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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 03:40 PM


Petulant bar steward! :lol::lol::lol:

It's the Contracts and Procurement Manager in me, I get soooooooooooo pissed off at the inadequacy of a lot of Defence (and Business) Procurement that bears no relationship to Integrated Project Management and Scheduling..............
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 04:32 PM


Data Analytics Collaboration to Improve Naval Capability

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 03, 2017)

The Royal Australian Navy will use an innovative new data analytics system to improve fleet efficiency and capability as part of a new collaboration with GE and CSIRO’s Data61.

The Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, said the GE LM2500 gas turbines that power the Adelaide and Anzac class frigates will be fitted with new sensors and coupled with advanced algorithms that will improve operational effectiveness and reduce operating costs.

“The collaboration between Defence, GE and Data61 would see the collection and analysis of gas turbine data to better understand the stresses placed on engines at sea,” Minister Payne said.

“This will enable Defence with real-time information to better identify and prevent issues before they occur, thereby reducing maintenance periods ensuring our frigates are available to spend more time at sea. Increasing engine performance and reducing fuel burn will also lead to greater operational efficiency.’’

“The information gained through this innovative data-sharing initiative could lead to increased operational effectiveness and readiness, as well as a reduction in the through life cost for the systems.”

“This is another example of Defence working collaboratively with industry to develop world-leading technology and deepen the relationships that create mutually beneficial outcomes,” Minister Payne said.

The existing contract for GE LM2500 gas turbine maintenance and logistic support was recently extended to include the Canberra class landing helicopter docks, with the Hobart class guided missile destroyers also expected to be included in the future.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 04:44 PM


Austal to sustain two Cape class patrol boats for Navy

03 Oct 2017



Austal today announced the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has awarded a sustainment contract worth up to $18 million over three years for the two Cape Class Patrol Boats, Cape Fourcroy and Cape Inscription.

The contract will employ eight directly and 20 indirectly in local contractors and Austal’s own facilities in the Cairns area, with the work in addition to that already undertaken by the company for the Australian Border Force.

The two vessels are being leased to cover a gap in Navy's patrol capabilities since the loss of the Armidale class patrol boat HMAS Bundaberg in a dockyard fire and limitations and maintenance constraints affecting the rest of the class, compounded by extra tasking as a result of Operation Sovereign Borders.

ADV Cape Fourcroy was delivered to the Navy in April 2017 and the delivery of ADV Cape Inscription followed in May. 

CEO David Singleton said the deployment of Austal’s Patrol Boats by the Commonwealth will allow export opportunities for Australia by effectively showcasing the vessel with a world class Navy.

“Austal is constantly pursuing opportunities for the Cape Class Patrol Boats and Pacific Patrol Boats to potential overseas customers.”

“Exports derived from defence programs, like Cape, highlight ’the potential multiplier effect’ on local job creation, where Australian suppliers are engaged to deliver both domestic and international contracts,” he said.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 04:47 PM


Approvals for $540 million Collins class upgrades

04 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney



Approvals on two projects to sustain the capability superiority of the Collins submarine fleet until its replacement by the future submarine were announced today at Pacific 2017.

The first project addresses obsolescence in the control system, known as the Integrated Ship Control Management and Monitoring System (ISCMMS) to allow safe operation of the submarines, while the second provides improved submarine communications capability.

The first stage of the ISCMMS upgrade was awarded to Saab in November 2013, with work commencing on one of the Collins Class boats. The first stage work was valued at around $65 million. Defence had planned for the second stage of the project to update the system in the remaining five Collins Class submarines once installation and testing in the first submarine had been completed. 

Second pass approval has now been given for the second stage. The first stage was due for completion in 2016 but according to Minister Pyne it will now be completed in 2018.  

Minister Pyne said the expertise and experience of Raytheon Australia, in the role of Collins Combat Systems Integrator, will be leveraged to coordinate the communications upgrade.

ADM understands this forms part of Sea 1439 Phase 5B Stage 2 (Collins Communications and Electronic Warfare Improvement Program) which was slated for Second Pass in 2016-17. This follows on from Stage 1, under which the first replacement communication and EW suites are in the final stages of delivery by Raytheon. Stage 2 will provide additonal capabilities including wideband satellite communications. 

“The first stage of this project provides an obsolescence update for the external communications system, with the first installation to complete in December 2017,” Minister Pyne said.

“The next stage will install improved communications capabilities, with the first installation to be completed in 2020.

This will include enhancements to both the satellite communications and on-board Information and Communications Technology (ICT) capabilities. These capabilities are essential for our submarines to effectively conduct their principal roles and will provide the ability to rapidly share large quantities of information in high threat environments.”

The suite of satellite communications upgrades include the Super High Frequency and Advanced Extremely High Frequency communications platforms.

“The Super High Frequency band satellite communications will increase information exchange and support core Defence business functions, while the Advanced Extremely High Frequency component will provide satellite communications and supporting capabilities to further enhance operational information,” Minister Pyne said.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 04:53 PM


$148m CEAFAR upgrades for Anzacs

04 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney


[img]A model of the CEAFAR2-L on display at Pacific 2017. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant[/img]

CEA Technologies will upgrade the CEAFAR phased array air search radar for Royal Australian Navy’s Anzac class frigates under a new $148 million contract.

The contract will see a new version of the radar, known as the CEAFAR2-L, fitted to the class. This contract is part of the larger program, the Mid-Life Capability Assurance Program (AMCAP) that will modify the ships and integrate the radars that has a total value of over $400 million. HMAS Arunta will be the first of the class to incorporate the full scope of the AMCAP upgrades.

The AMCAP scope of work includes replacement under Project Sea 1448-4B of the Raytheon SPS-49(V)8 ANZ long range air search radar with a more capable unit developed from the CEAFAR active phased array radar installed on the ANZACs as part of their ASMD upgrade.

The Commonwealth signed a standing offer for phased array radar development services with CEA Technologies in October 2013. Under this arrangement the company had progressed risk reduction and demonstration of the CEAFAR2 high power phased array radar (PAR) concept demonstrator in the S, X, and L bands. The radar will also be considered for the Future Frigate Sea 5000 project, under which the inclusion of a CEAFAR radar has been mandated by the Commonwealth.


The CEAFAR2-L as it will appear on the Anzac class following the AMCAP upgrade. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant

The CEAFAR2-L is a long range active electronically steered array (AESA) that provides high quality tracking in the L-band.

It includes an integrated, all mode, Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) capability. The new version marks the transition to gallium nitride (GaN) technology which will deliver much higher power but with half the weight and thickness of the previous generation technology used in CEAFAR1.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 07:26 PM


Pacific 2017: Australia deploys S-100 rotary-winged UAS in evaluation roles

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

03 October 2017


The RAN will deploy the Schiebel S-100 Camcopter in evaluation roles. Source: Schiebel

Key Points
- The Royal Australian Navy will deploy its Schiebel S-100 Camcopters for trials and evaluations within a test unit
- The system will fill the service’s knowledge gap between fixed-wing and rotary-winged UAVs

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) will deploy its fleet of two Schiebel S-100 Camcopter rotary-winged unmanned aircraft system (UAS) with the service’s Navy UAS Unit as evaluation platforms.

Jane’ s first reported in February 2017 that the RAN has selected the system to fulfil its interim vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAS requirement. A contract for the acquisition, which Jane’s has since learned to consist of two Camcopter units with three-years of technical support, was signed in December 2016.

An official from the Navy UAS Unit who spoke to Jane’s at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney has since confirmed that the units, which are currently scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2017, will not be deployed in operational roles.

“The units are intended to fill our knowledge gap between fixed-wing and rotary-winged unmanned aerial vehicles [UAVs]”, said Lieutenant Commander Ben Crowther, officer in charge of the Navy UAS Unit. “With the knowledge attained from the evaluation units, we will be an informed customer when we acquire similar UAVs in the future,” he added.

Among concepts that the S-100 units will evaluate for the RAN include different mission sets, payloads deliverable, and ship operating limits. The Navy UAS Unit, which is based within the RAN’s Headquarters Fleet Air Arm at HMAS Albatross, will also make recommendations on where best to situate UAS control consoles within a platform, based on results from the evaluations, added Lt Cdr Crowther. The S-100 units will be equipped with the MX-10 multi-sensor, multi-spectral imaging system from L3 Wescam.

(311 of 399 words)
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 07:28 PM


Pacific 2017: Ultra Electronics introduces sonobuoy mission pod concept to Asia-Pacific region

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

03 October 2017

Key Points
- Ultra Electronics is showcasing a mission pod concept that allows fixed- and rotary-winged UAVs to deploy sonobuoys
- Concept is expected to gain traction given the rapid proliferation of unmanned aerial systems, said the company


A scale model of the sonobuoy mission pod concept on display at Pacific 2017 (IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Ultra Electronics is showcasing the company’s sonobuoy dispenser concept for manned and unmanned platforms in the Asia-Pacific region for the first time at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney.

The concept is being showcased with the intention of generating awareness, and show operators of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in the region that these platforms can be used as effective anti-submarine warfare (ASW) platforms, an Ultra Electronics official told Jane’s during an interview on 4 October.

UAVs that can be equipped with the sonobuoy mission pod range from the Northrop Grumman MQ-4C Triton maritime surveillance high altitude long endurance (HALE) platform to the Schiebel S-100 rotary-winged UAS, said Peter Weir, market leader for Ultra Electronics’ Electronic Warfare and C2ISR division.

“The sonobuoy mission pod has been built with a bracket that can interface with hard points found on most UAVs and even helicopters,” said Wier, adding that the system has been designed for rapid front-line installation and removal.

According to specifications provided by the company, the sonobuoy mission pod has been designed to operate at altitudes of up to 30,000 ft, and speeds of up to 150 kt. The system can dispense sonobuoys at a rate of one every 2.5 seconds, and can work with Ultra Electronic’s spectrum sonobuoy products including the high-instantaneous-dynamic-range (HIDAR) and mini-HIDAR series.

(275 of 370 words)
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 07:29 PM


Pacific 2017: Ultra Electronics positions new torpedo countermeasures for SEA 1000

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

03 October 2017


A mock-up of the Deceptor and Defender torpedo countermeasures, on display at Pacific 2017 (IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Ultra Electronics is showcasing the latest models of its Defender and Deceptor series of torpedo countermeasures, with an eye on Australia’s SEA 1000 programme.

The new series, which are due for commercial production in 2018, feature programmable motion and acoustic plans that can better defeat the latest generation of torpedoes in the market today, said Douglas Burd, managing director of Ultra Electronics, in an interview with Jane’s at the Pacific 2017 exhibition in Sydney.

The Defender is a 1,000 mm by 100 mm vertically mobile countermeasure system that defeats torpedoes by luring it either upwards or downwards. The system transmits an acoustic signal to seduce torpedoes in a 360-degree direction horizontally, and can ascend and descend at a rate of about 1 m per second.

Meanwhile, the Deceptor is a fully swimmable countermeasure that works by luring an offending torpedo away from its intended target on the vertical and horizontal planes. The system is also encapsulated within a 1,000 mm by 100 mm unit, and has top swim speed of between 6 kt and 8 kt.

When deployed on submarines, the Defender and Deceptor systems can be launched at a maximum operating speed of 25 kt, and a maximum launch depth of 40 m. The countermeasures can operate in temperatures of between 0o and 30o Celsius.

(239 of 290 words)
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 08:08 PM


Pacific 2017: Tempting Australia with SDVs

3rd October 2017 - 08:10 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Sydney



Australia is looking forward to obtaining 12 new Future Submarines from Naval Group’s design studio under its Sea 1000 programme, but one French company is offering an extra dimension should Australia wish to add swimmer delivery vehicles (SDV).

Alseamar, joining Naval Group at its stand at the Pacific International Maritime Exposition in Sydney, had a scale model of its Sphyrene SDV alongside a model of the Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A submarine.

Alseamar offers two types of SDV – the six-man Sphyrene and the three-man Coryphene. The former is 8m long, has a cruising speed of 9kt and range of 100nm. The Coryphene is 6m long, has an 8kt cruising speed and 50nm range.

Eric de Tretaigne, sales manager for Alseamar’s defence side, said either wet shelters or dry shelters can be added to submarines to accommodate these SDVs, with the latter more suitable for larger submarines.

The company would not be drawn on who existing users of its SDVs are, but the French Navy is clearly one.

Shephard understands that Alseamar is developing a new, smaller SDV but details are not yet available.

The Royal Australian Navy has not issued any SDV requirement for its new diesel-electric submarines. However, such a capability would assist special forces and Alseamar remains hopeful about interesting the navy.

Alseamar also produces the portable Gib-Subsar, an acoustic geo-locating buoy. Deployed by ship, it can help identify the position of a submerged submarine in distress. The 2.5m-long underwater GPS tracking system can also detect and localise aircraft black boxes after an air accident, as occurred in the search for an EgyptAir aircraft that crashed in May 2016.
Used by France, Malaysia and the UK, the Gib-Subsar uses radio-frequency and Iridium communications.

The French company also makes antennas for radio communication on submarines, these being used on all French and Korean submarines, for example. De Tretaigne said his firm was discussing with Lockheed Martin the potential for its antenna on Australia’s new submarines.

Another product from the Alseamar portfolio is the 2m-long SeaExplorer underwater glider featuring an interchangeable payload section. The first client for the 59kg subsea glider used it for oceanography, followed by the oil/gas industry to detect underwater leaks. The latest client is a defence force, where the SeaExplorer has an acoustic recorder to find black boxes or submarines.

Last year Aseamar sold one glider to Tokyo University, this being fitted with American turbulence sensors.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2017 at 08:32 PM


ASC, Babcock extend partnership on RAN submarines

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

04 October 2017

Australian naval shipbuilder ASC has signed an agreement with Babcock International to support the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN’s) Collins-class submarines, it was announced on 4 October.

Under the goods and services agreement (GSA), ASC said it will collaborate with Babcock to supply maintenance, refurbishment, supply, engineering, and management services for the six submarines.

The GSA officially commenced in mid-September and runs for three years, with potential to extend for a further two years. The accord replaces a previous transitional services agreement (TSA), which was signed by the two companies in November 2015 but expired in June 2017.


ASC has signed an agreement with Babcock International to support the Collins-class submarines. (Royal Australian Navy)

The value of the new GSA was not disclosed, but the TSA was valued by Babcock at up to AUD15 million (USD12 million).

(120 of 327 words)
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[*] posted on 5-10-2017 at 05:28 PM


Sustaining the Capability Superiority of Collins

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 04, 2017)

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, and Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, announced today two projects to sustain the capability superiority of the Collins submarine fleet until its replacement by the future submarine.

“The 2016 Defence White Paper makes it clear submarines are an essential part of Australia’s defence strategy and a powerful instrument for deterring conflict and contributing to anti-submarine warfare in our region,” Minister Payne said.

“The Government is committed to continuing appropriate investments in the Collins class, including priority capability enhancements, obsolescence management and fleet sustainment.

“This will ensure Australia maintains a potent and agile submarine capability until the introduction of the future submarine fleet.”

The first project addresses obsolescence in the control system to allow safe operation of the submarines, while the second provides improved submarine communications capability.

Minister Pyne said the involvement of Australian defence industry, as part of Australia’s submarine enterprise, is fundamental to our ability to manage and sustain a multi-class submarine fleet.

“On average, 120 people per year across New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia will be employed over the life of the program,” Minister Pyne said.

“Combined the projects will inject approximately $540 million into the Australian economy over the next 20 years, with $300 million going into South Australia, $65 million to New South Wales, and $175 million to Western Australia.”

While ASC will manage the integration of the updated systems, Defence has engaged SAAB Australia to update the control system.

The expertise and experience of Raytheon Australia, in the role of Collins Combat Systems Integrator, will be leveraged to coordinate the communications upgrade.

The Turnbull Government is also pleased to advise that the Collins Class Submarines project (CN 10) has been officially removed from the Projects of Concern list. This project was added to the list in November 2008, but given the extraordinary effort that has been put into rectifying the issues associated with the Collins Class project, and given that submarine availability is now meeting international benchmarks, the Government is confident that the project can be removed from the list.

(ends)

$148 Million Radar Upgrade for Anzac Class

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 04, 2017)

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, today congratulated world leading Australian company CEA Technologies for winning a contract to upgrade the capabilities of the Royal Australian Navy’s Anzac class frigates.

Minister Pyne visited CEA Technologies today at PACIFIC 2017 and said the contract valued at $148 million would see the production of new air search radar, known as the CEAFAR2-L, for the Anzac class frigates. The contract is part of the larger program that will modify the ships and integrate the radars that has a total value of over $400 million.

“The air search radar upgrade will ensure Defence is able to adapt to modern and evolving air and missile threats and maintain a capability edge for the life of the Anzac class," Minister Pyne said.

“The radar has been developed by CEA Technologies here in Canberra, a company that employs almost 400 staff, whose technology is leading the world and being adopted by armed forces across the globe.

“The air search radar represents a leading-edge technology innovation and reflects a positive and effective ongoing collaboration between Defence and CEA Technologies over the last 15 years.

“CEA Technologies will build on the technology developed for the Anzac class frigates to develop the next-generation of air search radars for the future frigates.

"In addition to CEA, wider Australian industry will play a vital role in installing and sustaining the air search radar, particularly in providing local employment opportunities in Fremantle, Western Australia, with flow on benefits for the local economy,” he said.

CEA Technologies is an internationally recognised Australian company, and previously built the medium range Anti-Ship Missile Defence radar currently defending the Anzac class.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-10-2017 at 05:33 PM


Saab Combat Management System Announced as Choice for Royal Australian Navy

(Source: Saab; issued Oct 03, 2017)

Defence and security company Saab has been identified by the Australian government to provide the tactical interface to the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) fleet of nine Future Frigates. The Saab 9LV Combat Management System would form an integral part of the Future Frigate and upgraded Air Warfare Destroyer combat capability as well as being selected for the Offshore Patrol Vessels.

Over the last 30 years in Australia Saab has established a strong relationship with the Royal Australian Navy, delivering the combat management systems for the ANZAC class frigates, Canberra class Landing Helicopter Dock vessels and selected for the new supply ships.

“Saab welcomes the announcement made today by the Australian Prime Minister that confirms Saab as an integral part of the government’s enterprise approach to combat management systems. This is an endorsement of the advanced combat system capabilities we have developed for the RAN and we look forward to working closely with the Australian Defence Force to deliver highly capable systems for the Future Frigates and other platforms,” says Dean Rosenfield, Managing Director of Saab Australia.

At this stage there is no contract signed or order received by Saab.

“The government’s decisiveness and support for Australian industry will give Saab certainty to invest in the long-term. With a contract in place, this will mean new job opportunities and growth on the Australian market, carrying out development and support across every major ship in the Australian fleet”, says Dean Rosenfield.

Saab’s 9LV naval combat system solutions offer complete C4I for every type of naval platform, ranging from combat boats and patrol boats, to frigates and aircraft carriers, as well as submarines and vessels for anti-piracy, security and surveillance. Our 9LV solutions provide naval forces with outstanding operational capabilities, supporting all mission types, from littorals to the open ocean.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-10-2017 at 06:15 PM


Australia chooses Lockheed, Saab for warship combat systems

By: Nigel Pittaway   16 hours ago

Sydney, Australia — Lockheed Martin and Saab have won major deals to supply combat systems for the Royal Australian Navy, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced Oct. 3, the first day of the Pacific 2017 maritime symposium.

The deals are reported to be worth several billion Australian dollars and have been announced as part of the country’s plans to establish a continuous naval shipbuilding capability.

Turnbull said the Lockheed Martin Aegis combat management system, or CMS, will be integrated into the Navy’s nine Future Frigates together with an Australian Tactical Interface to be developed by Saab Australia, which will be acquired under the SEA 5000 project.

He said the Australian government has also mandated Saab Australia to provide its 9LV CMS for the 12 offshore patrol vessels, or OPVs, to be acquired under the SEA 1180 project and a future upgrade of the Australian Tactical Interface for the Navy’s three Hobart-class air warfare destroyers that are currently being delivered.

The Hobart DDG destroyers currently have the Aegis Baseline 8 combat system with the Australian Tactical Interface provided by Raytheon Australia, but the government is mulling a ballistic missile defence capability, which, among other things, will require an upgrade to Aegis Baseline 9.

The overall announcement is largely seen as an intent by the Turnbull government to guarantee an indigenous CMS capability in coming years. “It guarantees the development of a long-term sustainable Australian combat management system industry, which is integral to the implementation of the government’s Naval Shipbuilding Plan,” Defense Minister Marise Payne said in a statement.

The Future Frigate program will acquire nine warships from the mid-2000s, which will be optimized for anti-submarine warfare but also have a significant air defence capability. The Australian government had previously mandated a phased-array radar to be developed by Australia’s CEA Technologies and the combat system competition was between Lockheed Martin with the Aegis Baseline 9 and Saab Australia with the 9LV system.

“The decision to select Aegis for the Future Frigate is a good decision,” said Gary Feldman, Lockheed Martin’s director of Australian mission systems. “We think the commonality with the air warfare destroyers, the interoperability and the overall capability and the growth path for the future makes it a very important decision.”

The Saab Australia 9LV system is already in service aboard several of the Australian Navy’s warships, including the upgraded Anzac-class anti-ship missile defence frigates and the two 27,000-tonne Canberra-class landing helicopter dock ships.
The decision to integrate the system with the 12 OPVs, to be built in Australia in 2018, will mean that Saab will most likely be involved in some way with all surface ship combat management systems in the future.

“Saab welcomes the announcement by the Australian prime minister that confirms the company as an integral part of the government’s enterprise approach to combat management systems. This is an endorsement of the advanced combat system capabilities we have developed for the RAN, and we look forward to working closely with the Australian Defence Force to deliver highly capable systems for the Future Frigates and other platforms,” Saab Australia’s managing director, Dean Rosenfield, said.

“The government’s decisiveness and support for Australian industry will give Saab certainty to invest in the long term. With a contract in place, this will mean new job opportunities and growth on the Australian market, carrying out development and support across every major ship in the Australian fleet.”
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[*] posted on 6-10-2017 at 12:18 AM


Defence Drives Innovation Exports

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Oct 04, 2017)

More than 30 global companies with contracts to supply critical major parts for the Type 26 Global Combat Ship being manufactured in the UK, will transfer bespoke technologies and capability to Australia, should BAE Systems’ bid for SEA5000 be successful.

BAE Systems has proposed an Australian version of the Global Combat Ship to replace the aging ANZAC class frigates.

As well as the many thousands of jobs that the Future Frigates project will generate, the transfer of technology by these 30 companies and the advanced manufacturing they will undertake will create hundreds of jobs.

The companies will produce, assemble and test equipment in Australia. They will develop advanced manufacturing hubs in propulsion and combat systems technology, establishing new, highly skilled jobs in these specialised sectors during the building of the Future Frigates and in the many decades of sustaining the ships during their service life.

Together with the skills, knowledge and engineering capability that will be transferred by BAE Systems, the technology transfer will not only underpin the building and sustainment of the Future Frigates, it will also enable Australia to lead the design and build its next generation of warships for the Royal Australian Navy.

BAE Systems expects that within ten years, the shipbuilding capability developed in Adelaide will be autonomous and competing for export sales.

BAE Systems Chief Executive Glynn Phillips said:

“The transfer of intellectual property and technology is key to establishing and maintaining an enduring Australian shipbuilding capability.

“Our approach is to create an economic powerhouse of advanced manufacturing.

“Our investment in industrial capability will see highly skilled Australians playing a lead role in the design and building of the next generation warship well beyond the immediate Future Frigate program.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 6-10-2017 at 12:19 AM


Brainstorming the Future

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Oct 05, 2017)

Defence is holding its first force design conference to gather ideas from around Australia and the globe on designing the future force.

Decision-makers, practitioners, innovators, military partners, and researchers from Defence, industry, academia, and government agencies will join forces in Canberra from 10-11 October to discuss how to design and deliver a joint Australian Defence Force that is capable, potent and agile.

Deputy Director Force Options Development Commander Roger Fonhof, from Force Design Division, said the division, established last year post the First Principles Review, was transforming the way Defence undertakes force design, by making the force structure review a business-as-usual process.

“Force design is one of the big changes resulting from the First Principles Review,” Commander Fonhof said.

“It will finally provide Defence with an enduring capacity to review itself, to make sure we have the right mix of capability to do what we need to do today and in the future.

“We need to answer questions such as: What does the Australian Defence Force need today, tomorrow and well into the future? How can we maximise innovation and technology to give us an edge?

How do we continue to deliver an Australian Defence Force fit-for-purpose for today’s operations while also designing an Australian Defence Force that can not only fight but win, in future operations?”

Force Design Division is seeking to create a collaborative environment to promote creative thinking and to explore force option opportunities.

Commander Fonhof said it was critical the Australian Defence Force achieved the best fit in terms of capability and resources available while keeping within its budget.

“So it’s about frank and fearless advice, the understanding of options, benefits, trade-offs and implications,” he said.

Head Navy Capability Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead said Navy had embarked upon the most ambitious recapitalisation of its Fleet and supporting infrastructure since the Second World War.

“This offers both opportunities and challenges, but Navy’s potential will only be realised through a joint approach, which encompasses force design through to integrated warfighting,” Rear Admiral Mead said.

“It is absolutely essential that Navy’s needs and requirements are developed through a joint lens, and force design is the pathway by which we materialise our future order of combat.”

Head Force Design Air Vice Marshal Mel Hupfeld said he encouraged leaders in the fields of innovation, research and Defence to provide their ideas on areas such as collaboration, experimentation, wargaming, innovation, and options development to help Defence deliver a joint force by design.

“I’d like to enlist the collective wisdom to help the ongoing professionalization of our workforce and evolve the world-class tools, techniques and methodologies we need, so that every soldier, sailor and airman and airwoman has access to the best capability systems solutions at the right time in the right location,” Air Vice Marshal Hupfeld said.

“We have to be able to provide a clear, coherent, relatable and consistent capability narrative to both the public and government. This narrative must begin internally, before we begin our engagement with other external stakeholders, including central agencies, industry and academia.

“We draw on experts and information sources from both within the department and beyond. In particular, we work closely with our Service Chiefs and Group Heads who play a vital role providing input into force design, as well as a critical role in shaping the design of the future force.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 12:47 PM


Hi Guys, I'm sorry to report that I didn't get to the Pacific expo this year. Normally I post a photo essay of the stuff on show but not this year.

I've just started a new job that is kickiing my arse real hard and there was no way I could get out out of work before the exhibition closed each day, so no pics this time I'm afraid.




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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 02:02 PM


No sweat mate..............
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 02:57 PM


OMFG!!! Reality from an article in The Australian, by Greg Sheriden even!

Let no one sink Australia’s super submarines

The Australian12:00AM October 7, 2017
GREG SHERIDAN
Foreign EditorMelbourne

Our new submarines are under ­bizarre attack, the Collins subs have been officially rehabilitated and the future frigates have been assigned the most powerful missile defence systems in the world.

At a time when across the political divide in Australia, and across Asia, there are worries about whether Donald Trump represents a new unreliability in the US alliance system, we have never in peacetime more needed a powerful navy than now.

Our region is militarising. North Korea will soon be able to deliver nuclear payloads on intercontinental ballistic missiles. China is undertaking one of the biggest military build-ups in modern history. By 2030, one half of the world’s total submarines will be operating in our region.

Belatedly, but determinedly, and with seeming bipartisan support, we are now on a path to build the most formidable navy we have ever had in peacetime, and a navy that, for the first time in many decades, will give us a real self-defence capacity, a real strategic projection capacity, and which will also act as a massive force multiplier for the American alliance system in Asia.

The government announced this week that the nine future frigates, which we will start building in 2020, while still being configured for anti-submarine warfare, will all have the US Aegis Combat System, the world’s most advanced missile defence system.

They will join our three air warfare destroyers, which also have Aegis, giving us 12 surface combatants with the magnificent system of capabilities that the latest Aegis variant offers. These will join our two giant landing helicopter dock ships, which give us the ability to project force through the region in a multiplicity of ways.

And we will have 12 long-range, lethal submarines all with the AN/BYG-1 combat system, the best technology the mighty US Navy can produce.

The 12 Aegis surface ships and the 12 subs will all be built in Australia. That means they will cost more, but the Turnbull government, with the support of the Shorten opposition, is absolutely right to commit to building them in Australia.

This is for three compelling reasons.

One. If they don’t get built here, they won’t get built. This is a political reality. It is impossible to sustain upwards of $100 billion of naval expenditure across numerous political cycles if most of the money is going overseas.

Two. Building in Australia, if done properly, offers us the chance to create and sustain sovereign defence technology capacity of enormous benefit to us.

Three. The main reason building in Australia is so costly is because governments keep postponing or cancelling projects. That means every project undertaken in Australia is a virgin start-up. It is in the nature of all big, complex industrial projects that start-up costs are huge.

Whether he is your cup of tea or not, Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne is in the process of transforming our strategic outlook and industrial prospects. The government’s efforts to create a naval shipbuilding industry based on “continuous build” across destroyers, frigates, submarines, offshore patrol vessels and the rest, means the start-up costs are only borne once.

If we have the wit as a nation to sustain our commitment to this program across the political cycles we will get the navy we need, a formidable domestic industry and sovereign technological capacity.

Bill Shorten and Labor’s defence spokesman Richard Marles, are deeply committed to national security and understand that both sides of politics bear some blame for the long, slow, ludicrously delayed start to the program to replace the Collins subs. And they are certainly just as committed to Australian jobs as the government is. So there is a fair chance that this might actually work.

But our political culture contains many nutty elements that conspire against good policy, as the quite ludicrous attacks on our submarine project in recent weeks demonstrate.

The Government is committed to building 12 new subs with the French Naval Group, formerly DCNS. They will start to come into service in the early 2030s. To avoid a capability gap in the meantime, the Collins-class subs will have their service extended.

The government has not yet decided how many Collins subs it will extend and for how long. The extension actually holds out the possibility of Australia building towards 12 subs earlier than forecast because it is possible that six Collins boats could be operational as new subs come into service.

The decision on the French boat followed an exhaustive competitive evaluation process and extremely energetic and detailed bids from the Japanese and the Germans. American submariners and the most senior military people were involved in advising Canberra that the French were the best option.

At the time I backed the Japanese on strategic grounds but the French, in alliance with Australia, will certainly build very good subs. Australia already has hundreds of people at work on the project including more than a dozen permanently stationed in France. This will rise to 50-odd government people before Christmas and Naval Group Australia will send nearly 100 Australians to France by the middle of next year to spend two or three years on design and development work, and learning the French techniques.

If anything, the project is ahead of schedule, with the hull dimensions already decided in detail. But it is coming under truly eccentric fire from a range of weird sources. A group of activists who hate the French option funded a report by Insight Economics which opposes the project root and branch and offers loopy alternatives. This report is several thousand words of semi-coherent fantasy with endless figures conjured from magic.

It has had a good run from commentators who don’t know anything about defence. For example, it states that extending the Collins will cost $15bn. But the government has not yet determined how many Collins it will extend, nor for how long, so any such figure is nonsense.

The report proposes instead buying or building six short-range French Scorpene-class subs. Its strategic illiteracy is epic. Short-range subs, even modified, and long-range subs are inherently different. Two shorts does not make one long. They do entirely different things and carry different weapons. It proposes modifying these subs to give them longer range and then setting up a mother surface ship to look after them far to Australia’s north.

This is strategic analysis at the level of Biggles books for dullards. Such a ship would be a sitting duck. At any time of tension it would need to be withdrawn, so the short-range subs would lose their notional long range just when it was needed.

The report, while damning the new Naval Group subs, says we should nonetheless go ahead with them, but also build the modified six short-range subs, and buy the mother ship, for the miracle cost of less than $10bn.

The whole thing is absolute ­baloney from start to finish. Many of the things the report says about the Naval Group’s future subs are also wrong. It is perplexing that in any big Australian project there is always such a dedicated constituency for making it fail.

Equally absurd is the related campaign by some that we should get nuclear subs. The nuclear sub is the better sub but no nation runs nuclear subs without a domestic nuclear industry. There is not a snowflake’s chance in hell of any political party establishing a nuclear industry in the next decade. But any politician who talks airily about nuclear subs can have no credibility without establishing an Australian nuclear industry.

Then there is the argument that soon all subs will be obsolete so we shouldn’t bother with them at all. How is it that this revolutionary military insight has passed the Americans by, not to mention the Chinese, the Russians, the British, the Indians and everyone else who are is acquiring subs?

If any of these nutty objections gets any traction, they can only create further delay, so that instead of getting new subs early in the 2030s we wait until the 2040s or beyond, and kill all chance of a continuous build industry.

Surely we have moved beyond this stage of national insanity.

The frigates, meanwhile, are almost as sexy as the subs. They are a $35bn project. They will have two roles, anti-sub warfare and missile defence. No one is fonder of missile defence than me, but at this stage we are talking about the frigates defending themselves, and perhaps ships in an associated task group, from missiles fired at them by other navies or air forces.

However, by committing now to the Aegis Baseline 9 combat system we give ourselves the capacity to upgrade to full ballistic missile defence capabilities. Not only that, but all the ships’ radars will be able to communicate with each other and with allies in what is known as co-operative engagement capability. Having 12 such ships — the frigates and the AWDs — would give us all kinds of capabilities.

It would also give us the ability to join seamlessly and lethally with our US allies, and with their Asian allies, Japan and South Korea. We would all be formidable force multipliers for each other in any joint contingency.

The three frigate bidders are Britain’s BAE Systems, Spain’s Navantia and Italy’s Fincantieri. All three have serious strengths. The British build magnificent anti-sub ships. Protecting their nuclear subs and their aircraft carrier from hostile subs is core business for them. Navantia would use the same hulls as the AWDs; the firm and its Australian collaborators, have learned a great deal from the AWD experience. Fincantieri is a formidable bidder. Its ships would have two helicopters to attack subs — a big factor.

Anti-submarine ships use a great deal of submarine-style technology to be ultra-quiet. This can be things like covering the hull with smooth, silent tiles, or all the technologies subs use to keep internal noise down. The balance of technology between the sub and the surface ship is shifting. The sub still has the advantage but ASW ships are much more in the game than has been the case previously.

Australians love working with the British navy, the Spanish are a familiar partner and themselves operate Aegis systems, the Italians produce a superb ASW ship.

It may be that the definition of the role of these ships changed marginally this week. When Malcolm Turnbull talked of them in the context of North Korea, he seemed to add greater weight to their missile defence capabilities. The government is determined not to diminish their anti-sub capabilities, but we may get more vertical missile pods, and deeper pods that can take the more formidable missile interceptors.

Although even the best of these interceptors at the moment would be tasked with hitting shorter-range ballistic missiles, their eventual ability to intercept even ICBMs should not be ruled out.

Australia has embarked on something of the utmost importance and with a chance of delivering benefit to our nation across several critical dimensions: military capability, economic base, sovereign defence technology.

The subs, and even the frigates, will inevitably face challenges along the road. But you can’t complete the longest road if you never start. It would be a tragedy if our perennial culture of naysaying, or political short-termism, doomed these efforts just as they, all too belatedly, get going.




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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 03:11 PM


I would note that Greg Sheridan, the Foreign Editor had to write this article..............NOT the so-called Defence section/editor
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 05:10 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
I would note that Greg Sheridan, the Foreign Editor had to write this article..............NOT the so-called Defence section/editor


It just shows how crazy the defence debate is getting in this country when Greg Bloody Sheridan is the voice of reason...

The only other good news in this scenario is that Defence and the Government are absolutely ignoring these mouth-breathing imbeciles and continuing with these plans that are scheduled to deliver an outstandingly capable Navy in years to come.

Now if only we’d grow some balls, get Bugs beloved SM-6 and later SM-3 after AEGIS gets upgraded to Baseline 9 standard and we hurry up and put LRASM / Tactical Tomahawk (with the ASM seeker) onto the AWD’s and Collins in the meantime and then the FF and the future sub, things would be looking pretty sweet...





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 05:17 PM


One glaring inadequacy that might be "missing that it is missing" in the USN and The RAN (actually any Western Navy in the world) is that all of the surface combatants cannot take a hit.

A simple swarm of 50 lb bomb carrying drones will take out any Aegis system, how? it would be overwhelmed and therein seems to lie the Achilles heal.

The sensor suite which the vessel relies upon for survival is waaaaaaaaaaay too vulnerable to damage.

One cost effective solution to this might be to increase the height of the radar. Put it on an airship orbiting a ship, so that it has more time to respond to a swarm attack or whatever, but don't kid yourself, an Arleigh Burke or the new Australian AWD are fast becoming what Submariners call "targets".

Another cost effective solution might be to make the vessel survivable. The cheapest and easiest armor to incorporate in any vehicle is space and air (blast waves decay at a cubic rate in air) So build your design accordingly. What would that look like? A multi hull design. A mono hull is a dead duck to the one supersonic SSAshM that always gets through the "impregnable" Aegis shield (LMAO) Why always? Why would I shoot one, 4, 6 or even 8 missiles at an Aegis warship, if I wanted to kill it? I would shoot enough so it's fate would be sealed, because that's what enemies with missiles do. Any kind of thinking otherwise is Ostrich-with-your-head-(ummm, pause)-in-the-sand-thinking...


cheers

W
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 05:42 PM


Quote:
[quote=2898&tid=263&author=weasel]One glaring inadequacy that might be "missing that it is missing" in the USN and The RAN (actually any Western Navy in the world) is that all of the surface combatants cannot take a hit.

A simple swarm of 50 lb bomb carrying drones will take out any Aegis system, how? it would be overwhelmed and therein seems to lie the Achilles heal.


What would be the effect do you think of attempting to fly a drone with range of the radiated power output of a SPY-1D radar?

Quote:
The sensor suite upon which the vessel relies upon for survival is waaaaaaaaaaay too vulnerable to damage.


If it gets hit... But by the same argument we might as well ground every aircraft in the world...

Quote:
One cost effective solution to this might be to increase the height of the radar. Put it on an airship orbiting a ship, so that it has more time to respond to a swarm attack or whatever, but don't kid yourself, an Arleigh Burke or the new Australian AWD are fast becoming what Submariners call "targets".


Or a 360 degree podded radar system mounted on say, an MQ-8C?

Quote:
Another cost effective solution might be to make the vessel survivable. The cheapest and easiest armor to incorporate in any vehicle is space and air (blast waves decay at a cubic rate in air) So build your design accordingly. What would that look like? A multi hull design. A mono hull is a dead duck to the one supersonic SSAshM that always gets through the "impregnable" Aegis shield (LMAO) Why always? Why would I shoot one, 4, 6 or even 8 missiles at an Aegis warship, if I wanted to kill it? I would shoot enough so it's fate would be sealed, because that's what enemies with missiles do. Any kind of thinking otherwise is Ostrich-with-your-head-(ummm, pause)-in-the-sand-thinking...


cheers

W


The problem with this line of thinking is real world missile inventories. In war games, weapon stocks are always unlimited and always available wherever and whenever you need them.

I remember CP exercises back in the day where we easily destroyed enemy armoured force after enemy armoured force with Hellfire and Javelin ATGW fires alongside M1A1 tank fire. It was a one sided slaughter, how stupid these enemy armoured forces were? Why would you even bother with an armoured vehicle when they were so easily destroyed?

Problem was, back in the real world we had none of these capabilities...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 09:14 PM


October 7 2017 - 12:01AM

$50b submarine project struggling to find qualified Australians: French shipbuilder

David Wroe

The head of the French firm helping to build Australia's $50 billion fleet of new submarines has admitted it faces a significant battle to find a qualified and experienced local workforce.

Herve Guillou, CEO of French firm Naval Group, told Fairfax Media this week that the firm is practically having to recruit workers "one-by-one". While there are many young, university-educated people they can train from scratch, older and experienced managers are hard to find.

"My worry is always that people confuse education with experience. These are very, very different," he said.

"Finding people with a diploma is not so difficult, finding people with experience and managerial skills is more difficult … It's nearly a one-by-one exercise."


Naval Group chief executive Herve Guillou, right, at the firm's shipyards in Cherbourg, France, with Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne. Photo: AP

Naval Group – formerly called DCNS – won the contract last year to help design and build Australia's new fleet of 12 submarines.

Submarines are notoriously complex and the project needs about 1500 highly specialised workers by the end of next decade.

The firm now has about 80 people – a mix of Australians and French – based in Adelaide. But next year it will launch a nationwide recruitment campaign targeting sectors such as oil and gas, and automotive, "because we're not really getting the scope of experience that we need and there's a whole industry that still doesn't know about the program", Mr Guillou said.

He described the management of submarine construction as "incredibly dense" because everyone involved needed to be very closely co-ordinated from engineers to plumbers. Mid-range managers with experience at this were the hardest to find in Australia.


An impression of a Shortfin Barracuda submarine being built with the help of French firm Naval Group. Photo: DCNS GROUP

But he added that Naval Group had done this before in India and Brazil and insisted that enough time had been factored in by the Australian government.

He said it was "more risky" to do it in Australia than in France because a new supply chain would have to be built but these were "the rules of the game" set by the government.

"This country wants to get sovereignty, the full maritime enterprise on their side and that's fine. That's what we've been contracted for. That's what we will deliver."

The first of the 12 new submarines is scheduled to hit the water in the early 2030s. At least some of the ageing Collins-class submarines will need to go through refits to extend their lives.

Meanwhile, Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne and Defence Minister Marise Payne were at odds this week over the idea of stating a minimum level of Australian industry involvement in the submarines.

Mr Pyne told reporters at the Pacific 2017 naval conference in Sydney that at least 60 per cent of the work on the submarines would be done by Australian firms, which he said met the government's promise of building them locally.

"A local build is 60 per cent … That's the definition of a local build," he said, though he added he would like it to be higher for all shipbuilding projects.

The government has faced political pressure in South Australia – Mr Pyne's home state – to guarantee a minimum Australian content, including for the huge supply chain for the millions of parts that make up a submarine.

Mr Pyne said he had had "very clear conversations with Naval Group and they fully understand that and they have committed to at least 60 per cent". This was confirmed by Mr Guillou.

But just hours later, Senator Payne told an industry briefing at the conference: "The political argy bargy will have some people say they want to see a percentage put on that, but I don't see why you would put a floor on an item like that. Why wouldn't you start by reaching for the highest point possible? It doesn't seem logical to me to put a base on it."
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[*] posted on 7-10-2017 at 10:15 PM


Collins removed from Projects of Concern at last

06 Oct 2017

Patrick Durrant | Pacific 2017, Sydney


A Collins class cutaway cross sectional model on display at Pacific 2017. Credit: ADM Patrick Durrant

In a move that even Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne conceded was long overdue, the Commonwealth has finally removed the Collins class program (CN10) from the Projects of Concern list.

ASC’s Interim CEO Stuart Whiley said the move recognised the high performance of the Collins Class program, carried out by the Submarine Enterprise, including ASC as submarine platform sustainer and upgrader, the Royal Australian Navy, Defence Department and Raytheon Australia.
 
This decision recognises the fantastic work and expertise of our leading submarine platform personnel
 
“ASC welcomes the recognition by the Government of the Enterprise’s success in dramatically improving submarine availability for the Royal Australian Navy.

“This decision recognises the fantastic work and expertise of our leading submarine platform personnel, from our skilled production trades to our engineers, project managers and supply chain managers.”

Following an organisation-wide program of innovation and reform commencing in 2012, ASC is now performing at or above international benchmarks for its scope of work on Collins Class submarine.

During the Beyond Benchmark review last year, John Coles, who conducted the 2012 review into sustainment of the Collins Class Submarines, was impressed by the improvements made at ASC in a very short space of time.

The Beyond Benchmark review revisited the Collins submarine sustainment environment two years on from the March 2014 progress review and covered three areas: current Collins Class sustainment performance; sustaining performance during transition to the Future Submarine; and improving beyond the benchmark.

With observed improvements to planning, productivity, inventory investment, and performance monitoring, the review team saw the Enterprise would be in a position to achieve benchmark performance by mid-2017.

Whiley said ASC draws on its submarine personnel who number in excess of 1,200, and include some of Australia’s leading submarine platform engineers. It also leverages a network of Australian expert organisations to implement sovereign industrial solutions in Collins Class sustainment.

“ASC manages the integration of the Collins supply chain and has achieved Australian content of more than 92 per cent on its scope of work in Collins Class sustainment.”
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[*] posted on 8-10-2017 at 08:26 PM


Torpedo Countermeasures


The Subscut detects the torpedo and selects the appropriate decoy (Photo: Rafael)

At Pacific 2017, Rafael is also showcasing its submarine anti-torpedo systems: Shade, Scutter and Torbuster. Doron Levi, Marketing and Business Development Director for Naval Warfare Systems at Rafael, told MONS: “When an incoming torpedo is detected by a submarine, there are two things the Commander can do: manoeuvring and sending out a counter-measure. These are all human made decisions. We decided to offer systems that can facilitate and improve this decision-making either automatically or semi-automatically.”
 
Shade is the first step in the process. It is a torpedo defence suite that protects submarines from attacks by all types of acoustic homing torpedoes. “It consists of three components,” continues Mr. Levi: “A defence programmer that analyses threats and selects a pre-programmed response; a launcher controller that enables the selection and firing of torpedo countermeasures; up to 32 launchers for firing up to 32 decoys.”
 
In terms of decoys, Rafael offers the Subscut. Launched from the signal ejector of any submarine, the Subscut detects active acoustic transmissions, resulting in Countermeasure selection and generation of the appropriate deception signal for transmission, including Doppler effects, target highlights, and target self-noise. “However, torpedoes are becoming more and more intelligent and some have a long autonomy, as such it sometimes become inevitable to send another counter-measure that can end the run of the torpedo by disabling its electronics and motors,” says Mr. Levi.
 
To this end, Rafael has developed the Torbuster. Launched from an external launcher, it propels itself at a safe distance from the submarine and seduces the torpedo by transmitting specific acoustic signals. When the torpedo approaches the decoy, at the closest point of approach, it self explodes and neutralises it.
 
Scutter is already in use with the Royal Australian Navy on the ‘Collins’ class, as well as with the US and the Israeli navies.
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