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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 01:22 AM


There were multiple Parliamentary inquiries into Australia's air power needs and budgets, plus open public formal examination of critical claims since about 2006. RAAF, public officials, Lockmart bosses, USAF Generals all fronted-up and told the public inquiry how it really was, and why the RAAF air-power plans were consistent with being good plans. That process left no stones un-turned. So when is there going to be a similar rational fact-based formal National inquiry and review into what RAN proposes to do with a new sub procurement, and what they can really deliver in reality for Australia in peace or war?

Does the current $50 billion sub plan meet the actual needs now, and soon? Can it be proven on logical merit that the plan is actually the best and most suitable plan in the near and medium term to meet the threat level and military effects and objectives? Can we have information to challenge various media or political claims, decisions and policies, so these things are grounded in the rational domain?

And can the legacy interim sub force plan really bridge any gap during both peace or high-end warfare, to allow the growth of a better capability to come? If it can't realistically do what we need to get there, can we supplement it with interim capabilities we need that reasonably can get us there intact?

- What exactly do we want the capability to do? Define in detail.

- Identify all other known and novel mixes of technology, hardware and operating concepts that could achieve all of the same capability and military objectives and challenges in different ways, then evaluate these in comparison to existing methods on merit.

- Define the proposed alternatives in detail and their respective operating needs, their realistic timetable for delivery and basic operating life-cost estimate.


Let anyone make a case for the present plan, or any derivative of it. Let all make clear logically-consistent arguments for any alternative paths. Get to the heart of what we really need and don't, and what path we logically need to take to get that capability sooner, and cheaper, and on what scale. Then update the National capability planning to achieve those defined capability objectives in the shortest time, and at affordable cost. Generate that updated capability growth plan minus all sacred-cows including existing plans.

Then at least a debate will have been had, and is on record, to bring rational understanding and confidence to what we're doing, and why this is the right rational plan and timetable to be on. Why isn't this really occurring when $50 billion and an effective Australian national defence is on the line? Where's the fearless and frank advice, pro or con? Such a process is likely to end up costing us much less investment, and we get a more capable and credible navy* sooner with actual current domestic 'sovereign' capabilities we can develop from there, with a transparent and agreed plan and purpose.

* If we do actually follow through with executing the logical conclusions and recommendations of such a process.

--

I suspect we can do considerably better than the present plan. The anticipated procurement time-schedule appears in the face of the need and threat to be inappropriate, irresponsible and problematic, to say the least. If classified stealth fighters can be examined logically, and publicly, in detail, I see no reasons why we can't do the same with the details and capability requirements of RAN submarines (including the existing subs) within open formal public inquiries, to establish the validity of existing and evolving plans, and their time-schedule and a clear cost-benefit argument, plus analysis of relative tactical and strategic effects of different approaches to the specific defined military aims of such a force.


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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 09:32 AM


Australia’s navy is undergunned for denying long-range attackers
11 Oct 2019|Malcolm Davis

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/australias-navy-is-undergu...

Perhaps a timely read. Bleeding obvious comes to mind. :)
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 10:38 AM


Quote:
Looking further out on the horizon, there are other possible alternatives. Greater dependence on long-range unmanned combat air vehicles could open up options for either land-based or sea-based naval air strike for the RAN. The US development of the Northrop Grumman B-21 Raider bomber could see complementary long-range strike escort platforms that would support the B-21, which could include allied participation in the program.

Or Australia could look at the possibility of small surface combatants that can mount long-range strike weapons.

These would be corvette-sized, offer an interim level platform between the Arafura-class offshore patrol vessels and the Hobart-class and Hunter-class vessels, and would imply an expansion of the fleet beyond that planned for in the 2016 defence white paper. Such a move would contribute towards distributed architecture across more ships, rather than having all our eggs in a very few, very boutique platforms.


These are the interesting points.

What I'd like to see is more emphasis placed on broad area maritime surveillance, cued in part by JORN, using more low observable platforms that aren't as susceptible to being detected and potentially shot down as what Triton will be. This will be combined with a long range / persistance UUV that can monitor choke points and ports.

P8, F35, F18 equipped with LRASM / NSM can then be used for long range strike.

This will be combined with the previously mentioned corvette based platform. Given the growth in technology over the better part of two decades, this capability can be met by revisiting the shitcanned 'streetfighter' concept that led to the LCS, which in itself is the poor execution of a better idea.

This would be fitted with long range surface strike missiles, point defence air defence missiles capable of countering a saturation attack, ASW self defence capabilities, and its own UAV's for surveillance. I'm still not on board with these types of platforms being unmanned at this point, as this will depend on either autonomous targeting decisions being made by a ship based AI, or having the ship networked to a land based control center, where the network itself can be targeted. On these grounds, a minimally manned ship would be more practical and manageable given RAN manning limitations.

At this point, the technological limitations that limited the practicality of the 'streetfighter' concept in the very learly 2000's are no longer the issue they previously were.

The destroyer / frigate fleet can then be used for defending major platforms such as the amphibs, while offensive operations are undertaken using air power and a more distributed, smaller sized fleet of corvettes equipped with long range missiles and point defence systems.




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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 11:40 AM


Pacific 2019: Austal introduces line of autonomous ships to Asia-Pacific

Ridzwan Rahmat, Sydney - Jane's Navy International

10 October 2019


A scale model of Austal USA's autonomous ship on display at Pacific 2019. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Austal is making an inaugural showcase of its autonomous ships in the Asia-Pacific region at the Pacific 2019 international maritime exposition in Sydney.

Speaking to Jane's at the exposition, Paul Sparke, Austal's marketing manager, described the line as concepts that have been conceived by its subsidiary in the United States, Austal USA, in anticipation of future requirements from the US Navy (USN).

The concepts are based on the catamaran, trimaran, and single-hulled form factors, and range in overall length between 40 m and 110 m. These include smaller patrol craft that can be deployed for constabulary duties, high-speed troop transports, and replenishment-at-sea vessels.

The concepts range in tonnage from 260 to 2,500 tonnes and can operate autonomously for up to 90 days, with a range in excess of 10,000 n miles at 16 kt.

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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 11:47 AM


More models...….Trimaran...…….and Catamaran rear view





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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 01:58 PM


Signature of MoU between Naval Group Pacific and MacTaggart Scott

(Source: Naval Group; issued Oct. 10, 2019)


Naval Group Pacific is offering to fit its CANTO anti-torpedo countermeasures for Australian submarines and surface ships, and has teamed with local company MTSA to support its marketing efforts. (NG image)

Naval Group and MacTaggart Scott Australia (MTSA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding during PACIFIC 2019 in the frame of Naval Group Pacific countermeasures projects in Australia.

Naval Group and MacTaggart Scott Australia are proud to have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) during the Pacific Maritime Exposition 2019.

MacTaggart Scott, a first-class industry player in Australia, has been pre-selected by Naval Group Pacific to maximise Australian Industry Capability and to enlarge the Naval Group’s Defence Technological and Industrial Base (DTIB) in the country.

The cooperation between Naval Group Pacific and MacTaggart Scott is aimed at entrusting MTSA with the fabrication of equipment composing countermeasures and/or its associated launching system. It is one of nine MoU related to countermeasures signed by Naval Group Pacific in Australia.

Naval Group Pacific is proposing a breakthrough in anti-torpedo countermeasures for Australian submarines and surface ships programs (SEA 1000 Australian Future Submarine, SEA 5000 Hunter-Class Frigates and SEA 4000, upgrade of Hobart-class Air Warfare Destroyer) with CANTO, the latest countermeasure generation based on Dilution/Confusion multi-effects.

This anti-torpedo system, fitted with its associated reaction module, CONTRALTO is already in service in the French Navy and in several blue-water navies.

Naval Group is a European leader in naval defence. The group designs, builds and supports submarines and surface ships. It also supplies services to shipyards and naval bases. The group reports revenues of €3.6 billion and has a workforce of 14,860 (data for 2018).

-ends-
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 02:00 PM


Naval Group and ASC Partner to Train Next Generation of Submarine Builders

(Source: ASC; issued Oct 10, 2019)

The next generation of Australia’s submarine builders are slated to join the most skilled welders in the country, with Naval Group to select its first three apprentices to be trained by ASC Pty Ltd from January next year.

Naval Group, the designer-builder of the Attack Class future submarines and ASC, Australia’s dedicated submarine sustainer, today signed their first training initiative, under the Framework Agreement signed earlier this year.

Naval Group is currently designing the Attack Class and preparing to ramp-up its production workforce to commence construction in Adelaide from 2024.

In the first placement of its kind, ASC will integrate the Naval Group Australia apprentices into its existing, highly competitive four-year fabrication apprenticeship program working on the Collins Class submarine program.

The ASC welding school has for three decades trained its welders to the highest standards in the country, fit for the demanding work of welding submarine hull steel.

Naval Group Australia Chief Executive Officer John Davis said the training agreement was a sign of the strong relationship between NGA and ASC.

“The Framework Agreement is a unique and collaborative approach that bridges the Collins Class Sustainment and Future Submarine program to provide a stronger and more effective sovereign submarine enterprise to design, build and sustain submarines in Australia,” said Mr Davis.

“This initiative will provide apprentices with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from the best Australian and French minds in submarine design, build and sustainment.”

ASC Chief Executive Stuart Whiley welcomed the training program as the first under the Framework Agreement.

“During their time at ASC, apprentices will be exposed to over 30 years of experience, lessons learnt and a safety culture developed through the construction and sustainment of the Collins Class,” said Mr Whiley.

“The apprentices will join a high-performance submarine production environment in ASC which is delivering submarine availability to the Royal Australian Navy at beyond international benchmarks,” said Mr Davis

Naval Group Australia will lead the recruitment of the apprentices and will collaborate with ASC during the interview process to ensure those hired have the appropriate skills and values demanded of submarine fabrication.

The first intake of three apprentices will commence training with ASC in January 2020 for the four-year program.

ASC is currently training 53 apprentices across its South Australian and Western Australian operations, in fabrication, electrical and mechanical trades, as part of its 1300-strong dedicated submarine sustainment workforce.

(ends)

Joint Lab to Underpin Shipbuilding Jobs of Tomorrow

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Oct 10, 2019)

A transformative new collaboration between Flinders University and ASC Shipbuilding will bring Industry 4.0 and advanced manufacturing to the Hunter class frigates in South Australia’s new digital shipyard.

ASC Shipbuilding, BAE Systems Australia’s shipbuilding business, will deliver nine Hunter class frigates to the Royal Australian Navy over the next three decades.

The new partnership will set up a digital test and trial laboratory as part of Flinders University’s advanced manufacturing research facilities based at the Tonsley Innovation District in South Australia.

In the laboratory, researchers, ASC Shipbuilding and suppliers will be developing and testing the technologies that future shipyard workers will use at the new digital shipyard, currently under construction within the Osborne Naval Shipyard precinct.

The partnership will bring together the latest technologies from industries such as mining, automotive and construction and they will be adapted, trialled and tested to suit the Hunter class frigate’s design – specifically for prototyping, which commences in December 2020.

Managing Director, ASC Shipbuilding, Craig Lockhart said that applying digital technology in a ship building facility will require a fundamental shift in how the industry has traditionally operated.

“We are establishing a world-leading shipyard right here in Australia – it will mean autonomous ground delivery vehicles, paperless work orders, cobots, laser scanning and projection, virtual reality and, part and tool tracking, just to name a few technologies,” Mr Lockhart said.

“We are so pleased to partner with some of Australia’s leading researchers at Flinders University to help us create an efficient, safe and productive shipyard which provides long term careers for future workers that are exciting, challenging and rewarding.”

Flinders University Vice-Chancellor Professor Colin Stirling said Flinders is applying its research leadership in Industry 4.0 to contribute to faster, safer production and enhanced economic growth.

“Our expertise in industrial transformation will bring tangible benefits to the frigate project, one of the biggest defence investments in the nation’s history. Industry 4.0 is vital part of the digital transformation underway in manufacturing and this new research partnership with ASC Shipbuilding will help to solve the real world challenges faced in a modern shipyard.

“Flinders is delighted to be ASC Shipbuilding’s partner of choice in this important defence research initiative that will be pivotal to economic growth and workforce development in South Australia” Professor Stirling said.

ASC Shipbuilding will be part of the ongoing development at the Tonsley Innovation District as the centre of advanced manufacturing research in South Australia and home to Flinders University’s Australian Industrial Transformation Institute.

Supporting this initiative builds on the advanced technology BAE Systems already uses on our Global Combat Ship program, including the cutting-edge visualisation suite.

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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 02:02 PM


ASC and Jeumont Electric of France Confirm Plans for Future

(Source: ASC; issued Oct 09, 2019)

Australia’s high-performing submarine sustainer, ASC, and France’s leading maker of submarine propulsion and power generation systems, Jeumont Electric, have confirmed plans to establish a joint Australian presence to pursue future business, as Australia’s submarine sector undergoes an historic expansion.

Signed today at the Pacific 2019 Naval Exhibition in Sydney, the Heads of Agreement establishes a steering committee to identify joint business opportunities across Australia’s Collins Class and Attack Class submarine programs, as well as Australia’s marine generator and rotating electrical machinery market.

Under the HoA, ASC and Jeumont Electric will explore a range of commercial arrangements for future work, including formal joint ventures, teaming and other contractual arrangements. The HoA confirms earlier collaboration between the two companies, agreed at the 2018 Submarine Institute of Australia annual conference.

ASC Chief Executive Officer Stuart Whiley said the strengthening relationship with Jeumont Electric created natural synergies for the two leading organisations.

“ASC is the home of Australia’s high performing submarine sustainment workforce, employing 1,300 skilled personnel, delivering submarine availability never before seen for the Royal Australian Navy. This Heads of Agreement with Jeumont Electric will help to meet the future demands of both the Collins Class and Attack Class future submarine programs and identify diversification opportunities for both companies,” said Mr Whiley.

“We look forward to jointly working with Jeumont Electric, in Australia and in France, to expand our capabilities and support Australia’s historic submarine industry expansion in coming years.”

The HoA brings together Jeumont Electric and ASC, Australia’s dedicated submarine sustainer which, as part of the Australian Submarine Enterprise, delivers above international benchmark Collins Class submarine availability to the Royal Australian Navy.

Jeumont Electric already supplies the main propulsion and power generation systems to the Collins Class fleet and is seeking to provide its advanced permanent magnet propulsion motors to the Collins Class life-of-type extension program and the Attack Class future submarine program.

Jeumont Electric (JE) CEO Brahim Ammar said he considers Australia’s Collins Class and Attack Class submarine programs as an important opportunity to reinforce the historical relationships between the two partners.

“Working with ASC is a fantastic opportunity to strengthen the presence of JE in the long term in Australia. Beyond the naval business opportunities, this cooperation will enable the two partners to develop various other markets for which Jeumont Electric has solid knowhow and high levels of innovation,’’ said Mr Ammar.

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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 02:03 PM


Adelaide has put forward a plan to re-name itself Little Paris...…...they might as well...………...
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 10:52 PM


Pacific 2019: Leonardo postures AWHero for Australia’s SEA 129 Phase 5

Ridzwan Rahmat, Sydney - Jane's Navy International

11 October 2019


A mock-up of the AWHero on display at Pacific 2019 Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- Leonardo Helicopters is proposing its AWHero rotor-wing UAS for Australia's SEA 129 Phase 5 project
- The system is being touted as the only contender that is backed by a helicopter manufacturer

Leonardo Helicopters is positioning its AWHero rotary-wing unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for the Australian Department of Defence's SEA 129 Phase 5 programme, the company confirmed with Jane's at the Pacific 2019 maritime exposition in Sydney.

The programme seeks to equip the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) future Arafura and Hunter classes of vessels with embarked UAS capabilities.

Leonardo's AWHero has a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 200 kg, including payload and fuel at 85 kg. It has an endurance time of six hours, a service ceiling of 14,000 ft, and a maximum cruise speed of 90 kt.

The vehicle is powered by heavy fuels, including JP-5, JP-8, and Jet A-1, and has a maximum operating radius of up to 50 n miles, with options to upgrade it to 100 n miles when auxiliary fuel tanks are carried. The system features automatic deck landing and take-off capabilities.

The AWHero has two modular payload bays. Its nose bay can be incorporated with electro-optic/infrared (EO/IR) turrets of up to 10 inches in diameter, or EO/IR turrets of up to 8 inches in diameter with radar.

Meanwhile, its underbelly and side bays payload space can be mounted with heavier equipment including the Visual Detection and Ranging (ViDAR) sensor payload from Sentient Vision Systems.

"The main differentiator between the AWHero and other competitors vying for the same programme is that ours is the only one that is backed by a helicopter manufacturer instead of a UAV [unmanned aerial vehicle] manufacturer," said Michael Lenton, executive chairman of Leonardo Australia, in an interview with Jane's at Pacific 2019.

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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 11:31 PM


Sypaq contracted to develop small UAS for Australian Navy

Posted On Thursday, 10 October 2019 14:43

The Australian defence ministry has awarded Melbourne-based Sypaq an A$3.5 million contract to develop an unmanned aerial system with potential future applications for the Royal Australian Navy.


JUMP 20 could be a potential base for the RAN UAS (Picture source: Sypaq)

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Melissa Price MP, announced the Defence Innovation Hub contract with Sypaq Systems at PACIFIC 2019 in Sydney.

Sypaq will develop a small Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) with a hybrid power delivery system and the capacity to operate effectively in harsh environmental conditions, such as those that can be experienced at sea.

Minister Price congratulated Sypaq on their innovative solution and said the technology would enhance situational awareness for maritime operations. “If successful, this UAS would be capable of operating from ships at sea and performing a range of surveillance and reconnaissance operations,” she said. “Sypaq Systems, an engineering and systems integration company, is an example of an Australian business that is exploring leading technology to help the Australian Defence Force meet its current and future challenges. “Through the Defence Innovation Hub, we are investing approximately $640 million in Australian industry to develop innovative technology with a Defence application".

A JUMP 20 VTOL UAS deployed with the Mexican Navy in 2016. Back then, the company said it proposed a heavy fuel version of the T-20 JUMP for the Royal Australian Navy’s tactical unmanned aircraft program.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2019 at 11:50 AM


The warship is dead
By Ewen Levick | Sydney | 8 October 2019

The warship is dead and hypersonic missiles are overrated.

http://www.australiandefence.com.au/news/the-warship-is-dead...

Worth a read I think, if you haven't already been there. Not simply what the title would suggest. Lengthy, so I have just linked to it.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2019 at 05:38 PM


Quote: Originally posted by DEW  
The warship is dead
By Ewen Levick | Sydney | 8 October 2019

The warship is dead and hypersonic missiles are overrated.

http://www.australiandefence.com.au/news/the-warship-is-dead...


Linear thinking and unwarranted conclusions. For some reason Journo/analysts (who should know better) seem to presume, against all logic, observations and known physics, that the extreme drag acting on a spent hypersonic glider won't be acting like a viscous fluid on its skin (like flying through molasses). Fluid drag effect rises non-linearly as speed rises. It's why a Category 3 is so much less damaging than a Category 5 cyclone with only 100 km difference in speed between them.

If the atmosphere were constant density the deceleration rate of a Mach 9 weapon from max speed would be exponential, and ablate away the weapon skin like a meteorite does. It would slow to a more prosaic missile speed long before it got down to sea level. But air density isn't constant. As the target is approached in terminal phase the glider must and will slow down dramatically and convert speed into dazzling incandescence, dropping down to a more manageable speed, quickly.

The only thing stopping it slowing quickly is that a glider comes in at a shallow angle to both delay detection some, and to preserve its speed and altitude for as long as possible, before a final terminal plunge at a higher angle. It flies a longer distance for a comparatively longer time, emitting brightly in IR, as speed is turned into heat, even at very high altitude, and heating is turned into long-range detectability via staring satellite sensors or a wide-field DAS IRST on an F-35.

Those long-range passive wide-field IRST sensors have been on high-end ships for a long time. If I remember correctly long range Vampire-NG was acquired for ANZAC Class frigates in 2003.

The higher and the further out you try to counter the glider with a missile the harder it will be to hit, but at some point it must lose altitude and speed enough to nose-over and dive on a target at a non-gliding angle. And its target will become almost immediately evident. The track will become predictable as a shrinking cone of possible engagement area, and this cone will quickly shrink as it gets closer, and the most probable military target will be determined fast and easily by a learning-system. Confidence will rise fast that it has worked out the actual target from the track.

It has been slowing as it glided in but even with a shallow glide angle it will be detected for hundreds if not thousands of kilometers away by wide-field staring sensors, as they're particularly good at spotting small hot bright transients at over 1,000 km range.

Which frankly is significantly more and better early warning than just 20 km warning on a Mach 2.6 sea-skimmer that Vampire-NG might detect at sea level. So how is the speed such a game-changing advantage? Such gliders are likely to be radar-bright at that speed as well, from as much as 500 km out, so a multispectral target-quality track will exist, and very early.

Putin claimed Avangard reached Mach 9 during testing. At that speed a glider tracked from 500 km out still takes 2 minutes and 43 seconds to reach its target, but it will take even longer because it slows dramatically as it approaches to terminal range. You have over 3 minutes of warning time before the hyped-weapon arrives at a target.

But for a Mach 2.6 sea-skimmer doing a little over 1/4th of that speed, the warning time from 20 km range of detection is just 41 seconds. A fast sea skimmer is still more of a problem, and a very slow LRASM is probably lights-out every time.

So the balance is entirely around the other way actually, the B1-B with LRASM would eat the PLAN fleet alive! While the bulk of the USN fleet can remain outside of effective PLA targeting range, of the PLAN and PLAAF, as those are taken apart by the combination of SLOW VLO weapons, and overpowering EW.

And when the glider gets down to 10,000 ft will it even be exceeding Mach 3.0 any more? I remain unconvinced that its terminal phase homing will be much faster than this. The initial dive will be terrifyingly fast but seen coming from a long way out for ~3 mins. Plenty of time to prepare, orient, gain SA and deploy effective countermeasures against radar and IR terminal sensors, plus take early fly-out long shots against it before it gets within 10,000 ft slant distance.

In a head to head almost zero crossing speed engagement with a rapidly decelerating Mach 3 to 4 maneuvering glider and several rising Mach 3 to 4 ESSM-BkII, I'd bet on ESSM to nail it.

If China stops trying to build a bigger capital ship naval force than the US I'd maybe take their hyper-weapons more seriously. Apparently the PLAN don't know "the warship is dead".

And does anyone have a hypersonic strike weapon that's powered all the way to weapon impact? No, so the whole mach 8 or 10 meme is Hyper-Spam™.

And that's without pointing out that Russia said it is using off-board targeting for its naval hypersonic glide weapon and a high-power datalink to burn through plasma interference surrounding the glider. Which is basically an admission of integrated terminal tracking and sensor failures at hype-speeds.


Quote:

Russian surface warships to guide coastal missiles

News Navy Naval Maritime Defense Industry

Posted On Monday, 27 May 2019 14:25


" ... The new technique confirmed the high capabilities of the warships and was recognized as successful. It will be introduced in all fleets. In future, small missile ships will guide Tsirkon hypersonic missiles which are to be supplied to the coastal forces, Defense Ministry sources said. Guiding by small missile boats will increase combat capabilities of the missiles, former Navy Chief-of-Staff Admiral Valentin Selivanov believes. "Small missile ships will approach the adversary to the maximum and will uninterruptedly report target coordinates to the command post in real time. Such a warship can track targets for two days. The command post will decide which weapons to engage. For example, coastal complexes are considered the most dangerous weapons as they hit a warship hundred percent," he said. Upgraded Ovod-class warships of project 1234 also received a possibility to provide guidance to coastal missiles." ..."

https://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/defence-news/...



Which means such missiles are dependent on a LOS datalink to guide, same as for a 60 year old SA-2. If the Russians could make a terminal sensor work at hype-speeds, they wouldn't be doing any of that stuff.

But the article's conclusion is also linear in that it doesn't allow for the fact that this is a two-way street.

Quote:

" ... Let’s sum up. Australia’s new fleet of warships will provide theatre air defence, modern anti-submarine warfare capabilities and a suite of amphibious options. Hypersonic weapons will threaten those warships with an unprecedented combination of speed and manoeuvrability. Newer technologies may mitigate the hypersonic threat. But what can any of these do against the left of boom friction happening while you read this article? So is the hypersonic threat to warships really the problem? Or do we need to start asking different questions? ... "


Take down their economy, finances, budgets and internal stability, and their fleet build-up will stop, and what they have will rust quietly at the pier side for two decades. The failure in the South China Sea (SCS) is primarily due to atrocious political and diplomatic leadership, that created opportunity that was not countered. It was not due to the death of warships. Indeed warships and NAVAIR could change that situation in the SCS overnight.

They wouldn't even be doing any of that stuff if they didn't already have a strong fleet of warships.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2019 at 06:54 PM


The other thing to consider re. hypersonic missiles is the effect directed energy weapons will play in the defensive picutre. By the time technology has advanced where hypersonic missiles are able to enter into mass production, they may already be obsolete, with stealth once again being the deciding factor for getting a missile past defensive systems.



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[*] posted on 13-10-2019 at 12:08 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
The other thing to consider re. hypersonic missiles is the effect directed energy weapons will play in the defensive picutre. By the time technology has advanced where hypersonic missiles are able to enter into mass production, they may already be obsolete, with stealth once again being the deciding factor for getting a missile past defensive systems.


And the biggest advantage of stealth isn't not being seen much in multiple wavelengths, it's when detected that's generally not enough to get a solid track or lock to guide a weapon. Which serves to make EA, ECM and countermeasures much more effective against weapons. No one's going to have trouble detecting, tracking and maintaining lock or having situational awareness on all hypersonic weapons, from a long way out and for a long time. Their speed is more disadvantage than advantage. Things seen get shot. Imagine a high-value target protected by 4 x >250 kilowatt solid-state lasers, operating as one, converging power on a single target, i.e. 4 Arleigh Burkes protecting a carrier with laser and missile, carrier itself with two 500 kilowatt lasers, etc.

The side that loses its targeting data inputs will lose the fight as well - killing warships is not the winning move.
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[*] posted on 15-10-2019 at 07:38 PM


Australia awards interdiction boats contract for Arafura-class OPVs

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

14 October 2019

The Australian government has signed a contract for interdiction rigid-hull inflatable boats (RHIBs) that will be operated from the Royal Australian Navy's (RAN's) future Arafura-class offshore patrol vessels (OPVs).

A contract for vessels, which has been awarded to Finland-based Boomeranger Boats, will see the delivery of two davit-launched 8.5 m RHIBs and one 10.5 m ramp-launched RHIB for each of the 12 OPVs. Each of these RHIBs will be equipped with inboard engines.

Five more boats will also be supplied in the contract on top of these 36 RHIBs but Boomeranger Boats has not given details on the lengths of the additional vessels.

(127 of 178 words)
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[*] posted on 17-10-2019 at 09:16 AM



Image via BMT.

BMT to offer the Caimen 90 for Australian Land 8710 project

By Tom Dunlop - October 16, 20198

The Caimen 90 is being offered to Australia by BMT.

The firm say that the craft is able to operate at high speeds with heavy payloads, allowing faster amphibious offload from host ship compared with slower, more conventional landing craft.

“BMT is offered world leading capability in landing craft vessels to the Australian Army with the Caimen 90,” BMT Defence and Security Managing Director, Peter Behrendt said.



“A variant of this vessel is already being built internationally, which shows it is a proven hull form and design. The Caimen 90 represents a significant improvement on speed performance from previous landing craft vessels and is capable of traveling at up to 30 knots,” he said in a release.

“Additionally, features such as a tri-bow aluminum monohull and a bow and stern ramp, will allow for roll-on, roll-off capability, a key requirement for a modern landing craft. We are delighted to be able to offer this vessel to Australia” Mr Behrendt said.

Land 8710 Phase One is the programme to replace the Australian Army’s Mark 8 Landing Craft.
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[*] posted on 23-10-2019 at 11:04 AM


I was asked to copy this across.

I understand that Choules provides useful capability, but the RAN would prefer purpose built vessels, rather than a UK RFA capability.

Much like Manoora and Kanimbla gave the RAN the chance to work out what they wanted to do with amphibious capability, and let them stick their toe in the multi-helicopter, well deck, world, leading them to Adelaide and Canberra, the same is true of Choules, it's given them an entree to the capability and helped define the way forward, so now they want more purpose designed capability.

It would also allow Choules to be re-purposed towards the Pacific support ship role that was promised to the South Pacific nations.


PACIFIC 2019: Navantia Australia Unveils Joint Support Ship Design

At PACIFIC 2019, the naval defense exposition held last week in Sydney, Australia, Navantia Australia, the local branch of Spanish shipbuilding group Navantia, unveiled a new Joint Support Ship (JSS) design for both the domestic and export market.
Xavier Vavasseur 13 Oct 2019



The JSS was fully designed in-house by Navantia Australia’s new design center of excellence based in Melbourne. This facility was opened in 2018 with the aim of increasing the sovereign capability of Navantia Australia.

The JSS was designed with an upcoming need of the Royal Australian Navy in mind, that Navantia Australia expects will come out in late 2020. The Australian need is likely to be for 1 or 2 units.




Navantia Australia believes the JSS could answer some needs on the export market as well: For example a shorter version of the ship unveiled at PACIFIC 2019 could answer the Royal Malaysian Navy MRSS (Multi Role Support Ship) requirement.

“That ship is aimed at meeting a new market need, it is a sovereign, Australian, design. It will be fully exportable worldwide from Navantia Australia”

David Sippel, Corporate Director, Navantia Australia

Navantia Australia’s JSS design combines 70% of the load capacity of HMAS Choules LPD and 70% of the fuel capacity of the now decommissioned HMAS Success AOR. The Melbourne-based design team used the Galicia-class LPD as a base and came up with the JSS fulfilling the requirements.

The JSS has a capacity to embark a 300 strong force, up to 500 tons of vehicles, 3600 tons marine diesel capacity, 600 tons of aviation fuel and 400 tons of fresh water. The flight deck and hangar can accommodate 2 NH90 type helicopters. The well deck can launch and recover two LLCs. Navantia Australia is hopeful to keep the crew size below 160 sailors. The JSS comes with full medical facilities (dental, X-ray, operating rooms, critical unit intensive care ward etc…)




The design has a length of 176 meters, a beam of 25 meters. JSS has a maximum speed of 20 knots and a range of 6,000 nautical miles

The CGI unveiled by Navantia Australia at PACIFIC 2019 featured two PHALANX CIWS, decoy launchers, a multifunction radar and two fueling stations (one port, one starboard side).






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[*] posted on 23-10-2019 at 12:02 PM


Nice looking LPD, but I really don't like having refuelling as part of their capability...……...the Dutch company DAMEN have a modified Enforcer class LPD that does the same...……….Choules is an earlier version of the same class without the refuelling...…..

The main thing that continues to amaze and disturb me, is the fact self-defence capability lacks any form of missile defence, or even medium calibre gun ala 57mm or 76mm. 2 x20mm PHALANX are okay up to a point, but beginning to look inadequate...…….
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[*] posted on 23-10-2019 at 11:35 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Nice looking LPD, but I really don't like having refuelling as part of their capability...……...the Dutch company DAMEN have a modified Enforcer class LPD that does the same...……….Choules is an earlier version of the same class without the refuelling...…..

The main thing that continues to amaze and disturb me, is the fact self-defence capability lacks any form of missile defence, or even medium calibre gun ala 57mm or 76mm. 2 x20mm PHALANX are okay up to a point, but beginning to look inadequate...…….


Just get RAM on it and it should be sweet... :lol:

On a serious note. I suspect NZ would be interested in something like this to replace it’s near useless imitation of an amphibious vessel...




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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 08:37 AM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  


On a serious note. I suspect NZ would be interested in something like this to replace it’s near useless imitation of an amphibious vessel...


Agree, buying as converted ferry, which is more or less what they have, proved to be a very dumb idea!
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 09:19 AM


I was in NZ recently and had occasion to see Canterbury in the metal for the first time. First impression… it's tiny, and seems like a scale model of an MRV/sealift ship. That being said… NZ$130 million is not going to get much. However, with their dispersed areas of operations, if they had 3 of them it might start to make sense.
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 09:40 AM


The intent is to get a new (proper) LPD and then operate Canterbury on Pacific Island "support", whatever that means, same as has been said for Choules IF we go for the new Navantia design?
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 09:42 AM


Submarine Program Hits Six-Month Delay (excerpt)

(Source: Australian Financial Review; published Oct 23, 2019)

By Andrew Tillett

Defence officials revealed the future submarine program has already missed a key milestone by six months but they insist they will meet their commitment for the new boats to enter service by the mid-2030s.

Under questioning from Senator Rex Patrick, officials told Senate estimates on Wednesday that a planned review of its system requirements was meant to begin in March but had yet to get under way.

Defence's acting general manager of submarines Rear-Admiral Greg Sammut said the review would now start later this year.

Rear-Admiral Sammut said the criteria for the review was still being assessed. He said officials decided it would be "prudent" to allow more time to do preliminary work before the review so designing the submarine could be done more expeditiously.

"We have not changed delivery date for the future submarine," he said.

During questioning, Senator Patrick clashed with Defence Minister Linda Reynolds after he quipped "all is well in the Soviet state" in frustration over the answers he was getting from officials.

"This is a project running late minister and if you don't recognise that you shouldn't be in the chair," Senator Patrick said. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the AFR website.

https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/submarine-program-hits-...

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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 01:14 PM


Quote:
...but they insist they will meet their commitment for the new boats to enter service by the mid-2030s.


Jesus, it's not like they don't have 15 years to accomplish this mighty feat!:mad:




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