The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2    4  ..  15
Author: Subject: International Fighter Sales, part 2
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 29-12-2017 at 12:21 PM


Five US, European players apply for Poland's fighter jet tender

By: Jaroslaw Adamowski   16 hours ago

No Rafale? How interesting.......:cool:

WARSAW, Poland — The Polish Ministry of Defence has obtained five applications from companies that aim to participate in the country’s tender to purchase new fighter jets.

The participants include Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Leonardo and Saab, Lt. Colonel Robert Wincencik, a representative for the ministry’s Armament Inspectorate, told local news site Defence24.pl. Warsaw-based Fights On Logistics, a company that provided services in relation to Poland’s acquisition of 48 F-16C/D Block 52 Plus fighters, also applied to take part in the market analysis phase that precedes the planned tender.

The Armament Inspectorate initiated the procedure Nov. 23 as part of the Harpia (Harpy in English) program. Though the technical details of the planned procurement were not disclosed, Deputy Defence Minister Tomasz Szatkowski said last June that Warsaw aims to acquire new fighter jets around 2025.

For Boeing, the Polish procurement marks another fighter competition in the region in which the producer could supply its F/A-18 Super Hornets.

In November, Bulgarian Defence Minister Krasimir Karakachanov told journalists that, in addition to the three main competitors for the deal —which comprises Lockheed Martin’s F-16, Saab’s JAS 39 Gripen and the Eurofighter Typhoon —the ministry also requested an offer from Boeing for the Super Hornet.

The Eurofighter Typhoon is made by a consortium formed by Leonardo, BAE Systems, and Airbus Defense and Space.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ADMK2
Member





Posts: 1217
Registered: 11-5-2017
Location: Brisvegas
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-12-2017 at 12:02 AM


Interesting L-M aren’t bidding the F-35...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1248
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 30-12-2017 at 08:53 AM


Maybe the Poles aren't prepared to spend the money necessary to pay for F35s?

As for the no-show by Rafale, maybe Paris is still feeling the butt-hurt after their Puma derivatives got tossed aside for Black Hawks last year?






It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 05:03 PM


Vandeput Warns that French Offer for F-16 Successor is 'Too Good to Be True'

(Source: De Standaard; published Dec 27, 2017)

By Peter De Lobel (Published in Dutch; unofficial translation by D-A.com)

France is making every effort to give its Rafale fighter every opportunity. After the French government already promised an economic return of 4 billion, it is now talking of even 20 billion. But according to Minister of Defense Steven Vandeput (N-VA), this is mainly proof that the lobbying machine is running at full speed.

Vandeput cannot understand the increase in France’s promised return on investment. “The French offer is too good to be true. The lobbying is running at full speed, that is now clear, but we have opted for a straightforward and objective process through the RfGP. It truly is a pity that France is taking a different route. The claims that their offer did not fit within our process are simply incorrect. The criteria are clear. Period.”

The federal government has not set up the way in which France is putting pressure on the Belgian media, including an Opinion piece contributed by the French Minister of Defense. France did not reply via the established procedure of the Belgian government for the replacement of the F-16s. For the F-35 and the Eurofighter, the American and British governments responded with a bulky file. France sent a letter consisting of 3 A4-sized pages, in which it mentioned a collaboration around a new European fighter plane, together with Germany.

Since then, nothing much has moved on the French side, according to the opinions voiced within the government and the Defense establishment. "French bid is a hollow bid. They do not have timeline, no program, no answers," is what top military officials are saying off the record.

According to De Tijd, France could now compensate the full purchase amount. As to why France replied outside the Belgian procedure, it now says that, otherwise, it would not be possible to offer 100% economic compensation. However, this raises the question of why there was first talk of 4 billion euros and that now suddenly increases fivefold to 20 billion euros. “It's all about a desperate attempt from the sidelines,” can be heard in the government.

Nevertheless, the federal team has not been speaking with the same voice in the past few months. Prime Minister Charles Michel (MR) has a good relation with French President Emmanuel Macron and feels little about sending people out on cold walks.

Minister of Defense Steven Vandeput (N-VA) sees no solution to the replacement of the F-16 in the French proposal. It is best to talk about a collaboration for a new aircraft, but not for the deadline of 2023, when the first F-16s are taken out of circulation, because it will be unachievable.

Click here for our Dec. 14 story on the subject, which explains how European trade rules severely limit how offsets can be awarded during competitive tenders, and details the offsets offered by the candidates.)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/feature/5/189...

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1248
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 09:56 PM


Interesting, someone else calling out the French for their bullshit.



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 10:01 PM


The Belgian Army likes the French, the Airforce treats them with borderline contempt.............then you have the Walloon versus French speakers saga that goes on and on and on forever.................nobody in Belgium believes ANY politician, and most certainly NOT a French one (or three)...........
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 9-1-2018 at 09:35 PM


Nigeria to acquire three JF-17 fighters

09 January, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Nigeria's proposed 2018 budget document confirms that the African nation will obtain the Chengdu Pakistan Aeronautical Complex JF-17 fighter.

The nation's 2018 budget allocation document indicates that N13.1 billion ($36 million) will be earmarked as partial payment for three JF-17s. The payment will also cover support equipment and spares.

This makes Nigeria the first buyer of the type to be officially named, although programme officials have long said there is strong interest for the type in the developing world.

At the Paris air show in June 2015, a Pakistani air force official told FlightGlobal that a "contract had been signed" with an Asian country.

The Asian country has yet to be officially named, but is believed to be Myanmar. Images on Chinese social media have shown a JF-17 in Myanmar air force markings.

Powered by the Klimov RD-93 engine, the JF-17 is pitched as a low-cost fighter for developing world air forces. Following feedback from prospective customers, a two seat version was developed, which is now undergoing testing.

In addition to payments related to the three fighters, the Nigerian budget document earmarks funds for the acquisition of two AgustaWestland AW109 helicopters, as well as depot maintenance for two Dassault Alpha Jets and a Lockheed Martin C-130H.

Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that the Nigerian air force operates a broad inventory of 120 aircraft from a range of Western and Eastern European suppliers.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-1-2018 at 01:45 PM


Dassault details Rafale order backlog

11 January, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Craig Hoyle London

Dassault ended last year with a firm order backlog for 101 Rafales, after delivering nine of the type during 2017.

In a financial overview released on 8 January, the airframer says it shipped eight Rafales to Egypt and a single example to the French air force last year, in line with its planning expectations. Additionally, it returned one Rafale M for service with the French navy, after upgrading it to the latest F3 operating standard.

Dassault says its firm order backlog for the multirole combat aircraft stood at 101 units as of 31 December 2017. This includes 31 to be produced for its domestic operators, plus 70 for export customers. In addition to Egypt, which has so far fielded 14 aircraft from an eventual total of 24, other international buyers include India (24) and Qatar (36).


Dassault

The 101-strong backlog figure represents a reduction of nine units since the same point 12 months earlier.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-1-2018 at 02:54 PM


Lockheed keeps F-16 production line going with Bahrain deal

By: Chirine Mouchantaf   6 hours ago


An F-16 Fighting Falcon prepares to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker over Afghanistan Nov. 19. (Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Air Force)

BEIRUT – Bahrain is set to become the first country in the region to operate Lockheed’s F-16 Block 70 aircraft, in a move that will boost the Falcon’s production line.

Last November, Vice President Mike Pence announced the signature of a deal for the sale of 16 F-16s worth over $2.3 billion to the Gulf country, considering it a “big boost for American jobs and security.”

“We are pleased the Kingdom of Bahrain and the U.S. government have agreed to move forward with the sale of F-16 Block 70 aircraft for the Royal Bahraini Air Force,” said Rick Groesch, regional vice president of international business development at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.

The F-16 Block 70 is the newest generation of Fighting Falcon.

The core of its configuration (over the Block-50/52) is the AN/APG-83 active electronically-scanned array radar. The latest fourth-gen aircraft combines capability upgrades such as avionics architecture and structural upgrades to extend the life of the aircraft by more than 50 percent beyond that of previous production F-16s.

Although the number of aircraft has been reduced from a total of 19 to 16 units due to cost reduction policy, the sale “would save the shrinking F-16 line,” a military source has disclosed.

The source – who spoke on condition of anonymity – described the sale to Bahrain as “Lockheed’s pass to keep its F-16 production line open for the next three to five years.” In return, the RBAF is in a crucial need of upgrading its fleet to be able to keep up with other Gulf nations, the source continued.

“It’s a win-win situation; Bahrain needs the F-16 and the F-16 needs Bahrain.”

Bahrain was the first ever Gulf country to acquire and operate the F-16.

On potential new F-16 customers, Groesch stressed the company’s expanded efforts on keeping the production line open, noting that “Lockheed sees multiple opportunities totaling approximately 200 aircraft in Central Europe, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia and South America.”

Last June, Lockheed and Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL) signed a landmark agreement affirming both companies intent to join hands to produce the F-16 Block 70 in India; this represents another milestone that will help the company’s vigorous attempt to keep the F-16 assembly line going.

However, with this deal, one Bahraini military official confirmed the country’s withdrawal from the Eurofighter Typhoon program.

The European fighter was one of the main alternatives competing to join Bahrain’s air force, according to him.

“The decision is set and done. The Royal Bahraini Air Force won’t be operating the Typhoon anytime soon,” he said. “With a total of 16 brand new advanced F-16s and 20 upgraded Block 40 F-16 aircraft to the V configuration, the air force lost its need to operate a new kind of aircraft.”

Saudi Arabia, Oman and Kuwait are already regional customers for the jet built by Eurofighter consortium members Airbus, BAE Systems and Leonardo.

A Eurofighter spokesperson noted that, based on current orders, the typhoon will continue to be delivered until 2024.

“We continue to pursue a number of significant opportunities around the world and are confident that we will sell more Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft internationally,” said the spokesperson.

Military expert Naji Malaeb pointed out Bahrain’s lack of investment in military compared to other Gulf nations – especially Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Nonetheless, as this latest buy would indicate, “Bahrain is fully devoted to stick by its allies and counter Iran’s intervention in the region,” he noted.

In a study published last February, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) declared that all Arab states and the Gulf except Bahrain increased their major arms imports between 2007 and 2011 and between 2012 and 2016. Of the states with tense relations with Iran, Bahrain decreased its arms imports by 19 percent.

“The 16 strong-batch of Falcons aircraft ordered by Bahrain can be the start of a planned larger fleet for the air force,” Malaeb concluded.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 25-1-2018 at 04:39 PM


Belgium to Have a Voice in Future Aircraft Development, if Eurofighter Selected

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Jan 23, 2018)

Industrial proposals as part of the Eurofighter offer to Belgium would create opportunities to participate in the future development of the aircraft, leading industry representatives and academics have been told.

Further details about the Eurofighter consortium’s long-term industrial proposal to Belgium were revealed last week at a Eurofighter Typhoon Belgian Aerospace Industry Day, held in Brussels.

More than 50 representatives from industry and academia were at the event, which focussed on how the Eurofighter programme would seek to collaborate with Belgian industry, should Belgium choose Eurofighter Typhoon. Proposals included:

-- The creation of opportunities for Belgian industry to have a voice in the future development of Typhoon

-- The provision for Belgium to access valuable Mission Data and Electronic Warfare data, working with the UK

-- The opportunity for Belgium to participate in the support structure for the aircraft

-- The opportunity to ensure Belgium is "well positioned" for future European aircraft programmes

Anthony Gregory, Campaign Director for Belgium at BAE Systems, said: “One of the major strengths of our true European offer is that the IPR on Eurofighter is entirely owned by the companies within the programme itself. That means we can share that IPR and invite Belgium into the future development of the aircraft. Our proposals around access to Mission Data and Electronic Warfare data would mean Belgium would not simply be provided with a data pack, but would have its own representatives within the system.

“Belgium would be given access to the systems to allow it to programme the aircraft to its requirements, as well as having a seat alongside the UK. We have provided some of that UK infrastructure and plan to invite Belgian industry to become a part of it.”

The UK-led European offer to Belgium offers a Government to Government Memorandum of Understanding underpinning a deep strategic partnership and including a comprehensive relationship between the Royal Air Force and the Belgian Air Component.

Part of that relationship would bring the Belgian Air Component’s Eurofighter aircraft into a support structure based on the UK’s support model, known as the Typhoon Total Availability Enterprise, or TyTAN. The TyTAN agreement, signed between BAE Systems and the UK Ministry of Defence in 2016, is an innovative 10-year agreement to reduce the support costs of the Eurofighter UK fleet by more than a third, with savings reinvested into the programme.

Mr Gregory added: “We are examining how Belgian industry could participate in that structure. All of our proposals further ensure that Belgian industry is well positioned to take advantage of next generation capability. That is embodied in the Eurofighter aircraft, which benefits from a long-term future development path, but it also positions industry well for the next European combat aircraft development.

“The various elements of our offer are designed to ensure that Belgian industry can realise the full extent of opportunities that this procurement could represent.”

The European Eurofighter offer, led by the UK Government, is offering Eurofighter Typhoon as an advanced multi-role combat aircraft solution to Belgium. Other elements of the industrial proposals include the establishment of two National Innovation Centres for Belgium.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-1-2018 at 04:22 PM


Kuwait Moving Ahead with F-18 Purchase: Report

(Source: Gulf News; published Jan 24, 2018)

Estimated cost of the deal is $10.1 billion

DUBAI --- Kuwait has informed the US that it plans to go ahead with the purchase of 40 F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, a Kuwaiti daily reported on Wednesday.

Specialised military committees will follow up on the details of the purchase of the fighter jets, and their maintenance, training and spare parts, Al Rai reported.

The daily added Kuwait had sought to purchase 40 Super Hornet Aircraft — 32 F/A-18E and eight F/A-18F, all with F414-GE-400 engines — with support, equipment, and training at an estimated cost of $10.1 billion.

In November 2016, the State Department said it had approved the sale, explaining it “will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a major non-Nato ally that has been, and continues to be, an important force for political and economic progress in the Middle East”. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Gulf News website.

http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/kuwait/kuwait-moving-ahead-wit...

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 06:50 PM


Opinion: F-35 Catalyzes High-End Export Fighter Market

As more countries opt in, the forecast swells 10% in 2018

Feb 6, 2018

Richard Aboulafia | Aviation Week & Space Technology

The High-end Fighter Club

The world fighter market is growing at an impressive pace. Deliveries in 2017 grew 9.1% by value over 2016, and Teal Group projects 10% growth in 2018. High levels of tension in key regions are a big demand driver, along with delayed replacement cycles in many countries.

But the interesting aspect of this growth is that it is primarily benefiting high-end models, particularly (but not exclusively) Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. What was once an exclusive club—customers of high-end fighters with a unit recurring flyaway price above $75 million in today’s money—is becoming much less exclusive.

Australia became the first member when it began operating F-111s in the 1970s. Later that decade, Israel and Japan acquired F-15s. Under the Shah, Iran acquired F-14s, but after the revolution it exited the high-end market.

Excluding countries that built their own high-end fighters (Germany, Italy and the UK built and operated Panavia Tornados, for example), the high-end export fighter market stayed at just four countries through the 1980s and 1990s. In the 2000s, South Korea and Singapore joined when they bought F-15s. That brought the club to six members. The other 30+ countries in the export fighter market bought aircraft in the $40-60 million class (F-16s, Mirages, etc.).


Source: Teal Group

But since 2015, the club has grown from six to 15 members. Tensions in the Middle East, coupled with a growing awareness that fighter procurement can be used as a form of diplomacy, and the arrival of the F-35, have produced a remarkable market disruption.

Dassault’s Rafale was the first beneficiary of this boom. After 25 years of failed marketing campaigns, the first two export customers—Egypt and Qatar—signed in 2015. Both wanted a second source for air weaponry, one that probably would not cut them off in the event of conflict. Egypt gets a caveat on our list since its fighters were largely paid for by other Gulf countries.
Qatar, astonishingly, went on to purchase F-15s and Eurofigthers, meaning it has now signed for three of the four available high-end Western fighters. India signed for Rafales, too, while Kuwait and Oman went with Eurofighters (along with less expensive F/A-18E/Fs). These countries, therefore, have joined the high-end club.

The most recent market catalyst, however, has been the F-35.

For decades, while numerous export market countries were part of the Joint Strike Fighter development team, it was not clear when—or if—some would actually sign production contracts. But contracts have been signed in the past few years, resulting in deliveries. Lockheed Martin delivered 66 F-35s in 2017, of which 19 went to international customers. Ninety deliveries are planned this year, about one-third of which are going overseas.


Source: Teal Group

F-35 production will grow to approximately 150 F-35s annually, with at least one-third for export. F-35 output will exceed over half the market’s value by output in the early 2022s, even if it does not win any of the key undecided fighter competitions (see graph).

Thanks to the F-35, the Netherlands, Norway and Turkey are now high-end fighter customers. Our list excludes the UK and Italy, but it is noteworthy that the F-35 represents the first time that these countries have purchased high-end fighters built out of country.

This market shift is also driven by the need to incorporate new technologies. High-end fighters can better exploit the full range of external tracking and targeting systems that are increasingly available, from satellites to UAVs to sensor aircraft. This translates into more operational flexibility and greater ability to track targets over larger areas—critical considerations for an air force with fewer aircraft.

To look at this shift from the other perspective, more expensive aircraft often means fewer aircraft, which will translate into tough force structure decisions. The U.S. Air Force is not buying nearly enough F-35s to replace its F-15s, F-16s and A-10s, especially since the F-22 program was slashed by over 70%. As an extreme example, the Netherlands plans to buy 37 F-35s, and the government is concerned that it can afford only 34. By contrast, the country purchased 213 F-16s.

Perhaps these force structure concerns will create a market for less expensive combat aircraft, to be purchased as a complement. But until then, the average price of a combat aircraft is rising fast.

Contributing columnist Richard Aboulafia is vice president of analysis at Teal Group. He is based in Washington. The views expressed are not necessarily shared by Aviation Week.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 09:51 PM


Singapore Airshow 2018: Indonesia Su-35 programme at risk of delays over commodity dispute

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Defence Weekly

06 February 2018

Key Points

- Indonesia’s ambition to receive its first Su-35 aircraft by 2019 is facing obstacles in the form of a counter-trade disagreement
- Jakarta is pushing for the platform to arrive in time for the next Indonesian general elections

Indonesia’s plan to receive its first Sukhoi Su-35 ‘Flanker-E’ multirole combat aircraft by 2019 is now at risk of being delayed unless the country can resolve a dispute over the list of commodities that are being offered to Russia as part of Indonesia’s counter-trade obligation.

Speaking to Jane’s at the Singapore Airshow 2018 exhibition, a senior Indonesian government official has identified rubber as the commodity that is stalling negotiations between Jakarta and Moscow.

(135 of 472 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-2-2018 at 03:33 PM


BAE Proposes UK Government Financing to Malaysia for Typhoon Jet Deal (excerpt)

(Source: Reuters; published Feb 13, 2018)

By Praveen Menon and Tim Hepher

KUALA LUMPUR --- BAE Systems will provide Malaysia a UK government-backed financing deal if it decides to replace its fleet of combat jets with the Eurofighter Typhoon, senior company officials said.

Malaysia has for several years been weighing France’s Rafale jet and the Eurofighter Typhoon, built by a European consortium including Britain’s BAE, as it looks to buy up to 18 jets to replace its Russian MiG-29s - most of which are grounded.

The contest, potentially worth over $2 billion, is one of the biggest fighter deals under consideration in Asia, although a decision has been delayed due to upcoming national elections and a shift in Malaysia’s focus towards upgrading aerial surveillance capabilities.

“We have an offer on the table...It’s competitively priced and we have offered UK government financing so the Malaysian government can spread the payment over a longer period,” Alan Garwood, the Group Business Development Director for BAE Systems said in an interview in Kuala Lumpur.

“We can offer training, local partnership and lots of jobs,” he added.

Financing would be provided via the UK Export Finance export credit agency. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Reuters website.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-bae-systems-malaysia/bae-...

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-2-2018 at 04:24 PM


Belgium wants to buy Rafale fighters for naval capability, says French lawmaker

By: Pierre Tran   12 hours ago


A French Navy Rafale fighter jet takes off from the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle operating in the Gulf on Feb. 26, 2015. (Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images)

Idiot Reason of the Year as to why the Belgians "might" prefer RAFALE Navale.......they want to operate them off the French, and presumably other, western aircraft carriers..........:lol: :no: :thumbdown:

PARIS — Belgium has shown interest in the Rafale fighter jet for maritime use, said Jean-Jacques Bridey, chairman of the French Defence Committee of the lower house National Assembly.

“The Belgians are interested in the Rafale,” he told The Defense Journalists Association. “Why? If they buy the Rafale, it will be the naval Rafale.”

Belgium is interested in the aircraft’s ability to land on the French aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle, which would boost Belgium’s deployment capacity, Bridey said. “This is a seaborne airbase, after all,” he added.

France has pitched the Rafale in an offer of broad bilateral military cooperation with Belgium, opting out of a competition that has attracted British and American offers of the Eurofighter Typhoon and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, respectively.

Laurence Mortier, the spokeswoman for Belgium’s defense minister, said she could not confirm the interest in a carrier-based aircraft.

The French government letter offering the Rafale is undergoing a legal review in Belgium, she said.

That review seeks to determine whether the French proposal can be considered despite being made outside a tender.

The Belgian Defence Ministry has posted a request for government proposal for public consultation, setting out the tender for 34 multirole combat aircraft and support equipment.

An aircraft carrier capability is not among the requirements listed in the air combat capability program.

A fighter jet with carrier capacity reflects European and international cooperation in which France, one of the largest European forces, could “federate” its “discriminating capabilities,” Bridey said.

There are nations that lack equipment, and cooperation would allow their forces to take part in operations.

French cooperation could include a naval task force, cybersecurity, intelligence gathering in the exo-atmosphere, military intelligence, special forces, and command and control of large operations, he said. Frigates from Britain, Germany and Spain have sailed in a French naval task force, he noted.

Dassault Aviation, prime contractor on the Rafale, was not immediately available for comment.

Dassault last week signed 13 cooperative agreements with Belgian companies as part of the French offer of the Rafale.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-2-2018 at 06:28 PM


Boeing rejoins competitive field for Canadian fighter deal

22 February, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Stephen Trimble Washington DC

The Canadian government has announced that five bidders — Boeing, Dassault, Eurofighter, Lockheed Martin and Saab — are eligible to compete for a long sought-after contract to replace the country’s 88 CF-18 fighters.

The disclosure of the Future Fighter Capabilities Project (FFCP)’s official Supplier’s List ends a mystery about whether Boeing would decline to participate after angering Canadian government officials.

The Supplier’s List shows that Royal Canadian Air Force’s options remain plentiful, with the Typhoon, Rafale, Gripen, Super Hornet and F-35 Lightning II available for purchase. The release of the government’s Supplier’s List does not mean the companies are committed to submitting bids for the contract award scheduled 2021 or 2022.

“We will continue to evaluate our participation in the FFCP as the Government of Canada outlines the procurement approach, requirements and evaluation criteria,” Boeing says.

The company’s role in the project has gone through a couple of unexpected twists and turns. The conservative Harper government had selected the F-35 to replace the CF-18 fleet in 2009. But the arrival of the Trudeau government in 2015 led to a review of that decision. Initially, the RCAF announced plans to buy 24 F/A-18E/Fs as an interim solution, then select a permanent CF-18 replacement in the early 2020s.

Last year, however, Boeing filed a trade complaint with the US Commerce Department against Canadian aircraft manufacturer Bombardier over allegedly unfair pricing on a sale of CSeries aircraft to Delta Air Lines. The Canadian government react strongly against Boeing, canceling the interim fighter deal. The Canadian defence minister said last summer that Boeing was not a trusted partner of the Canadian government.

In January, the US International Trade Commission determined Boeing was not injured by the Delta order, negating a 292% tariff on CSeries imports proposed by the Commerce Department.

“Boeing values Canada as a customer and supplier-partner for both our commercial and defense businesses,” Boeing says.
The Canadian government plans to begin receiving new fighters under the contract in 2025, with initial operational capability scheduled six years later.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
unicorn
Member





Posts: 1248
Registered: 11-5-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Resignedly Sceptical

[*] posted on 24-2-2018 at 08:22 PM


Treudeau moved to spite Boeing to salve his personal butt-hurt, only to discover that Boeing was the best non-F35 option available.

I wonder if he will need a chiropractor after that particular backflip.




It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 25-2-2018 at 01:43 PM


Canada names suppliers approved to bid in future fighter competition

By: David Pugliese   1 day ago


Canada's future fighter project is estimated to cost $15 billion. (Don MacKinnon/Getty Images)

VICTORIA, British Columbia — Five European and U.S. aerospace firms have been approved to take part in the upcoming competition to provide Canada with a new fighter jet.

Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Saab, Dassault and Airbus were all named Thursday to Canada’s official fighter jet supplier list, which allows them to receive information about plans to buy 88 jets and ultimately bid on the program.

“We are pleased with the responses received from foreign governments and commercial entities that have the ability to meet Canada’s needs,” Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough said in a statement. “Our government is confident this will result in a robust competition.”

The project is estimated to cost CA$19 billion (U.S. $15 billion).

Over the course of the last five years, those companies have all indicated their interest in providing new fighter jets to Canada.

The aircraft expected to be offered to Canada include Lockheed Martin’s F-35, Boeing’s Super Hornet, the Eurofighter Typhoon, the Dassault Rafale and Saab’s Gripen.

There were some questions about whether Boeing would put its name forth in the aftermath of a messy trade dispute with Canada and its main domestic aerospace firm, Bombardier.

In the midst of that dispute, Canada canceled a plan to buy 18 Super Hornets as a stopgap measure until the new fighters could be acquired. It will now instead buy used F-18 aircraft from Australia to fill in as “interim” fighters.

“Boeing and the US Government have taken the first step in Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP), and the Super Hornet is among the aircraft included on the FFCP Supplier List by the Government of Canada,” Boeing spokesman Scott Day noted in an email. “We will continue to evaluate our participation in the FFCP as the Government of Canada outlines the procurement approach, requirements and evaluation criteria.”

A request for proposals for the new fighter jets will be issued in 2019, Canadian government officials say.

A winning bidder is expected to be selected in spring 2021.

The first aircraft would be delivered sometime in 2025.

Deliveries could take place between then and 2031. The new aircraft would replace the Royal Canadian Air Force’s existing CF-18 fleet.

Email: dpugliese@defensenews.com
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-3-2018 at 06:36 PM


March 1, 2018 / 3:18 AM / 2 days ago

German ministry sees benefit in keeping fighter jet expertise in Europe

Andrea Shalal

BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany’s defense ministry said on Wednesday that its plan to give priority to the European fighter jet over U.S. competitors in a competition to replace aging Tornado jets would retain aircraft expertise in Europe and continue use of a proven system.

The German Defence Ministry, in a letter to a Greens lawmaker, acknowledged that the German air force’s strategy recommended parallel use of two different fighter jet models, but said that was“not a binding guideline.”

The ministry said in December that the Eurofighter Typhoon was the leading candidate to replace its Tornado jets beginning in 2025. It said it did not share the view of German air force chief Georg Muellner, who had indicated he preferred Lockheed Martin Corp’s stealthy F-35 fighter jet.

Its latest comments came after Greens lawmaker Tobias Lindner asked the ministry to explain that position, and how it jarred with the air force’s strategy to operate two different models of fighter jets, aimed at ensuring the ability to continue operations in the event of fleet-wide grounding.

Deputy Defence Minister Ralf Brauksiepe told Lindner a final decision on the Tornado replacement would be made only after a comprehensive assessment of data provided by the aircraft manufacturers.

He said the ministry intended to buy a combat aircraft that was already available on the market, and would look primarily at the Eurofighter, as well as the Lockheed F-35 and the F-15E and F/A-18E/F fighter jets built by Boeing Co.

“A possible purchase of the Eurofighter would ensure the retention of military aircraft expertise in Germany and Europe, and value creation in our own country,” he said in the letter.“The weapons system has already been introduced to the Bundeswehr (armed forces) and is being successfully used.”

Those factors, he said, would have to be“considered” in the assessment of the different aircraft.

Lindner said the ministry’s preferential treatment of the Eurofighter underscored the problem affecting many large procurement programs.“There is a tendency to give preference to domestically developed (weapons) and value creation at home over options that are already available on the market and therefore likely less risky,” he said.

Lindner said recent German procurement programs showed that focusing too much on industrial policy factors could lead to poorly performing contracts.

The multination European A400M program, for instance, has faced huge cost overruns and technical challenges.

Brauksiepe’s letter comes shortly after the U.S. government told European Union nations that it and other non-EU countries should play a“robust” role in European defense integration, including access to future procurement contracts.

U.S. officials have provided classified briefings on the Lockheed and Boeing jets to German military officials as they prepare to launch a competition to replace the current fleet of around 90 Tornado jets - a deal that will be worth billions of euros to the winning bidder.

Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Susan Fenton
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-3-2018 at 01:46 PM


Saudi Arabia signs MOI for 48 more Typhoons

Gareth Jennings, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

09 March 2018


With its latest MOI, Saudi Arabia will field 120 Typhoon fighters by the time that deliveries are complete. Source: BAE Systems

Saudi Arabia has firmed-up its long-awaited procurement of an additional 48 Eurofighter Typhoon combat aircraft, with a memorandum of intent (MOI) being signed on 9 March.

The MOI for the BAE Systems-built aircraft was announced by the company in a notification to the London Stock Exchange. It is understood to have been signed by the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammad Bin Salman Al Saud, and UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson during a meeting at Royal Air Force (RAF) Northolt in north London.

An announcement pertaining to the additional Typhoons had been expected for some time, but controversy surrounding Saudi Arabia’s involvement in the war in Yemen in general and the role of its UK-supplied Typhoons in that war in particular meant that it was uncertain if it would take place during the crown prince’s state visit to the UK.

No contract value or delivery timeline was disclosed.

Saudi Arabia ordered 72 Tranche 2 Typhoon aircraft in 2007, and at an estimated GBP20 billion (USD41 billion at the time) it was one of the largest defence procurement contracts ever signed. Under that agreement, the first 24 aircraft were to be built by BAE Systems at its Warton production facility, with the remaining 48 to be built in Saudi Arabia itself by the Alsalam Aircraft Company. This plan did not come to fruition, however, and all 72 aircraft were built in the UK with Saudi Arabia focusing its attentions on delivering in-country through-life support to the fleet instead.

(271 of 565 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-3-2018 at 02:58 PM


Riyadh advances on repeat Typhoon order

09 March, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Craig Hoyle London

Saudi Arabia could be set to acquire a follow-on batch of 48 Eurofighter Typhoons, pending the conclusion of government-to-government discussions with the UK disclosed on 9 March.

"The UK government has signed a memorandum of intent with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to aim to finalise discussions for the purchase of 48 Typhoon aircraft," BAE says. The Royal Saudi Air Force already has acquired 72 of the European type, with deliveries under its Project Salam acquisition having concluded last year.

"We are committed to supporting the kingdom as it modernises the Saudi armed forces and develops key industrial capabilities critical to the delivery of 'Vision 2030'," says BAE chief executive Charles Woodburn, referring to Riyadh's ongoing military transformation programme.

Further details of the potential sale – such as an expected delivery schedule – have not been disclosed. In its annual results overview for 2017, published on 28 February, BAE said: "Discussions with current and prospective operators of the Typhoon aircraft continue to support the group's expectations for additional Typhoon contract awards. However, there can be no certainty as to the timing of these orders."

While the memorandum of intent comes as good news for BAE and its partners in the Eurofighter consortium, earlier expectations for a follow-on Saudi acquisition had been based around the potential sale of up to 72 Typhoons.

Other beneficiaries of a fresh Typhoon order would include the Eurojet consortium, which supplies the type's EJ200 turbofan engines; Leonardo, responsible for its electronic warfare equipment and radar, as part of the Euroradar group; and guided weapons supplier MBDA.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-3-2018 at 04:21 PM


Saudi Arabia and BAE one step closer to finalizing Typhoon deal

By: Andrew Chuter   9 hours ago


Eurofighter Typhoon in flight over United Arab Emirates. (BAE Systems)

LONDON — Saudi Arabia has moved a step closer to purchasing a second batch of Typhoon fighters with the signing of a memorandum of intent with the British government to acquire 48 jets from BAE Systems.

The preliminary agreement to move forward on the long running negotiations to purchase the Typhoons came at the end of a three-day visit to Britain by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

“We have taken a vital step towards finalizing another order for Typhoon jets that will increase security in the Middle East and boost British industry and jobs,” said Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson.

Completion of the deal would come as a major boost for Britain’s combat air industry, just weeks after the government here announced plans to conduct an industrial strategy review of the sector to map out future skills and resources required beyond Typhoon.

Aside from BAE, the U.K. arm of Italian aerospace company Leonardo is a major supplier of avionics for the jet. Rolls-Royce is involved in building the jets engines for the Typhoon and dozens of smaller local companies are also in the supply chain.

Nearly 15,000 people are employed in the Typhoon supply chain in Britain, with thousands more jobs supporting manufacturing in Eurofighter partner countries Germany, Italy and Spain.

The Typhoon is built by the Eurofighter consortium in which Airbus and Leonardo have a stake alongside BAE.

A deal could involve some assembly of the Typhoons in Saudi Arabia in support of the Vision 2030 economic reform program being implemented by the government in Riyadh, said industry sources.

Increased Saudi industrial involvement in Typhoon was hinted at in a statement released by Charles Woodburn, BAE’s CEO.

“Today’s news is a positive step towards agreeing on a contract for our valued partner, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We are committed to supporting the Kingdom as it modernizes the Saudi Armed Forces and develops key industrial capabilities critical to the delivery of Vision 2030,” said Woodburn.

BAE already undertakes subassembly of Hawk trainers in Saudi as part of a 2015 deal to equip the air force with 22 of the jets.

Along with the large, and lucrative support contracts for Typhoon, Hawk and Tornado jets, the British company employs some 6,000 people in Saudi — the majority being locals.

The Saudis already operate 72 Typhoons from a first batch of jets ordered from BAE in 2007. The final jets from that order were delivered in the first half of last year.

The 2007 deal included an element of Typhoon assembly in Saudi Arabia but that requirement was eventually ditched as being too ambitious.

Commercial negotiations between BAE and the Saudis over the terms of the new deal are ongoing.

Late last year the British sold 24 Typhoons to Qatar in a deal valued at around £5 billion (U.S. $6.9 billion). Unusually the two governments went from signing a memorandum of intent to BAE concluding the deal in just three months.

Industry executives though caution against such a rapid conclusion to negotiations this time around.

Aside from the Saudi air force, Kuwait, Oman and Qatar have also ordered the Typhoon in the Gulf region.

Paul Everitt, the CEO of ADS, the aerospace and defense trade organization said: “Today’s announcement, coupled with the MoD’s work to develop a combat air strategy, will help ensure the U.K. remains a world leading military air power and a highly competitive and capable option in the export market.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 18-3-2018 at 03:34 PM


Saudi-UK Agreement Gives Eurofighter A Boost

Mar 16, 2018

Tony Osborne | Aviation Week & Space Technology

A follow-on order for the Eurofighter Typhoon from Saudi Arabia could extend production of the fighter well into the mid-2020s and give the UK more breathing room as it considers industrial options for a future combat aircraft.

Britain and Saudi Arabia have begun negotiating a potential order for 48 Typhoons. The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) already operates 72 of the jets.

While it is not a firm contract, the memorandum of intent signed between the two countries on March 9 during an official visit by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman appears to be a breakthrough after years of deadlocked negotiations. If signed, the deal could be worth £8 billion ($11 billion), adding to the £65 billion worth of trade agreements between the two countries that will extend over the next decade.

Saudia Arabia and the UK will “deepen and broaden” defense cooperation and enhance Saudi defense industrial capabilities. It could lead to the Saudis becoming party to a future British fighter program, The Sunday Times reported.

- Riyadh wants 48 more Typhoons for its growing air force
- After Qatar success, UK pushes Typhoon in Belgium, Finland

The agreement has added momentum to the Typhoon’s export prospects. In December, the UK secured a 24-strong order for the aircraft from Qatar, and it is making sales pushes in Belgium and Finland. Germany is considering Typhoons to replace its Panavia Tornados by 2030, although American types including the Lockheed Martin F-35 are also on the table.

A follow-on order from Saudi Arabia was long expected in part because it has been operating the Typhoons in its campaign against the Houthi rebels in Yemen. However, issues around price and internal Saudi disagreements about the final assembly location interfered.


BAE Systems built 72 Saudi Typhoons in the UK, but the next batch likely will be completed in Saudi Arabia. Credit: Katsuhiko Tokunaga/Eurofighter GmbH

Relations also were strained by a judicial review brought to the British High Court by the UK Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT), arguing that the UK should have halted arms sales to Riyadh after reported human rights violations in Yemen. The British high court rejected the complaint last July, but CAAT has appealed the decision. The next hearing in the case is expected in April.

Under the 2007 contract for 72 Typhoons, some 48 were supposed to have undergone final assembly in-country through the In-Kingdom Industrial Program (IKIP). But due to a contract adjustment and price escalation, all 72 aircraft were in fact completed at BAE’s facilities in Warton, England. The final price for the first 72 aircraft was agreed only in 2014.

The IKIP plan looks likely to return, however. BAE Systems says it is “committed” to supporting Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030—the investment program launched by the crown prince in 2016 to try to wean the Saudi economy from its heavy reliance on oil.

One of the drivers for Vision 2030 is a push to source 50% of defense equipment locally. In 2016, about 2% was produced in Saudi Arabia. BAE has made considerable strides in supporting the plan: A second batch of Hawk jet trainers ordered by the kingdom at the end of 2015 are undergoing final assembly in Dhahran, including the 1,000th Hawk to be built. The Hawks are being supplied in kit form from the UK and shipped to Saudi Arabia for final assembly. A similar process is likely to be adopted if there is a follow-on Typhoon order.

Any deal with Saudi Arabia is controversial with the British public, given Saudi Arabia’s human rights record and questions about corruption in previous large-scale defense deals.

However, continued production of the Typhoon will be invaluable for BAE and the wider four-nation program to retain skills and engineering capability for future combat aircraft. With the Qatari order, Typhoon production has been extended to at least 2024, and a Saudi order would add years more.

Britain is weighing its post-Typhoon options, with a Combat Air Strategy document due to be published this summer, probably in time for the Farnborough Airshow. Britain’s last defense industry strategy, published in 2005, contended that the introduction of the Eurofighter and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter meant the UK would not need to envisage building a new fighter for more than 30 years.

But with France and Germany seemingly snubbing Britain in announcing their plans last July to jointly develop a future combat aircraft for the late 2030s, British Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson has promised a “bold and ambitious” approach for Britain’s future combat air capability.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 24-3-2018 at 02:40 PM


Bulgaria expresses interest in Israeli F-16s

Igor Bozinovski, Skopje - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

23 March 2018

Israel will be invited to offer F-16C/D fighters for the Bulgarian tender for a new fighter to replace the Bulgarian Air Force’s MiG-29s, Bulgarian Defence Minister Krasimir Karakachanov said on 19 March.

He added that a letter from Boeing offering the F/A-18 had been received and that the F-16, Eurofighter, and Gripen offers would be requested from bidders that can offer new or used aircraft.

(89 of 90 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 24-3-2018 at 04:27 PM


Belgian F-16 Replacement Program In Turmoil

Mar 22, 2018

Tony Osborne | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report


F-16: USAF

LONDON—Belgium’s future fighter program has been thrown into turmoil after it emerged that cheaper options to extend the life of the country’s F-16 Fighting Falcons had been deliberately hidden from ministers.

The scandal, which has already resulted in the suspension of several military officers and civil servants, came to light after the leaking of a Lockheed Martin assessment dated April 2016 to several Belgian news outlets on March 20. The documents suggested the country’s F-16s could be upgraded and given another six years of operational life, making a new fighter purchase less urgent than government officials had previously contended.

Defense Minister Steven Vandeput told the country’s Parliament that he had not been made aware of the report about the potential life extension option.

“If this report actually exists, if its content is accurate, and if the defense [ministry] has decided not to share it, there is a problem,” Vandeput told a Belgian radio station.

The news comes just weeks after the British and U.S. governments submitted their best price tenders for the Belgian fighter program for the Eurofighter Typhoon and the Lockheed Martin F-35A Joint Strike Fighter, respectively.

It is unclear whether the €3.6 billion ($4.35 billion) program will be frozen or terminated in light of the life extension option. But Vandeput is eager for the program to continue unhindered.

“The purchase program has reached a crucial phase and we do not want to disrupt this sensitive moment,” Vandeput said.

Belgium wants to purchase 34 new fighters to replace the existing 54-strong F-16 fleet. Selection of the fighter choice is expected later this year, with a contract due to be signed in 2019.

The scandal adds further drama to the Belgian fighter contest, which has seen the short list of participating fighter types shrink dramatically over the past 18 months due to the perception that Brussels has a preference for the F-35.

In April, Boeing withdrew the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet from the competition, saying it did not believe the contest was on a “truly level playing field.” And in July, the Swedish government aborted its offer of the Saab JAS-39E/F Gripen, on the grounds that Belgium’s requirements for “extensive operational support from the delivering nation” could not be met without radical political reforms.

A French offer of the Dassault Rafale made outside standard procurement channels and offering an opportunity to rekindle a defense relationship with France was rejected.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2    4  ..  15

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 56.1% - SQL: 43.9%]