The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  19    21
Author: Subject: Unmanned Aircraft thread, part 2
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-2-2019 at 01:53 PM


Launch of a new Hero [IDEX19D4

DAVID DONALD

20 February 2019



On 15 February, Leonardo not only opened a new manufacturing facility in Pisa, but also unveiled the AWHero production-ready version of its Hero multi-role rotary unmanned air system (RUAS). The AWHero will be the factory’s first main product.

The pre-production version unveiled last week features significant alterations from the original Hero, including optimised airframe and aerodynamics, a new fuel system, and a new liquid-cooled rotary engine. The 200kg-class vehicle also has a new composite tail rotor drive shaft.

The AWHero undertook a 10-minute first flight in December 2018, and a second pre-production vehicle is due to join the trials campaign in the next few months.

Certification by Italian military authorities is expected before the end of the year. The AWHero is due to take part in maritime surveillance demonstrations as part of the European Defence Fund’s Ocean 2020 initiative.

AWHero offers an endurance of more than six hours, and can carry a variety of payloads, including radar such as the Leonardo Gabbiano TS UltraLight, electro-optic sensors, LiDAR, and electronic support measures systems such as the Leonardo Sage. The vehicle incorporates deck sensor and autopilot modes specifically adapted for shipborne operations. Leonardo is developing considerable expertise in unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The company’s Ronchi dei Legionari facility builds the successful Falco series of fixed-wing UAVs, and Leonardo has also built the 1,200kg Sky-Y MALE (medium-altitude, long-endurance) UAV technology demonstrator. The AWHero complements the SW-4 Solo RUAS, which is an optionally manned adaptation of the 1,800kg PZL-Swidnik SW-4 Puszczyk light helicopter that was acquired when Leonardo’s forerunner, AgustaWestland, bought the Polish factory in early 2010.

(263 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-2-2019 at 01:55 PM


Defeating drones on the move [IDEX19D4]

20 February 2019



AVT Australia, formerly known as UAV Vision, is showcasing its expertise in gyro-stabilised imaging systems and solutions for counter-drone operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR), and air defence as part of the Team Defence Australia display (Stand 07-C04). The company focuses on providing ITAR-free solutions in the Asia-Pacific region.

In addition to a range of low SWaP (size, weight and power) imaging systems, AVT Australia is highlighting its new X-MADIS system, which provides C-UAS (counter unmanned air system) capability for fixed-site, mobile and on-the-move applications.

X-MADIS (eXpeditionary Mobile Air Defence Integrated System) is battle-proven, rugged and reliable and can detect, locate, identify, track and defeat a range of aerial threats, including improvised small UAS swarms. It has long-range detection capability and can engage UASs while on the move over rough terrain at speeds exceeding 40mph. The system combines electro-optics, radar and electronic warfare elements into a platform-agnostic system.

(148 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-2-2019 at 01:59 PM


Fully automated surveillance [IDEX19D4]

20 February 2019



Azur Drones of France is showing its Skeyetech drone system, part of the company's Drones'guard surveillance and reconnaissance solutions. The system is on show as part of the presentation by Etimad (Stand 04-C10), which is the Abu Dhabi distributor for the system.

Skeyetech is a fully automated drone system that is connected into a wider security network that can include thermal and radar sensors, and smart fence technology. It is designed as a reactive system that supports security by providing onscene imagery when potential issues have been detected by other means.

The drone and its day/ night cameras are housed in a fixed-position container that is networked directly into the security system. When a potential security breach is detected, the container's doors slide open and the drone launches to fly to the threat location based on co-ordinates generated within the security management system. Imagery is downlinked to the container, which then streams it in real time into the security command post.

With its visual check/identification task complete, the drone then returns to the container and lands - the landing platform serving as a charging station for the vehicle's electric motors.

All this process is designed to be completely automatic, with no human intervention required, although the drone can be controlled from the security post if desired. Endurance of the eight-bladed drone is 35 minutes.

Last month, Skeyetech became the first such system to receive certification from the French DGAC civil aviation authority, permitting it to be flown in civilian airspace, including urban environments, with only supervision from an unlicensed operator required.

(261 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-2-2019 at 10:51 PM


IDEX 2019: Serbian Mini Aleks UAV to make first public flight in July

Jeremy Binnie, Abu Dhabi - Jane's Defence Weekly

20 February 2019


The Mini Aleks was displayed at IDEX with dummy rockets. Source: IHS Markit/Patrick Allen

The Mini Aleks vertical take-off and landing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by Serbia's Engine Development & Production (EDePro) is set to make its first public flight during an exhibition that will be held in Belgrade in July, Jane's was told during the IDEX show held in Abu Dhabi from 17-21 February.

The Mini Aleks uses four rotors to take off and land before transitioning to a pusher propeller as its wings provide aerodynamic lift.

Dusan Petrovic, an EDePro engineer working on the UAV, said it will have a one-hour endurance when powered entirely by electric motors and four hours when using a hybrid power system where a conventional combustion engine drives the pusher and generates electrical power for the other systems.

The Mini Aleks was displayed at IDEX fitted with dummy rockets, but its payload is 6 kg, according to Petrovic, so it is not a feasible attack platform. He said the aircraft displayed at IDEX is capable of flying, but a second model with an airframe made entirely of carbon-fibre has been completed.

(199 of 329 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-2-2019 at 08:00 PM


Cerberus GL has bite [IDEX19D5]

21 February 2019



The Cerberus GL developed by Skyborne Technologies, participating as part of Team Defence Australia (Stand 07-C04, Australia Pavilion), is a lightweight unmanned combat aerial vehicle (UCAV) designed for tactical fire support, writes Sam J Basch.

It has the ability to fire multiple 40mm grenades and perform intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) before, during and after its fire mission.

The tri-tilt rotor design allows the 6kg airframe to be used as a primary gimbal to aim munitions, such as 40mm grenade launchers, 12-gauge shotguns or RPGs, without the need for a low-slung, heavy gimbal. Instead, the compact +/-10° gimbal provides fine pointing accuracy.

Its armament is mounted close to the UCAV’s centre of gravity to ensure recoil robustness, which results in a smaller vehicle. The armament payloads are fired electronically. It has a 22-minute endurance with a full payload of three 40mm grenades, with a speed of 45km/h. Effective firing range is 180m line of sight, and the UCAV is launched and recovered by vertical take-off and landing.

(167 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-2-2019 at 08:22 PM


Korea and UAE team up on UAVs [IDEX19D5]

DAVID DONALD

21 February 2019



Abu Dhabi-based Calidus has partnered with Korean Air to offer a range of UAVs to the UAE and regional market. The Korean airline's Aerospace Business Division is working on several UAV designs, and is showing its KUS-FT fixed-wing UAV (pictured) at the Calidus exhibition (Stand 04-C15) in the UAE Pavilion. The two companies have been in discussion for around a month, resulting in the marketing arrangement, which is hoped to be expanded into co-development.

The partnership is evidence of a growing UAE-Korea partnership in defence products, which has already seen EARTH and LIG Nex 1 form Emirates Systems & Support Services (ESSS) to promote and produce a range of weapons. The ESSS/LIG Nex 1 LOGIR imaging-infrared guided 70mm rocket is one of the weapon options being displayed on the Calidus B-250 light attack aircraft.

Korean Air's UAV range covers six programmes. The KUS-FC is a next-generation stealthy unmanned combat air vehicle with flying-wing configuration and an internal weapons bay. KUS-FS is a strategic medium-altitude, long-endurance UAV, while KUS-FT is a 150kg tactical UAV that is in use with the Republic of Korea Army and Marine Corps. KUS-VH is a large unmanned helicopter, while KUSVT is a tilt-rotor design. Finally, KUS-HD is a 38kg UAV with eight rotors in four pairs.

(210 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-2-2019 at 08:39 PM


IDEX 2019: Emirates Advanced Research and Technology unveils SCRAB III turbojet drone

20 FEBRUARY 2019

Emirates Advanced Reasearch and Technology (EARTH) and its Spanish partner Systemas de Control Remoto (SCR) unveil SCRAB III turbojet drone.


The Scrab III displayed at IDEX 2019 (Picture source: Army Recognition)

The Scrab III has been designed from scratch, having in mind military training operations where high speed, long range missile weapon systems are used, such as Patriot, AMRAAM or Nasam.

The Scrab III is powered by two turbojet engines which provide unprecedented performance levels at high speeds, while allowing the target to climb to altitudes unreachable by most of the other systems. The drone’s autopilot is capable of executing a totally autonomous flight plan from take-off to recovery in a precise and reliable manner with a datalink coverage exceeding 100 km and a maximum operating ceiling of 26,247 ft. is easy to operate and maintain following a short training program.

The drone has a maximpum take-off weight of 140 kg, including a 13 kg payload. Its maximum speed is 389 knots and its endurance averages 1 hour.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 22-2-2019 at 09:11 AM


Aero India 2019: HAL unveils rotary-wing unmanned aerial vehicle

Akshara Parakala, Bangalore - Jane's Defence Weekly

21 February 2019


HAL displayed a full-scale prototype of a new rotary-wing UAV equipped with an electro-optical/infrared turret at Aero India 2019. Source: IHS Markit/Akshara Parakala

Indian aerospace and defence company Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) unveiled a full-scale prototype of a locally designed rotary-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at the Aero India 2019 defence exhibition being held in Bangalore on 20-24 February.

Specifically designed to perform intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) operations, the UAV was developed by HAL in co-operation with the country's Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) and the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kanpur, to meet specific requirements of the Indian Army and Indian Navy.

The 200 kg UAV, which is equipped with a twin-blade main rotor and a locally developed petrol engine, is stated to have a range of 200 km, endurance of six hours, and a service ceiling of 6,000 m. The platform, the fuselage of which is 4.2 m long and 1.28 m wide, is reportedly capable of flying at a top speed of 200 km/h and can carry a 40 kg payload.

The preliminary design of the platform was completed in January, with clearance for the preliminary design review (PDR) now pending.

The UAV, which features a full‐authority digital engine control (FADEC) and SLR-DC datalink, can fly in fully autonomous mode, including auto take-off and landing with a return-to-home recovery option, according to HAL. It uses GPS for interactive command and control with completely programmable mission management computers. Real-time data and video links are available for line-of-sight operations.

The UAV can be used for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) missions, coastal surveillance, radar and missile decoy operations, detecting improvised explosive devices and landmines, and tracking and designating targets.

(282 of 370 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-2-2019 at 12:29 PM


IDEX 2019: QinetiQ joint venture nears readiness

Charles Forrester, Abu Dhabi - Jane's Defence Weekly

22 February 2019

QinetiQ's Houbara target drone joint venture (JV) is continuing to stand up its capabilities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), following its formation in late 2017.

Speaking to Jane's at the IDEX 2019 trade show in Abu Dhabi, QinetiQ's international business development director, Michael Collier, said that the organisation has recruited 80-90% of its staff in the UAE, and established its offices in Abu Dhabi.


QinetiQ's Rattler supersonic target system mounted on a Banshee target drone. (IHS Markit/Patrick Allen)

The JV's factory at the Tawazun Industrial Park will undertake first-line assembly of Banshee target drones, and ultimately full manufacturing once the supply chain and representative volumes can be achieved, Collier said.

Tim Allen, CEO of Houbara, said the company's plans are to diversify beyond its current target systems in the future.

"When you look at the areas of interest in terms of technology and capabilities the UAE is focussed on, there are a number of good offerings we could potentially bring to the market notably autonomy. It's not just in developing systems but also to develop and run programmes, which are along the lines of the [UK's] Army Warfighting Experiment - and there has been some significant UAE interest in that."

Allen added that there is scope to build-out capabilities in the UAE for roles in areas such as testing and evaluation (T&E). In the future, building on the UAE's relationship with Saudi Arabia may be a stepping stone for building regional sovereign capabilities in areas such as T&E, as engineering capabilities mature in both government and end-users.

Houbara was displaying the Rattler Ground Air Launched Supersonic Target (GAL-ST) mounted on a Banshee Jet 80 target drone at the show. The Rattler was developed at the request of a European navy to mimic high velocity missile threats, and can be used to replicate air-launched anti-radiation missiles and supersonic high-diver threats such as anti-ship missiles.

(324 of 489 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-2-2019 at 10:23 AM


Aero India 2019: HAL unveils Unmanned Wingman concept

Rahul Udoshi, Bangalore - Jane's International Defence Review

25 February 2019

India’s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) unveiled its Unmanned Wingman concept at the Aero India 2019 exhibition held in Bangalore from 20–24 February.

The Unmanned Wingman concept is currently envisioned to be a 6 m-class, low-observable, multipurpose unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) with an endurance of up to 80 minutes and a range of 800 km, although its size can be scaled up for greater endurance or payload capacity should there be a customer requirement.


An impression of HAL’s proposed Unmanned Wingman concept. (IHS Markit/Rahul Udoshi)

The development is an effort led by HAL with industry partners, including a local start-up called NewSpace Research and Technologies (NRT), to develop low-cost platforms that can provide on-call support to forward-deployed combat aircraft operating in contested airspace.

(112 of 559 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-2-2019 at 07:54 PM


Israel has signed an agreement with India to sell 50 Heron UAVs

POSTED ON TUESDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 2019 06:36

Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) has signed an agreement with Ministry of Defense of India for the sale of 50 Heron Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for $500 million U.S. dollars, according the daily newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth.


Israel has signed an agreement with India to sale 50 Heron UAVs 925 001 The Heron Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) takes off from the Comalapa airport runway during a counter drug support mission May 21. (Picture source Wikipedia)

In July 2018, the government of India had approved the purchase of 10 Heron drones from Israel. These drones will be operated by the Indian Air Force

The IAI Heron (Israeli name Machatz-1) is a medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by the Malat (UAV) division of Israel Aerospace Industries. It is capable of Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) operations of up to 52 hours' duration at up to 10.5 km.

The Heron UAV is designed to perform different types of operations, even under adverse weather conditions. It uses multiple sensors and satellite communication (SATCOM) for extended-range data capture and transfer. Its features include state-of-the-art avionics, retractable landing gear, along with automatic take-off and landing systems.

The Heron UAV is powered by a single Rotax 914 turbo aircraft engine. It was manufactured by Austria’s leading aircraft engine supplier BRP-Rotax. The engine has the capacity to produce 85.79kW of output power.

The Heron UAV can fly at a maximum speed of 207 km/h at a maximum altitude of 30,000ft and range of 350 km
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 26-2-2019 at 08:28 PM


AVALON: Zephyr gears up for Australian payload work

26 FEBRUARY, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GREG WALDRON MELBOURNE

Airbus Defence & Space is gearing up for a series of payload tests operating from the Western Australian town of Wyndham with its revolutionary Zephyr unmanned aircraft.

Airbus heavily promoted the type at the Avalon air show, with a large model housed in a special pavilion. “Enduring like an satellite, focused like an aircraft,” was written in large letters on the floor.

Though the aircraft is capable of operating for weeks in the stratosphere, regulatory hang-ups mean the examples Airbus is deploying to Australia had to be flown in aboard a freighter aircraft.

The work in Australia, says head of Zephyr sales NIgel Chandler, will not be about demonstrating the aircraft’s ability to stay aloft for days on end, but instead will look at different payloads. The examples based in Wyndham will start flying in the coming weeks.

Airbus sees both military and commercial applications for the type, which has a 25m wingspan and derives its power from solar panels during the day and batteries during the night.

Applications for the aircraft include intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, as well as communications. Chandler said Zephyr is well suited to providing communications over areas that have been hit by a natural disaster, or ones that temporarily need additional coverage, such as regions hosting major events but where mobile phone coverage is spotty.

ISR missions could include military missions, or monitoring for forest fires and shipping activity.

As for the market, Chandler sees broad opportunities in the Asia-Pacific region, though he declined to discuss specifics.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-2-2019 at 11:53 AM


Turkey details Akinci armed UAV programme

Kerry Herschelman, Washington DC - Jane's International Defence Review

26 February 2019


An official infographic detailing Turkey’s Akinci armed UAV development. Source: SSB

The Presidency of the Turkish Defence Industries (SSB) has revealed fresh details of its Akinci (Raider) armed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which is under development by local enterprise Baykar Makina.

The Akinci UAV will have a wingspan of 20 m and a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 4,500 kg. It is expected to be capable of staying aloft for up to 24 hours and attain an operational ceiling of 40,000 ft (12,192 m).

The air vehicle will be powered by a pair of indigenously manufactured PD-222 turbo-diesel engines built by Tusas Engine Industries (TEI) in partnership with US company General Electric. The PD-222 is based on the new PD-170 engine that will replace the Thielert Centurion 2.0 S turbodiesel engine, which is currently powering Turkey's Anka medium-altitude long endurance (MALE) UAV.

TEI successfully carried out initial flight tests of a PD-170 powered Anka UAV in December 2018.

According to the SSB, the Akinci will be able to carry internal and external payloads of up to 450 kg and 900 kg respectively. The air vehicle will be equipped with indigenously developed mission equipment, including an Aselsan-supplied active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, electronic warfare (EW), and satellite communication systems.

It will also be able to carry a wide range of external weapons, such as the Roketsan MAM-L precision-guided bombs (PGBs), Cirit guided rockets, as well as the latest MAM-C smart munition that has just entered serial production. The MAM-C can engage targets that are up to 8 km away depending on its launch altitude.

Other weapons are also planned for integration, including the Roketsan SOM-A cruise missile with a range of 250 km and a selection of PGBs based on the Mk 82 general purpose bomb.

(309 of 437 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 28-2-2019 at 08:12 PM


UAVOS introduces tropicalised UVH-170E VTOL UAV

Kelvin Wong, Singapore - Jane's International Defence Review

27 February 2019


The updated UVH-170E is designed to offer improved reliability and performance in tropical conditions. Seen here is the baseline air vehicle. Source: UAVOS

UAVOS has developed a tropicalised version of its UVH-170E vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) optimised for operations in hot and humid environments.

Jane’s understands from UAVOS officials that development and modification work had been completed at the end of December 2018. The company is currently performing operational testing with a modified example.

The baseline UVH-170E UAV has a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 41 kg and measures 3.28 m long and 0.85 m tall, with a main rotor diameter of 2.6 m. It is powered by a 4-stroke gasoline direct injection engine rated at 7 kW that enables it to attain cruising and maximum speeds of 60 km/h and 120 km/h respectively, with an operational ceiling of 8,200 ft (2,500 m). UAVOS claims that the air vehicle can perform VTOL manoeuvres in wind conditions of up to 14 m/s.

A 13 litre fuel tank supports up to five hours of flight when carrying a 4 kg payload, which includes a newly developed, gyro-stabilised, two-axis gimbal equipped with an integrated full HD (1080/60p) daylight camera with ×30 optical zoom, a longwave infrared (LWIR) camera with 1,024×768 pixel resolution, a laser rangefinder with a range of 2,500 m, and an onboard graphics processing unit (GPU).

A complete system comprises a UVH-170E UAV with its ground control station.

“The unmanned helicopter is adapted for flying in a tropical climate and is equipped with a modified payload for operations outside of direct radio coverage,” Aliaksei Stratsilatau, UAVOS co-founder and lead developer, told Jane’s .

“The main advantage of the [air vehicle] is that it possesses unique characteristics to work in high [mountainous] conditions [and] in hot and tropical climates, with sudden temperature changes,” he added, noting that possible applications include law enforcement; counter terrorism; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR); and search and rescue (SAR).

(328 of 564 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-3-2019 at 09:31 AM


Avalon 2019: Optionally manned Firebird set to enter service

Damian Kemp, Melbourne - Jane's Defence Weekly

28 February 2019


The optionally manned Firebird is set to enter service with a US government customer later in 2019. Source: Northrop Grumman

Northrop Grumman expects to deliver its first optionally manned Firebird aircraft to a US government customer before mid-2019. The company will demonstrate the aircraft in Europe and the Middle East in 2019 and in Australia in 2020.

Northrop Grumman's autonomous division senior vice-president and general manager, Brian Chappel, told Jane's on 28 February at the 2019 Avalon Airshow that the company has "multiple orders over multiple years for US government customers and had been in production for the last three years".

The Firebird is designed to combine the advantages of manned flight with the ability to deploy easily and operate in controlled airspace and unmanned, as well as lower cost and longer endurance. This conversion from manned to unmanned involves the removal of two seats and the console and the installation of a satcom link and an opaque cover.

Main applications for the medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) platform are littoral and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) operations as an alternative to larger platforms such as Triton or Predator. The company declined to list a price, but it is described as less than that of a Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

Chappel said the conversion takes less than four hours and requires a minimal amount of equipment, all of which can be carried in a standard utility vehicle. The platform can carry five payloads at once.

"It has an IP-based [Internet Protocol-based] open mission architecture and payloads can be switched in less than 30 minutes, and we have demonstrated with customer-provided payloads that payloads can be ready within 60 minutes," he said.

(284 of 376 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-3-2019 at 04:29 PM


Northrop pitches optionally manned Firebird to monitor Australia’s coasts

By: Nigel Pittaway   9 hours ago


The Firebird drone takes to the skies. (Northrop Grumman)

MELBOURNE, Australia — Northrop Grumman has responded to Australia’s request for information on a new maritime surveillance capability with its optionally manned Firebird aircraft, a company representative said Thursday.

Speaking at the 2019 Avalon Airshow, Brian Chappel, vice president and general manager of autonomous systems, said the Firebird could meet some of Australia’s project requirements, which is being managed through the Department of Home Affairs and the Australian Border Force.

“We haven’t directly spoken to the Australian government yet, but it’s an application and a mission set that we certainly believe has some applicability. We will be following that with Border Force very closely, [and] we have responded to the request for information,” Chappel said.

“We’re not just going to stand up and say: ‘We have a platform [and] it’s the right answer.’ We work closely with customers to determine what their mission sets are. Our response to the RFI is an architecture and it’s a set of capabilities,” he added.

Chappel also indicated that other, undisclosed platforms could be offered alongside Firebird, once more details of the commonwealth’s requirements are known.

Firebird is developed by Northrop subsidiary Scaled Composites in Mojave, California. Chappel said two prototypes are currently flying and a third will join the program shortly. Production aircraft will be built at an undisclosed location in Southern California.

Firebird is a medium-altitude, long-endurance aircraft with a 30-hour endurance, with a nominal payload. Chappel said the aircraft has been tested with more than 24 different intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance payloads, which can be swapped in 30 minutes. The initial customer is the U.S. government.

“We’re marketing the airplane now because it has gotten to the stage where the initial production program is assured and we wanted to make sure we were all good before we start talking,” Chappel said.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-3-2019 at 12:03 PM


Latvia acquires Penguin C long-endurance UAVs

Igor Bozinovski, Skopje - Jane's Defence Weekly

12 March 2019


UAV Factory Penguin Cs, which have an endurance of up to 20 hours, are to enter service with the Latvian National Armed Forces. Source: UAV Factory

UAV Factory has been selected to supply the Latvian National Armed Forces (LNAF) with an undisclosed number of its latest Penguin C long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the company’s CEO, Konstantin Popiks, recently told Jane’s .

UAV Factory is based in Marupe, Latvia.

The UAVs, which according to the company have an endurance of up to 20 hours, will be equipped “with advanced electro-optical/infrared gyro-stabilised sensors and other features specifically tailored to the requirements of the Latvian National Armed Forces,” Popiks said.

They will be used to enhance the LNAF’s aerial surveillance and indirect fire support capabilities, as well as to conduct search-and-rescue (SAR) operations and similar civilian-oriented missions.

(133 of 155 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-3-2019 at 02:05 PM


Airbus’ Skyways Drone Trials World’s First Shore-to-Ship Deliveries

(Source: Airbus; issued March 15, 2019)



SINGAPORE --- Airbus has begun shore-to-ship trials in Singapore with its Skyways parcel delivery drone. This marks the first time drone technology has been deployed in real port conditions, to deliver a variety of small, time-critical maritime essentials to working vessels at anchorage.

The maiden shore-to-ship delivery flight was made to the Swire Pacific Offshore’s Anchor Handling Tug Supply vessel ‘M/V Pacific Centurion’, 1.5km from the shoreline of Singapore’s Marina South Pier, carrying 1.5kg of 3D printed consumables. Landing safely on the ship deck and depositing its cargo to the shipmaster, the Skyways unmanned air vehicle swiftly returned to its base, with the entire flight taking within ten minutes.

The trials are being undertaken in conjunction with partner Wilhelmsen Ships Services, one of the world’s leading maritime logistics and port services company. During the trials, Airbus’ Skyways drone will lift off from the pier with a payload capability of up to 4kg, and navigate autonomously along pre-determined ‘aerial corridors’ to vessels as far as 3km from the coast.

Airbus’ Skyways lead, Leo Jeoh shared his excitement at the milestone flight: “We are thrilled to launch the first trial of its kind in the maritime world. Today’s accomplishment is a culmination of months of intense preparation by our dedicated team, and the strong collaboration with our partner, as we pursue a new terrain in the maritime industry.”

“We are also happy to be taking a step forward for Airbus’ urban air mobility endeavour, as we continue to explore and seek better understanding of what it takes to fly safe and reliable autonomous flying vehicles safely,” he added.

“The now proven, seamless operation of drone deliveries from shore to ship, in one of the world’s busiest ports proves the hard work, investment and faith we, and indeed our partners, placed in the Agency by Air project over the past two years was not misplaced,” said Marius Johansen, Vice President Commercial, Ships Agency at Wilhelmsen Ships Services.

“Delivery of essential spares, medical supplies and cash to master via launch boat, is an established part of our portfolio of husbandry services, which we provide day in and day out, in ports all over the world. Modern technology such as the unmanned aircraft systems, are just a new tool, albeit a very cool one, with which we can push our industry ever forward and improve how we serve our customers,” he added.

The use of unmanned aircraft systems in the maritime industry paves the way for possible enlargement of existing ship agency services’ portfolio, speeding up deliveries by up to six times, lowering delivery costs by up to 90%, reducing carbon footprint, and significantly mitigating risks of accidents associated with launch-boat deliveries.

Airbus and Wilhelmsen Ships Services signed an agreement in June 2018 to drive the development of an end-to-end unmanned aircraft system for safe shore-to-ship deliveries. The collaboration marries Airbus’ extensive expertise in aeronautical vertical lift solutions and Wilhelmsen’s wealth of experience in ship agency services.

A landing platform and control centre were set up at the Marina South Pier in November 2018, through the facilitation of the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore. The maritime agency also designated anchorages for vessels to anchor off the pier for the trials, while the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore worked with Airbus and Wilhelmsen to ensure safety of the trials.

Skyways is an experimental project aimed at establishing seamless multi-modal transportation networks in smart cities. Through Skyways, Airbus aims to develop an unmanned airborne infrastructure solution and address the sustainability and efficiency of unmanned aircraft in large urban and maritime environments.

Having demonstrated the ability to deliver parcels safely and reliably to vessels anchored off the coast of Singapore, Skyways will soon be commencing another trial phase delivering air parcels autonomously in an urban environment, at the National University of Singapore.

Airbus is a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services. In 2018 it generated revenues of €64 and employed a workforce of around 134,000. Airbus offers the most comprehensive range of passenger airliners. Airbus is also a European leader providing tanker, combat, transport and mission aircraft, as well as one of the world’s leading space companies. In helicopters, Airbus provides the most efficient civil and military rotorcraft solutions worldwide.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-3-2019 at 06:58 PM


US, India collaborating on air-launched drone

By: Aaron Mehta   16 hours ago


Concept art from the Air Force Research Laboratory shows a drone swarm that the service could potentially use. The U.S. and India plan to develop small UAVs that can be launched from aircraft. (Air Force Research Laboratory)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. and India are working on development of a small, air-launched unmanned system that could be launched from cargo aircraft, according to Pentagon acquisition head Ellen Lord.

The systems are part of a broader technology effort known as the Defense Technology and Trade Initiative, or DTTI, which seeks opportunities for co-production and development of military technologies between the two countries.

Lord highlighted the drone project during a roundtable with reporters on March 15, a day after she hosted a delegation from India to discuss DTTI programs.

The UAV project — a collaboration between the Air Force Research Laboratory and India’s Defence Research and Development Organization — is a recent addition to the DTTI slate. The two organizations intend to write a technical planning document next month and then sign that plan during a meeting in New Delhi, which Lord will attend, tentatively planned for late September.

Lord declined to say if the program draws specifically from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Gremlins program, which aims to launch and recover reusable drone swarms using manned airborne aircraft. However, she did indicate the systems could likely launch from aircraft operated by both nations, specifically the C-130J and C-17.

That program contains “potential” for Indian industry to take part in co-development of the system, which would have three targeted uses: humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, “cross-border operations,” and cave and tunnel inspection, Lord said. She added that the program could be “an efficient, cost-effective way to provide additional capability to the war fighter.”

Another DTTI program under development is a lightweight small arms technology project, which could reduce combined weapons and ammunition weight by about 40 percent. (That project involves U.S. industrial firm Textron Systems, which Lord led before joining the Pentagon; she clarified she does not take part in any specific discussions about that project aside from its broad involvement as part of the DTTI portfolio.)

“This is an area where there is co-development, as well as co-production opportunity, and that’s really what we’re interested in — technologies where the U.S. has brought them to a certain level and there’s an appetite for more investment, and for whatever reason we’re not able to get at that [in] the U.S. right now,” Lord said about that project.

Other long-gestating DTTI projects, such as India’s desire to procure the EMALS carrier launch technology, remain in rough stasis, although Lord expressed hope the September meeting could set hard timetables for moving forward in that area.

Indian bureaucracy has long entangled both the Pentagon and the American defense industry, and the DTTI program has certainly moved more slowly than was envisioned when it was launched by then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Ash Carter in 2012.

But Lord expressed optimism that the effort has finally turned a corner, thanks in part to Ajay Kumar, the secretary for defense production in the Indian Ministry of Defence. Kumar, Lord said, has been “very key” in getting the projects to move beyond just repeated meetings on the same topics — what Lord said was previously “death by PowerPoint.”

“What is different now is there’s been a lot of discussion and a lot of exchanges, [and] Dr. Kumar and I are saying we need to focus on deliverables with specific dates and really document what the objectives and the potential outcomes of the project are going to be,” she said, again noting that her September visit to India should coincide with putting a number of real deadlines and developmental milestones on the table.

The inclusion of industry trade groups, including two major groups based in India, has also helped get buy-in from Indian commercial enterprises, she added.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-3-2019 at 09:01 PM


Single-Use Cargo UAV Demoed For DARPA, USMC

Mar 18, 2019 Graham Warwick | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report

A disposable unmanned cargo glider designed to enable aircraft to resupply fast-moving ground forces over greater distances has entered a new phase of flight testing under contracts from DARPA and the U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.
U.S. startup Logistics Gliders says it has completed 12 prototype flight tests, six for each customer, with testing still ongoing under follow-on contracts with both. Of the prototypes flown so far, six have been deployed as sling loads under a helicopter and six have been dropped from a cargo aircraft.

Compared with the standard air-dropped parachute Container Delivery System (CDS) used to resupply ground forces, the glider would allow aircraft to deliver cargo from greater standoff range. This would increase protection from air defenses and reduce the flying time required to reach the release point.

CDS is most cost-effective when large numbers of containers can be air-dropped at a single point of need. If several locations need to be resupplied, then it will be less expensive to release multiple gliders from one point to then fly independently to the different sites, says Marti Sarigul-Klijn, principal investigator for Dixon, California-based Logistics Gliders.

The LG-2K glider developed under the DARPA-funded Revolutionary Airlift Innovation project is 12.7 ft. long with a 23.2-ft. wingspan. Payload capacity is 1,800 lb. and cargo volume about 42 ft³. Empty weight of the prototype is 400 lb. An optional landing parachute adds 45 lb. and reduces cargo volume to 36 ft³.

The truss-braced wing folds back for carriage inside an aircraft. The LG-2K is sized to fit inside a Marine Corps’ Bell Boeing MV-22B, and the tiltrotor can carry up to four. A Sikorsky CH-53K heavy-lift helicopter can carry up to eight and a Lockheed Martin KC-130J tanker/transport up to 18. A smaller LG-1K tactical aerial delivery glider has been developed and tested under the Marine Corps contract.

Test flights have involved rolling the glider out of a Shorts Skyvan cargo aircraft. The glider has a spin-resistant H-tail to cope with large pitch and yaw motions upon initially emerging from the aircraft. Then a static line releases the stowed wings, which are deployed by gas springs mounted inside the wings.

In an October 2018 flight test, the LG-2K was released from the Skyvan at 130 kt. and 8,000 ft., the glider flying for 7.33 min. Design glide ratio is 15:1. The LG-1K has flown at 17,000 ft. and 151 kt. in testing for the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.

Of the 12 flights so far, exceeding 54 min. flight time, seven have been radio controlled and five have been autonomous, using a disposable, commercially available flight controller that enables GPS-based waypoint navigation. Electric flight-control actuators are powered by a small battery.

To fly the glider directly to the point of need, rudders on the H tail are used to slip the aircraft and reduce its glide ratio, avoiding the need to manage energy. The disposable glider can belly-land if terrain is suitable or deploy the optional parachute and land vertically on its impact-absorbing, crushable nose.

Cost is envisioned as comparable to CDS, which costs $4,500-$11,000 per unit depending on the parachute used. The prototypes are handmade, with weather-resistant plywood fuselage panels, aluminum-extrusion wing spars and injection-molded plastic wing panel-ribs.

Logistics Gliders is now seeking a contract that will enable it to figure out how to automate production. “It will take us a couple of years to come up with a way to mass-produce the glider,” Sarigul-Klijn says.

He envisions the gliders being produced by multiple subcontractors. “This is furniture-type technology and tolerances. It’s more Russian than American design,” he says. “The idea is to really get the cost out.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-3-2019 at 09:07 AM


Pentagon orders second stealth target drone to be built

20 MARCH, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES

The Department of Defense ordered a second stealth aerial target demonstrator from Sierra Technical Services on 13 February.

The so-called 5th Generation Aerial Target (5GAT) is a high-performance, fighter-size unmanned air vehicle that is intended to represent stealthy aircraft threats from advanced adversaries such as China or Russia. The Pentagon is considering using follow-on production versions of the aircraft for air-to-air and ground-to-air weapons evaluation, pilot training, and ground forces training, says Sierra Technical.


5GAT rendering
Sierra Technical Services


The contract to complete the design, development, fabrication and testing of the first 5GAT was awarded to Sierra Technical by the Pentagon’s Director of Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E) in 24 March 2017. That initial target aircraft is still under development and is scheduled to fly during the summer of 2019.

The second 5GAT demonstrator is scheduled to make its first flight in November 2020, says Sierra Technical.

Sierra Technical is building the 5GAT demonstrators at a municipal airport in Tehachapi, California, a small town on the edge of the Mojave Desert. The company is using composites for the airframe and parts from old Northrop T-38s and F-5s, including landing gear and GE Aviation J85-5 engines.

Pulling parts from used aircraft is intended to keep costs low, the company told FlightGlobal in July 2018. The DOT&E is only paying Sierra $15.9 million to complete the first 5GAT design and deliver the first article demonstrator through the initial flight tests. The contract value for the second target demonstrator was not disclosed.

The target drone is about 12.2m (40ft) long and has a 7.3m wingspan, sitting less than a metre off the ground. It is designed to be launched and landed using a conventional runway, and has a maximum gross weight of 4,350kg (9,600lb) with full fuel.

The lightweight aircraft is designed to sustain up to +7.5g and -2g. It should be able to reach Mach 0.95, have a flight endurance of 1.5h and a maximum operating altitude of 40,000-45,000ft.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-3-2019 at 07:19 PM


More on this, with pics............

Unmanned Cargo Glider Extends Aerial Delivery Standoff

Mar 21, 2019 Graham Warwick | Aviation Week & Space Technology

A disposable unmanned cargo glider designed to enable aircraft to resupply fast-moving ground forces over greater distances has entered a new phase of flight testing under contracts from DARPA and the U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.

U.S. startup Logistics Gliders says it has completed 12 prototype flight tests, six for each customer, with testing still ongoing under follow-on contracts with both. Of the prototypes flown so far, six have been deployed as sling loads under a helicopter, and six have been dropped from a cargo aircraft.

- Air-dropped cargo glider made of inexpensive materials
- Allows transport aircraft to standoff from air defenses

Compared with the standard air-dropped parachute Container Delivery System (CDS) used to resupply ground forces, the glider would allow aircraft to deliver cargo from greater standoff range. This would increase protection from air defenses and reduce the flying time required to reach the release point.

CDS is most cost-effective when large numbers of containers can be air-dropped at a single point of need. If several locations require supplies, it will be less expensive to release multiple gliders from one point that then fly independently to the different sites, says Marti Sarigul-Klijn, principal investigator for Dixon, California-based Logistics Gliders.

The LG-2K glider developed under the DARPA-funded Revolutionary Airlift Innovation project is 12.7 ft. long with a 23.2-ft. wingspan. Payload capacity is 1,800 lb. and cargo volume about 42 ft.³ Empty weight of the prototype is 400 lb. An optional landing parachute adds 45 lb. and reduces cargo volume to 36 ft.³


An LG-2K cargo glider unfolds its wings after release from a Shorts Skyvan transport aircraft during flight tests. Credit: Logistics Gliders

The truss-braced wing folds back for carriage inside an aircraft. The LG-2K is sized to fit inside a Marine Corps Bell Boeing MV-22B, and the tiltrotor can carry up to four. A Sikorsky CH-53K heavylift helicopter can carry up to eight, and a Lockheed Martin KC-130J tanker/transport up to 18. A smaller LG-1K tactical aerial delivery glider has been developed and tested under the Marine Corps contract.

Test flights have included rolling the glider out of a Shorts Skyvan cargo aircraft. The glider has a spin-resistant H-tail to cope with large pitch and yaw motions encountered when initially emerging from the aircraft. Then a static line releases the stowed wings, which are deployed by gas springs mounted inside the wings.

In an October 2018 flight test, the LG-2K was released from the Skyvan at 130 kt. and 8,000 ft.; the glider flew for 7.33 min. Its design glide ratio is 15:1. The LG-1K has flown at 17,000 ft. and 151 kt. in tests conducted for the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.


Smaller LG-1K in gliding flight. Its blunt nose is impact-absorbing for parachute-assisted vertical landing. Credit: Logistics Gliders

Of the 12 flights so far, which have exceeded 54-min. flight time, seven have been radio-controlled and five have been autonomous, using a disposable, commercially available flight controller that enables GPS-based waypoint navigation. Electric flight-control actuators are powered by a small battery.

To fly the glider directly to the point of delivery, rudders on the H tail are used to slip the aircraft and reduce its glide ratio, avoiding the need to manage energy. The disposable glider can belly-land if terrain is suitable or deploy the optional parachute and land vertically on its impact-absorbing crushable nose.

Its price is envisioned as comparable to CDS, which costs $4,500-11,000 per unit depending on the parachute used. The prototypes are handmade, with weather-resistant plywood fuselage panels, aluminum-extrusion wing spars and injection-molded plastic wing panel-ribs.

Logistics Gliders is now seeking a contract that will enable it to tackle how to automate production. “It will take us a couple of years to come up with a way to mass-produce the glider,” says Sarigul-Klijn.

He envisions the gliders being produced by multiple subcontractors. “This is furniture-type technology and tolerances. It’s more Russian than American design,” he says. “The idea is to really get the cost out.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 12270
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-3-2019 at 03:33 PM


General Atomics awarded $123m to produce four Dutch MQ-9 Reapers

22 MARCH, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems was awarded a $123 million contract by the Pentagon to manufacture four MQ-9 Block 5 Reapers for the Royal Netherlands Air Force.

The contract has been anticipated for a while, as the US State Department approved the sale in 2015 and Amsterdam officially announced the order in July 2018 at the Farnborough air show in the United Kingdom.

The contract provides for four unmanned air vehicles (UAVs), four mobile ground control stations, spares and support equipment.


General Atomics MQ-9 Block 5 Reaper

The Netherlands is interested in the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities of the drone. Dutch crews began training on the Reaper in January 2019.

Work will be performed predominately at General Atomics headquarters and manufacturing plant in Poway, California. The UAVs are expected to be complete by the end of 2020.

In August, the US Air Force made its first-ever automated landing of the MQ-9 Block 5. General Atomics says automatic landing, as well as the UAVs automatic takeoff capabilities, enhances safety and increase efficiency.

The sale to the Netherlands of the MQ-9 Block 5 comes as General Atomics has been having success in Europe selling another variant of the Reaper, the MQ-9B SkyGaurdian. That drone is designed to meet NATO standards and pending Federal Aviation Administration approval could eventually meet global civil airworthiness certification standards.

The Royal Air Force has ordered the MQ-9B SkyGaurdian as part of its Protector RG Mk1 programme, and is scheduled to receive the aircraft in the early 2020s. Belgium also chose the SkyGuardian and the UAV is being considered by the Royal Australian Air Force.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  19    21

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 60.3% - SQL: 39.7%]