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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 04:46 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
Jesus, it's not like they don't have 15 years to accomplish this mighty feat!:mad:


We're going to be watching this RAN mess unfold until the day we kick-the-bucket.
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[*] posted on 24-10-2019 at 05:48 PM


To think, I was actually pretty positive about this selection when it was first announced, but the more the timetable of the project development had a chance to sink in...:no:



Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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[*] posted on 30-10-2019 at 09:39 AM


Australia's Submarines in the National Interest

(Source: Prime Minister of Australia; issued October 26, 2019)

We want Nukes, we want Nukes, WE WANT NUKES! (Submarines of course! :)

Australia’s submarine capability is an essential component of our defence force. As the Indo-Pacific region experiences a new era of strategic competition, our submarine fleet is vital in keeping Australians safe and our sea lanes open.

Today our fleet of six Collins Class submarine incorporates the most advanced technology of any conventional submarines.

Three of the six submarines are consistently available for tasking as it attends to its most solemn duty – the protection of the nation and our people.

This cannot be achieved without the skills, courage and professionalism of our hard-working submariners.

Today we thanked the men and women of the Royal Australian Navy, at HMAS Stirling in Perth.

Being a submariner is no easy job. We ask our people who protect our nation to spend long periods of time away from their families, and they often can’t talk about what they do.

But it is also a highly rewarding career, working around the world on one of our best navy assets with a crew of great mates.

As the Morrison Government delivers our $90 billion Naval Shipbuilding Plan, the largest regeneration of the Navy since the Second World War, we will be building 57 naval vessels in Australia, by Australian workers, with Australian steel.

These vessels will be the backbone of the ADF’s maritime capability and will generate 15,000 new jobs across defence industry, from diesel fitters to electricians and carpenters.

The Navy has been an integral part of the nation it has served with great distinction for over a century.

We are rebuilding our fleet and transforming our navy to ensure a potent capability for whatever challenges this century brings our nation.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 1-11-2019 at 09:53 AM


HMAS Brisbane Commences Combat System Trials in US

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Oct 31, 2019)

In a first for the Royal Australian Navy and the United States Navy, HMAS Brisbane has completed a live missile engagement.

Using remote sensor data from the USS Stockdale and the Cooperative Engagement Capability, the combat system was tested against a range of challenging targets and tactical situations.

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said the trials which were held in the US over the past month, mark a ground-breaking milestone for Australia.

“This missile firing demonstrates the very highest levels of interoperability between our navies,” Minister Reynolds said.

“It reaffirms the game changing technology that the Aegis combat system brings to our Navy and the advanced capability of the Australian-built Hobart Class Destroyers.

“By conducting these trials in the US, our Navy is able to access the world’s best expertise, instrumented ranges and analysis capabilities to provide confidence in how the ship will perform in combat.”

The Hobart class of ships, commissioned by the Liberal National Government in 2007, are among the most potent warships at sea, forming an important part of the defence of our nation.

Cooperative Engagement Capability provides a secure communications capability between Australian and US equipped ships, aircraft or land forces and allows a unit to detect and, if needed, engage a threat identified by another ship or aircraft.

The trials mark the next step in the Hobart Class Destroyer’s introduction into service.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-11-2019 at 02:07 PM


Missile Firing Breaks New Ground

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 04, 2019)

In a first for the Royal Australian Navy and the United States Navy, HMAS Brisbane has completed a live missile engagement.

Using remote sensor data from USS Stockdale and the Cooperative Engagement Capability, the combat system was tested against a range of challenging targets and tactical situations.

The Minister for Defence, Linda Reynolds, said the trials, which were held in the US over the past month, marked a ground-breaking milestone for Australia.

“This missile firing demonstrates the very highest levels of interoperability between our navies,” Senator Reynolds said.

“It reaffirms the game-changing technology that the Aegis Combat System brings to our Navy and the advanced capability of the Australian-built Hobart-class destroyers.

“By conducting these trials in the US, our Navy is able to access the world’s best expertise, instrumented ranges and analysis capabilities to provide confidence in how the ship will perform in combat.”

The Hobart-class of ships is among the most potent warships at sea, forming an important part of Australia's defence.

Cooperative Engagement Capability provides a secure communications capability between Australian and US-equipped ships, aircraft or land forces and allows a unit to detect and, if needed, engage a threat identified by another ship or aircraft.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 06:03 PM


HMA Ships Stuart and Sirius Arrive in Malaysia for Bilateral Exercise

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued Nov 06, 2019)

Fresh from a successful welcoming visit to the Philippines for Second World War 75th anniversary commemorations, HMA Ships Stuart and Sirius have sailed on to Malaysia for continued bilateral engagement.

Stuart’s Commanding Officer, Commander Luke Ryan said interacting with the two regional partners was an important part of the ongoing East Asia Deployment, in which 11 ships are participating in multinational exercises and engagement activities across the region.

“We were pleased to join the Philippine Navy to commemorate historic naval battles, and in Malaysia we look forward to Exercise MASTEX 19, in which we will further develop the strong relationship we have with their Navy,” he said.

“The Task Unit’s transit between engagement activities is also valuable, as we use this time at sea to conduct routine training for our ship’s company.”

During the four-day transit from the Philippines to Malaysia, the ships conducted a replenishment at sea, engineering break-down drills and Officer of the Watch manoeuvres. Stuart’s MH-60R helicopter also conducted day and night flying.

Commander Ryan said that during the transit the two ship encountered the high level of maritime traffic that is expected in busy international waters.

“As professional mariners, we travel throughout international waters as we transit between exercises and engagements. Along the way we regularly encounter variety of civilian vessels and other nation’s warships as they passage through international waters.

“Making contact with other vessels is not only a courtesy shared with fellow mariners, but is an important factor in maintaining safety and protecting the environment,” Commander Ryan said.

In Malaysia, Stuart and Sirius will take part in Exercise MASTEX. This activity encompasses seven days of bilateral training exercises with the Royal Malaysian Navy, in harbour and at sea, to enhance mutual cooperation.

For the next two months, 11 ships and more than 1000 Navy personnel across two task groups are visiting regional partners in North and South East Asia for multinational exercises and regional engagement activities.

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[*] posted on 9-11-2019 at 01:29 PM


Royal Australian Navy ranks grow by 1,000 personnel in less than two years

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

08 November 2019

The number of Royal Australian Navy (RAN) personnel has increased by more than 1,000 in less than two years, according to the Department of Defence (DoD) in Canberra.

This represents an 8% increase since January 2018, said Minister for Defence Linda Reynolds in an 8 November statement, pointing out that the rise is related to a series of personnel retention initiatives that include flexible workplace arrangements, financial incentives, and industry placements.

“Navy is currently rolling out 45 retention initiatives, including financial bonuses for key sailor and officer categories, flexible workplace arrangements for uniformed members as well as outplacement programmes to improve professional development for technical sailors,” said Reynolds, pointing out that the initiatives are the result of a RAN-wide consultation programme that resulted in 600 suggestions from members of every rank.

(155 of 289 words)
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[*] posted on 12-11-2019 at 12:30 PM


Australia’s third air warfare destroyer completes sea trials

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

11 November 2019


Australia's third air warfare destroyer, Sydney. Source: Commonwealth of Australia

Key Points

- Australia's third air warfare destroyer has concluded its sea trials
- The vessel will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy in February 2020

The third Hobart-class air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has completed its sea trials, the country's defence minister, Linda Reynolds, announced on 9 November.

The vessel, which will be in service as HMAS Sydney once commissioned, is the final AWD ordered for the RAN. It was laid down in November 2015, and launched at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in Adelaide in May 2018.

The first phase of Sydney's sea trials was announced in September 2019, and the vessel began a more advanced phase of these tests, which validated its combat and communication systems, in the following month.

The first AWD, HMAS Hobart, was commissioned in September 2017, while the second-of-class, HMAS Brisbane , was inducted into service in October 2018.

The AWD derives its design from the Spanish Navy's (Armada Española's) Alvaro de Bazan (F-100)-class frigate. It displaces 6,350 tonnes at full load, and has an overall length of 146.7 m, an overall beam of 18.6 m, and a hull draught of 4.9 m.

The warship is equipped with the Aegis combat system incorporating the AN/SPY 1D(V) phased array radar, and is armed with the 48-cell MK 41 strike-length vertical launch system (VLS) that can launch Standard Missile-2 medium-range Block IIIA (SM-2MR Block IIIA) and SM-2MR Block IIIB long-range surface-to-air missiles, and the medium-range RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missiles (ESSMs) Block I.

The destroyer is also equipped with a 127 mm naval gun in the primary position, the Phalanx Block 1B 20 mm close-in weapon system (CIWS), two Orbital ATK M242 25 mm Bushmaster automatic cannons in Rafael Typhoon stabilised and remotely operated mounts, and launchers for the RGM-84 Harpoon Block II anti-ship/land attack missiles.

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[*] posted on 13-11-2019 at 01:39 PM


Navy's Largest Warships Achieve New Milestone

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Nov 12,.2019)

The Royal Australian Navy now has one of the most capable and sophisticated amphibious deployment systems in the world, with the Fleet’s Landing Helicopter Docks achieving final operational capability.

At 230-metres long and with a speed of more than 20 knots, the 27,500 tonne ships are home-ported at Garden Island, Sydney.

Each ship has the ability to support six helicopters, and four small landing craft which areable to carry Army’s M1A1 main battle tank.

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said HMA Ships Adelaide and Canberra are ready to be deployed on amphibious operations such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and amphibious warfare.

“The Australian Defence Force’s amphibious capability is an integral part of Australia’s strategic posture and this milestone is another step in Navy’s roadmap to delivering amphibious excellence,” Minister Reynolds said.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Michael Noonan AO, RAN, said Navy is closer to achieving a resilient, sustained and integrated Navy supported by our workforce, as outlined in the Plan Pelorus strategy for 2022.

“As we transition to a more technologically advanced Navy, our goal is to be capable of conducting sustained combat operations as part of a Joint Force,” Vice Admiral Noonan said.

-ends-
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