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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 8-10-2017 at 08:30 PM


OPV80 RAN


Model of the OPV80 RAN at the Pacific 2017 show in Sydney

In the context of the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) competition for the replacement of 13 ‘Armidale’ class patrol boats with 12 new vessels (SEA 1180), Fassmer of Germany teamed-up with Austal in Australia to offer the OPV80 RAN. Harald Fassmer, Managing Director of Fassmer, told MONS: “There are two main reasons we teamed-up with Austal. Firstly, because involvement of local industry was a requirement in the tender, but most importantly because we wish to build a vessel that we can then export in the Asia Pacific region and it will be much easier if we are building from Australia.”
 
The OPV RAN is the latest evolution of the proven Fassmer OPV 80 design, of which seven similar vessels are currently in service with the Chilean and Colombian navies since 2008 while three vessels are under construction for the German Coast Guard.
 
MONS asked Mr. Fassmer what makes the AustalFassmer OPV80 RAN particularly competitive compared to the other ships offered by Damen and Lürssen for SEA 1180: “The first customer for the OPV80 was the Chilean Navy, for which we had to build a ship that could withstand very harsh sea conditions.

Moreover, AustalFassmer are offering a ship with two medium speed engines, instead of two high speed engines, which increases the time between maintenance thus decreasing the costs.” The OPV80 RAN will be able to go as fast as 21knots.
 
Mr. Fassmer concluded by indicating that the contenders are expecting a decision by the end of October.
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[*] posted on 11-10-2017 at 01:38 PM


Frigates and OPVs parade three by three in Australia

10th October 2017 - 03:10 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Sydney



Frigates and OPVs were a major focus at the Pacific International Maritime Exposition in Sydney last week, with each programme – Project Sea 5000 and Sea 1180 respectively – shortlisted to three contenders each after RfTs were earlier issued.

On the last day of the expo, the three frigate contenders presented their designs at a conference session: the BAE Systems Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Fincantieri FREMM-A and Navantia F-5000. The former employed a chief engineer to highlight design features of the Type 26, while Fincantieri rolled in a couple of Italian Navy officers. Navantia took a multimedia approach to emphasise local industrial involvement and its ‘low-risk choice’ status.

Dominic MacNamara, business development manager at Navantia Australia, claimed: ‘The F-5000 will enhance the presence, persistence and lethality of future task group operations.’ He emphasised the frigate’s commonality and shared weapons with the Hobart class.

Given Navantia’s involvement in the Air Warfare Destroyer and Canberra-class LHD programmes, plus auxiliary oilers/replenishment ships currently under construction, the company is in a strong position. The fact that Navantia is the only one of the three to have integrated the Aegis combat management system – now mandated for the Future Frigates – ticks another box.

However, the F-5000 (based on the F100 of the Spanish Navy) was the only design to have a single helicopter hangar.

The Royal Navy’s Type 26 was designed from the outset for anti-submarine warfare so its acoustic signature has been carefully managed. It has a hull life of 35 years, according to Chris Muskett, a chief engineer at BAE Systems.

A feature of the Type 26 design is a mission bay that can hold up to ten 20ft containers or even a helicopter of Merlin size. This adds flexibility and the ship can be re-roled within 24 hours. The flight deck can handle a helicopter up to the size of a Chinook.

However, the Type 26 is the only one of the three not in service.

Fincantieri perhaps begins with the greatest disadvantage, having no naval shipbuilding experience in Australia.

Nevertheless, it is planning a new office in Adelaide and will list on the Australian Securities Exchange.

Sean Costello, director of Fincantieri Australia, highlighted the flexible propulsion and survivability of the 6,700t FREMM-A design. It features an azimuthal retractable thruster in the forward part of the hull. The frigate can accommodate up to two helicopters of MRH90 size.

The Sea 5000 schedule will see second pass approval given next April at the completion of the competitive evaluation process. Construction of the first of nine Future Frigates is to begin in South Australia in 2020 to replace the ANZAC class.

Moving on, the OPV contenders for 12 new vessels to replace the Armidale class are Fassmer, Lürssen and Damen. All were coy about their designs when speaking to media at the Pacific expo.

Fassmer has teamed with Austal to offer the OPV80 RAN design, with the German shipbuilder eyeing not only Australia’s tender but also wider sales in the Asia-Pacific region. This design is based on Fassmer’s OPV 80, of which seven examples are in service in Chile and Columbia and three are under build for the German Coast Guard.

Lürssen was particularly brusque in its handling of media, but it displayed a scale model of its OPV80, perhaps best known in the region under its Darussalam-class guise as used by Brunei. This type displaces 1,486t and measures 80m long. Lürssen has teamed with ASC and Civmec.

Damen has partnered with Forgacs Marine and Defence, and its design is based on the OPV 1800 Sea Axe (pictured above) that displaces 980t and measures 85m long. It has a specially shaped ‘axe bow’ to avoid slamming in heavy seas and which reduces fuel consumption by up to 20%. Damen has built similar Arialah-class hulls for the UAE.

At the Pacific expo Damen and Forgacs announced the award of a dredger contract, with the 60m craft to be built in Western Australia. Roland Briene, Damen’s area director for Asia-Pacific, told Shephard that this was significant as ‘it is a good step up to constructing OPVs in Australia’.

The three European shipbuilders are expecting an OPV selection decision by the end of October in readiness for construction to commence in Adelaide next year, before work shifts to Western Australia from the third vessel onwards.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2017 at 12:21 AM


Getting a bit sick of all these journalists basing their opinions on what exactly is being offered for Future Frigates and OPV’s etc, on what a loosely representative model shows...

They are MODELS people. Not the friggin boats themselves!!!




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 12-10-2017 at 05:30 PM


The're journalists, which is shorthand for overpaid, over-opinionated, under-informed and underwhelming idiots.



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[*] posted on 21-10-2017 at 10:41 AM


Australia completes operational evaluation phase of the ScanEagle UAS

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

20 October 2017

Key Points
- The Royal Australian Navy has completed operational evaluation of the ScanEagle UAS
- Milestone paves the way for greater adoption of MUM-T operations across the service

After executing a number of successful missions from an Adelaide (Oliver Hazard Perry)-class guided-missile frigate in the Middle East, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has completed operational evaluation (OPEVAL) of the ScanEagle unmanned aircraft system (UAS).

The OPEVAL was completed onboard HMAS Newcastle , which is currently deployed as part of Operation ‘Manitou’ – Australia’s contribution to an international effort promoting maritime security in the Middle East.

Newcastle has been equipped with four ScanEagle vehicles for the evaluations.

(128 of 499 words)
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[*] posted on 22-10-2017 at 09:07 AM


How to screw up a Romeo

Damaged Romeo helicopter could be a write-off

A multi-million dollar naval helicopter has been extensively damaged on its way to the Middle East.

It is understood the MH-60 Romeo Seahawk from 725 Squadron at HMAS Albatross was damaged onboard HMAS Warramunga on it’s way to Perth before heading to the Gulf.

It is believed the helicopter may have broken free of its lashing in an hangar area, half way across the Great Australian Bight in rough conditions.

It is understood the helicopter “bounced” around the hangar area, causing significant damage, with one of three sources who spoke to the Register saying the helicopter might be “a write-off”.

Other reports suggest the aircraft has suffered millions of dollars worth of damage.

It is understood no one was injured in the incident.

The Register has been told the aircraft was replaced to allow Warramunga, an Anzac Class Frigate Helicopter (FFH), capable of air defence, surface and undersea warfare, surveillance, reconnaissance and interdiction, to continue to the Middle East.

Defence was contacted for comment over the alleged incident but is yet to respond.

The Australian Government approved the acquisition of 24 MH-60R Seahawk Romeo naval combat helicopters at a cost of over $3 billion.

The Romeo, replacing the S-70B-2 Seahawk helicopters, is seen as the future of naval aviation. It is equipped with a highly sophisticated combat systems designed to employ Hellfire air-to-surface missiles and the Mark 54 anti-submarine torpedo.

The Romeo’s primary mission is anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare but also has the ability to undertake search and rescue, logistics support, personnel transport and medical evacuation.

The helicopters are largely military off-the-shelf built by Sikorsky and Lockheed Martin and were acquired through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process from the US Navy.

The final of the 24 helicopters arrived at Nowra’s HMAS Albatross in September 2016, providing navy the capacity to equip at least eight warships with a combat helicopter at the same time.

The remainder are based at Albatross with 725 Squadron which was recommissioned in 2015.

As well as Anzac Class frigates, the Romeos can also be deployed on the new Air Warfare Destroyers.

ENDS

The info I have heard is the damned thing bounced around inside the hangar like a "ping pong ball".

Apparently Warramunga was heading across the Great Australian Bite to the Gulf when she hit some rough weather. During the pitching and rolling the Romeo had come loose from her tie downs and had bounced around in the hanger for two days. They couldn't send anyone into the hanger to try and re-lash it down for fear of them being crushed by the aircraft moving around. They just had to leave it there until they got calmer weather.

They apparently now use material tie down straps instead of chains. These straps stretched under the strain which then came off the aircraft.




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[*] posted on 22-10-2017 at 03:19 PM


Australian Navy Perseveres With S-100 Camcopter Despite Crashes

by Mike Yeo - October 19, 2017, 10:51 AM


One of two Schiebel S-100 Camcopters that crashed while on trial with the Royal Australian Navy. (Photo: Australian Ministry of Defence)

Two S-100 Camcopter VTOL UAVs being provided by their Austrian maker Schiebel to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) for trials have crashed. But the service still plans to buy two S-100s plus two ground stations. Separately, the RAN is upgrading its fleet of 24 manned Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters, the last of which was delivered just over a year ago.

Speaking at a Naval Aviation Symposium on the sidelines of the Pacific 2017 Maritime Exhibition in Sydney, Commodore Chris Smallhorn, the commander of the RAN’s Fleet Air Arm, said both unmanned helicopters crashed for similar reasons and that investigations are ongoing. However trials with the S-100 are set to continue, with delivery of two more powered by a new heavy-fuel engine. According to documentation from Schiebel, the new engine will be able to use JP-5 fuel with its higher flash point for shipboard operations.

Australia selected the S-100 Camcopter for its Navy Minor Project (NMP) 1942 in December last year to meet the RAN’s interim requirement for a VTOL UAV, signing a three-year contract. This project will lead to Project SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1, which will select a UAV to go aboard the RAN’s 12 Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) whose construction is due to start in 2018.

Phase 2 of this project will select another UAV type to equip nine frigates the RAN is planning to build for service from the early 2030s.

At the symposium Commodore Scott Lockey, ‎director general of Navy Aviation Systems at the ‎Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG), said that the timeline for the start of SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1 has slipped by two years although he expects that with a compressed timeline the program will still be able to deliver UAVs to operate on board the OPVs when they are commissioned in the early 2020s.

The program will likely see Schiebel competing with UMS Skeldar again in a repeat of the NMP 1942 competition that saw the S-100 up against Skeldar’s V-200. However, other ship-capable UAVs such as the Insitu Scan Eagle or the Northrop-Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout may also be in contention.

CASG had released a request for information in May from potential suppliers for the SEA 129 Phase 5 Stage 1, which it said drew 27 responses, seeking to provide the OPVs “with an embedded, off-board intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that will enhance its ability to perform its primary and secondary missions.”

Commodore Lockey also revealed that the RAN’s MH-60R Seahawks will undergo a $500 million (Australian dollars, U.S.$394 million) Capability Assurance Program following its approval by the Australian government in June. There will be upgrades and replacement of systems, sensors and weapons to ensure commonality with the U.S. Navy’s MH-60Rs.

The first deliverable of the program will see the integration of the BAE Systems Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) guided rocket, which Lockey said fills an anti-surface warfare gap between door-mounted machine guns and the Lockheed Martin AGM-114 Hellfire missile. 
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[*] posted on 24-10-2017 at 08:14 PM


The Australian is running the story that BAE the ‘bidder’ for the Future Frigate program is responsible for losing the 126 page security manual for Parliament house.

Won’t help their T26 bid...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 24-10-2017 at 08:30 PM


Hmmmm...........why would BAE have it to start with?
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[*] posted on 24-10-2017 at 08:55 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Hmmmm...........why would BAE have it to start with?


Because they are the contractor for the Parliament house upgrades...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 25-10-2017 at 09:39 AM


Well it may or may not have been them, but then again that's never stopped The Australian from printing crap............!
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[*] posted on 25-10-2017 at 07:46 PM


RAN to receive first heavy-fuel-powered S-100 Camcopters by end-2017

Julian Kerr - IHS Jane's Navy International

25 October 2017

The first heavy-fuel-powered versions of the Schiebel S-100 Camcopter rotary-winged unmanned aircraft system (UAS) will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) – the vehicle’s launch customer – by the end of 2017, Schiebel’s Australia sales representative, Phil Swinsburg, confirmed on 25 October.

Schiebel has replaced the Diamond piston engine from previous versions of the S-100 with a two-disc rotary engine, sourced from UK company Rotron and modified in-house. The engine accepts JP-5, a kerosene-based fuel with a flash point above 60 degrees Celsius, specified by the RAN for safety reasons.

The vehicles were procured under a December 2016 contract to meet the RAN’s interim maritime vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) requirements.

(136 of 384 words)
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[*] posted on 25-10-2017 at 11:51 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Well it may or may not have been them, but then again that's never stopped The Australian from printing crap............!


BAE have publicly admitted they had lost it and reported such to the AFP in February this year...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 26-10-2017 at 09:33 AM


Ah well, there you go, they told the truth for once...............
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[*] posted on 29-10-2017 at 05:58 PM


Fine-tuning starts for navy’s first air warfare destroyer

JULIAN KERRThe Australian12:00AM October 28, 2017
The formal commissioning at Sydney’s Garden Island on September 23 of HMAS Hobart saw the Royal Australian Navy welcome into service one of the world’s most capable multi-mission warships.

In essence, the 7000-tonne air warfare destroyer — now officially designated as a DDG (guided missile destroyer) — provides in the hull of a large frigate the weapons capability of a destroyer together with communications and command and control resources broadly similar to those of a much larger US Navy Ticonderoga-class cruiser.

Importantly, the DDGs come equipped with the US co-operative engagement capability (CEC) that provides an over-the-horizon capability across platforms. The CEC enables each ship to act as part of a wider grid of sensor and weapon platforms that allows similarly-equipped ships to share surveillance and targeting information.

Following significant improvements in what has been a contentious construction process, Ship 2, the Brisbane, is 95 per cent complete at ASC in Adelaide and is tracking to meet a rescheduled delivery date of June 2018. Delivery of Ship 3, the Sydney, now 65 per cent complete, has been advanced by three months to December 2019.

The RAN will then boast three ships whose capabilities, orchestrated by their Aegis combat systems, stretch well beyond those of their primary long-range anti-air role, albeit at a price. The final cost is estimated in 2016-17 budget papers as $9.09 billion — about $1.25bn in out-turned dollars over the original budget.

Fine-tuning those air-defence, land-attack, surface-attack and anti-submarine capabilities to reach initial operational capability by December 2018 is the responsibility of Captain John Stavridis.

In addition to three masters degrees and extensive command experience, Stavridis is also a qualified chartered accountant whose respect for ordered, detailed process should, he acknowledges, stand him in good stead during Hobart’s work-up program.

This is expected to culminate late next year with US Navy combat system sea certification (CSSC) trials. The trials will include firings over the southern California test range off San Diego of the ship’s SM-2 Block IIIB medium-range and Evolved Seasparrow (ESSM) short-range anti-air missiles. While the SM-2 Block IIIB is lethal against aircraft and sea-skimming anti-ship cruise missiles, it is not designed for use against ballistic missiles.

Given the threat posed by North Korea’s strategic missile program, it would be surprising therefore if consideration is not being given in Canberra to an early upgrade of the command and control element of the DDGs’ Aegis combat systems and the acquisition of SM-6 missiles to provide a sea-based terminal-phase ballistic missile defence (BMD) capability.

The intention to equip the DDGs with the SM-6 to enhance their capability “against emerging air threats” was explicitly confirmed in both the Defence Department’s 2009 and 2012 defence capability plans.

The 2016 policy white paper stated simply that the DDGs would be equipped with “new advanced surface to air missiles” — presumably the SM-6 Dual 1 with a range of about 370 kilometres and combined BMD, anti-air and anti-surface target capabilities — by the middle of the next decade.

Deploying SM-6 for terminal-phase BMD (that is, when the missile is approaching its target) would require upgrading the DDGs’ Baseline 8.0 Aegis systems to the latest Baseline 9.C1 configuration with an optional BMD module, thus combining BMD and air defence in a single integrated package. The Baseline 8.0 systems were ordered from the US in 2006, produced in 2009, and subsequently languished in warehouses for years before installation.

A report by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute suggests upgrading Aegis to Baseline 9.C1 could cost about $US125 million ($160m) per ship, together with the opportunity cost of taking each vessel out of service — or possibly delaying the delivery of Ship 3 — for an unknown period.

To that must be added the cost of BMD-capable missiles — about $US4m per copy for the SM-6 and $US12m each for the US Navy’s SM-3 exo-atmosphere ballistic missile interceptor, which can also be deployed with Aegis Baseline 9.C1.

Defence’s Integrated Investment Plan (IIP) includes a $4bn-$5bn provision for enhancements to the DDG combat system between 2017 and 2028, but gives no details of what these large sums will involve. The IIP also anticipates additional expenditure between 2018 and 2028 of $2bn-$3bn on area air-defence weapons.

Preliminary approval for the first upgrade to Aegis is slated for 2017-18 under Project Sea 4000 Phase 6, and this work is likely to be undertaken during Hobart’s first scheduled docking period in early 2019.

At present it is understood the docking will include some relatively minor software enhancements to Aegis, improving the protective armour on the magazine storing Hellfire air-to-surface missiles for the ship’s embarked MH-60R combat helicopter, and installing equipment to allow the ship to make use of the Hawklink high-speed digital data link already fitted on the MH-60R.

Barring the emergence in the meantime of a credible solution to the threats emanating from Pyongyang, that maintenance period could also provide the opportunity to initiate the BMD upgrade.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/defence/fin...




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[*] posted on 29-10-2017 at 06:00 PM


Future Frigate decision’s focus on combat system will leverage Aegis

KYM BERGMANNThe Australian12:00AM October 28, 2017

With evaluation of the three contending Future Frigate designs well under way, a critical decision regarding the combat system for them was announced by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on October 3.

In essence, this will be a combination of advanced Australian CEAFAR radars, a combat management system with a US Navy pedigree — Lockheed Martin’s Aegis — and vital software interfaces from Saab Systems called 9LV.

This latter system will then become common across the Royal Australian Navy’s entire surface fleet and has been mandated for the offshore patrol vessels as well as the Sea 5000 frigates. These measures define the way forward for naval combat systems and local industry for decades to come.

One way of looking at the nine ships being selected under the Sea 5000 program is that the ships are merely the floating vehicles for the advanced weapons and electronics they carry in order to fight and survive in a high-intensity conflict.

Reality is more complicated than that because the frigates themselves also need to be at the leading edge of naval technology, which is why the shortlist is the British Type 26 global combat ship from BAE Systems; the Italian anti-submarine warfare Fremm from Fincantieri; and a modified version of the three Hobart-class air warfare destroyers (AWDs) built and being built in Adelaide to a design from Spain’s Navantia.

When the Future Frigate project was conceived, it was with an emphasis on anti-submarine warfare, which has not diminished.

It was assumed the AWDs would provide long-range air cover for ships and task groups, leaving the frigates to concentrate on the vital job of detecting and hunting underwater threats that are rapidly increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. However, as events such as the rapid development of North Korea’s ballistic missile capability has necessitated, the future frigates will now also need to have anti-air warfare systems at least as good as the AWDs. Because of the need for this capability increase all three designs are about 7000 tonnes — almost indistinguishable in size from the Hobart-class destroyers.

The navy will achieve this ambitious goal by taking the heart of the AWD anti-air warfare solution — the Lockheed Martin Aegis firing-control system in widespread USN use since the 1980s — and marry it to the ultra-modern active digital phased-array radars developed by Canberra-based CEA Technologies. Because the combat system for the Hobart class was ordered in 2005, it is based on an earlier generation of passive phased-array radars that, while still formidable, are no longer state of the art.

But the Aegis anti-air software for the ships has been constantly updated. This is where another local player, Adelaide-based Saab Systems, comes into the picture.

Saab produces the 9LV combat management system that — along with the CEA radars — is responsible for the stunning success of the Anzac frigate anti-ship missile defence (ASMD) upgrade, which is able to defeat multiple simultaneous incoming supersonic targets.

A limitation of the Anzacs is that the ASMD solution is relatively short-range and insufficient for the future frigates, which will need to control SM-2 missiles to a distance of 200 kilometres and an altitude of 24,000 metres, which is more than twice the height of a cruising A380.

Indeed, it is highly likely that Australia will seek to acquire in the future a naval ballistic missile defence (BMD) capability using SM-3 missiles, which are designed to intercept targets well outside the Earth’s atmosphere and with ranges in excess of 2000km.

These could equip either the AWDs or future frigates — or both. Aegis is the backbone of the USN’s anti-air and BMD capabilities and so, by combining it with CEAFAR and 9LV, the RAN will receive an exceptionally modern system that is arguably the best in the world.

Aegis also comes with co-operative engagement capability, meaning that any ship equipped with it can be fully networked, giving the RAN, USN and potential coalition partners such as Japan and South Korea the ability to seamlessly exchange targeting data.

The practical consequence is that a threat detected by one ship could be automatically engaged and destroyed by a missile fired from another ship in the network many hundreds of kilometres away. The ability to do this and also network with coalition air assets such as F-35s is regarded as the future of naval warfare — especially for high-end conflicts.

The industrial picture for Sea 5000 is not necessarily finalised, with the October 3 announcement still leaving the door open for a possible overall combat system integrator. In the case of the AWDs, this is Raytheon Australia, so if the Future Frigate design is a modified Hobart, then the company might well replicate the success of that program. If either the BAE Systems or Fincantieri ships are selected, there are other possibilities with Lockheed Martin high on the list.

Another notable feature of the government’s overall approach to Sea 5000 is that it will be a major boost to sovereign capability. The most obvious manifestation is the decision to build all nine ships in Adelaide, which Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne believes will guarantee Australian content in excess of 60 per cent — and for a $35 billion program that is a lot of money going into the local economy.

But the big benefit for Defence is more likely from the combat-system decision, because it involves electronics, software and systems integration skills at the very top of the technology spectrum. If the Sea 5000 solution comes together as expected, that will have considerable export potential — and may even be retrofitted to the AWDs.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/defence/fut...




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[*] posted on 4-11-2017 at 12:55 PM


Australia to upgrade Nulka missile decoy system used by RAN

Gabriel Dominguez - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

03 November 2017

The Australian government announced on 3 November that it will invest AUD207 million (USD 159 million) into upgrading the Nulka missile decoy system used by Royal Australian Navy (RAN) vessels.

In a joint statement Minister for Defence Marise Payne and Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne said the upgrade will take place during the next 20 years and ensure that the system “remains at the cutting edge into the future”.

The upgraded system will be installed in all RAN frigates and Hobart-class air warfare destroyers and introduced for the first time on the Canberra-class landing helicopter docks.

The ministers pointed out that the Nulka system will continue to be upgraded in the coming decades “to keep pace with anti-ship missile technologies and ensure our sailors have the best available protection at sea”.

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[*] posted on 9-11-2017 at 07:03 PM


Germans bullish on patrol vessel bid

The Australian12:00AM November 8, 2017
PRIMROSE RIORDAN
Political reporterCanberra
@primroseriordan

German boatbuilder Fassmer, bidding for Australia’s new $3 billion offshore patrol vessels contract, believes it is in a “good position” to win the lucrative deal because of its ability to deliver helicopter hangars on the ships.

A decision to award the contract for 12 boats could be made this month, with Fassmer promoting its recent success against the same two bidders, Damen and Lurssen, to build ships for the German coast guard.

A recent Australian Strategic Policy Institute report has argued Defence’s proposed requirements for the vessels should have included capacity for a helicopter. The report, by former Defence Department analyst Ben Coleman, said the boats would be used to fight armed coastguard vessels, state-sponsored harassment by fishing vessels, pirates and armed terrorist groups. A lack of heli­copter facilities would restrict the navy’s ability to use the boats to fight future threats such as piracy, maritime terrorism and weapons proliferation, he said.

Fassmer managing director Harald Fassmer travelled to Canberra this week on a last-ditch charm offensive. “We believe we are in a good position, otherwise we wouldn’t be here,” he told The Australian.

Mr Fassmer said the ships’ helicopter capabilities set their design apart. “We have a helicopter hangar, which is different,” he said. “You cannot have it outside without being protected from the harsh environmental conditions — with the salty seawater you need to have a helicopter hangar. I think that gives it great advantage.”




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[*] posted on 9-11-2017 at 08:37 PM


I personally have the Germans ahead on this one. Tis a pretty boat indeed!



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[*] posted on 10-11-2017 at 01:43 AM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
I personally have the Germans ahead on this one. Tis a pretty boat indeed!


Maybe, but no-one outside Defence and Damen really know what Damen bid, so I guess time will tell.




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[*] posted on 10-11-2017 at 09:11 PM


You would think the inclusion of a hangar on a ship of that size would be an essential capability, not a nice to have.

Sometimes ADF procurement leaves me shaking my head. Well most of the time actually.




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[*] posted on 10-11-2017 at 11:45 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
You would think the inclusion of a hangar on a ship of that size would be an essential capability, not a nice to have.

Sometimes ADF procurement leaves me shaking my head. Well most of the time actually.


Is there any chance that RAN would be considering using a semi / rigid fabric hangar such as that used on HMAS Choules and that is why they are not especially fussed about a permanent hangar? Particularly as these ships won’t have a permanent helo or UAV attached anyway?






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[*] posted on 11-11-2017 at 07:21 AM


My understanding is that you cannnot properly maintain a helo in that type of hangar, it's protection from the worst of the elements only.



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[*] posted on 11-11-2017 at 11:05 AM


Some maintenance can be done, but nothing that requires any lifting above manpower levels. There are, possibly, sufficient Stores space for anything needed...............possibly?
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[*] posted on 11-11-2017 at 02:11 PM


I can't help but think that the tight confines of the Cairns naval base are making us do something that is 6-10 m less than optimal. Even 6 m would have made a world of difference.
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