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Author: Subject: RAN part 2
bug2
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 09:40 AM


Austal to be announced as OPV builder but with Luerssen, not Fassmer

By Patrick Durrant | Sydney | 24 November 2017



In a surprise twist, the Commonwealth appears to have selected West Australian shipbuilder Austal to build 10 of the 12 Offshore Patrol Vessels under the Sea 1180 tender, but with the OPV80 design of German shipbuilder Luerssen, not Fassmer, with which Austal was partnered.

The West Australian reported late last night that an announcement by the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull would be made later today to that effect. ASC Shipbuilding will reportedly build the first two vessels in Adelaide, as was mandated by the Commonwealth in the tender.

ADM has contacted Luerssen and Austal for confirmation and comment but, understandably both will await the official announcement prior to to doing so.

ADM Editor Katherine Ziesing visited the Luerssen yards and head office in Germany earlier this year, along with time at the Fassmer yard, on the same river in Bremen. Her coverage of the OPV program to date can be found here.

Company spokesperson Detlef Schlichting confirmed at that time the company was offering a number of options for armament, fit out and various systems to the Commonwealth; he was evasive on the exact design being offered for Sea 1180 although their 80m design was highlighted. 

The company had teamed in a joint venture formed by ASC and Civmec, allowing them access to mature facilities in both states.
Austal had partnered with Fassmer for the build, and given the limited time before steel cut is scheduled in 2018, will be under pressure to adjust to the Luerssen design.

The Fassmer design was well suited to the Australian requirement, with a far superior range to the other offerings (12,000 nautical miles as opposed to 6-8,000 nautical miles), an ice rating, more space for containerised mission modules (3 vs. 2) and a design that was proven in service with Chile and Colombia and required few modifications for Sea 1180 purposes.

Civmec/Forgacs Marine would have built the ten ships at a new shipbuilding hall currently under construction at Henderson and will be disappointed by the decision if confirmed. 

ADM will provide further updates to this story as more information comes to hand.

Read more at http://www.australiandefence.com.au/news/austal-to-be-announ...
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 10:45 AM


"The Fassmer design was well suited to the Australian requirement, with a far superior range to the other offerings (12,000 nautical miles as opposed to 6-8,000 nautical miles), an ice rating, more space for containerised mission modules (3 vs. 2) and a design that was proven in service with Chile and Colombia and required few modifications for Sea 1180 purposes".

I particularly like that bit. Nicely crafted. It shouts "We know you made this decision for reasons other than capability".

It'll be fine… but the overall cost of keeping these jobs/workers in SA keeps mounting
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 11:47 AM


Update:
"the $3.6 billion program would utilise the building expertise of ASC in Adelaide for the first two vessels, with both Austal and Civmec/Forgacs to share construction of the further 10 vessels at Henderson. The share of the work between Austal and Civmec/Forgacs was subject to negotiation according to Minister Pyne."

Oh right… what could possibly go wrong?
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 02:38 PM


Technology to ‘Future Proof’ Australia’s Future Frigates

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Nov 23, 2017)

BAE Systems and the UK Government have committed to transfer cutting-edge technologies and design innovation that will ensure Australian industry can build one of the world’s most formidable and flexible warships to protect the nation’s borders and strategic assets.

If successful on SEA 5000, BAE Systems and the UK Government will transfer more than 500,000 ‘work years’ of world-class technical design to Australia, worth $1.5 billion, to support the national shipbuilding endeavour.

The transfer of data and the digital design of one of the world’s most sophisticated ships will support the development of a continuous naval ship building capability in Australia, ensuring that local industry can build the fleet of nine future frigates. It will also ensure they can be upgraded and supported during their decades of service.

The unprecedented transfer of intellectual property will also include all ship parts, materials, systems and sub systems used to build the Type 26 frigate. With this knowledge, Australian industry will gain the know-how needed to both build and optimise the ship over its life, potentially improving its stealth, flexibility and performance with bespoke local innovation and technology.

BAE Systems is proposing the Global Combat Ship-Australia (GCS-A) for its SEA 5000 bid to replace the Anzac class frigates. It is based on the Type 26 Global Combat Ship currently being manufactured in the UK for the Royal Navy.

The GCS-A will provide the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) with a world leading submarine hunting capability. This ship will also be an extremely capable multi-role combatant not just in undersea warfare but also across air and surface domains.

A large mission bay will also ensure the ship can meet future operational requirements such as humanitarian responses, and deployments of troops and future unmanned vehicles.

BAE Systems’ Glynn Phillips said: “The Global Combat Ship-Australia is a mature design that provides both stealth and flexibility to meet the future operational requirements of the Royal Australian Navy.

“The transfer of data and the development of the digital shipyard will be important in the development of an enduring industry that will employ generations of Australians.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 06:29 PM


Official RAN announcement.....the 40mm cannon is a bit of a surprise...................

Offshore Patrol Vessel announced

Published on 24 November 2017 Mr Pup Elliott (author)
Location(s): Russell Offices, ACT
Topic(s): Ships, Boats and Submarines


An Offshore Patrol Vessel, designed by Lürssen.

The pic seems to show a 57mm cannon? :no: :no:

The much awaited announcement for the replacement to the current Armidale Class patrol boats was announced by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull at Russell Offices in Canberra today.
 
Lürssen was named as the prime contractor for the 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) with the Australian PV80 variant. It will be 80 metres in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 metres.
 
The vessels will be fitted with a 40mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4m sea boats, state of the art sensors as well as command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels, other Australian Defence Force units and our regional partners.
 
The vessels will accommodate up to 60 personnel, including a crew of around 40 Navy personnel and have the ability to accept modular mission packs such as unmanned aerial systems.
 
At the launch the Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, said the Lürssen ship will meet the Navy’s needs.
 
“The new OPV will go further and will be able to be at for sea longer than our current Patrol Boat fleet," Vice Admiral Barrett said.
 
"It will achieve the task that we have already been doing successfully, even better.
 
“The decision has been made with the team we acknowledged today and our role is to now deliver on the decision. Now let’s get on with it.”
 
The first ship is due to enter service in 2021.
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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 06:44 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  


Offshore Patrol Vessel announced


The original PV80 was only 1486 tonnes, 3m draught, this OPV80 is 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4m.

Must be quite a few changes made from the old PV80

Cheers


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[*] posted on 24-11-2017 at 06:58 PM


Let's hope those changes include a hangar



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[*] posted on 25-11-2017 at 12:55 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Official RAN announcement.....the 40mm cannon is a bit of a surprise...................

Offshore Patrol Vessel announced

Published on 24 November 2017 Mr Pup Elliott (author)
Location(s): Russell Offices, ACT
Topic(s): Ships, Boats and Submarines


An Offshore Patrol Vessel, designed by Lürssen.

The pic seems to show a 57mm cannon? :no: :no:

The much awaited announcement for the replacement to the current Armidale Class patrol boats was announced by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull at Russell Offices in Canberra today.
 
Lürssen was named as the prime contractor for the 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) with the Australian PV80 variant. It will be 80 metres in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 metres.
 
The vessels will be fitted with a 40mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4m sea boats, state of the art sensors as well as command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels, other Australian Defence Force units and our regional partners.
 
The vessels will accommodate up to 60 personnel, including a crew of around 40 Navy personnel and have the ability to accept modular mission packs such as unmanned aerial systems.
 
At the launch the Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, said the Lürssen ship will meet the Navy’s needs.
 
“The new OPV will go further and will be able to be at for sea longer than our current Patrol Boat fleet," Vice Admiral Barrett said.
 
"It will achieve the task that we have already been doing successfully, even better.
 
“The decision has been made with the team we acknowledged today and our role is to now deliver on the decision. Now let’s get on with it.”
 
The first ship is due to enter service in 2021.


I believe though I’m happy to be correct, that the Bofors 40mm Mk 4 / L70 and the Bofors 57mm Mk3 gun share the same cupola.

As for the 40mm? Meh. They’ve already integrated it on the vessel and it’s in-service with other nations. It is undoubtedly a step up over the existing 25mm guns so I guess it will suffice.

I’d think personally the 57mm gun would be a lot more useful for not a lot more cash, but they didn’t ask me about it...





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[*] posted on 25-11-2017 at 01:11 AM


Any word out on the hangar status yet?



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[*] posted on 25-11-2017 at 08:02 AM


At the launch the Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, said the Lürssen ship will meet the Navy’s needs.

“The new OPV will go further and will be able to be at for sea longer than our current Patrol Boat fleet," Vice Admiral Barrett said.

"It will achieve the task that we have already been doing successfully, even better."

Err, thank you Tim for that effusive praise.
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