat radar system (TARS) donated by the US government.

The turnover ceremony will be led by US Embassy in Manila’s Deputy Chief of Mission, Michael Klecheski, and PN flag-officer-in-command, Vice Adm. Ronald Joseph Mercado, at the Naval Education and Training Command in San Antonio, Zambales on Tuesday.

Navy spokesperson, Capt. Lued Lincuna, said the TARS, a self-sustained, unmanned lighter-than-air systems, would enhance the PN’s capability in maritime intelligence surveillance reconnaissance by effectively detecting maritime and air traffic within the country’s coastal waters using sensors.

It will also be used in the conduct of humanitarian assistance and disaster response operations.

The TARS includes a weather station that provides telemetry data to the ground station for the monitoring of ambient temperature, pressure, wind speed, and other pertinent parameters in the operation of the system. (PNA)

-ends-
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 12:19 PM


Philippine Navy chief terminated in reported frigate procurement row

By: The Associated Press   10 hours ago

There is a VERY BAD stink being left by this. The Navy specified a bunch of necessary requirements and between the Korean designer/builder HHI, and the DND, Department of National Defense in the Philippines, these requirements have been emasculated to the point of non-existence.........IF built, these are going to be 2nd class warships NOT the premier warships the Navy wanted and needs........expect huge amounts of shit to fly around on this, including corruption........

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippine Navy chief has been relieved of his duties, reportedly because of differences with other security officials over a frigate deal, officials said Tuesday.

Military spokesman Col. Edgard Arevalo said the military chief of staff, Gen. Rey Leonardo Guerrero, has enforced orders from “higher authorities” and assigned Vice Adm. Ronald Joseph Mercado to his office and installed an acting Navy chief, Rear Adm. Robert Empedrad.

Arevalo said that “the reason for this change of command will be explained in due time.”

Navy spokesman Capt. Lued Lincuna said he was unaware what sparked Mercado’s “relief” and asked reporters to refer their questions to “higher authorities.”

In a letter seen by The Associated Press, however, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana complained that Mercado, through his subordinates, “had continued to trifle” with the Department of Defense’s decision in a major frigate deal, which the department awarded to Hyundai Heavy Industries of South Korea last year.

Mercado and other Navy officials apparently had opposing views over which “combat management system” to install in two frigates, which Hyundai Heavy Industries was building for 18 billion pesos (U.S. $357 million) under the military’s modernization program.

Mercado’s attitude of “orchestrating such unmeritorious issue does not speak well of his leadership for which this department had lost its confidence in him to lead this important major service command,” said the letter from Lorenzana, who sought President Rodrigo Duterte’s approval to relieve the Navy chief from his post.

Mercado did not immediately respond to a request from reporters for comment.

The government has scrambled for years to raise funds to modernize its military, one of Asia’s most ill-equipped, to deal with decades-long Muslim and communist insurgencies and protect its territorial claims in the disputed South China Sea.
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 07:31 PM


Spotlight falls on Philippine frigates acquisition programme after navy chief’s sudden removal

Ridzwan Rahmat - Jane's Navy International

19 December 2017


A computer generated image of the Philippine Navy's new frigates. Source: Hyundai Heavy Industries

Key Points
- The Philippine Armed Forces has relieved the country’s navy chief of his duties in a shock move
- Removal has put a spotlight on the country’s frigates acquisition programme, which has seen a number of irregularities

Acting on instructions from the Department of National Defense (DND), the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) has removed Vice Admiral Ronald Joseph Mercado from his position as Philippine Navy (PN) chief in a widely unexpected move.

The development was confirmed by spokesperson for AFP, Colonel Edgard Arevalo, on 19 December, and the changes took effect on the same day. Adm Mercado assumed leadership of the PN in November 2016.

The admiral is now expected to take on duties within the AFP’s headquarters in Manila, where he may serve until his scheduled mandatory retirement in March 2018 upon reaching the age of 56, in accordance with AFP manpower regulations. However, his exact appointment within the establishment has not been announced by the AFP at the time of writing.

Replacing Adm Mercado as acting PN chief is Rear Admiral Robert Empedrad, who was previously the PN’s Deputy Chief of Staff for Retirees and Reservists Affairs.

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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 08:10 PM


HHI could end up being the biggest Loser here, in the form of a cancellation of the Project. There is a lot of dubious shit gone on here, mostly led by the Koreans NOT being able to meet the PN requirements and specifications. As a result they have offered lesser-capability Korean systems and not the predominantly THALES systems the PN SPECIFIED.

Some of this is driven by the fact the Philippine PESO has lost value against other currencies, but, it's also very apparent HHI did not price most of this project correctly or even accurately, and presumed that the PN could "magic" additional funds from somewhere.........they can't, there are none to access.

HHI has been intent for at least the past 6-9 months to drive down costs by substituting inferior equipment to that specified. The Navy has final say, but the prime sign-off, Head of the Navy, has now been sacked due to his on-going opposition to what has been offered. The DND has already told HHI everything they have offered is good to go! HHI remains intent to offer only Korean systems as this puts them in good stead with the Korean government (that they owe significant funds to) and National industry, ion some cases, that is part of the same industrial grouping.
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[*] posted on 28-12-2017 at 01:34 PM


Via MaxDefense Philippines blog........



Inserting a good news out of the many bad news coming out of the Philippine Navy, correcting our info posted earlier today:
Sourcing the announcement made during the Offshore Combat Force's Christmas Party over a week ago, Pres. Duterte is said to have signed the DBM recommendation and order to release funding for the transfer of the former ROKN Flight III Pohang-class corvette ROKS Chungju to the Philippine Navy worth Php250 million, and that the officers, men and women to man it would be sent to South Korea by January 2018.

The signing was done quite late to the point that the SARO release order was not made together with other projects like the MPAC Batch 4 and PAF Combat Utility Helicopters which were signed earlier and has SARO released on 22nd December 2017.

SARO release would possibly be made in early January 2018 once government offices resume business after the long holidays.

At least it was still a Merry Christmas for the OCF despite the setbacks in the Frigate project, considering the ship could be in Manila before the end of 1st Quarter 2018.
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[*] posted on 9-1-2018 at 10:01 PM


OCEA to Supply Patrol Boats and OPV to Philippines Coast Guards

Posted On Monday, 08 January 2018 21:52

The Philippines Coast-Guards selected OCEA for the supply of 5 boats at civil standards, with the associated logistic support services: 4 fast-patrol boats of 24 m Type OCEA FPB 72 MKII, 1 offshore patrol vessel of 84 m type OCEA OPV 270, cCrew and maintenance teams training, the maintenance of the vessels in operational conditions.


OCEA FPB 72 MKII

This choice is the result of an international competition that highlighted the solutions developed by OCEA; that allow very strong reduction of the operational costs and of the CO2 emissions.

OCEA fast patrol boat FPB 72MKII (24 m) is a well-known model within the shipyard, who already delivered such units to Nigeria in 2012, to Suriname in 2013, and again to Nigeria in 2017.


OCEA OPV 270 MKII

OCEA OPV 270 offshore patrol vessel (84 m) is the outcome of 30 years of experience and permanent innovation in the field of aluminum design and shipbuilding. OCEA confirms its presence in the offshore patrol vessels (OPV) segment, initiated during the 2014 EURONAVAL exhibition by the presentation of its OPV range. OCEA has already delivered 60 m units to the Indonesian Navy in 2015 and to the Senegalese Navy in 2016.

These units will be built in the new facilities of OCEA shipyard in Les Sables d’Olonne.

The transition to this new size of vessels represents a great performance for OCEA, who substantially invested in its production facilities and design capabilities in 2015.

The customer selected OCEA for the performances and operational capabilities of the vessels, fully adapted to Philippines coastguard requirements, thanks to its design department and its expertise in building aluminum vessels with demanding operational profiles.

Beyond these technical considerations, the advantages of OCEA solution were its competitive acquisition price as well as the operational cost of the vessel designed by OCEA, significantly lower than a steel vessel.

A less common selection criterion, but taking a significant turn: the Philippines, who signed the Paris Agreements, were seduced by the reduced environmental impact of OCEA solution.

The OCEA OPV 270, over 20 years of operation, will allow for a CO2 emission reduction of 20 400 tons, equivalent to approximately 40% reduction by comparison to a similar size steel vessel, for equal performance.

After the delivery of two 60 m oceanographic vessels to the Indonesian Navy, this new contract with the Philippines government sets firmly OCEA sales activities in Asia.

OCEA points out that this achievement was made possible thanks to the support of the French State, in particular BPI France, the committed French Administration (especially the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Finance), and also thanks to the strong involvement of BNP Paribas and Crédit Agricole-LCL banks.

The vessels are scheduled for delivery in 2018 for the 4 FPB 72 and in 2019 for the OPV 270.
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[*] posted on 23-2-2018 at 06:23 PM


Senior Philippine Navy official reiterates call to acquire submarines

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

23 February 2018

I'm all for the Navy getting submarines BUT, as pointed out to a number of people there, you are looking at a 10-15year programme to achieve an effective Force of even 3 x submarines..........PLUS you need to build 2-3 facilities around the Philippine Islands to base them from, defend those bases with missiles AND stock them with enough torpedoes and missiles to make the Force effective under war scenarios.........NOT something done cheaply, quickly or easily! All of this out-with of the Training that would need to be done of 200-300 crew and support personnel.....

A senior Philippine Navy (PN) official has reiterated calls for the country to operate its own fleet of submarines amid mounting security challenges in the region.

The service’s flag officer-in-command, Rear Admiral Robert Empedrad, made the call during a hearing with the Philippine senate. The admiral was responding to questions from Senator Emmanuel Pacquiao, on equipment that the PN would need for its modernisation efforts.

Besides being “the future of naval warfare”, submarines are also required “to get the respect of other foreign countries or navies”, according to the admiral, as quoted by the country’s official Philippine News Agency (PNA).

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[*] posted on 23-2-2018 at 08:40 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Senior Philippine Navy official reiterates call to acquire submarines


What a waste of precious resources. If they really want to "get the respect of other foreign countries or navies" they would set up a SOSUS network for a fraction of the cost and time. The Philippine archipelago is choke-point central. Add a modest but credible ASW force and some "respect" from a neighbour is theirs.
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[*] posted on 2-3-2018 at 08:04 PM


Philippine’s seventh Parola-class patrol vessel arrives home

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

02 March 2018

Key Points

- The Philippine Coast Guard has received its seventh Parola-class patrol vessel
- Platform has significantly bolstered service’s constabulary capabilities



The Philippine Coast Guard’s (PCG’s) seventh multirole response vessel (MRRV) has arrived in the country.

Vessel movement analysis by Jane’s via the IHS Markit’s AISLive portal on 2 March indicates that the platform, which will be in service as BRP Cape San Agustin with pennant number 4408, departed Tokyo Bay on 23 February, and has now arrived in Manila Bay.

Cape San Agustin joins six existing MRRVs that were commissioned by the PCG between October 2016 and November 2017. The vessels were ordered under a government programme known as the Maritime Safety Capability Improvement Project for the PCG (Phase II).

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[*] posted on 18-4-2018 at 08:14 PM


Philippine Navy receives donation of 41 inflatable boats from US

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

17 April 2018

The Philippine Navy has received a donation of 41 inflatable rubber boats from the Joint US Military Assistance Group (JUSMAG).

These boats, which have been supplied by military equipment manufacturer Zodiac Milpro, were handed over on 13 April in a consignment that includes a 30 hp outboard motor for each vessel and other associated equipment.

Each boat measures 13.5 ft in length, has a hull weight of 205 lb, and can deliver a payload of 2028 lb, such as an eight-men troop detachment.

The inflatable boats will be distributed across the Philippine Navy’s fleet of surface vessels, said the service in a statement on 17 April.

(130 of 222 words)
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[*] posted on 2-5-2018 at 10:07 PM


Hyundai cuts steel for Philippine Navy’s first HDF-3000 frigate

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

01 May 2018

Key Points

- Hyundai has begun work on the first of two new frigates on order for the Philippine Navy
- Service is expected to receive the first frigate in the second half of 2020

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has held a steel-cutting ceremony for the first of two 107 m frigates on order for the Philippine Navy (PN).

The ceremony was held on 1 May at HHI's Ulsan's shipyard. It was attended by Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana and PN chief, Vice Admiral Robert Empredad.

HHI received a contract to supply the PN with two 2,600-tonne frigates, both of which derive its design from the Republic of Korea Navy’s (RoKN’s) Incheon (FFX-I) class, in 2016.

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[*] posted on 4-5-2018 at 08:28 PM


HHI Cut Steel of Philippine Navy First HDF-3000 Frigate

Posted On Thursday, 03 May 2018 16:19

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) started construction of the Philippine Navy’s first of two future guided missile frigate. The steel-cutting ceremony was held on May 1st at the HHI shipyard in Ulsan.

The ceremony was attended by Hyundai Heavy Industries President Hwan-Goo Kang, Philippines Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, Philippine Navy Chief of Staff Vice Admiral Robert Empedrad, and Defense Undersecretary Raymundo Elefane.

Hyundai Heavy Industries is set to launch the vessel in May next year and deliver it to the Philippine Ministry of Defense in the second half of 2020. HHI will start construction on the second frigate in September this year and deliver it in the first half of 2021. The contract for the two frigates was awarded to Hyundai Heavy Industries in October 2016.


Philippines Navy future frigate

These new frigates are variant of Hyundai’s own HDF-3000 FFX-I Multipurpose Frigate. According to specifications provided by Hyundai, the Philippines design features a length of 107m, a beam of 12m and a hull draught of 4m. The platform has a standard displacement of approximately 2,600 tonnes.The propulsion consists in four diesel engines in Combined Diesel and Diesel (CODAD) configuration.

The frigate has a range of 4500 nautical miles, a maximum speed of 25 knots and is capable of carrying ASuW, AAW and ASW missions. According to HHI, it is designed to have excellent operational performance and survivability, especially in rough sea conditions such as typhoons and tropical climate.

Servowatch Systems’ scope of supply comprises an IPMS control and monitoring package for the vessels’ propulsion plant, electric power plant, auxiliary/ancillary system. Battle Damage Control System (BDCS) and On-board Training System (OBTS) are also to be included in scope of IPMS.

The frigates sensor systems will consist in:

» Hanwha Systems Naval Shield Baseline 2 Integrated combat management system (CMS)
» Hensoldt TRS-3D Baseline D multi-mode phased array C-band Radar
» Airbus MSSR 20001 Identification Friend of Fore (IFF) System
» Leonardo Selex ES NA-25X Fire Control Radar
» Harris Model 997 medium frequency active/passive ASW hull mounted sonar
» Hanwha Systems Link P Tactical Data Link (derived from Link K)
» Elbit Systems Elisra NS9300A Electronic Support Measure (ESM)
» Safran PASEO NS Electro-Optical Tracking System (EOTS)
» Servowatch Integrated Platform Management System

The frigates weapon systems will consist in:

» 1x Hyundai Wia 76mm main gun
» 1x Aselsan SMASH 30mm RWS as secondary weapon
» 4x LIGNex1 SSM-700K C-Star anti-ship missiles
» 2x MBDA Simbad-RC VSHORAD launchers (2x Mistral missiles each)
» 2x SEA Ltd. TLS-TT Shipboard tirple Torpedo Launching System for LIGNex1 K745 Blue Shark torpedoes
» 8x vertical launch system (VLS) cells for surface to air missiles (to be determined)
» 2x Terma C-Guard decoy launchers

The frigates are fitted with a helicopter pad and hangar to accommodate an AW-159 Wildcat Anti-Submarine Helicopter.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2018 at 08:37 PM


Noteworthy is the fact the warship has no Oto Compact Super Rapid 76/62mm main gun, rather a Hyundai less capable 76/62mm cannon with lower rate of fire. The CMS is a Hanwha "copy" of an earlier version of the Thales TACTICOS system that they were partners with until 2016..............it's not LINK 16 capable. HHI cheap-shitted the 30mm RCWS and have included a Turkish cheapo system, only recently introduced (2017) and not combat proven.

All told HHI have ferked this up.............and some clown in the Philippines DoD signed off a change to the Contract that allows HHI to make these changes almost at their discretion. LOTS of Lessons Learnt for the PN!
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[*] posted on 22-5-2018 at 09:12 AM


Philippine Navy to receive Saab’s Sea Giraffe AMB radar

Gabriel Dominguez, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

21 May 2018

Saab will supply its Sea Giraffe AMB naval radar system to the US Navy (USN) as part of a Foreign Military Sales (FMS) deal between the United States and the Philippines.

The radar system will be installed on two Philippine Navy frigates – BRP Gregorio del Pilar (FF-15) and BRP Ramon Alcaraz (FF-16) – both of which are former US Coast Guard Hamilton-class cutters, said the company in a 21 May statement. The sale also includes Saab’s 9LV combat management system for radar control and display for enhanced situational awareness.

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[*] posted on 21-6-2018 at 08:59 PM


Philippines moves ahead with ‘second horizon’ modernisation

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

21 June 2018


The Russian-made Kilo-class submarine is regarded as a possible procurement under the Armed Forces of the Philippines’ ‘second horizon’ modernisation programme. Source: Russian MoD

Key Points

- President approves USD5.6 billion modernisation programme
- Requirements include accelerated submarine procurement

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has given approval to the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) to progress plans to procure a wide range of defence equipment under its ‘second horizon’ modernisation programme, which runs 2018–2022.

The state-run Philippines News Agency (PNA) reported on 20 June that the second horizon programme has been allocated “roughly PHP300 billion” (USD5.6 billion) and includes the procurement of a range of tactical military platforms including multirole combat aircraft and diesel–electric submarines.

Department of National Defense (DND) spokesman Arsenio Andolong was quoted by the PNA as saying Duterte has approved the funding programme, which also encompasses an accelerated schedule for the submarine procurement. This was originally scheduled for the 2023–2027 third horizon but has now been moved forward, said Andolong. “This is not included in horizon three any more,” he said. “It has been pushed into horizon two [and the procurement] must be studied.”

While Andolong did not state the reason for the shift in schedules, Philippine Navy (PN) officials have confirmed to Jane’s a need to accelerate the submarine procurement given the growing trend in Southeast Asia to boost subsurface warfare capability as part of efforts to secure offshore territory.

PN officials have said the service requires at least two submarines and that the procurement was initiated in 2015 through the issue of a preliminary request for information (RFI).

The PN has also established a submarine office that, as part of planning processes, is reviewing contemporary submarine designs and drawing up a concept of operations. Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana also confirmed in 2017 that the Russian-made Kilo-class submarine was one platform under consideration.

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[*] posted on 3-8-2018 at 12:46 PM


Insight: Is now the right time for Philippine submarines?

2nd August 2018 - 11:18 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Hong Kong

In June, President Rodrigo Duterte promised the Philippine Navy (PN) two diesel-electric submarines under Horizon 2 of the revised modernisation plan for the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP). However, does such a sophisticated capability amount to overreach for this Southeast Asian navy?

Defense spokesman Arsenio Andolong said, also in June, ‘We will be joining the exclusive club of countries. In the navy there are two symbols of force projection, symbols of power – those are aircraft carriers and submarines…Now we will have one, it can sink an aircraft carrier if a threat comes close, so at least that is cost effective in terms of defence.’

In early 2017, Duterte rejected a Horizon 2 (2018-22) plan submitted by the PN asking for three conventional submarines, seven midget submarines and six swimmer delivery vehicles for a total budget of PHP95.21 billion ($1.83 billion).

Thereafter, submarines were relegated to Horizon 3, which covers the 2023-28 period. With their now having been promoted back to Horizon 2 by Manila, why the headlong rush towards submarines?

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana stated on 31 July, ‘For a nation with maritime territory especially, its national defence is incomplete without [a] submarine.’ He added that an effective active submarine force is a great deterrent for would-be aggressors due to their element of surprise. He also noted that it would be a ‘great morale booster’ for the AFP.

There is clearly strong support within the PN, Lorenzana commended Flag Officer-in-Command VAdm Robert Empedrad for pushing for the inclusion of submarines in Horizon 2.

The navy chief, who has been lobbying hard, said he fully supports all proposals for the Philippines to acquire its first submarines at the soonest possible time. Referring to regional neighbours, he said in June, ‘If they know you have submarines, they will start to respect the Philippine Navy.’

The PN activated a Submarine Group on 16 March 2016 with 15 officers and 12 enlisted personnel. This unit has divided the acquisition process into three phases that correspond to the three horizons. The first is organise, research and training, and it is mostly complete now. The second is infrastructure and support development. The final phase is acquisition and sustainment, with delivery of a first submarine tentatively slated for 2025.

In December 2016, the PN actually issued an RfI to various submarine builders. According to the MaxDefense Philippines blogsite, those who responded were Saab/Kockums (with the A26), ThyssenKrupp (Type 209/1400, modified Type 210 and Type 212A), Naval Group (Scorpene derivative), Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (Chang Bogo class) and Rosoboronexport (Project 636 Kilo).

The same website claimed that small numbers of PN personnel have trained with German, Indian and South Korean submariners.

Shephard spoke to Collin Koh, a research fellow at the Maritime Security Programme at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore, about the Philippine need for submarines. ‘Objectively speaking, the Philippines will need submarines…because, if you look at the Philippine archipelago, there are a whole number of chokepoints and areas that will optimise the use of submarines against any potential approaches.’

He said submarines would play an ‘ideal role’ in defence. Such a need is therefore indisputable.

However, Koh added, ‘It’s one issue to talk about the Philippines having submarines suitable for its defence, but it’s quite another to talk about whether they’re needed now.’ He added that ‘the timeline that we see there is not realistic for acquiring submarines’, describing it as ‘too ambitious’.

As an example, the PN does not even have a surface anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability at the moment. It has in the past, but that skill has eroded and has become non-existent.

The arrival of a Pohang-class corvette and two brand new frigates from South Korea will help redress that gap, but this ASW capacity has to be built from scratch.

Koh explained, ‘Without ships having a surface ASW capability to start to trial underwater concepts from the start, it’s like putting the cart before the horse.’

The Singaporean academic elaborated, ‘In a way, that will create more problems than benefits for the PN, because the first thing is that a naval build-up is always a costly game. Second, it’s also technically complex as well. Just one mistake in terms of prioritisation could put all the other programmes into haywire. Because of that, if you want to get the submarines, it’s more aspirational than actual.’

As an example, the AFP has only just acquired its first ever missile capability with Spike-ER missiles installed on Multi-Purpose Attack Craft. However, these missiles are not complex and cannot be considered in the same league as true anti-ship missiles such as the Harpoon.

‘And now we’re talking about a quantum leap into the undersea dimension. I think that’s too much of a bridge to gap,’ Koh noted.

While shiny new submarines pose an alluring prospect for a navy accustomed to hand-me-downs and old equipment, but it is questionable as to whether the PN has the wherewithal to operate them to their full potential and to sustain them for many years ahead.

Thus, the navy has to think about infrastructure and bases for submarines.

It does not have adequate facilities for upcoming frigates, and its newest warships and support ships already have to use civilian piers in Subic, Manila, Davao and Zamboanga.

It is developing Naval Base Cebu in Lapu-Lapu City, but is this suitable for submarines? The PN will need at least one, and possible two, submarine bases. The PN will need a submarine training centre with a simulator too.

Additionally, the level of human capital must be raised to operate such technologically high-end equipment.

‘It’s not as simple as has been reported that that you just buy the ships and systems. Equal is the issue of infrastructure and manpower, which will require money, and there’s the chance that the allocated budget may not be wholly sufficient to meet all those needs in the first place,’ Koh warned.

To a large degree, the Philippine desire for submarines has come about as it observes what has been going on in Asia. As well as major submarine powers such as China, Japan, North Korea and South Korea, others have been getting into the game as well.

Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam have or are modernising their underwater fleets. Thailand is also gaining a modern submarine force after placing an order for the Chinese S26T.

This seems to smack of keeping up with the Joneses, with many viewing submarines as a mark of prestige.

The RIMPAC 2018 exercise in Hawaii has been good for the Philippines, which dispatched two vessels. ‘It’s the first RIMPAC to which they’ve sent ships, and now they see themselves as increasingly moving up the ranks to join other Southeast Asian partners,’ Koh enthused.

While the PN is definitely growing in sophistication, Koh cautioned that the pace of the submarine programme should be slower than is being talked about. ‘They’re on the upswing, but I guess there must be some rational voices within the rank and file cautioning that it’s not a rash decision to be made.’

Shephard notes that little seems to have been said about the PN starting with a second-hand submarine or small submarine to gain experience first before investing in brand new boats. This is the approach that Singapore, for example, took.

Nor have we asked yet where the money for these submarines will come from. The Horizon 2 Priority Projects programme budget has been set at around PHP300 billion ($5.76 billion), of which the navy will get PHP77.6 billion.

There is not enough money for submarines and for all the other goodies on the navy’s wish list. This will likely force the PN to re-prioritise its acquisitions, or else the government will have to come up with additional pesos from somewhere.

There are various murmurings about how this could be done.

For example, the PN could shelf its corvette plans and instead get one or two additional frigates from Hyundai Heavy Industries, which is currently building two warships due in 2020-21.

There is certainly a risk that a submarine force will chew up vast amounts of the AFP budget for years to come. Furthermore, the navy’s Offshore Combat Force, Littoral Combat Force, and Sealift and Amphibious Force are all under-equipped and need to be modernised.

Indeed, Koh suggested the navy will ‘first of all need surface assets as the most important things’. Current construction is being outstripped by obsolescence, so the surface fleet is going to diminish in coming years.

Finally, also competing for a slice of the budget, Koh said there is a pressing need to get the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) up to speed as well, and there is ‘a high chance that it will start to demand more resources’.

Faced with boisterous Chinese activity in the South China Sea and within the Philippine EEZ, the PCG will need more patrol boats and OPVs. Indeed, it could be argued that such assets are of greater importance to the nation now than ever before.
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 06:10 PM


Austal offers Cape class variant for Philippine Navy’s OPV requirements

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

13 August 2018

Key Points

- Austal has proposed a larger variant of the Cape-class patrol vessel for the Philippine Navy's six-ship offshore patrol vessel programme
- Vessel features a remote vessel monitoring system, and flight deck for helicopter operations


Austal has proposed an 80 m variant of the Cape-class patrol boat, which is in service with the Australian Border Force and the Royal Australian Navy. (Austal)

Australian shipbuilder Austal has submitted a design based on the company's Cape-class patrol boat for the Philippine Navy's (PN's) offshore patrol vessel (OPV) requirements, a representative from the company confirmed with Jane's on 13 August.

Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana first disclosed in a press briefing on 11 August that the country's navy would acquire a fleet of six OPVs as part of its armed forces modernisation programme.

- ENDS -

Austal set for Philippine OPV programme

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

12 August 2018

Australian shipbuilder Austal is bidding to supply a version of its Cape-class patrol boat (pictured) to the Philippine Navy. Source: Austal Limited

Australian shipbuilder Austal confirmed on 13 August that it is in position to secure a contract to supply a version of its Cape-class patrol boat to the Philippine Navy (PN).

The deal is expected to feature six vessels that will be built in the Philippines by the company’s local subsidiary, Austal Philippines, which is based in Balamban in the central island province of Cebu.

The potential contract was announced by Austal two days after Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said the PN would acquire six offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) from the Australian company.

Austal said it had earlier submitted a proposal to the PN based on a “larger, more capable variant” of the 58 m Cape-class patrol boats that are currently in operation with the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and Australian Border Force (ABF).

Austal said that the variant developed for the Philippines “is a circa 80 m steel OPV, which includes a dedicated helicopter flight deck and the latest technology in naval systems” including Austal’s MarineLink ship control system and ride control technologies. The company said it hopes to finalise contractual arrangements “as soon as possible”.

Commenting on the proposed build programme, Austal said, “Austal’s OPV will be designed in Australia and the Philippines but will be proudly built at Austal Philippines, by Filipinos, for the Philippines Navy. Our Balamban shipyard will not only be able to build the new vessels but also support any through-life maintenance that is required.”

Austal acquired its Philippine shipbuilding business in 2012 for about AUD10 million (USD7.2 million). In May 2018, Austal said it would invest USD18 million to expand these facilities, trebling its capacity and enabling it to build larger vessels. The expansion is expected to complete in 2019.

The RAN and ABF operate fleets of two and eight Cape-class patrol boats respectively.

(325 of 590 words)
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 06:22 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Austal offers Cape class variant for Philippine Navy’s OPV requirements

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

13 August 2018

Key Points

- Austal has proposed a larger variant of the Cape-class patrol vessel for the Philippine Navy's six-ship offshore patrol vessel programme
- Vessel features a remote vessel monitoring system, and flight deck for helicopter operations


Austal has proposed an 80 m variant of the Cape-class patrol boat, which is in service with the Australian Border Force and the Royal Australian Navy. (Austal)

Australian shipbuilder Austal has submitted a design based on the company's Cape-class patrol boat for the Philippine Navy's (PN's) offshore patrol vessel (OPV) requirements, a representative from the company confirmed with Jane's on 13 August.

Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana first disclosed in a press briefing on 11 August that the country's navy would acquire a fleet of six OPVs as part of its armed forces modernisation programme.


Hell no! Just offer the Fassmer 80 OPV, built under under licence, to a more appreciative audience. :smilegrin: :lol:
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 06:39 PM


I'm curious how you change a 57-58 metre boat into an 80 metre one................
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 06:41 PM


Quote: Originally posted by DEW  


Hell no! Just offer the Fassmer 80 OPV, built under under licence, to a more appreciative audience. :smilegrin: :lol:


Too expensive mate, this is the Philippines we are talking about, not Gucci-ville in Australia..............:cool:
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 07:27 PM


It's being reported on Filipino sources that these vessels are going to be made in steel............the Austal CEBU-based facilities only have experience in aluminium...........hmmmmm
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[*] posted on 13-8-2018 at 07:33 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
I'm curious how you change a 57-58 metre boat into an 80 metre one................


I think they are probably stretching the "based on" description as much as the boat. Brand association is probably the only connection. Anyway kudos for the Philippine yard, and loads of opportunity for local identities to 'participate' in the procurement process.

A little surprised that a variant of Austal's MRV shelf design didn't get a look in, but then you couldn't sell it as "based on" the Cape class.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 09:26 AM


Philippines considers Russian loan to support submarine procurement

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

14 August 2018


Russia has offered the Philippines a soft loan, repayable over several years, to support its potential acquisition of Kilo-class submarines. Source: IHS Markit/Patrick Allen

Russia has newly offered the Philippines an economic package to support its potential acquisition of Kilo-class submarines, Arsenio Andolong, the chief of public affairs at the Philippine Department of National Defense (DND), told Jane’s on 14 August.

He said the offer was made to the Philippine government recently and consists of a soft loan that would be repayable over several years. He also stressed that the loan has not been agreed but is being considered by the Philippine government as it looks to boost the undersea capabilities of the Philippine Navy (PN).

“This offer was made last week,” said Andolong. “Russia has said that if we require funds [for the submarine procurement] we could opt for a soft loan to be repaid over a period of time. We are considering the offer, nothing has been agreed.”

The new loan offer was made shortly after the PN confirmed that it was discussing with the Russian Navy the terms of a memorandum of understanding centred on the provision of training and support of submarines.

PN spokesman Commander Jonathan Zata also confirmed in comments to the state-run Philippine News Agency in early August that the Philippines is looking at Russia as a “possible source” of submarines and that the pending agreement would facilitate technical and operational training for the PN.

PN officials have also been invited to Russian shipyards to observe submarine construction programmes, he said.

The PN submarine procurement programme was recently accelerated by the Philippine government, and the DND is expected to decide on the acquisition within the next year. The acquisition, which is likely to feature the procurement of up to three platforms, was previously scheduled for 2023–27 under the Philippines’ ‘third horizon’ military modernisation programme but was moved forward to the 2018–22 second horizon.

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[*] posted on 21-9-2018 at 10:52 AM


Hyundai cuts steel for Philippine Navy’s second 107 m frigate

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

20 September 2018

Key Points

- Hyundai Heavy Industries has begun construction work on a second HDF-3000 frigate on order for the Philippine Navy
- The service is on track to receive both vessels by 2021

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has held a steel-cutting ceremony for the second 107 m frigate on order for the Philippine Navy (PN).

The ceremony was held on 17 September at HHI’s Ulsan’s shipyard. The 2,600-tonne frigate, which is scheduled to be delivered in 2021, is the second of two ships under a 2016 contract awarded to HHI in 2016. Steel for the first-of-class was cut in May 2018.

(126 of 486 words)
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[*] posted on 28-9-2018 at 01:32 PM


ADAS 2018: Damen aims to build Philippine profile

Jon Grevatt, Manilla - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

27 September 2018



DAMEN have an alternate design put forward for the OPV requirement, see above, BUT I'd be astounded IF this gets anywhere. AUSTAL have an EXISTING yard outside of CEBU, and Cebu is one of Duterte Family's strongholds..........

Dutch shipbuilder Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding is looking to establish within the Philippines a similar industrial footprint to the profiles it has developed in neighbouring Indonesia and Vietnam, Roland Briene, Damen’s Asia-Pacific area director, told Jane’s on 27 September.

The strategy is centred on collaborating with local shipyards, and Briene said Damen is currently talking to two or three shipbuilding companies in the Philippines with a view to forming a partnership that would pursue naval and commercial ship construction opportunities in the country.

In the naval domain, Damen is currently focused on bidding for the Philippine Navy’s (PN’s) requirement to procure offshore patrol vessels (OPVs).

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