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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 12-9-2017 at 02:03 PM
RAN part 2


ANOTHER deletion, the RAN thread.............this is a restart...........

Aussie Warship Project to be Delayed for Two Years by Local Companies: Minister

(Source: Xinhuanet; issued Sept 08, 2017)

CANBERRA --- A 28-billion-U.S.-dollar Australian warship project could be delayed for two years if local companies are handed the contract, a government minister has warned.

The Future Frigates project will see nine new anti-submarine warfare frigates designed and built to replace Australia's existing Anzac frigate fleet.

The Australian bid to build the ships is being led by South Australia's ASC and Western Australia's Austal, but Spain's Navantia, Britain's BAE Systems and Italy's Fincantieri have also been shortlisted for the project.

Despite an initial promise that the ships would be built in Australia, the Defence Department has convinced the government that the Australian-built clause should be "optional" rather than "mandated."

Christopher Pyne, Australia's defence industry minister, said: "Advice from the Department of Defence is that changing the request for tender to mandate a particular shipbuilder would result in a delay of at least two years in the Future Frigates program."

"The government is committed to creating an indigenous naval shipbuilding industry in Australia which will involve a significant increase of employees in the shipbuilding industry, focused on South Australia," Pyne said in a statement on Friday.

Appearing alongside ASC and Austal at a parliamentary inquiry into the project, Glenn Thompson, assistant national secretary at Australian Manufacturing Workers' Union (AMWU), said that the foreign companies had to commit to hiring 1,000 Australian apprentices and graduates for the program.

"The government must reward and support tenderers that show that level of commitment to developing the skills that workers will need to complete these projects," Thompson said.

"It is pretty remarkable that we've got a foreign company bidding for this project, talking up the Australian workforce, while the government's own documents make it clear that using these workers is optional.

"A sovereign capability to build, maintain, sustain and upgrade ships and submarines in Australia is not optional, using Australia workers on these projects from day one isn't either."

-ends-
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[*] posted on 12-9-2017 at 02:06 PM


Deployable Mine Countermeasures Increase

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Sept 08, 2017)

The Royal Australian Navy is forging ahead with new technologies to counter the threat of sea mines to military and commercial vessels.

The Head of Navy Capability, Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead, said the prevalence and increasing sophistication of sea mines means the Royal Australian Navy must continue to improve the way it finds and disposes of these mines.

“New autonomous and remote-controlled technologies deployed from within the maritime task force provides the opportunity to find and dispose of sea mines more safely and efficiently,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

“In the 2030s, Defence will seek to replace its specialised mine hunting and environmental survey vessels with a single fleet of multi-role vessels embarking advanced autonomous and uninhabited systems.”

Rear Admiral Mead said these newly introduced systems are the first step in realising a future capability which would allow the Royal Australian Navy to clear sea mines with minimal risk to its people and assets.

“Thales Australia Ltd will deliver and support the new equipment over the next 15 years,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

The new capability will primarily be based and sustained at HMAS Waterhen in Sydney, New South Wales.

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[*] posted on 15-9-2017 at 02:00 PM


Frigate contenders warned off ASC/Austal build option

14 Sep 2017

Julian Kerr | Sydney

Exchanges in the Senate References Committee have made it clear the government has no intention of amending the terms of the Request for Tender (RfT) for the Sea 5000 Future Frigate program to mandate the inclusion of an Australian shipbuilder.

This means the winner among the three shortlisted international contenders for the $35 billion program will retain responsibility for the construction – albeit in Australia – of its proposed Future Frigate design.

The three competing designs comprise a version of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship offered by the UK’s BAE Systems, a modified F-100 design proposed by Spanish shipbuilder Navantia, and a derivative of the Carlo Bergamini-class variant of the FREMM multi-mission frigate offered by Fincantieri of Italy.

At the committee’s 8 September hearing into the future sustainability of Australia’s naval shipbuilding industry, Labor Senator Kim Carr quoted Clause D of the RfT as stating “The successful tenderer will not be directed to utilise any particular shipbuilding workforce or engage any particular provider of shipbuilding services. In particular, the Commonwealth is not mandating that the successful tenderer use the workforce of ASC.”

Independent Senator Nick Xenophon earlier quoted a passage stating the Commonwealth’s intention “that the successful tenderer will directly manage and supervise the workforce undertaking shipbuilding work. The responsibility for build management and supervision should not be subcontracted in its entirety to a third party entity”.

Both Austal CEO David Singleton and ASC Shipbuilding CEO Mark Lamarre told the committee that meaningful engagement with the contenders had ended after the RfT’s release on 31 March. Three months later the two companies entered a teaming arrangement for Future Frigate construction.

Responding to questions from Senator Carr, Department of Defence Associate Secretary Brendan Sargeant confirmed that CASG head Kim Gillis had subsequently telephoned the three contenders.

“Austal and ASC were making statements about their desire to participate in the (RfT) process,” Sargeant said.

“It may be that people thought the Government was making a decision to change that process and the communications with the companies were to ensure that they understood that the process as designed would proceed.”

Asked if the change in attitude of the preferred tenders to Austal and ASC had anything to do with Gillis’s telephone call, Sargeant responded “I have no idea. That would be speculation on my part and I don’t think it’s appropriate for me to talk about how tenderers might approach their commercial relationships.”
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[*] posted on 16-9-2017 at 01:23 PM


No it's not mandated, however if you don't agree to build our ships at our new shipbuilding facility, the likelihood of you gaining the contract is dubious...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 19-9-2017 at 07:09 PM


Australian frigate conducts first MUM-T operations with MH-60R helicopter, ScanEagle UAS

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

19 September 2017

The Royal Australian Navy’ (RAN’s) Adelaide (Oliver Hazard Perry)-class guided missile frigate HMAS Newcastle (06) has completed the service’s first ever man-unmanned teaming (MUM-T) integrated flying serials.

The operations, which involved Newcastle’s embarked MH-60R helicopter, and a ScanEagle unmanned aerial system (UAS), were conducted while the frigate was on a two-week attachment with the US Fifth Fleet in the Arabian Gulf, said the Australian Department of Defence (DoD) in a statement on 19 September.

During its attachment, Newcastle also supported the US Navy’s (USN’s) USS Nimitz carrier strike group (CSG-11) with escort operations, and “a range of naval manoeuvres”, the DoD added.

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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 08:00 PM


BAE Systems proposes ‘digital shipyard’ for Australia

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

22 September 2017

BAE Systems Australia has outlined a plan to invest AUD100 million (USD80 million) in a new “digital shipyard” in Adelaide, South Australia, if it is selected to build Future Frigates for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), the company said in a statement on 21 September.

The statement said that BAE Systems Australia would facilitate the transfer to Adelaide of intellectual property (IP) and technical data – including the digital ship design optimised for the production of the Global Combat Ship (GCS) – together with naval shipbuilding processes tailored to the requirements of shipyard.

BAE Systems Australia is seeking to win the SEA 5000 Future Frigate programme, which features the construction of nine vessels for AUD35 billion (USD26.25 billion), with a variant of its Type 26 GCS design, which BAE Systems recently started building for the UK Royal Navy (RN).

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[*] posted on 26-9-2017 at 10:46 AM


Australia commissions first Hobart-class air warfare destroyer

Julian Kerr - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

25 September 2017

The first of three 7,000-tonne Hobart-class air warfare destroyers (AWDs) was formally inducted into the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) on 23 September and is expected to be ready for operational tasking in late 2018.

Attending the commissioning ceremony of HMAS Hobart held at Fleet Base East in Sydney, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull referred to the “brinkmanship” of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and stressed the criticality of having a strong and well-equipped Australian Defence Force (ADF) “in these uncertain times”.


The RAN commissioned the guided missile destroyer HMAS <I>Hobart</I> in Sydney on 23 September. (Commonwealth of Australia)

The second ship of the class, Brisbane , will undertake builder’s sea trials in the final quarter of 2017, with delivery to the RAN scheduled for September 2018.

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[*] posted on 26-9-2017 at 12:49 PM


HMAS Hobart Commissioning

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept 23, 2017)


HMAS Hobart, the first of three Air Warfare Destroyers built in South Australia by ASC, was commissioned on Saturday. She is fitted with a US-supplied Aegis air-defense system allowing it to protect several ships. (RAN photo)

The safety and security of Australia and our interests around the globe has been significantly strengthened with the commissioning of the first Australian-built Air Warfare Destroyer, HMAS Hobart, today.

Hobart brings together the best of Australian and global technology to be one of the world’s most potent and lethal warships. She will provide air defence for accompanying ships, in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft.

The commissioning of Hobart is the culmination of the hard work of thousands of Australians who built and delivered the future capability of the Royal Australian Navy. The crew and shipbuilders who have brought this new capability into service are to be congratulated on their achievement.

The Turnbull Government has committed to a continuous sovereign naval shipbuilding program that will keep our Navy equipped with the latest technology for generations to come and Hobart demonstrates our commitment and ability to meet that promise.

This sovereign continuous naval shipbuilding program will create thousands of jobs across the country and is another example of the Turnbull Government building and strengthening our defence capability and defence industry.

HMAS Hobart is the first of three Hobart class guided missile destroyers that will enter service in coming years and the third ship to carry the name, Hobart. Her motto, Grow with Strength, reflects the future direction of the Navy as it continues its primary mission of protecting Australia and its interests in an increasingly dynamic region.

As detailed in the Turnbull Government’s 2016 Defence White Paper, our Navy is undergoing its largest regeneration since the Second World War and our future fleet will be more flexible, more versatile, and more lethal than ever.

Hobart will now undergo her test and evaluation period where she will integrate into the fleet and Navy personnel will train to operate the warship.

Story history:

-- Sept. 25: corrected factual mistake in the photo caption. H/T to reader D.E. for catching it, and apologies to all our readers for making the mistake in the first place.

(ends)

Welcome to the Fleet - HMAS Hobart III

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Sept 23, 2017)

With a zealous crowd and great fanfare, the guided missile destroyer HMAS Hobart was commissioned in to the Royal Australian Navy fleet in a formal ceremony at Garden Island in Sydney today.

The Prime Minister of Australia, the Honourable Malcolm Turnbull, joined with other dignitaries, ship’s company and family and friends to welcome the newest ship to the Australian Fleet.

Mr Turnbull said Australia plays a leading role in ensuring the world remains at peace.

"In these uncertain times, a strong, well equipped Australian Defence Force is absolutely critical," he said.

"The commissioning of HMAS Hobart provides clear evidence of our determination to keep Australians safe and ensure we are ready and able to meet the challenges that come our way in the years ahead.

"Wherever she may travel around the world, Hobart will serve our nation and take action in Australia's name."

The third Australian Navy ship to carry the name Hobart will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft.

Hobart’s state-of-the-art Aegis combat system, including the phased array radar and missile systems, will provide an advanced air defence system capable of engaging enemy aircraft and missiles at ranges in excess of 150 kilometres.

She will also be capable of undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons

Commanding Officer, Hobart, Captain John Stavridis said the ship will be the most complex and capable warship ever operated by Australia.

“She is as powerful as she is potent and is every bit a destroyer,” he said.

“Her sensors and weapons are leading edge and she is capable of conducting the full span of maritime security operations.

“However, without the 185 men and women who serve in her, she is just another ship alongside. To be a warship requires a specialist team who are masters in their individual skills and are capable of working collectively to achieve the mission.

“I am blessed with such a crew, who are both proficient and professional.”

The ceremony included the breaking of the commissioning pennant and hoisting of the Australian White Ensign for the first time, at which point, Hobart became the responsibility of Captain Stavridis.

Witnessing the historic occasion were sailors from the former Hobarts which served with distinction in the Second World and Vietnam Wars.

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[*] posted on 27-9-2017 at 10:34 PM


Marise Payne, Christopher Pyne hit back at report into $50bn subs plan

The Australian8:13PM September 27, 2017
ROSIE LEWIS
ReporterCanberra
@rosieslewis

The Turnbull government has hit back at a scathing independent report into the $50 billion plan for a fleet of French-built submarines, declaring it had been produced by “individuals who have no experience in designing, building or operating submarines”.

Commissioned by Sydney businessman Gary Johnston, who launched a push to torpedo the French-built submarines last year, the report from Insight Economics says the selected Shortfin Barracuda submarines carry “excessive costs” and come with strategic, economic, technical and industrial risks.

The report, Australia’s Future Submarine: Getting This Key Capability Right, urges the government to urgently move to acquire a fleet of military off-the-shelf submarines if Australia is to avoid a “very serious capability gap of several years”.

“The most immediate and possibly the biggest risk flowing from the decision to acquire the Shortfin Barracuda — a submarine that is yet to be designed, let alone built — is the inevitable long schedule for its delivery,” the report states.

“Even on the best possible scenario where everything goes according to present plans, the first Shortfin Barracuda becomes operational only in 2033, while the Collins Class submarines are scheduled to be progressively withdrawn at the age of 30, between 2026 and 2033. Even then, under these very benign circumstances where everything goes according to plan, the Navy will have only one submarine in 2034 and perhaps four by 2040. This capability is clearly inadequate.”

Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne called the 11-page document a “hatchet job” while Defence Minister Marise Payne said it appeared to be a “beat up” rather than an authoritative contribution to the submarine capability discussion.

The ministers said the consistent advice from Defence and “actual experts in the field” was that there was no military off-the-shelf submarine options that met Australia’s “unique capability requirements”.

“Much of this report is inaccurate and not informed by the facts. The writers of this report have not been involved in the process of the tender or the projects since the tender was completed,” Mr Pyne said.

“The submarine project is on schedule; on budget and will deliver the most lethal and effective weapon in the navy in the 2030s as planned. The Collins Class life of type extension will ensure there is no capability gap in Australia’s submarine fleet.”

‘Buy off the shelf’

The report blames “both persuasions” of government, from the Rudd government through to the Turnbull government, for the “predicament in which we now find ourselves” and estimates a “whole of life cost” for the 12 new submarines, including the acquisition, sustainment and a possible life extension for the Collins Class, of $180bn.

Insight Economics says the question is not whether the Navy needs to renew its submarine capability but what would be the most appropriate type of sub and how many are needed.

While it notes the proposal to extend the life of the Collins class submarines to help maintain “some capability into the 2030s and perhaps beyond”, the report suggests acquiring an evolved version of a military off-the-shelf submarine “built at a fixed price and modified for Australian conditions and requirements”.

“To avoid long and fatiguing transits, this fleet of smaller submarines would be serviced by a tender (mother) ship that could operate much closer to the submarines’ area of operations,” it states.

“This option should cost under $10bn for a 30-year life; much less than (extending the life of the) the Collins option and for a submarine that would have a longer life and be less at risk of detection. Importantly, this approach would also offer an insurance policy if the Shortfin Barracuda program failed, in that more of the military off-the-shelf boats could be acquired. A Collins (life of type extension) would not offer this very important benefit.”

Senator Payne said a modified off-the-shelf submarine was an “oxymoron” and any suggestion the future submarines would not be in service until the 2040s was “uninformed scaremongering”.

“Submarines are among the most complex pieces of machinery on earth. Contrary to the claims made today, modifying an existing submarine to substantially extend its range would involve a complex and risky redesign process,” she said.

The report’s co-author Hugh White, professor of strategic studies at the Australian National University and a former deputy secretary for strategy at the Department of Defence, said he was not surprised by the government’s response.

“There’s a very serious risk, a very evident risk, that the project they now have underway to build a very sophisticated submarine in a very technically risky way is likely to deliver submarines too late after our present submarines are gone out of service,” he told Sky News.

The report argues the government took the “most risky option possible” when it chose the Shortfin Barracuda, which it labels a “new bespoke design”, and says there was “very little cabinet consideration of this enormous investment”.

“While the National Security Committee of Cabinet met five times to consider the Air Warfare Destroyer acquisition, which was basically a MMOTS (modified military-off-the-shelf) platform, ministers had only a very limited time around the Anzac Day long weekend to consider Defence’s much more complex, costly and risky FSM (future submarine) proposal,” the report states.

Mr Johnston, who owns Jaycar Electronics and runs a website for “those concerned about Australia’s future maritime defence”, said he decided to commission a “thorough investigation of the acquisition process” for the future submarine project after the government agreed last year to spend $50bn on the 12 new French subs.

He said the program will not be “regionally superior” as the waters to Australia’s north “teem with nuclear submarines in the 2030s”.

“In a time of a heightened strategic threat, we may lack any credible submarine capability for a decade or more. And it takes a long time to restore that capability, not just in terms of platforms but in retaining personnel and being able to train new people,” he said.

“The way forward would not require the government to change existing policy decisions.”

Mr Johnston said the Insight Economics team had consulted “very widely” with local and international strategic experts, admirals, former submarine commanding officers, engineers, shipbuilders and former defence officials to write up the report.

Insight Economics was founded in 2006 and says it is a consulting firm “uniquely focused on both public policy and corporate strategy”

Michael Keating, one of the firm’s directors who helped launch the report at the National Press Club today, is a former head of the Australian Public Service and secretary of three Commonwealth departments, including Prime Minister and Cabinet.




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[*] posted on 27-9-2017 at 11:19 PM


Australia’s LEADING think tank, just popped in and said who needs submarines anyway, when we could just solve the problem with F-111 kill boxes?

Sorry. I’ll just get my hat...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 01:28 PM


I'm glad to see the Apple Blossoms are still with us.......................
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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 08:09 PM


Pacific 2017 is next week, many of these stories are appearing now because of companies postioning themselves in the media leading up to the conference.

Future Frigates ‘must be North Korea-proof’



Warren King, a senior adviser to Navantia Australia. Picture: Gary Ramage
The Australian6:30PM September 26, 2017

ROSIE LEWIS
ReporterCanberra
@rosieslewis

A major shipbuilder competing for Australia’s $35 billion Future Frigate contract has warned the warships must have the capacity to deal with the emerging threat of North Korea.

Warren King, a Navantia Australia board member, said there had been a “great focus” on anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability but the ships also needed to “meet a whole range of requirements” that might surface over the next three decades.

As the war of words between the North Korean regimen and US President Donald Trump intensifies, Mr King said North Korea had become a “real and apparent (threat) right on our doorstep”.

“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.

“Are we making sure that the frigates have a balanced capability to deal with multiple threats that have had a light shone on them by North Korea? As a nation, we are spending a considerable amount of money in acquiring these frigates.”

The plan to buy nine Future Frigates with a strong emphasis on ASW was announced in the 2016 Defence White Paper.

Tensions with North Korea have escalated dramatically since then, with Malcolm Turnbull calling the regime’s nuclear program the “gravest threat to peace” on the peninsula in 60 years.

Malcolm Davis, a senior analyst in defence strategy and capability at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said the government had to “think beyond” the North Korean threat and also focus on China.

He noted a war with North Korea would likely be “over and done with in the space of a few weeks or months” while the threat of a future conflict with China could “last for decades”.

“If they’re not thinking about China as the long-term threat, they should be,” Dr Davis said.

“North Korea is a threat and I think it’s going to be evolving very rapidly and potentially resolved very rapidly … We need to think about how these ships will fare in a future conflict with China rather than North Korea.”

Spanish shipbuilder Navantia is bidding against BAE Systems and Fincantieri to build the frigates.

Navantia sees an opportunity to use the same hull in the ships as it used for its three Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers that are fitted with a US air defence missile system known as AEGIS.

Navantia says the AEGIS system could be upgraded to target ballistic missiles.

If it wins the tender, Navantia would closely model the Future Frigates on its Hobart Class warfare destroyer, which has been extensively modified for Australian conditions.

“We provide a low risk approach, leveraging on the experience of what has been done here with the Hobart class,” Navantia Australia’s managing director Donato Martinez said.

“If you want to retain employment and then grow the workforce, you need to start as soon as possible. We are fully committed to a fully Australian capability.”

But Dr Davis said if the government was “really serious” about dealing with threats from both North Korea and China it would purchase the American Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to cover air, surface and subsurface warfare.

The government is expected to announce the winning contender for the Future Frigates program in the first half of next year.




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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 08:10 PM


And another.

Italian shipbuilder’s pledge to use all-Australian labour on frigates



Fincantieri built FREMM frigate from Italy.
The Australian12:00AM September 28, 2017

CAMERON STEWART
Washington CorrespondentUnited States
@camstewarttheoz

Europe’s largest shipbuilder has promised to turn Australia’s $35 billion naval frigate project into an all-Australian endeavour, with a listing on the local stock exchange and an all local workforce.

Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri will release details of its bid to build the new frigate fleet today, with the company opening an Adelaide office next month and placing pilot orders with Australian industry to prepare for the venture.

Fincantieri, which builds both warships and cruise ships in 20 shipyards around the world, will maximise the Australian contribution to the project in response to accusations from local shipbuilders that the three European bidders for the frigate project are in effect mounting a foreign takeover of local shipbuilding.

Fincantieri is up against British defence giant BAE Systems and Spanish shipbuilder Navantia for the right to design and build nine new frigates for the navy, optimised for anti-­submarine warfare.

The company plans to list its Australian business unit for building the frigates on the Australian Stock Exchange.

“This initiative allows Australian investor par­tici­pation in Fincantieri Australia and ensures decisions will be taken locally and in the best interests of Australia,” chairman of Fincantieri Australia Dario Deste said. He said the move means a share of the profits from the project would remain in Australia and he confirmed an Australian workforce would be used to build the frigates.

Mr Deste said Fincantieri was already mobilising Australian industry for the project and would recruit more than 150 Australian engineers and technicians to send to Italy next year to train on the Italian FREMM frigate project before commencing work on the Australian frigates.

Opening a new Australian ­office on October 10 would ‘‘expand Fincantieri’s operations into Ade­laide as we mobilise Australian industry, activate the Adelaide shipyard with the proven digital tools needed to build the Italian FREMM frigates on time and on budget in Italy and recruit and train the Australian workforce for the project”.

The company will use its expertise in cruise ship construction to build cruise ship blocks in Australia from next year, using Australian subcontractors to accli­matise them to the company’s methods leading into the start of the frigate construction in Adelaide in 2020.

Fincantieri’s rival bidders for the frigate project have also tried to Australianise their bid, pledging to use local workers and to modernise and digitise shipbuilding operations in Adelaide.

Australian shipbuilder Austal last month warned of a foreign takeover of the nation’s naval shipbuilding industry after it was revealed the government would allow the European bidders to not only design but also control the building process for the frigates.




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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 08:39 PM


Quote:
“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.


In other words, they want 12 air warfare destroyers with ballistic missile defence capabilities.

At ~6000t and $35 billion for just nine ships, if they can't manage a "general purpose" capability in addition to ASW as a standard matter of course, they have thoroughly fucked things up already.




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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 10:21 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
Quote:
“One of the questions we need to ask ourselves is whether we acquire a frigate only capable of ASW, or whether for a similar cost, by building on experience, we acquire a frigate with a strong ASW capability which also has built-in general purpose capacity,” Mr King told The Australian.


In other words, they want 12 air warfare destroyers with ballistic missile defence capabilities.

At ~6000t and $35 billion for just nine ships, if they can't manage a "general purpose" capability in addition to ASW as a standard matter of course, they have thoroughly fucked things up already.


In completely unrelated news, it has been revealed that the ship being offered by Mr King’s firm is the only one even remotely suited to a realistic BMD capability thanks to it’s 48 cell Mk 41 launcher...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 11:00 PM


It does seem like a bit of a coincidence.



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[*] posted on 2-10-2017 at 10:42 PM


The announcement of BMD and combat systems is supposed to happen tomorrow...

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/new-fl...

Australia's next fleet of navy frigates will be tailored to shoot down incoming missiles in a recognition of the growing threat posed by rogue regimes such as North Korea.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will announce on Tuesday that the nine "future frigates", which the government wants to start building in 2020, will be equipped with an ambitious combination of the US-made Aegis combat system meshed with locally made SAAB Australia technology.

While the frigates are primarily meant for anti-submarine warfare, the inclusion of Aegis will tilt the purpose towards air and missile defence in a clear signal of the government's growing concern about the threat of missiles.

"Recent events in our region have proven that Australia's future frigates must be equipped to defend Australia from the threat of medium and long-range missile attacks," Mr Turnbull said in written comments provided in advance of the announcement.

This technology will enable the future frigates to engage missiles at long range."

The frigates will not provide a comprehensive missile shield across Australia. But according to Andrew Davies, a defence expert with the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, the latest Aegis system would allow the future frigates to operate with US and Japanese partners as a kind of defence network to provide some protection to specific targets in the region.

The combat system is the brains of a warship, allowing it to detect threats, pinpoint targets and fire weapons.

Aegis, made by US giant Lockheed Martin, will be meshed with a system made by SAAB Australia that can work closely with the ships' Australian-made radar and specialises in tackling shorter-range threats.

The combat system is estimated to make up about $3 billion of the total $35 billion cost of the frigate program.

Other future Australian warships will use the SAAB system which Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne said would bring about $1 billion worth of work to local industry.

Dr Davies said a so-called "co-operative engagement capability" would allow the frigates to act as eyes and ears to allied ships and vice versa. Defence Minister Marise Payne stressed that being able to work with allies was a key part of the program.

But Dr Davies said the frigates would need to be upgraded with longer-range interception missiles than those already planned if they are to shoot down intercontinental ballistic missiles - the kind that North Korea could use to threaten Australia. The Aegis system the frigates will use would be optimised for shorter-range missiles but could catch intercontinental range missiles in the early phase of their flight, meaning the ships would need to be stationed in the seas close to North Korea.

US and Japanese destroyers are already equipped with Aegis ballistic missile defence systems and the latest SM-3 missiles, and are critical in trying to intercept any nuclear missiles fired by North Korea if the current tensions deteriorate into conflict.

Dr Davies said the Aegis announcement signalled a prioritisation of missile defence in addition to anti-submarine warfare but added that "they are 7000 tonne ships and there's no reason they can't do both".

The government is already considering ship-based, ballistic missile-defence on the Air Warfare Destroyers, which will hit the water over the next couple of years but for which an upgrade is already planned over the next decade.

Beyond North Korea, the US and its allies are also concerned in the longer run about China's vast arsenal of ballistic missiles.







In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 3-10-2017 at 02:19 PM



Joint Media Release - Prime Minister, Minister for Defence and Minister for Defence Industry - New Approach to Naval Combat Systems
3 October 2017

The Turnbull Government is equipping Australia’s Navy with the world’s best technology as part of a multi-billion dollar investment unveiled today.

The new approach for combat management systems will ensure our Navy’s future ships are fitted out to protect Australia in the decades ahead.

Under the plan, the combat management system for Australia’s fleet of nine Future Frigates will be provided by the Aegis Combat Management System, together with an Australian tactical interface, which will be developed by SAAB Australia.

This decision will maximise the Future Frigate’s air warfare capabilities, enabling these ships to engage threat missiles at long range, which is vital given rogue states are developing missiles with advanced range and speed.

The Future Frigates will be operating in a complex and growing threat environment. By bringing together the proven Aegis system, with a cutting edge Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia, our Future Frigates will have the best capability to defeat future threats above and below the surface, while also ensuring we maintain sovereign control of key technologies, such as the Australian designed and built CEA phased array radar.

In the past, Defence has taken the tendered combat management systems individually, which has meant that the Navy has operated numerous systems at the same time. This has not allowed defence industry to strategically invest for the long-term and has also increased the cost of training, maintenance and repair.

Under the Turnbull Government’s new strategic enterprise approach, the Government has now mandated that where the high-end warfighting capabilities of the Aegis system are not required, a SAAB Australia developed combat management system will be used on all of Australia’s future ship projects.

This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels, which will be built in Australia from 2018, and an Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia for the Hobart class Air Warfare Destroyers when their

Aegis combat management system is upgraded in the future, consistent with the 2016 Defence White Paper.

Further, it guarantees the development of a long-term sustainable Australian Combat Management System industry, which is integral to the implementation of the Government’s Naval Shipbuilding Plan.

The Turnbull Government is investing in Australia’s Navy and ensuring it is fully equipped to protect the nation from future threats.
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[*] posted on 3-10-2017 at 05:26 PM


Excellent! BUT what about the missiles?
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[*] posted on 3-10-2017 at 08:13 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Excellent! BUT what about the missiles?


It’s a bit early... We have only just had our order for GBU-53 - SDB II approved by the State Department for the F-35 and they are arriving at Williamstown next year...

They’ll be using SM-6 along with the AWD and probably SM-3 in due course, however the orders for these will come after they do for AWD...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 12:56 AM


Maybe's, but neither the SM-6 nor the SM-3 are short lead-time items. Approval will take 12-24 months, manufacture 3-4 years, although this may be cut to 2-3 years as everyone gets increasingly nervous about North Korea, ISIS, and the old nemesis China and Russia...............realistically 4 years is the quickest we could get any new missiles, more realistically 5-6 years.................it would be "nice" to have the damn missiles before, or just as, we get the warships!
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 01:22 AM


Published: Tuesday, 03 October 2017 10:04
 
Australia's SEA5000 ASW Frigates to be Fitted with AEGIS Combat System and CEA Radar
 
The Australian Governement announced a multi-billion dollar investment today at the PACIFIC 2017 exhibition, to equip the future SEA5000 Frigate of the Royal Australian Navy with what it called "the world’s best technology". Under the plan, the combat management system for Australia’s fleet of nine Future Frigates will be provided by the Aegis Combat Management System, together with an Australian tactical interface, which will be developed by SAAB Australia.

  
Scale model of Fincantieri's FREMM design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
  
This decision will maximise the Future Frigate’s air warfare capabilities, enabling these ships to engage threat missiles at long range, which is vital given rogue states are developing missiles with advanced range and speed.

The Future Frigates will be operating in a complex and growing threat environment. By bringing together the proven Aegis system, with a cutting edge Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia, our Future Frigates will have the best capability to defeat future threats above and below the surface, while also ensuring we maintain sovereign control of key technologies, such as the Australian designed and built CEA phased array radar.

  
Scale model of BAE Systems Type 26 design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
  
The Australian Governement shortlisted three designs for the SEA5000 ASW Frigate program in April 2016: BAE Systems with the Type 26 Frigate; Fincantieri with the FREMM Frigate, and Navantia with a redesigned F100 – have been short-listed to refine their designs. The frigates will all be built in Adelaide, incorporating the Australian-developed CEA Phased-Array Radar.

  
Scale model of Navantia Frigate design for SEA5000 at Pacific 2017
 
The Competitive Evaluation Process is on schedule to return second pass approval in 2018, which will allow for construction to commence in Adelaide in 2020. This program is estimated to be worth more than $35 billion, and will directly create over 2000 jobs.

9 new frigates will be procured as part of the SEA5000 program which calls for the replacement of the RAN ANZAC class frigates. The Future frigate-class is expected to have anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities and the CEAFAR2 radar currently in development by CEA.

  
Austal OPV design at PACIFIC 2017
 
Under the Turnbull Government’s new strategic enterprise approach, the Government has now mandated that where the high-end warfighting capabilities of the Aegis system are not required, a SAAB Australia developed combat management system will be used on all of Australia’s future ship projects.

This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels, which will be built in Australia from 2018, and an Australian tactical interface developed by SAAB Australia for the Hobart class Air Warfare Destroyers when their Aegis combat management system is upgraded in the future, consistent with the 2016 Defence White Paper.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 01:40 AM


Leonardo Establishes New Site In Western Australia to Deliver on Major Defence Contracts

(Source: Leonardo; issued Oct 03, 2017)


Leonardo’s new naval electronics facility in Western Australia is being set up for the SEA1442 program, which will see Leonardo become prime system integrator of the Royal Australian Navy’s ANZAC-frigate upgrade program. (RAN photo)

SYDNEY --- Leonardo continues to invest in Australia by opening a new site in Western Australia, through its subsidiary Selex ES Australia Pty Ltd.

The addition of this new site confirms Leonardo's commitment to growing its industrial footprint in Australia beyond its current presence in Melbourne in Victoria and Nowra in New South Wales. Further expansion is planned over the forthcoming 18 months. The new opening was announced at Pacific 2017, an international maritime exposition taking place in Sydney, Australia, where Leonardo is attending (Stand 4F10).

The new facility is located in Rockingham, South of Perth and will be the regional hub for engineering, integration, installation and through life support. Proximity to the Hendersen shipyards and Garden Island will allow Leonardo to be highly responsive on naval programmes. It will also allow Leonardo to team with Western Australian companies and build up a local workforce with specialist skills particularly in defence electronics that will complement the already strong shipbuilding capabilities in the area.

The new site will also play a key role in Leonardo's delivery as prime system integrator of the SEA1442 phase 4 solution. Under the programme, Leonardo will provide an integrated suite of state-of-the-art communications capabilities for the upgrade and modernisation of Australia's ANZAC frigates.

The solution includes enhanced external RF communications and internal communications equipment, the provision of a high-data-rate-line-of-sight bearer and the introduction of a modern communications management system.

The capability upgrade will lay the foundation for a maritime architecture critical to future tactical communications for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). It will also contribute towards the Australian Defence Force’s network-centric warfare concept in the maritime environment, helping reach the goal of a truly networked RAN.

Michael Lenton, Executive Chairman of Selex ES Australia said: “The facility is another example of Leonardo’s commitment towards Australia where the company has been active since it first supplied torpedoes to the Navies of Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia in 1885. Over many years, Leonardo has been building a considerable legacy in Australia through the supply of solutions, products and services for both the defence and civil markets. It is a long-term effort we are immensely proud of and intend to build on going forward.

“Leonardo is serious about its investment in Australia and has taken big steps over the past 12 months to significantly grow local capability as well as building and strengthening the national supply chain. Leonardo has been able to grasp the opportunities around the recent thrust in naval capability procurement and we are intent on demonstrating that our local investment in skills and people is as intense as our transfer of technology from our global operations, even ahead of the next round of naval contracts."

Leonardo is a global prime defence and electronics systems and aerospace specialist, operating in Australia as Selex ES Australia Pty Ltd (defence systems, land and naval), and as AgustaWestland Australia Pty Ltd (helicopters).

-ends-
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 12:32 PM


Quote:
This includes mandating a SAAB Australia combat management system on the upcoming Offshore Patrol Vessels,


Called it! Told ya’ll SAAB’s 9LV would go onto the OPV’s...





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 12:33 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Maybe's, but neither the SM-6 nor the SM-3 are short lead-time items. Approval will take 12-24 months, manufacture 3-4 years, although this may be cut to 2-3 years as everyone gets increasingly nervous about North Korea, ISIS, and the old nemesis China and Russia...............realistically 4 years is the quickest we could get any new missiles, more realistically 5-6 years.................it would be "nice" to have the damn missiles before, or just as, we get the warships!


Fine! You can order your ‘damn missiles’ now then, I guess! (child!) :lol:




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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