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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
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[*] posted on 19-5-2020 at 11:58 AM


Adelaide Provides Vital Training Platform for Army CH-47 Helicopters

(Source: Royal Australian Navy; issued May 17, 2020)

HMAS Adelaide has recently provided a platform for Army CH-47 Chinook helicopters from the 5th Aviation Regiment in Townsville to conduct training at sea.

The CH-47 helicopters have been conducting Deck Landing Operations that will qualify them to support any future operations that would require heavy lift capability, both day and night, from the Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs).

HMAS Adelaide Commander Air, Commander Leon Volz said the essential training off the coast of Queensland involved both the Army’s 5th Aviation Regiment and the ship’s own Aviation Support crew.

“Adelaide is currently providing the embarked CH-47 element the opportunity for Army aircrew to gain Deck Landing Qualifications as well as providing training and journal progression for new members of the Ship’s Aviation Team,” he said.

“Once the CH-47 aircrew have completed their qualification it will allow 5 Aviation’s CH-47 force to be ready to provide heavy lift capability from the LHDs in support of Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief (HADR) and amphibious operations,” Commander Volz said.

The embarked Navy MRH and MH-60R aircrew are also using this period of training to maintain and hone their skills to ensure that they are ready to support current and future operations.

HMAS Adelaide recommenced essential aviation and amphibious training activities off the coast of Queensland following a scheduled port visit to Townsville to undertake logistical resupply and refuelling.

As well as the Deck Landing Operations, Adelaide will support a variety of exercises to maintain capability, including landing craft training, Damage Control routines, assault guide training and Wet and Dry Rehearsals (WADER).

Adelaide is currently the Navy’s high-readiness vessel and is available to support humanitarian and disaster relief operations domestically and in the region.

HMAS Adelaide Executive Officer Commander Jace Hutchison said the ship had put in place strict protocols for the resupply visit and subsequent training and was following whole-of-government guidance in relation to COVID-19.

“It is important that we maintain Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) capability and readiness, but the health and well-being of our people and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 is our highest priority,” Commander Hutchison said.

The Landing Helicopter Dock first left Sydney on 31 March and has already completed three weeks of successful First of Class Flight Trials (FOCFT) involving MH-60R ‘Romeo’ helicopters.

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[*] posted on 19-5-2020 at 01:02 PM


Warship Sydney commissions at sea

Published on 19 May 2020 LEUT Ryan Zerbe (author)


The crew of HMAS Sydney (V) 'cheer ship' inside Jervis Bay, NSW following the ship's commissioning ceremony at sea. (photo: POIS Tom Gibson)

The Royal Australian Navy has welcomed its newest Air Warfare Destroyer into the Fleet in the first commissioning of an Australian warship at sea since the Second World War.

The ceremony, conducted off the coast of New South Wales, marked the moment the 147-metre long Air Warfare Destroyer HMAS Sydney (V) became one of Her Majesty’s Australian Ships.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Michael Noonan, and Commander of the Australian Fleet, Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead, were aboard the guided missile destroyer, to officially welcome Sydney into service.

Vice Admiral Noonan told the commissioning crew that Sydney’s history was of a legendary pedigree.

“You will all form part of the HMAS Sydney fabric. You are sailors and officers who will all continue the proud Sydney legacy.”

“It is a great responsibility - one I know each and every one of you is capable of honouring and carrying forward into the future.”

“HMAS Sydney, welcome home, welcome back to our Fleet. Your name once again takes pride and its rightful place in Her Majesty’s Fleet,” Vice Admiral Noonan said.

During the ceremony the ship received a blessing and Sydney’s Commanding Officer, Commander Edward Seymour, read the ship’s commissioning order before the Australian White Ensign was hoisted, signifying completion of the commissioning.

The crew also watched video messages of congratulations from Governor-General David Hurley, Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Minister for Defence Linda Reynolds, and the ship’s sponsor, Mrs Judy Shalders.

Commander Seymour said he was proud to lead the ship’s company and carry forward the legacy of previous Australian warships that carried the name.

“It isn’t often in a naval career that you are part of commissioning a brand new warship, but to do so at sea and carrying the significant legacy behind the name Sydney, is a special feeling for the entire ship’s company.”

“A lot of hard teamwork has led us to this moment of bringing a world-class warship into the fleet and we’re eager to now prove what Sydney can do.”

“She brings an outstanding, Australian-built air warfare capability over an exceptional range and gives Navy a surface combat capability like never before.”

Sydney is the last of three Hobart Class vessels built for Navy at Osborne in South Australia and is based on the Navantia F100 frigate design.

She is equipped with advanced combat systems, providing the ship with layered offensive and defensive capabilities to counter conventional and asymmetric threats.

Sydney will now undergo her test and evaluation period where she will integrate into the fleet and Navy personnel will develop their proficiencies with her cutting-edge Aegis combat system.

Sydney’s sister ships, Hobart and Brisbane, commissioned in 2017 and 2018 respectively and all three vessels are homeported at Fleet Base East in Sydney.

The first Royal Australian Navy vessel to be commissioned at sea was HMAS Matafele. The World War II stores carrier was commissioned on 1 January 1943.
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[*] posted on 26-5-2020 at 02:30 PM


ASC Shipbuilding gears up for Osborne South Surface Warship Facilities handover

POSTED ON MONDAY, 25 MAY 2020 14:47

Construction is nearing completion in the $500 million upgrade of Adelaide’s new high-tech frigate shipyard with five new sheds rising from its Port River site. Despite the COVID-19 outbreak, the handover is still planned for June 2020.


Artist impression of the Osborne South Naval Shipbuilding Precinct (Picture source: Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

According to ASC Shipbuilding director Jim Cuthill, five new sheds in the shipyard were being fitted with state-of-the-art equipment. In effect, this means that contractors Australian Naval Infrastructure and Lendlease are successfully tracking towards a handover deadline, originally scheduled for July.

In 2017, the Australian Government unveiled the design and turned the first sod for the new surface shipbuilding yard in Osborne, South Australia. The unveiling of the design for this $535 million project is an exciting insight into the future of Osborne's shipyards that is a result of this Government's $89 billion investment in our future shipbuilding industry.

The infrastructure expansion and upgrades are a fundamental enabler of the construction of the Future Frigates and are key to delivering a continuous naval shipbuilding program which will support thousands of Australian jobs.

Workers employed on the frigates project run by ASC Shipbuilding, a subsidiary of defence giant BAE Systems Australia, are now just over 600 with Cuthill saying this would be climbing up from July to hit about 1000 by the end of 2020.

ASC Shipbuilding gears up for Osborne South Surface Warship Facilities handover 925 002Australian "Hunter" class frigate (Picture source: US Navy)

With Australian Naval Infrastructure gearing up for the phased hand over of the Osborne Naval Shipyard South to ASC Shipbuilding, BAE Systems is getting ready to start prototyping for the Hunter-class frigates

Two Arafura Class offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) are currently being built at Osborne. And the last of three air warfare destroyers built at Osborne was recently handed over to the Royal Australian Navy.
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[*] posted on 27-5-2020 at 12:16 PM


Patrol boat refit urged to fill subs gap
PAUL MALEY
NATIONAL SECURITY EDITOR

The Australian

Navy planners may be forced to fit new patrol boats built to catch illegal fishers and boatpeople with high-end anti-ship missiles and sophisticated sonar buoys, to bridge a looming capability gap caused by a delay in acquiring new submarines.

Australian Strategic Policy Institute senior analyst Marcus Hellyer said delays in Australia’s new submarine program might force Defence planners to look for quick workarounds to give the Australian Defence Force the capability to meet the threat posed by the gathering number of foreign submarines operating in the region…
Full article:
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/defence/patrol-boat-...

Da Dum… and they might want to ditch one of the RHIBs and refit the RAS station… amongst other things. :no:

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[*] posted on 3-6-2020 at 01:43 PM


ASC and Partners to Pioneer Additive Manufacturing for Submarines

(Source: ASC; issued June 01, 2020)

Australia's dedicated submarine sustainment organisation, ASC, is collaborating with Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and DMTC Limited, to pioneer the use of additive manufacturing for the repair of Collins Class submarines.

The partners have joined forces to further develop 'cold spray' technology for repairing damaged metal surfaces, to enable the future in situ repair of submarine components.
Successful development of the cold spray technique for this specific maritime application will allow Australian submarines to remain at sea for longer, without the need to dock for lengthy repairs.

Cold spray is an additive manufacturing and repair method that uses a stream of supersonic gas to accelerate metal powder particles at a surface, building up a dense deposit.

The innovative process occurs below the melting temperatures of the metals involved, which avoids damaging the structural integrity of the components and surrounding area.

ASC Chief Executive Officer Stuart Whiley said: "It's vitally important for ASC to be on the cutting edge of submarine sustainment innovation, to continually improve Australia's submarine availability to the Royal Australian Navy service," Mr Whiley said.

"The use of additive manufacturing for the repair of critical submarine components, including the pressure hull, will mean faster, less disruptive repairs for our front-line Collins Class submarine fleet."

Research Team Leader at CSIRO, Dr Peter King, said: "CSIRO and ASC have been working together for a number of years, exploring ways to use cold spray of nickel to repair corrosion," Dr King said.

"CSIRO has spearheaded the adoption of cold spray by Australian industry since first introducing the technology 18 years ago. We have developed unique cold spray-based solutions for the printing industry, aerospace, rail and for combating marine biofouling. The team is focussed on working closely with local companies to develop new intellectual property for Australia and to deliver on national missions such as building sovereign capability," Dr King said.

The two-year project seeks to deliver breakthroughs in submarine repair and cost-of-ownership reductions for the Royal Australian Navy, through expert contributions from industrial and research partners.

DMTC Chief Executive Officer, Dr Mark Hodge, welcomed the commencement of the new project.

"This project builds on the relationship between ASC and CSIRO since 2015 but will also leverage DMTC's long history in developing cold spray as a repair technology for defence applications. Our work to date has mainly focused on the aerospace domain, but we are now looking to apply that to submarines and other defence applications," Dr Hodge said.

The project will see ASC engineers working with CSIRO's Lab22 research facility for additive manufacturing of metals, in Melbourne, to develop portable equipment for in-situ repair in the confines of a submarine.

Once successfully proven and certified, ASC will be licensed to use cold spray to support its work as Australia's submarine sustainment organisation, primarily in supporting the Collins Class submarine fleet.

As Australia's national science agency, CSIRO is solving the greatest challenges through innovative science and technology. CSIRO uses collaborative research to turn science into solutions for food security and quality; clean energy and resources; health and wellbeing; resilient and valuable environments; innovative industries; and a secure Australia and region. CSIRO has been a world-leader in cold spray additive manufacturing, since introducing the technology to Australia in 2003.

DMTC Limited (formerly, the Defence Materials Technology Centre) develops and delivers technology and manufacturing solutions that strengthen Australian industrial capacity in areas identified as sovereign defence priorities. DMTC outcomes are achieved through collaborative partnerships between Defence, government research agencies, universities and industrial partners.

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[*] posted on 3-6-2020 at 03:41 PM


SR157 Offshore patrol vessels - banner

03 JUNE 2020

From concentrated vulnerability to distributed lethality—or how to get more maritime bang for the buck with our offshore patrol vessels

By Marcus Hellyer

This report proposes a way for the Australian Government to acquire maritime war-fighting capability quickly and affordably while promoting Australian industry and the continuous Naval Shipbuilding Program.

It would deliver substantial new maritime capability in the next few years, in contrast to the current investment program, and it would introduce a transformative force structure for the price of one or two traditional large multi-role platforms.

This would address key challenges faced by the ADF by enabling it to transition more quickly to a force structure that better supports operating concepts employing distributed lethality and greater use of autonomous systems and human–machine teaming.

PDF: https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/ad-aspi/2020-06/SR%2...
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[*] posted on 3-6-2020 at 07:04 PM


Very sensible and well argued. The lack of immediate political kudos for the government or organisational kudos for Defence will almost certainly mean it goes nowhere.

I would prefer the 57mm main gun all round for its versatility. Restoration of the RAS station for the ASW/AAW and ASuW versions. Refuelling capability for a Romeo/Blackhawk or similar preserved for lillypad services on the ASW/AAW/SpecOps variants.
… small beer indeed, but I had to say it. :blush:
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[*] posted on 3-6-2020 at 10:51 PM


Navantia Will Manage, Under A Strategic Agreement with Australia, the Support of Its Naval Units

(Source: Navantia; issued June 2, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

Navantia Australia has signed a Strategic Agreement with the Commonwealth of Australia, which reinforces the relationship between the signatories and provides the collaboration framework that ensures that all current and future ships, designed by Navantia and in service at the Royal Australian Navy, are properly maintained throughout their operational life.

The Agreement was signed in Sydney, aboard the destroyer HMAS Hobart, by Vice Admiral Michael Noonan, Chief of the Australian Navy, and the President of Navantia Australia, Warren King. Susana de Sarriá Sopeña, President of Navantia, and the Deputy Secretary of Naval Construction, Tony Dalton, are also signatories of the agreement.

The President of Navantia said that “this agreement represents an important milestone in the long relationship of trust that Navantia has had with Australia since the early 2000s. This agreement recognizes the importance of Navantia Australia in the panorama of industries critical to defense and it is also proof of the company's commitment to internationalization, in which Australia is listed as one of the strategic markets for the company.”

Warren King, President of Navantia Australia, commented that “this agreement is an important milestone in the development of the Company's capabilities, which means that the maintenance and modernizations of the Hobart-class destroyers, LHDs and landing craft as well as the new logistical support vessels will be managed by Navantia Australia. It opens an important future in the development of current operations and new solutions supported by digital technologies.”

Navantia's relationship with the Australian Navy dates back to the 2000s, first with contracts for the design of the AWD destroyers and for the construction of two LHD-type amphibious ships, including their 12 landing craft, and in 2016 with the contract for the supply of two AOR ships, currently under construction at the Ferrol shipyard.

Navantia registered its subsidiary in Australia in 2012, which currently provides design and maintenance support services for all classes of Navantia-designed vessels.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 3-6-2020 at 10:53 PM


I'd personally rather see the government abandon local shipbuilding, which is clearly never going to be commercially viable, and instead build the ships overseas. With the money and time saved, buy more frigates and more appropriate submarines and get them into service sooner.

If the RAN is going to get corvettes, and there is a strong argument to support it, the better option would be something along the lines of the European Patrol Corvette. The Arafura class are there for constabulary roles, and twelve is barely enough to manage even that. Spending money to have them tasked for wartime roles is dense.

As far as jobs / stimulus goes, the money can be far more intelligently spent somewhere (anywhere) else.




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[*] posted on 4-6-2020 at 12:01 AM


The problem is, the vessel chosen is fundamentally flawed as it's too small to undergo any meaningful increase in capability growth - which was probably by design. The baseline OPV80 is supposed to be around 1400-1500t. The Arafura class is topping out at around 1650t, how much more margin does it have? If he is talking about adding a CEAFAR mast, VLS missiles, AShM, etc, that is going to push the design to its limits, if not entirely blow them out. If the larger 90m version was chosen, or a vessel much larger - approaching corvette/light frigate territory 100-120m, it would have been a much better platform to propose such upgrades. As it is, I'd highly doubt there is much room left over for anything approaching the kind of upgrades and variants Hellyer is proposing without having issues on sea keeping or without undergoing serious redesign of the superstructure.

I'd argue that the Arafura should be kept as is with it's 12 boat build as an ACPB replacement with weapons upgrades during overhauls, focusing on border protection, interdiction, ISR and minor warfighting roles - MCM etc. I would even argue that increasing the build to 16-18 boats could be worth it, seeing as 12 is approximately sweet fuck all of a capability for patrolling our EEZ. When that build schedule is complete from about 2028/29, an entirely new class should be brought in that fits somewhere between Arafura and Hunter, with VLS, 57 or 76mm gun, ASW/ASuW capability, mission bay, helo hanger and deck - similar to the Type 31, but maybe not as big. Maybe use the same/similar main deck design as the Arafura or larger OPV90, and design a superstructure that can accommodate a much more combat oriented corvette class, similar to the K130 redesign for the Israeli Navy's Sa'ar 6 corvette - about 12, for a total fleet of 30 patrol/corvette vessels would be nice and only about 6 more than we currently have in the combined patrol/mcm/hydro fleet, but far more capable.

Either way, it seems as though he is looking back to the original outline of the SEA1180 program and trying to shoehorn various capabilities into a boat that is 400t lighter than originally envisioned... it will go nowhere.
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[*] posted on 4-6-2020 at 01:20 AM


Quote:
The problem is, the vessel chosen is fundamentally flawed as it's too small to undergo any meaningful increase in capability growth - which was probably by design.


I've been speculating this since the ship won the procurement. I strongly suspect the one thing the RAN doesn't want is for someone in governmnet to think it can take the role of a frigate, and be upgraded at the expense of the frigate fleet. The current ship selection and configuration is pretty much the largest you can reasonably expect from something that will only take on a patrol role in non-contested space, while not being easily upgraded to anything else.

Quote:
...similar to the Type 31, but maybe not as big.


I don't think the Type 31 would be such a bad idea. At $500m the price is pretty good for what the ship offers, and if it turns out that in the future the RAN needs a more capable frigate, the ship can be easily upgraded into something vastly more potent.




Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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