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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 04:46 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
Jesus, it's not like they don't have 15 years to accomplish this mighty feat!:mad:


We're going to be watching this RAN mess unfold until the day we kick-the-bucket.
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 05:48 PM


To think, I was actually pretty positive about this selection when it was first announced, but the more the timetable of the project development had a chance to sink in...:no:



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[*] posted on 30-10-2019 at 09:39 AM


Australia's Submarines in the National Interest

(Source: Prime Minister of Australia; issued October 26, 2019)

We want Nukes, we want Nukes, WE WANT NUKES! (Submarines of course! :)

Australia’s submarine capability is an essential component of our defence force. As the Indo-Pacific region experiences a new era of strategic competition, our submarine fleet is vital in keeping Australians safe and our sea lanes open.

Today our fleet of six Collins Class submarine incorporates the most advanced technology of any conventional submarines.

Three of the six submarines are consistently available for tasking as it attends to its most solemn duty – the protection of the nation and our people.

This cannot be achieved without the skills, courage and professionalism of our hard-working submariners.

Today we thanked the men and women of the Royal Australian Navy, at HMAS Stirling in Perth.

Being a submariner is no easy job. We ask our people who protect our nation to spend long periods of time away from their families, and they often can’t talk about what they do.

But it is also a highly rewarding career, working around the world on one of our best navy assets with a crew of great mates.

As the Morrison Government delivers our $90 billion Naval Shipbuilding Plan, the largest regeneration of the Navy since the Second World War, we will be building 57 naval vessels in Australia, by Australian workers, with Australian steel.

These vessels will be the backbone of the ADF’s maritime capability and will generate 15,000 new jobs across defence industry, from diesel fitters to electricians and carpenters.

The Navy has been an integral part of the nation it has served with great distinction for over a century.

We are rebuilding our fleet and transforming our navy to ensure a potent capability for whatever challenges this century brings our nation.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 1-11-2019 at 09:53 AM


HMAS Brisbane Commences Combat System Trials in US

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 31, 2019)

In a first for the Royal Australian Navy and the United States Navy, HMAS Brisbane has completed a live missile engagement.

Using remote sensor data from the USS Stockdale and the Cooperative Engagement Capability, the combat system was tested against a range of challenging targets and tactical situations.

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said the trials which were held in the US over the past month, mark a ground-breaking milestone for Australia.

“This missile firing demonstrates the very highest levels of interoperability between our navies,” Minister Reynolds said.

“It reaffirms the game changing technology that the Aegis combat system brings to our Navy and the advanced capability of the Australian-built Hobart Class Destroyers.

“By conducting these trials in the US, our Navy is able to access the world’s best expertise, instrumented ranges and analysis capabilities to provide confidence in how the ship will perform in combat.”

The Hobart class of ships, commissioned by the Liberal National Government in 2007, are among the most potent warships at sea, forming an important part of the defence of our nation.

Cooperative Engagement Capability provides a secure communications capability between Australian and US equipped ships, aircraft or land forces and allows a unit to detect and, if needed, engage a threat identified by another ship or aircraft.

The trials mark the next step in the Hobart Class Destroyer’s introduction into service.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-11-2019 at 02:07 PM


Missile Firing Breaks New Ground

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 04, 2019)

In a first for the Royal Australian Navy and the United States Navy, HMAS Brisbane has completed a live missile engagement.

Using remote sensor data from USS Stockdale and the Cooperative Engagement Capability, the combat system was tested against a range of challenging targets and tactical situations.

The Minister for Defence, Linda Reynolds, said the trials, which were held in the US over the past month, marked a ground-breaking milestone for Australia.

“This missile firing demonstrates the very highest levels of interoperability between our navies,” Senator Reynolds said.

“It reaffirms the game-changing technology that the Aegis Combat System brings to our Navy and the advanced capability of the Australian-built Hobart-class destroyers.

“By conducting these trials in the US, our Navy is able to access the world’s best expertise, instrumented ranges and analysis capabilities to provide confidence in how the ship will perform in combat.”

The Hobart-class of ships is among the most potent warships at sea, forming an important part of Australia's defence.

Cooperative Engagement Capability provides a secure communications capability between Australian and US-equipped ships, aircraft or land forces and allows a unit to detect and, if needed, engage a threat identified by another ship or aircraft.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 06:03 PM


HMA Ships Stuart and Sirius Arrive in Malaysia for Bilateral Exercise

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Nov 06, 2019)

Fresh from a successful welcoming visit to the Philippines for Second World War 75th anniversary commemorations, HMA Ships Stuart and Sirius have sailed on to Malaysia for continued bilateral engagement.

Stuart’s Commanding Officer, Commander Luke Ryan said interacting with the two regional partners was an important part of the ongoing East Asia Deployment, in which 11 ships are participating in multinational exercises and engagement activities across the region.

“We were pleased to join the Philippine Navy to commemorate historic naval battles, and in Malaysia we look forward to Exercise MASTEX 19, in which we will further develop the strong relationship we have with their Navy,” he said.

“The Task Unit’s transit between engagement activities is also valuable, as we use this time at sea to conduct routine training for our ship’s company.”

During the four-day transit from the Philippines to Malaysia, the ships conducted a replenishment at sea, engineering break-down drills and Officer of the Watch manoeuvres. Stuart’s MH-60R helicopter also conducted day and night flying.

Commander Ryan said that during the transit the two ship encountered the high level of maritime traffic that is expected in busy international waters.

“As professional mariners, we travel throughout international waters as we transit between exercises and engagements. Along the way we regularly encounter variety of civilian vessels and other nation’s warships as they passage through international waters.

“Making contact with other vessels is not only a courtesy shared with fellow mariners, but is an important factor in maintaining safety and protecting the environment,” Commander Ryan said.

In Malaysia, Stuart and Sirius will take part in Exercise MASTEX. This activity encompasses seven days of bilateral training exercises with the Royal Malaysian Navy, in harbour and at sea, to enhance mutual cooperation.

For the next two months, 11 ships and more than 1000 Navy personnel across two task groups are visiting regional partners in North and South East Asia for multinational exercises and regional engagement activities.

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[*] posted on 9-11-2019 at 01:29 PM


Royal Australian Navy ranks grow by 1,000 personnel in less than two years

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

08 November 2019

The number of Royal Australian Navy (RAN) personnel has increased by more than 1,000 in less than two years, according to the Department of Defence (DoD) in Canberra.

This represents an 8% increase since January 2018, said Minister for Defence Linda Reynolds in an 8 November statement, pointing out that the rise is related to a series of personnel retention initiatives that include flexible workplace arrangements, financial incentives, and industry placements.

“Navy is currently rolling out 45 retention initiatives, including financial bonuses for key sailor and officer categories, flexible workplace arrangements for uniformed members as well as outplacement programmes to improve professional development for technical sailors,” said Reynolds, pointing out that the initiatives are the result of a RAN-wide consultation programme that resulted in 600 suggestions from members of every rank.

(155 of 289 words)
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[*] posted on 12-11-2019 at 12:30 PM


Australia’s third air warfare destroyer completes sea trials

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

11 November 2019


Australia's third air warfare destroyer, Sydney. Source: Commonwealth of Australia

Key Points

- Australia's third air warfare destroyer has concluded its sea trials
- The vessel will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy in February 2020

The third Hobart-class air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has completed its sea trials, the country's defence minister, Linda Reynolds, announced on 9 November.

The vessel, which will be in service as HMAS Sydney once commissioned, is the final AWD ordered for the RAN. It was laid down in November 2015, and launched at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in Adelaide in May 2018.

The first phase of Sydney's sea trials was announced in September 2019, and the vessel began a more advanced phase of these tests, which validated its combat and communication systems, in the following month.

The first AWD, HMAS Hobart, was commissioned in September 2017, while the second-of-class, HMAS Brisbane , was inducted into service in October 2018.

The AWD derives its design from the Spanish Navy's (Armada Española's) Alvaro de Bazan (F-100)-class frigate. It displaces 6,350 tonnes at full load, and has an overall length of 146.7 m, an overall beam of 18.6 m, and a hull draught of 4.9 m.

The warship is equipped with the Aegis combat system incorporating the AN/SPY 1D(V) phased array radar, and is armed with the 48-cell MK 41 strike-length vertical launch system (VLS) that can launch Standard Missile-2 medium-range Block IIIA (SM-2MR Block IIIA) and SM-2MR Block IIIB long-range surface-to-air missiles, and the medium-range RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missiles (ESSMs) Block I.

The destroyer is also equipped with a 127 mm naval gun in the primary position, the Phalanx Block 1B 20 mm close-in weapon system (CIWS), two Orbital ATK M242 25 mm Bushmaster automatic cannons in Rafael Typhoon stabilised and remotely operated mounts, and launchers for the RGM-84 Harpoon Block II anti-ship/land attack missiles.

(329 of 399 words)
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[*] posted on 13-11-2019 at 01:39 PM


Navy's Largest Warships Achieve New Milestone

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 12,.2019)

The Royal Australian Navy now has one of the most capable and sophisticated amphibious deployment systems in the world, with the Fleet’s Landing Helicopter Docks achieving final operational capability.

At 230-metres long and with a speed of more than 20 knots, the 27,500 tonne ships are home-ported at Garden Island, Sydney.

Each ship has the ability to support six helicopters, and four small landing craft which areable to carry Army’s M1A1 main battle tank.

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said HMA Ships Adelaide and Canberra are ready to be deployed on amphibious operations such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and amphibious warfare.

“The Australian Defence Force’s amphibious capability is an integral part of Australia’s strategic posture and this milestone is another step in Navy’s roadmap to delivering amphibious excellence,” Minister Reynolds said.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Michael Noonan AO, RAN, said Navy is closer to achieving a resilient, sustained and integrated Navy supported by our workforce, as outlined in the Plan Pelorus strategy for 2022.

“As we transition to a more technologically advanced Navy, our goal is to be capable of conducting sustained combat operations as part of a Joint Force,” Vice Admiral Noonan said.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 19-11-2019 at 07:37 PM


Chilean parliament confirms decision to procure Australian frigates

Jose Higuera, Santiago - Jane's Navy International

18 November 2019

Chile moved closer to procuring two Adelaide-class frigates from Australia with the recent inclusion of crew-training funding for the ships in the Chilean parliament’s budget bill for fiscal year 2020 (FY 2020) and other further official government confirmation that it still intends to buy the ships.

The parliament included USD3.7 million to cover the training of crews and associated services in Australia in its FY 2020 budget for the frigates – former HMAS Newcastle and HMAS Melbourne – which were decommissioned by the Royal Australian Navy in April and October, respectively, this year.

The Chilean government also reported the acquisition to parliament to fulfil requirements under the new law for military hardware buys starting for 2020 procurements.

(141 of 343 words)
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[*] posted on 26-11-2019 at 08:59 AM


Royal Australian Navy trials deployable 3D printer technology

Mathew George, Bangalore - Jane's International Defence Review

25 November 2019

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has announced plans to invest USD1.01 million in a two-year Supersonic 3D deposition printer pilot.

This trial of a deployable 3D printer is expected to streamline maintenance of patrol vessels by significantly increasing parts availability compared with a regular supply chain, Melissa Price, minister for Defence Industry, said in a statement. "This … enables metal components to be produced quickly and efficiently, meaning our ships can get back on the water without delay," Price said.

The Supersonic 3D deposition printer was first launched by Darwin-based company SPEE3D in 2017 and was installed at the Charles Darwin University (CDU).

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[*] posted on 26-11-2019 at 11:58 AM


Babcock Sub-contract

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 23, 2019)

I am pleased to announce Naval Group has signed a subcontract with Babcock International Group PLC for the design of the weapon discharge system for the Attack class submarines.

The development of the weapon discharge system is critical to the overall design of the Attack class submarine. Its purpose is to launch the submarine main weapons, including torpedoes and anti-ship missiles.

Babcock is a proven in‑service supporter for systems that have already been installed on the Collins class submarine and Hobart class guided missile destroyers.

The subcontract with Babcock will support the operation and sustainment of the Attack class while maximising the involvement of Australian industry.

The Liberal-National Government’s $50 billion Attack class program will see 12 regionally superior submarines designed and built in Australia, for the Navy.

Our Government is committed to maximising local industry involvement in the Attack class program to ensure Australians get the most out of this important national investment.

Babcock will transfer the necessary Intellectual Property to its Australian subsidiary Babcock Australia to act as the Engineering Design Authority. This includes training, maintenance and managing the supply chain, creating around 170 new jobs for the build and sustainment of this system.

Already, 220 Australian companies have been identified with the potential to become involved in this work following completion of the design phase.

This is the fourth subcontract for major subsystems for the Attack Class Submarine established by Naval Group this year.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 30-11-2019 at 01:58 PM


Australia's New Fleet of Submarines Will Ultimately Cost A$225b Over Their Lifetime (excerpt)

(Source: Australian Associated Press; published Nov 29, 2019)

By Finbar O'Mallon

Australia's new 12-strong submarine fleet will cost taxpayers $225 billion, an estimates committee has been told.

Rear Admiral Greg Sammut said there was an $80 billion build cost, which was originally touted by defence to be $50 billion.

There would also be an $145 billion support and maintenance cost over the lifetime of the attack subs until 2080.

"It is only an estimate of the sustainment of the fleet, we are designing the sub today," Read Admiral Sammut said.

The submarines are being built in a contract with French submarine company Naval Group.

The $80 billion build cost also covered other infrastructure related to the submarines, including upgrades to the wharves where they'd be housed.

Defence heads also said there was a high risk the new submarines would not be ready by the early 2030s. (ends)

Click here for the full story, on the Newcastle Herald website.

https://www.newcastleherald.com.au/story/6517803/new-sub-fle...

-ends-
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[*] posted on 30-11-2019 at 05:50 PM


I had somewhat high hopes for this project when it was announced, but it is clearly a first order clusterfuck.

Quote:
Rear Admiral Greg Sammut said there was an $80 billion build cost, which was originally touted by defence to be $50 billion.


And I remember when the cost was about $30 billion!

At that price, there is literally zero reason or excuse not to buy SSN's directly from the US. They'll end up being about a third cheaper. The money saved would be more than adequate to build the all the necessary nuclear training and support facilities one could ever hope for, and there would still be more than enough money left over to invest in any other industry on earth that would be able to sustain more jobs than what will be produced by putting the money into shipbuilding.

I sincerely hope this is all a part of some elaborate plot where somebody turns around and says, 'but hey, if we switch from conventional power to nuclear, we will be able to get the submarines in service sooner and cheaper'.




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[*] posted on 30-11-2019 at 11:36 PM


Bugger me, these must be the most gold plated subs ever built. At this price, they are about 2 billion above the cost of a Virginia with the VPM module. If they don't match the combat capabilities and range then these are an obscene waste of money. As usual, we are getting screwed over.
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[*] posted on 1-12-2019 at 01:01 PM


……….and Virginia's with the VPM modules is exactly where we should be going, not this pathetic charade we are currently going through, it's a sick joke!
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[*] posted on 4-12-2019 at 02:46 PM


DUGONG Tests Shallow Water Mine Countermeasures

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Dec 03, 2019)

Defence personnel from Australia, United States and New Zealand take part in a live underwater demolition exercise at Bindoon Military Training Area in Western Australia as part of Exercise DUGONG 19.

The Royal Australian Navy’s premier international mine countermeasure exercise recently came to an end at Fleet Base West, Rockingham in Western Australia.

Exercise DUGONG 19, which also featured navies from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand, plays a major role in enhancing interoperability between participating nations in all facets of maritime mine warfare.

The exercise provides a unique opportunity for members of our Navy to work closely with Australia’s international partners to develop skills in areas such as water space management and mine countermeasures.

Commanding Officer of Clearance Diving Team Four, Lieutenant Commander Ryan Post, said Exercise DUGONG 19 was a very successful exercise with all participating nations benefitting greatly from it.

“DUGONG provides very shallow water mine counter measure training, using both autonomous vehicles and clearance divers from participating nations,” he said.

“By bringing in our coalition partners we can work on our integration and improve how we operate together in the area of very shallow water mine countermeasures.”

Royal Canadian Navy Diving Officer Lieutenant Slava Khabiam said participating nations welcomed the chance to exchange various operational techniques with their coalition partners.

“Canada has been participating in DUGONG for the past few years and the exercise is very beneficial for our team as it allows us to develop our ability to integrate into an international environment,” he said.

“This is important because in any mine countermeasure operation we would not be working on our own, but as an international team.

“DUGONG 19 was a great success with plenty of dive time and was very beneficial to all involved,” Lieutenant Khabiam said.

First conducted in 1988, this was the 18th iteration of Exercise DUGONG.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 7-12-2019 at 10:22 PM


BAE Systems Australia

7 hrs ·



Our ASC Shipbuilding team responsible for the technology transfer between the UK and Australia recently hit a major milestone, successfully sharing the first formal 3D model of the #HunterClassFrigate from 🇬🇧 to 🇦🇺.

ASC Shipbuilding will deliver 9 Hunter class frigates – the Australian variant of the Global Combat Ship – to the Royal Australian Navy.

Transfer of the 3D digital model of the anti-submarine warfare frigate represents the first time the business has had a detailed model of the frigate, featuring all of its design changes.

According to Head of Technology Transfer, Dr Alastair Bacon, this is a terrific achievement.

“This is a major milestone in the digital shipyard story for the Hunter Class Frigate Program. In order to build a sovereign and enduring shipbuilding capability in Australia, technology transfer like this is exactly what is required,” Alastair said.
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[*] posted on 8-12-2019 at 09:09 PM


Looks like they've locked it in for only 32 VLS - that's very shortsighted. And again, they keep referring to the Hunter as an ASW frigate.... shortsighted. They need to leverage that big fucking radar on top and Aegis, if not, they are a waste of money.

Also seems as though it will be a single hanger door only, given the design back there - and for a supposed main role that should operate with 2 helos... that's dumb.

I don't mind the overall design of the ship, I think it has a lot of potential... but that potential is only met when it's fit out matches, right now it's far off.

Unless they are starting off light and pushing the heavier fit out to later blocks? They should be designing them with the mindset that China is an enemy and focusing on defensive and offensive capabilities against the 054A and 052D's. They would be no match against a 055.

Another disappointment, like the Attack class. Better than what we have now, but nowhere near what we need.

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[*] posted on 8-12-2019 at 09:37 PM


And at close to $4 billion a pop, they are an absolute bargain too!



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[*] posted on 9-12-2019 at 09:15 AM


A whole bunch of people are acting like buffoons...……..under-equip the Forces with horrendously over-priced equipment that is under-armed.

The RN cost for theirs is approx. GBP1 Billion, so around AUD$1,62 Billion Dollars.
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[*] posted on 9-12-2019 at 03:37 PM


Well at least it will be tens of billions of dollars spent propping a whopping 2000 shipbuilding jobs that nobody actually cares about...



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[*] posted on 11-12-2019 at 12:34 PM


RAN/JMSDF "raft" exercise...…..

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Dec 10, 2019)

In a first for the Royal Australian Navy, HMA Ships Diamantina and Gascoyne completed a complex dual refuel and stores replenishment with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force Japanese Ship (JS) Uraga.

The evolution involved the two Huon class minehunters ‘rafting’ up to the anchored Mine Sweep Tender and taking on a combined 32,000 litres of fuel and three days-worth of food stores each.

Completed during Exercise HYUGA NADA - a mine countermeasures exercise off the coast of Miyazaki, Japan - the raft exercise was the culmination of more than 12 months of planning.

Commander Task Group, Commander Brett Dawe, said it was a very significant achievement in deepening the Royal Australian Navy’s connection with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and for the minehunter capability.

“Operationally this was a momentous achievement for navy to improve our interoperability with JMSDF,” Commander Dawe said.

“This raft exercise was conducted by a relatively small task group and required coordination of people, parts and relationships.

“The performance of all three teams was flawless in ensuring success and safety,” he said.

The refuelling concept was borne during the inaugural Exercise HYUGA NADA, when participating ships Gascoyne and Huon rafted to JS Bungo in 2018. A raft replenishment was then conducted between Diamantina and HMAS Leeuwin earlier this year.

The conditions were challenging for this evolution, due to the different sizes and functionalities of the platforms and the unfavourable swell and weather.

Commanding Officer of Diamantina, Lieutenant Commander Darren McDevitt, said this vital re-supply was important for the deployment and planning occurred with the JMSDF and across engineering, logistics, policy, seamanship and operations disciplines.

“After a significant amount of engagement with our Japanese partners, and many technical drawings later, the re-fuel pumping was understood – and critically – a hose connection was manufactured and approved for use,” Lieutenant Commander McDevitt said.

“The JMSDF do this process regularly, and JS Uraga was well set up with lines and fenders.

“When conducting a Replenishment at Sea in this manner, the ships are only a few metres apart, so there was much friendly banter between the two crews; between old friends, and some new ones.

“The replenishment had a critical function as there were very few opportunities for logistical re-supply in the Exercise area to continue the deployment.”

Commanding Officer of Gascoyne, Lieutenant Commander Sean Aitken, said this milestone was satisfying for Gascoyne, despite the conditions.

“It was pleasing to be able to see the culmination of the planning efforts that has gone into this evolution and even better that Gascoyne was able to finish what they started last year.

“Rafting to a foreign warship while at anchor, in very challenging conditions, and then passing fuel, is not something that MHCs (Mine Hunter Coastals) practice often.

“There are several members of Gascoyne that were onboard last year for the first iteration with JS Bungo, including Gascoyne’s Ship’s Technical Officer, Chief Petty Officer Dave Walker, whose planning and technical expertise was instrumental to the success.

“Being able to successfully complete the rafting and having passed fuel and food (including a vital resupply of Tim Tams and Vegemite which was passed to the embarked Commander Task Group onboard JS Uraga) was one of the highlights of the exercise for the crew,” Lieutenant Commander Aitken said.

-ends-
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