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Author: Subject: Missile Defence part 2
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[*] posted on 29-11-2017 at 03:27 PM


Sweden Says No to Less Expensive Air Defence: Dagens Industri Has Document That Proves A French Deal Would Save Billions

(Source; Dagens Industri; published Nov 26, 2017)

(Published in Swedish; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


This slide obtained by Dagens Industri shows that France’s Eurosam quoted a price of €850 million for the SAMP/T medium-range air-defense system it offered to Sweden, or about 50% less than the cost of the Patriot that Sweden finally chose. (DI document)

In all of the competitions that both SAMP/T and PATRIOT have entered, PATRIOT has won with the exception of the Turkish one, where EuroSam has sold its soul to ensure a win.........funny that!

STOCKHOLM --- Dagens Industri can today reveal that Sweden has received an offer for French air defence systems which is significantly lower than the SEK 10-12 billion that the Swedish government plans to spend on initial procurement of the Patriot system. The competing French package would cost SEK 8.5 billion and covers the entire need of the Armed Forces.

SEK 8.5 billion for a full arsenal of French weapons or SEK 10-12 billion for a smaller number of American missiles that are not enough to protect Sweden - these are two cost options available when the Swedish Armed Forces procure a new medium-range air defence system.

If, or when, a second instalment of Patriot is eventually decided, the figures could increase to SEK 8.5 billion against SEK 25 billion, 30 billion or perhaps 40 billion. Nobody knows, today, how much the Patriot system will cost when the contract is signed, while the French have already committed to a so-called target price.

These figures are set out in classified documents from negotiations between the FMV and the French company Eurosam. Dagens Industri (DI) has also viewed other documents relating to FMV's talks with the French.

The price indications for the alternative French offer are being kept so secret that not even the opposition parties in the Parliament are aware of the figures. The question is how many people in the government are?

According to DI sources, FMV and Eurosam/OCCAR were, as late as April, preparing a deal, and were planning to sign contracts before the end of the year. But three weeks ago, the government instead decided to acquire Patriot, and instructed FMV (the Swedish defense materiel administration) to open negotiations with the United States.

As DI has previously reported, the FMV was left to implement the decision. In its November 7 press release, FMV said that the Patriot purchase "is estimated at just over SEK 10 billion."

What is little known is that FMV had already obtained a significantly lower cost for the Patriot’s direct competitor, the SAMP/T from Eurosam. France also guaranteed that the fire units would be delivered to Sweden in 2019, thereby allowing the Armed Forces to reach an initial operational capability in accordance with the 2015 defence agreement.

One of the documents that DI has obtained is a Eurosam presentation that was distributed at a meeting on April 6th. The document describes what will be delivered and when, the cost as well as a number of other commitments to Sweden. It also showed how the French have adjusted their offer in 2015, 2016 and 2017 to meet the requirements of FMV and the budget of the Armed Forces.

At the April 6 meeting, Joakim Lewin and Magnus Astell from FMV, Thorbjörn Johannesson and Jan Ohlsson from the Armed Forces met with Eurosam's CEO Michel Vigneras. The aim was to allow Eurosam to introduce a so-called ROM price, that is, "rough order of magnitude", an estimate of costs.

In the type of negotiations between Eurosam and FMV, ROM is an indicative price or target price for a quotation. The price in the contract can differ by +/- 10 percent. In this deal there was a clear chance that the price would be pushed down further in the final negotiations.

When the meeting began, the Swedes were excited about the cost of the French offer. In its evaluation, FMV had already found that SAMP/T met the Armed Force's requirements of performance and potential.

The French side said its ROM price was 850 million euros, corresponding to SEK 8.5 billion kronor. It concerned both deliveries for Sweden's Initial Operational Capability (IOC) as well as its Full Operational Capability (FOC).

According to DI sources, the price indication was in line with FMV's expectations. Eurosam also said the target price could come down to 800 million euros, or 8 billion kronor. According to DI sources, the meeting continued in a positive atmosphere, even with representatives of the Armed Forces.

Sweden also got the opportunity to make a smaller part-purchase at a favourable price. The document from the meeting of April 6 states that Eurosam announced in 2016 an indicative fixed price of EUR 400 million, corresponding to SEK 4 billion, for an initial delivery of two fire units and missiles - the same type of smaller part-purchase that is estimated to cost 10-12 billion kroner for the Patriot system.

Since SAMP/T is launched vertically, and its radar has 360-degree coverage, each fire unit with only two missile launchers is able to cover a larger area than an entire Patriot battery.

A single SAMP/T fire unit and one other lorry would be enough to engage simultaneous incoming targets from all directions around the F7 in Såtenäs, one of Sweden's most important air bases.

The April 6 meeting was the final negotiation between FMV and Eurosam, and FMV was later forced to announce that it had no mandate to negotiate further.

French President Emmanuel Macron personally tried to break the deadlock during his meeting with Swedish prime minister Stefan Löfven, government sources state sources to DI. But on Thursday (Nov 23) it was clear that the Parliament’s Defense Committee forces the Government to inform the Parliament about an acquisition of the Patriot before taking a final decision.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: The Patriot offer is not only about 50% more expensive than Eurosam’s, as DI reports here, but despite this higher price it can only deliver three of the four fire units that Sweden needs to protect all of its territory.
Furthermore, the cost of further Patriot follow-on deliveries and upgrades cannot be estimated in advance, and conclusion of an FMS sale as Sweden intends will commit it to keeping its Patriots at the same standard as the US Army’s, whatever the cost.
Finally, Patriot deliveries can begin in 2020 at the earliest, while Sweden’s requirement is for 2019 deliveries – which Eurosam has guaranteed.
The original Nov 6 statements by FMV and the Swedish Ministry of Defence are available here.)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/188230...

(ends)

FMV Interview: "Basically, There Is No Price Negotiation"

(Source; Dagens Industri; published Nov 26, 2017)

(Published in Swedish; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

At the FMV, nobody wants to comment officially on the negotiations with Eurosam and the price information that France has submitted to Sweden. On the other hand, the FMV holds the door open to a French deal - if the offer on the Patriot becomes too expensive.

"What we have got now is a mandate to negotiate the Patriot and then we will report the results when we are done. Because this is an intergovernmental agreement, it is a government decision under the constitution," says Joakim Lewin, Planning Officer at the FMV. FMV's counterpart is the US Defence Security Cooperation Agency. If the deal is executed, the US Government will sell Patriot to Sweden through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process.

The possibilities of negotiating an FMS price are limited. It is not even certain that the Swedish Armed Forces budget of SEK 10-12 billion is enough for the purchase three fire units and missiles, let alone the four fire units Sweden requires. "Basically, it's not a price negotiation, but there are other things to negotiate that bring added value," said Joakim Lewin.

Q: You have already said you want the stuff. Is it not difficult to negotiate price and added value?
A: "Yes, you can never negotiate price directly in a FMS deal. Poland has received a price for Patriot and Romania another, but the difference is due to offset deals”.

Q: The meeting held on April 6 with Eurosam – which you attended - shows that you have had deep discussions with the French.
A: "Yes, we've had deep discussions about both options."

Q: What did you think of the offer presented by the French? You had obtained pretty good conditions.
A: "Yes, that's our job. I do not comment on individual offers, but our job is to get the best possible options. "

Q: I have documentation from the meeting. The interesting part is that you at the FMV were completely prepared to go ahead with the French, and sign contracts.
A: "Yes ... so, we found out as much as we could about both options and then we presented both options. The Armed Forces took note of this, analysed the security threat scenario, and then advocated the Patriot option. "

Q: Is it possible that the Patriot becomes too expensive when negotiations with the United States have ended?
A: "Yes, it can happen. We cannot know until we have tried. "

Q: If it gets too expensive - are we back to square one?
A: "Yes."

Joakim Lewin states that there are two good air defence systems that meet each other.

"We do not think SAMP/T is a bad solution. It's a great system. There are advantages and disadvantages of both options. Whichever one chooses, it will be a big boost for the Armed Forces” he says.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 30-11-2017 at 12:28 PM


Complex PAC-3 missile test paves way for full-rate production decision

By: Jen Judson   1 day ago


A soldier signals a colleague when to stop rotating the MIM-104 Patriot launching station. (Sgt. Brandon Banzhaf/U.S. Army)

WASHINGTON — Five Patriot Advanced Capability — 3 interceptors took out four tactical ballistic missile targets in a recent test at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, according to a Lockheed Martin statement released Tuesday.

Four PAC-3 Cost Reduction Initiative (CRI) interceptors and one PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) completed the complex test.

The PAC-3 MSE intercept met a requirement that “supports” a full-rate production decision for that variant, according to the statement.

The MSE version has a larger, dual-pulse solid-rocket motor and larger control fins that double the missile’s reach and improve performance against evolving ballistic and cruise missiles.

According to Lockheed, the test “reconfirmed PAC-3 CRI and MSE’s ability to detect, track and intercept incoming missiles while meeting fielded reliability requirements.”

The U.S. Army fired the PAC-3 MSE for the first time in a successful intercept test during the summer of 2016. The MSE went up against a full-scale, air-breathing target and demonstrated the weapon’s ability to detect, track, engage and intercept an aircraft.
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[*] posted on 30-11-2017 at 12:48 PM


Lockheed Martin hopes ‘NAREW’ could offer MEADS a second chance in Poland

While 'Narew' requires less than what MEADS delivers, MEADS officials are confident their weapon system could provide a common system addressing Polands' short and medium range requirements. 'If MEADS would be selected for 'Narew', we believe Poland could reconsider the system for WISLA as well' company officials commented.

By Tamir Eshel - Jan 7, 2015 852


MEADS tested in 2013

The tri-national Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) program returns to the Polish air defense arena, positioned as a candidate for the Polish for Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) requirement. MEADS is now positioned to fulfill three European programs, in Germany, Italy and Poland.

MEADS is currently being evaluated as a candidate for the German Taktisches Luftverteidigungssystem (TLVS), a new generation of air and missile defense that requires a flexible architecture based on strong networking capabilities. MEADS is also expected to become the basis of a national defense system in Italy. Formal decisions are expected from Germany and Italy early in 2015, and a follow‐on plan is being developed for transition.

According to MEADS program management agency NAMEADSMA analysis, MEADS is designed to defend up to eight times the coverage area of existing Patriot systems, with far fewer system assets with significantly reduced demand for deployed personnel and equipment and for airlift. MEADS is also designed for high reliability and needs fewer personnel to operate.


MEADS firing two Patriot MSE missiles in a ‘shoot-shoot’ protocol, engaging a ballistic missile target on a flight test at White Sands. Photo: MEADS International.

Poland has considering the multinational US-European MEADS program for its medium range air defense system (also known as WISLA). But MEADS has not made it to the finals, as the Poles demanded that only operationally proven systems will be considered (MEADS is still in the development phase).

WISLA required a weapon system capable of intercepting targets at medium to long range, with secondary missile defense capability. Late last year the Polish Armament Inspectorate announced it is embarking on a selection of a new, SHORAD system procurement called ‘Narew’, intended to cover ranges of up to 25km. The new acquisitions will be part of the broader air and missile defense shield Poland intend to deploy in the 2020s, at a cost of 7.1 billion euros ($8.8 billion).

The ‘Narew’ system will be capable to defend homeland and deployed forces from aircraft, helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles and cruise missile threats. Companies believed to be included in the competition include the Polish Armaments Group (Polska Grupa Zbrojeniowa, or PGZ), the US-Norwegian consortium Kongsberg – Raytheon, as well as MEADS, MBDA and Thales from Europe, Rafael and IAI from Israel and Diehl BGT Defence from Germany – each likely to separately team with local industries to compete for the Polish program.

Although MEADS is ‘over qualified’ for such mission, MEADS International was invited to participate in the technical discussions expected to be held in the first quarter of 2015. “We have built and tested a new generation of networked air and missile defense radars, launchers and battle managers,” said MEADS International executive vice president Volker Weidemann. “MEADS is now ready for continuation programs in Germany and Italy, and for Poland’s Narew program.”

While ‘Narew’ requires less than what MEADS delivers, MEADS officials are confident their weapon system could provide a common system addressing Polands’ short and medium range requirements. ‘If MEADS would be selected for ‘Narew’, we believe Poland could reconsider the system for WISLA as well’ company officials commented.

“The nations recognize the need for a more versatile capability in air and missile defense,” said NAMEADSMA general manager Gregory Kee. “MEADS is designed to be flexible, agile and lethal against the evolving threats our adversaries are developing.”

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Command has recently reviewed the program to respond to interest within the US Department of Defense in leveraging MEADS technology. MEADS represents a $4 billion effort to develop, implement and prove next-generation air and missile defense system technology.
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[*] posted on 30-11-2017 at 11:52 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Sweden Says No to Less Expensive Air Defence: Dagens Industri Has Document That Proves A French Deal Would Save Billions

(Source; Dagens Industri; published Nov 26, 2017)

(Published in Swedish; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


This slide obtained by Dagens Industri shows that France’s Eurosam quoted a price of €850 million for the SAMP/T medium-range air-defense system it offered to Sweden, or about 50% less than the cost of the Patriot that Sweden finally chose. (DI document)

In all of the competitions that both SAMP/T and PATRIOT have entered, PATRIOT has won with the exception of the Turkish one, where EuroSam has sold its soul to ensure a win.........funny that!

STOCKHOLM --- Dagens Industri can today reveal that Sweden has received an offer for French air defence systems which is significantly lower than the SEK 10-12 billion that the Swedish government plans to spend on initial procurement of the Patriot system. The competing French package would cost SEK 8.5 billion and covers the entire need of the Armed Forces.

SEK 8.5 billion for a full arsenal of French weapons or SEK 10-12 billion for a smaller number of American missiles that are not enough to protect Sweden - these are two cost options available when the Swedish Armed Forces procure a new medium-range air defence system.

If, or when, a second instalment of Patriot is eventually decided, the figures could increase to SEK 8.5 billion against SEK 25 billion, 30 billion or perhaps 40 billion. Nobody knows, today, how much the Patriot system will cost when the contract is signed, while the French have already committed to a so-called target price.

These figures are set out in classified documents from negotiations between the FMV and the French company Eurosam. Dagens Industri (DI) has also viewed other documents relating to FMV's talks with the French.

The price indications for the alternative French offer are being kept so secret that not even the opposition parties in the Parliament are aware of the figures. The question is how many people in the government are?

According to DI sources, FMV and Eurosam/OCCAR were, as late as April, preparing a deal, and were planning to sign contracts before the end of the year. But three weeks ago, the government instead decided to acquire Patriot, and instructed FMV (the Swedish defense materiel administration) to open negotiations with the United States.

As DI has previously reported, the FMV was left to implement the decision. In its November 7 press release, FMV said that the Patriot purchase "is estimated at just over SEK 10 billion."

What is little known is that FMV had already obtained a significantly lower cost for the Patriot’s direct competitor, the SAMP/T from Eurosam. France also guaranteed that the fire units would be delivered to Sweden in 2019, thereby allowing the Armed Forces to reach an initial operational capability in accordance with the 2015 defence agreement.

One of the documents that DI has obtained is a Eurosam presentation that was distributed at a meeting on April 6th. The document describes what will be delivered and when, the cost as well as a number of other commitments to Sweden. It also showed how the French have adjusted their offer in 2015, 2016 and 2017 to meet the requirements of FMV and the budget of the Armed Forces.

At the April 6 meeting, Joakim Lewin and Magnus Astell from FMV, Thorbjörn Johannesson and Jan Ohlsson from the Armed Forces met with Eurosam's CEO Michel Vigneras. The aim was to allow Eurosam to introduce a so-called ROM price, that is, "rough order of magnitude", an estimate of costs.

In the type of negotiations between Eurosam and FMV, ROM is an indicative price or target price for a quotation. The price in the contract can differ by +/- 10 percent. In this deal there was a clear chance that the price would be pushed down further in the final negotiations.

When the meeting began, the Swedes were excited about the cost of the French offer. In its evaluation, FMV had already found that SAMP/T met the Armed Force's requirements of performance and potential.

The French side said its ROM price was 850 million euros, corresponding to SEK 8.5 billion kronor. It concerned both deliveries for Sweden's Initial Operational Capability (IOC) as well as its Full Operational Capability (FOC).

According to DI sources, the price indication was in line with FMV's expectations. Eurosam also said the target price could come down to 800 million euros, or 8 billion kronor. According to DI sources, the meeting continued in a positive atmosphere, even with representatives of the Armed Forces.

Sweden also got the opportunity to make a smaller part-purchase at a favourable price. The document from the meeting of April 6 states that Eurosam announced in 2016 an indicative fixed price of EUR 400 million, corresponding to SEK 4 billion, for an initial delivery of two fire units and missiles - the same type of smaller part-purchase that is estimated to cost 10-12 billion kroner for the Patriot system.

Since SAMP/T is launched vertically, and its radar has 360-degree coverage, each fire unit with only two missile launchers is able to cover a larger area than an entire Patriot battery.

A single SAMP/T fire unit and one other lorry would be enough to engage simultaneous incoming targets from all directions around the F7 in Såtenäs, one of Sweden's most important air bases.

The April 6 meeting was the final negotiation between FMV and Eurosam, and FMV was later forced to announce that it had no mandate to negotiate further.

French President Emmanuel Macron personally tried to break the deadlock during his meeting with Swedish prime minister Stefan Löfven, government sources state sources to DI. But on Thursday (Nov 23) it was clear that the Parliament’s Defense Committee forces the Government to inform the Parliament about an acquisition of the Patriot before taking a final decision.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: The Patriot offer is not only about 50% more expensive than Eurosam’s, as DI reports here, but despite this higher price it can only deliver three of the four fire units that Sweden needs to protect all of its territory.
Furthermore, the cost of further Patriot follow-on deliveries and upgrades cannot be estimated in advance, and conclusion of an FMS sale as Sweden intends will commit it to keeping its Patriots at the same standard as the US Army’s, whatever the cost.
Finally, Patriot deliveries can begin in 2020 at the earliest, while Sweden’s requirement is for 2019 deliveries – which Eurosam has guaranteed.
The original Nov 6 statements by FMV and the Swedish Ministry of Defence are available here.)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/188230...

(ends)

FMV Interview: "Basically, There Is No Price Negotiation"

(Source; Dagens Industri; published Nov 26, 2017)

(Published in Swedish; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

At the FMV, nobody wants to comment officially on the negotiations with Eurosam and the price information that France has submitted to Sweden. On the other hand, the FMV holds the door open to a French deal - if the offer on the Patriot becomes too expensive.

"What we have got now is a mandate to negotiate the Patriot and then we will report the results when we are done. Because this is an intergovernmental agreement, it is a government decision under the constitution," says Joakim Lewin, Planning Officer at the FMV. FMV's counterpart is the US Defence Security Cooperation Agency. If the deal is executed, the US Government will sell Patriot to Sweden through the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process.

The possibilities of negotiating an FMS price are limited. It is not even certain that the Swedish Armed Forces budget of SEK 10-12 billion is enough for the purchase three fire units and missiles, let alone the four fire units Sweden requires. "Basically, it's not a price negotiation, but there are other things to negotiate that bring added value," said Joakim Lewin.

Q: You have already said you want the stuff. Is it not difficult to negotiate price and added value?
A: "Yes, you can never negotiate price directly in a FMS deal. Poland has received a price for Patriot and Romania another, but the difference is due to offset deals”.

Q: The meeting held on April 6 with Eurosam – which you attended - shows that you have had deep discussions with the French.
A: "Yes, we've had deep discussions about both options."

Q: What did you think of the offer presented by the French? You had obtained pretty good conditions.
A: "Yes, that's our job. I do not comment on individual offers, but our job is to get the best possible options. "

Q: I have documentation from the meeting. The interesting part is that you at the FMV were completely prepared to go ahead with the French, and sign contracts.
A: "Yes ... so, we found out as much as we could about both options and then we presented both options. The Armed Forces took note of this, analysed the security threat scenario, and then advocated the Patriot option. "

Q: Is it possible that the Patriot becomes too expensive when negotiations with the United States have ended?
A: "Yes, it can happen. We cannot know until we have tried. "

Q: If it gets too expensive - are we back to square one?
A: "Yes."

Joakim Lewin states that there are two good air defence systems that meet each other.

"We do not think SAMP/T is a bad solution. It's a great system. There are advantages and disadvantages of both options. Whichever one chooses, it will be a big boost for the Armed Forces” he says.

-ends-


Old De Briganti is losing his sh*t over this. He is alleging that SAMP-T despite being ‘widely’ acknowledged as more capable according to him alone is both far more capable and far cheaper, just like every French military product...

Having lost 3 competitions in a row in Europe, (plus Turkey to Russia) I’m guessing he is worried about his revenue base...

He is alleging the State Dept is using under-handing tactics to win these contracts. Couldn’t possibly be the realisation that French / Euro under-bidding and over-stating practices aren’t fooling people as they used to...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 4-12-2017 at 09:56 PM


Israel Aborts an Arrow 3 Test for Target Failure

By Tamir Eshel - Dec 4, 2017



A test of Israel’s Arrow-3 ballistic missile interceptor was aborted today due to a target failure. According to an Israel Ministry of Defense (IMOD) announcement, the test performed at the Air Forces’ Palmachim missile test base was planned as part of the series of tests on Israel’s multi-tiered defense array.

The Arrow 3 interceptor missile was developed under a Israel-US cooperation, by IAI and is jointly produced by IAI and Boeing. The target missiles are produced by Rafael. The Arrow 3 provides the exoatmospheric upper-tier component of Israel’s missile defense system, as an interceptor designed to defend against ballistic missiles by targeting the threat outside of the earth’s atmosphere.

launched On such tests the Arrow interceptor is pitted against an air launched ‘Sparrow’ ballistic missile target launched eastwards from the Mediterranean Sea. Under such conditions, the test range is limited to strict safety limitations, to avoid collateral damage on land or space, resulting from debris caused by the interceptor’s collision with the target. According to the IMOD announcement today’s test was stopped at an early stage, before the interceptor was launched, once it was discovered that the ‘Silver Sparrow’ target did not meet those strict predetermined test parameters.

The Arrow 3 tests continued after the first interceptor were fielded with operational Arrow 2 Block4 missile units this year.

To date the new interceptor performed three successful tests flights from an Israeli missile test site south of Tel Aviv. Only one of those flights included an actual intercept of a real target.

A fourth test was aborted in 2014, in circumstances similar to today’s situation, before the missile was launched.

To prove the missile’s full capabilities Israel and the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) are planning to perform the next test flights over the Pacific Ocean, at the US missile test facility at Kodiak, Alaska. These tests are scheduled to start in early 2018.


The first Arrow-3 interceptor was handed over to the Israel Air Force on January 18, 2017, to join the Arrow-2 as the operational interceptors of the Arrow Weapon System (AWS).
Photo: IMOD
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[*] posted on 5-12-2017 at 12:48 PM


An inside look at Israel’s missile test range

By: Barbara Opall-Rome   4 hours ago


An Israeli Arrow anti-ballistic missile leaves a smoke trail in the evening sky as it flies toward a target after launching from the Palmachim Air Force Base on Jan. 5, 2003, in central Israel. (David Silverman/Getty Images)

PALMACHIM AIR FORCE BASE, Israel — Monday’s “no test” of the Arrow-3 interceptor due to target missile performance anomalies underscored the paramount importance Israel places on safety when conducting complex and dangerous tests from the nation’s main ballistic missile test range here, in the highly populated heart of the country.

As far as sophisticated instruments for accurately measuring and tracking such long-range, high-velocity objects goes, the test range at this seaside base is similar to the sprawling Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site in the Pacific Marshall Islands, the U.S. Army’s White Sands Missile Range in the New Mexico desert or even Moscow’s Kura range in the far east of Russia.

From here, Israel deploys front-line optical, radar and telemetry instruments up and down the Israeli coast, with hundreds of kilometers of fiber cables and air- and sea-based communications links providing redundant layers to ensure each point of the target missile trajectory and of the ground-based defender are properly covered.

What distinguishes this range from the vastly larger but no less technologically advanced ranges in the U.S. or Russia is that this site sits squarely in the heart of the country, with the Port of Ashdod to the south, Ben Gurion Airport to the north, and multiple desalination plans and other critical infrastructure all around, according to Lt. Col. Ofir, the commander of an Israeli Air Force missile-testing unit.

“More than 2 million people live in a 15-kilometer radius of here,” said the commander, whose last name was withheld from publication for security reasons. “Obviously these people weren’t here in 1969 when the site was established, but back in those days, it was determined that this place offered the most optimum point along our entire coast for launching westward over the sea.”


This graphic depiction shows Israeli Arrow anti-ballistic missiles flying toward their targets, detailing the first-ever successful multiple-launch test from the Palmachim Air Force Base on Jan. 5, 2003, in Israel. (Israel Aircraft Industries via Getty Images)

In an interview months before the Dec. 4 Arrow-3 “no test,” Ofir noted that such intercept tests can take up to six months to plan. Hundreds of people from Israel’s defense establishment are involved in such tests, as are dozens of aircraft, ships and ground-based assets. Tests of the Arrow-3 exo-atmospheric interceptor, he noted, are actually two tests run in parallel, where planners must always prepare for the worst.

“We follow and track two systems at the same time since the target missile ― the family of the Sparrow ― is actually being launched by our pilots toward Israel. That means we have to be prepared for the possibility that the intercept won’t happen and the target will continue flying towards Israel. We have to make sure that all safety precautions are being taken; and that’s all separate from all the other safety procedures in place regarding the intercepting system,” he said.

Whether it’s the periodic launch of an Israeli spy satellite or the much more frequent milestone tests of Israel’s Arrow and David’s Sling missile defense intercepting systems, Ofir said, the same four-pronged safety assurance process applies:

“The first green light we get is from my technical manager, who works and checks all the instrumentation. If it’s a green range, the second green light is from the operational manager, who conducts the operational mission, ensuring that aircraft are deployed to keep air routes clear and help from the Israel Navy to make sure sea corridors are clear. We also have forces checking that all the ground area inside the hazard zone is clear. And if all that is green, we still need clearances from the safety manager and, finally, from the industry. There is a test manager from the industry who has his own protocols and makes sure the weapon system [or systems] have passed each phase and are ready for launch. Only after all four green lights are given will the test manager initiate countdown.”

In the aborted Dec. 4 test, an Israeli Air Force F-15 deployed at long ranges above international waters launched an upgraded version of the Sparrow target missile toward the Israeli coast. The plan was for the Arrow’s Super Green Pine radar to detect and track the target, launch its interceptor and destroy the incoming target hundreds of kilometers in space.

The entire test was to have lasted about 10 minutes, but just seconds after the F-15 launched its target missile ― way before Arrow’s radar could even pick up the target missile heading toward Israeli shores ― a decision was made to abort the test.

“Shortly after the target was launched, it started behaving in a way that was not conforming to safety parameters determined in advance and we were forced to declare a ‘no test,’ ” said Moshe Patel, director of the Israel Missile Defense Organization at Israel’s Defense Ministry.
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[*] posted on 7-12-2017 at 12:19 PM


Poland has sticker shock over ’unacceptable’ price tag for Patriot buy

By: Jen Judson   4 hours ago


US troops from the 5th Battalion of the 7th Air Defense Regiment emplace a launching station of the Patriot air and missile defence system at a test range in Sochaczew, Poland, on March 21, 2015 as part of a joint exercise with Polands troops of the 37th Missile Squadron of Air Defense that is to demonstrate the US Armys capacity to deploy Patriot systems rapidly within NATO territory. AFP PHOTO / JANEK SKARZYNSKI (Photo credit should read JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — Poland has been pushing toward a purchase of a medium-range air-and-missile defense system for many years, settling on an unprecedented configuration of the Patriot system, but was surprised by the high price tag presented when the U.S. State Department cleared the sale of half of the Patriots Poland plans to buy.

According to the Defense Security Cooperation Agency, when it notified Congress last month of the potential sale, the deal could cost the country $10.5 billion for four systems — that is roughly 37 billion zloties — which already exceeds by 7 billion zloties what Poland has said it would spend on the entire program.

The DSCA announcement only marks the progress in the first phase of the acquisition. Poland would like to see a second round of Patriot systems with a 360-degree detection capability and the first four retrofitted with the new radar in a subsequent deal.

“The high cost came as a surprise for us,” Bartosz Kownacki, secretary of state in Poland’s Ministry of National Defense, told Defense News in a Dec. 5 interview in Washington.

“The price is indeed unacceptable for us even in the view of the significant financial assets that we allocated for the technical modernization of the Polish Armed Forces,” he said through a translator. “We cannot simply afford to spend that much money on the procurement of two batteries and [Patriot Advanced Capability]-3 missiles for such an amount of money.”

The offer from the U.S. included 16 missile launchers, four sector radars and 208 PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) missiles.

The possible sale is a long time coming with Poland and the U.S. struggling through complicated negotiations over the past several years.

Poland began its “Wisla” competition to procure a medium-range air-and-missile defense system many years ago, ultimately choosing Patriot in 2014 but, instead of simply buying what Raytheon had at the ready, the country decided it wanted a command-and-control system for Patriot that is still in development by the U.S. Army and Northrop Grumman called the Integrated Battle Command System (IBCS) along with a new radar down the road.

Instead of opting for a simple foreign military sale like Romania did recently when purchasing Patriot, Poland is, in a sense, creating its own integrated air-and-missile defense program.

Poland has also been adamant about creating quality defense work for its industrial base and has demanded certain offsets to ensure growth in its defense industry.

“We will be doing thorough analyses of the draft Letter of Agreement once it is sent to us,” Kownacki said. Looking at his watch, he said he expected the draft LOA could be sent at anytime and could even be delivered during the interview.

The cost estimate for the Patriot deal was the topic of discussions held this week during Kownacki’s trip to Washington. “We simply cannot accept such financial conditions, we will be working hard on reducing it, we will be conducting a line-by-line review,” he said. “We understand to reduce it more than one meeting will be required, maybe two or three meetings will be required to negotiate an acceptable, reasonable price.”

Kownacki added that there are other elements of the deal that came as a surprise as well. “For instance, the price of offset,” he said. While some companies involved with the deal gave reasonable prices for offset, “there is one company which presented an unacceptable offset for us and conditions we cannot accept,” he said.

And even with the companies that offered reasonable deals, Kownacki said, there will still be an effort to negotiate the price down further.

Kownacki added it’s possible that over the course of the negotiations it will turn out that some of the high prices were presented to the country due to a misunderstanding of its offset regulations. Poland changed its offset regulations and there are a number of elements that may not be understood, he said.

While the price tag for the first round of Patriots should be higher because of some up-front costs that cover the program as a whole, it should still be proportionately smaller than what Poland plans to spend over the entire life-cycle of the program, Kownacki said.

“Of course we can’t foresee by how much we will manage to lower the price, nonetheless, the U.S. Administration as well as the companies are aware that we need to reduce this price,” he added. “I am confident that we will manage to reach our goal, our objective, and we are currently finalizing the project so we are in the last stage of negotiations.”

[Poland Wants Patriot With Different Battle Command System]
Some analysts in Poland are more than skeptical that the price tag can be reduced enough so the country doesn’t exceed the 30 billion zloties for which its has budgeted to cover the entire program.

The U.S. cost estimate already exceeds the limit set by Poland by 20 percent, Marek Swierczynski, of Poland’s Polityka Insight, points out in a recent report. “So it will be good if the first phase negotiations will end at 30 billion zloties,” he writes.

He calculates that if the second phase of the program reflects the first phase in numbers, the costs could be “colossal.” For example, the price of one Lockheed Martin-manufactured PAC-3 MSE for the U.S. Army is $5.7 million and, with the offset Poland wants, the cost could rise to $8 million, Swierczynski notes. The PAC-3 order is already reduced to a minimum so there is little wiggle room for price there. And he also writes the low-cost SkyCeptor missile that Poland wants to manufacture as part of the program is currently a wild card, falling in the second phase of the procurement.

Swierczynski suggests that if Poland wants to get the cost down significantly “it has to say goodbye to the prospect of technological leaps in radar or rockets. And that was the most important thing in the industrial part of the Wisla program.”

The future 360-degree radar’s cost is also an unknown because Poland won’t know what it is buying for some time.

And adding IBCS to the Patriot system is an additional cost, yet it doesn’t appear to be the reason for the enormous cost of the first phase of the program. Northrop Grumman confirmed to Defense News that IBCS actually makes up less than 15 percent of the total acquisition cost for the Wisla FMS acquisition.
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[*] posted on 7-12-2017 at 04:15 PM


Poland To Get ‘Next-generation’ Patriot System

by Reuben F. Johnson - December 6, 2017, 8:16 AM


A 360-degree non-rotating AESA radar incorporating Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology will be a key feature of Poland’s Patriot system. (Raytheon)

The last half of November has seen the culmination of efforts by Raytheon to add two new customers for its family of Patriot Air and Missile Defence (AMD) users. But whereas Poland is only now moving to conclude a firm contract, after years of evaluation and indecision, Romania spent just a little more than one year to decide on its new air defense system.

According to a new notice to the U.S. Congress by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), the sale to Poland will include four AN/MPQ-65 radar sets, four engagement control stations, 16 launching stations and 208 Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missiles.

The Polish deal has a "ceiling" price of $10.5 billion, but both U.S. and Raytheon officials have explained that this figure accounts for the possibility of follow-on buys and other options that could be exercised in "phase two" of the program. The overall cost of "phase one" is expected to be approximately $7.6 billion (U.S.).

Poland selected the Patriot system in 2015 after a lengthy evaluation of alternatives such as the Israeli Rafael David’s Sling; the MBDA-Thales Eurosam/SAMP-T; and the Medium Extended Air Defence System (MEADS) from a consortium led by Lockheed Martin.

Raytheon representatives note that Poland will become an industrial partner for the next-generation of the Patriot system.

Speaking at the recent Dubai Air Show, Joseph P. Antona, v-p for business development and strategy at the company’s Integrated AMD division, explained that the planned new 360-degree non-rotating AESA radar incorporating Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology “will revolutionize what warfighters can expect from their sensors.” He added that Raytheon is the only company “with a U.S. Government-grade foundry for military AESA GaN technology, that we have started to insert into our products already.”

Another aspect of the Polish system is that it will be integrated with the Northrop Grumman Battle Command System (IBCS). The sale to Poland includes the IBCS software, six “current operations” IBCS engagement operations centers and two “future operations” EOCs, according to the DSCA announcement.

Poland will also be adding a new weapon to the Patriot missile mix. SkyCeptor, a NATO-compliant version of the RTN/Rafael Stunner missile, will be assembled in Poland and will be a third option for the Polish Patriots to slot in between the Raytheon-made MIM-104E Guidance Enhanced Missile-TBM (GEM-T) and Lockheed Martin Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) missile models. Raytheon is also reportedly looking at incorporating a fourth missile that would mirror the MSE’s hit-to-kill capability.

The U.S. has been in favor of the Patriot sale to Poland due to the synergies created between “the U.S. and other NATO allies that also possess the Patriot system,” read an official U.S. statement on November 17. Within NATO, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, and Spain also operate the Patriot system.

The same interoperability issues were a major factor in Romania's deciding to procure seven Patriot fire units, 56 GEM-T missiles and 168 MSE interceptors. The NATO member signed for this acquisition on November 29 after a selection process that RTN representatives described as a “land-speed record.”

The Poland and Romania decisions, plus a recent announcement by Sweden that it will buy the Patriot system, have led to speculation regarding the previous German decision to acquire MEADS to meet its Taktisches Luftverteidigungssystem (TLVS) future ground-based air defense requirement. Germany appears to be the only potential remaining MEADS customer.
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[*] posted on 9-12-2017 at 01:36 PM


Russia to start exports of its S-400 anti-air system to China soon

Posted On Friday, 08 December 2017 14:32

Rostec CEO Sergey Chemezov said the shipments of the S-400 anti-aircraft systems to China will start in the near future.


S-400 Triumph (SA-21 Growler by NATO classification)

"In the near future," he answered a TASS question. The Rostec chief added "everything is ongoing according to the contract."

China is the first foreign buyer of S-400 and the contract was announced in the spring of 2015. The deal is estimated at close to three billion dollars. Chemezov also mentioned plans to sell S-400 to Saudi Arabia. "Talks are underway but there is definitely no contract yet," he said. When asked if the contract could be worth $2 bln, the Rostec CEO noted that the parties were just beginning the negotiating process. "What supplies are you talking about?" he added. There are no plans so far to localize S-400 production in Turkey. "We are not talking about it yet," Chemezov said. He specified that the issue now is about sales only, without local content.

He admitted that Turkey raises the issue of localization. "Of course, they raise it, but try to produce even a car in green field. This is unreal; experience is necessary. Some wheels may be produced this way, but not high-end products," Chemezov said, adding that, in his opinion, the Turkish side is perfectly aware of it.

"We can hand over papers and what’s next? This leads nowhere," he said, stressing that any license would be expensive as well. S-400 Triumph (SA-21 Growler by NATO classification) is a Russian antiaircraft intermediate and long-range missile system to destroy modern and perspective aerospace attack means. It can destroy aerodynamic targets at a distance up to 400 km and tactical ballistic targets with a speed of 4.8 km/s (cruise missiles, tactical and strategic aircraft, ballistic missile warheads) at a distance of up to 60 km.

Its radars detect air targets at a distance of 600 km. Guided antiaircraft missiles 48N6E3 can hit aerodynamic targets at altitudes from 10 to 27 thousand meters and ballistic targets - from 2 to 25 thousand meters.

© Copyright 2017 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 12-12-2017 at 02:46 PM


MDA awards three contracts to design UAV-based laser

By: Jen Judson   6 hours ago


An MQ-9 Reaper sits on the flight line Nov. 16, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-9 provides persistent attack and reconnaissance capabilities for combatant commanders and coalition forces involved in 24/7/365 combat operations abroad. (Photo by Airman 1st Class James Thompson/U.S. Air Force)

WASHINGTON — The Missile Defense Agency has awarded three contracts to develop preliminary designs for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-based multi-kilowatt class laser to demonstrate beam stabilization technology.

Lockheed Martin and General Atomics were chosen to deliver designs in October and November and Boeing was awarded a contract Dec. 11. Each contract is worth roughly $9 million.

For the past several years, MDA has pursued an incremental directed energy development path that “involved scaling laser power levels in the laboratory, demonstrating precision tracking from unmanned airborne platforms and investigating the feasibility of operating a multi-kilowatt class laser on an airborne platform,” Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, MDA’s director, told Defense News in a statement.

MDA formally began the Low-Power Laser Demonstrator program in 2015 when it awarded concept design contracts to five prime integrator companies: Boeing, General Atomics, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon.

Industry concepts were designed to meet MDA requirements and assess the feasibility, schedule and cost of building and testing a laser-equipped demonstrator, Greaves said.

MDA used those designs to help define the requirements for a flight test program, he added.

The demonstrator will consist of a tracking laser, a defensive laser and a beam control system integrated onto an unmanned aircraft that can fly at high altitudes.

The companies chosen to develop demonstrators will be responsible for selecting an airborne platform and completing an initial design of the lasers and beam control system, according to Greaves.

“A manned aircraft could be used, but the laser and beam control system must operate from a ground control station to buy down the risk of transitioning to a UAV in the future,” Greaves said.

The three contractors will develop preliminary designs in the first phase and final designs during the second phase, which is expected to begin in late 2018 and will last for roughly one year. Phase 2 will end with a critical design review.

Timelines are dependent on the results of the phase prior, according to Greaves.

During Phase 3, which may begin in 2019 and wrap up toward the end of 2023 if everything stays on track, one or more designs will be built and flight tested, Greaves said. The phase will culminate in a series of airborne tests that “demonstrate the ability to acquire a missile in flight and hold the laser beam steadily on the target at threat representative ranges,” Greaves said.

“MDA will assess the merits of continued competition at each phase,” he noted.

The Low-Power Laser Demonstrator program is part of MDA’s efforts to develop and demonstrate directed energy and laser technologies that could be integrated into the Ballistic Missile Defense System, Greaves said.

“We are actively testing a broad range of potential concepts that could be deployed on a variety of platforms,” he said.

One potential concept, according to Greaves, is exploring a UAV-mounted laser that could destroy Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) in the boost phase at long standoff ranges.
That requires precision tracking and “a highly stable, lightweight, accurately pointed laser beam,” Greaves said.

The Low-Powered Demonstrator is an incremental demonstration of the technologies required to possibly get to those capabilities, he added.

“We are currently testing a number of technologies to determine if this is a viable concept,” Greaves said. “Based on the results of these and other tests, we will work closely with the [Pentagon] and Congress to determine the best way to integrate directed energy and laser sensing into the missile defense system.”
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[*] posted on 13-12-2017 at 06:59 PM


Poland will piece together its own solution for short-range air defense

By: Jen Judson   11 hours ago


A Gepard short-range air defense system fires on the banks of the Danube. (Jen Judson/Staff)

WASHINGTON — Poland plans to piece together its own solution for short-range air defense using indigenous radars, potentially even developing its own command-and-control capability and incorporating it into a system that will fill its urgent need, according to the secretary of state in Poland’s Ministry of National Defense.

The country has been on a long road to procure a medium-range air and missile defense system, and it is nearing a final agreement with the U.S. government to buy Raytheon’s Patriot air and missile defense systems with Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System, or IBCS, and Lockheed Martin’s Patriot Advanced Capability —3 Missile Segment Enhancement missiles.

Once the Wisla program —the name given to the medium-range procurement — is underway, Poland can shift some attention to its short-range air defense, or SHORAD, procurement plans under what it is calling the Narew program.

Poland has wanted to rapidly procure both a medium-range air and missile defense system and a SHORAD system, as the European country has perceived a ramping up of Russian aggression in the region over the past several years. Yet changes in the government caused the process for procuring a system under the Wisla program to slow as new leadership reassessed the previous administration’s decision to buy Patriot.

The Narew program’s progress has been contingent on the Wisla program because Poland hopes to leverage what is gained in Wisla for Narew.

“We hope that next year the program will accelerate because ... the current situation with the SHORAD system in Poland is far from being satisfactory,” Bartosz Kownacki told Defense News in an interview in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 5.

“However, this program is simpler because we have our own solution regarding radars. We have indigenous radars, which will be used for Narew,” he said through a translator.

Poland will need to choose appropriate interceptors for the SHORAD system, and there are several missiles being considered. “There are several solutions available on the market,” he said. “There are two proposals from the British MBDA.”

But Poland is also considering using the low-cost SkyCeptor interceptor for Narew that it plans to buy in the second phase of the Wisla procurement plan. Negotiations for the first phase of Wisla are ongoing and a letter of agreement is expected to be minted early next year, but that first phase does not include SkyCeptor procurement or how Poland might manufacture them in country.

SkyCeptor is a variant of the jointly developed Israel and U.S. Stunner interceptor. The Polish government particularly wants to establish a robust manufacturing outfit to make SkyCeptor missiles that would not only serve the Poles but could be built for export.

Should Poland decide to use SkyCeptor for the Narew program, “that would reduce the cost for Narew,” Kownacki said. “Of course, certain elements would have to be replaced with something else, but, nonetheless, that would definitely reduce the cost of the missile.”

Yet, he added, “everything depends on the scope of transfer of technology for the SkyCeptor in the Wisla program.”

Kownacki said the government is also considering using the IBCS system in some way in the Narew program.

“We want to start with Wisla and then we are considering plugging in the Narew system,” he said.

But Poland is also “contemplating developing an alternative indigenous IBCS-like system that would be useful for the Narew program,” Kownacki said.

Should Poland develop its on system, it would be a simpler solution and at a much smaller scale than IBCS, according to Kownacki.

IBCS recently completed a second round of soldier testing at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, at the end of October that proved the system can be effective in a joint environment and can provide a complex picture of the battle space, tying a variety of sensors and systems together into one large, networked air and missile defense system.

“IBCS’ open systems design philosophy allows for the best mix of sensors and effectors, and brings next-generation IAMD capability to Wisla,” Kenn Todorov, Northrop Grumman’s vice president for missile defense solutions within its mission systems sector, told Defense News. “The system will also be extensible to short range defense architectures such as Narew. IBCS is the U.S. Army’s No. 1 priority for IAMD and assures interoperability between systems and with allied forces.”

Kownacki acknowledged that Northrop has spent many years developing IBCS, noting that he imagined it would take “a long time” if Poland were to decide to develop something with similar features and characteristics.

Both the Wisla and Narew programs, as well as a number of other projects, have taken much longer to get off the ground in Poland than originally anticipated, Kownacki admitted.

“We want to procure the system as fast as possible,” he said, “however we must also take into consideration the fact that there are certain independent elements that need time.”

Poland has never had a medium-range air defense system, so it is building an entire infrastructure to support the program from the ground up, to include establishing manufacturing processes for the elements of the system that will be built in the country and ensuring a robust training program is in place, Kownacki said.

Kownacki noted that he did not think integrating IBCS into the system that they are buying would be the reason for any delays. “I held a discussion with the United States government and I was assured there is no risk, there is no threat of IBCS being delayed.”

In the case of getting the Narew program off the ground, “we can construct the nucleus quite quickly of the system,” Kownacki said.

What missiles are chosen for the system could affect the timeline, he said. “There is a question of the effectors and the transfer of technology linked to that,” Kownacki noted. “When we implement SkyCeptor, when we decide to use SkyCeptor, then the system will be fielded later than if we decided to procure off-the-shelf solution, off-the-shelf missile.”
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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 03:58 PM


Russian Experts May Be Employed to Service Turkey’s S-400s — Turkish Top Diplomat

(Source: TASS; published Dec 14, 2017)

MOSCOW --- Turkey may engage Russian specialists to help service Russian S-400 air defense missile systems, if need be, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusolgu said on Thursday.

"As for the S-400 systems, we plan to rely on our own forces, on our own personnel. But, if need ben we will engage Russian specialists, both military and civilian," he told a news conference aired by the Haberturk television channel.

On September 12, Turksih President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Ankara had signed an agreement with Moscow on purchases of S-400 systems, with an advance payment already made. On November 2, Director General of Russia’s Rostec corporation Sergei Chemezon told TASS that the contract with Turkey on the sales of S-400 Triumf systems exceeded two billion US dollars. Supplies of these systems are expected to begin within two years. On December 11, Erdogan said that work linked with S-400 supplies to Turkey would be finished within one week.

Russia’s S-400 Triumf (NATO reporting name: SA-21 Growler) is the latest long-range antiaircraft missile system that went into service in 2007. It is designed to destroy aircraft, cruise and ballistic missiles, including medium-range missiles, and surface targets. The S-400 can engage targets at a distance of 400 kilometers and at an altitude of up to 30 kilometers.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 11:22 AM


Japanese cabinet approves deployment of two Aegis Ashore BMD systems

Kosuke Takahashi - Jane's Defence Weekly

19 December 2017

The cabinet of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on 19 December approved the introduction of two Lockheed Martin Aegis Ashore ballistic missile defence (BMD) systems to counter the growing threat posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.

"North Korea's nuclear and missile development has become a greater and more imminent threat for Japan's national security, and with the two Aegis Ashore systems, we believe we can drastically improve our ballistic missile defense capability to protect Japan continuously and sustainably," said Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera.

The approval allows the Ministry of Defense (MoD) to purchase two units of the advanced air-defence systems to add to Japan's current two-layered BMD system based on ship-borne Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) interceptors and land-based PAC-3 batteries.

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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 08:50 PM


India and Russia will sign contract for S-400 missile systems

Posted On Tuesday, 19 December 2017 17:02

Russia and India may soon sign a contract for the delivery of S-400 Triumph missiles to the Indian armed forces, the Press Trust of India (PTI) new agency reported quoting Rostec Director for international cooperation Viktor Kladov.


S-400 TEL Transporter Erector Launcher at MAKS 2017 Russian AirShow (Picture source Army Recognition)

"It is being discussed and the contract is at an advanced stage.

Both negotiating teams are working hard. It is a sophisticated system and many technical details have to be agreed," he said.

The cost of the deal, personnel training, technology transfer and the number of complexes for India are being discussed. "As soon as the contract is ready it will be signed," Kladov said.

"Even if we supply the missiles today you will not be able to operate them as two years are necessary to train the personnel," he added.

The S-400 Triumph (SA-21 Growler by NATO classification) is a Russian-made long-range and intermediate air defense missile system designed to eliminate all advanced and perspective aerospace weapons. It can hit aerodynamic targets at a range of up to 400 kilometers and tactical ballistic targets flying at a speed of 4.8 km/s at a distance of up to 60 kilometers. Such targets include cruise missiles, tactical and strategic aircraft and ballistic missile warheads. The radars detect aerial targets at a distance of up to 600 kilometers. The 48N6E3 missiles can hit aerodynamic targets at altitudes of 10,000-27,000 meters and ballistic targets at altitudes of 2,000-25,000 meters.
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[*] posted on 23-12-2017 at 12:10 PM


Lockheed awarded nearly $1 billion contract for Patriot missiles

By: Jen Judson   7 hours ago


Service members with the Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) 2nd Air Defense Missile Group, set up the MIM-104 Patriot missile system during Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) deployment training at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Aug. 29, 2017. PAC-3 is a surface-to-air missile defense system, which provides a highly reactive hit-to-kill capability in both range and altitude while operating in all environments. Photo by Cpl. Aaron Henson/U.S. Marine Corps.

WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin has won a $944 million contract to deliver Patriot Advanced Capability-3 and PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement missiles to the United States and allies, according to a Dec. 21 company statement.

The Missile Segment Enhancement builds on PAC-3 capability by using a two-pulse solid rocket motor, which boosts the interceptor’s range and altitude.

The Lockheed statement specifically names Romania as one of the recipients of the missiles, but also includes the U.S. Army and other foreign military sales customers.

In late November, Romania sealed the deal to buy seven Patriot air-and-missile defense batteries to include 168 PAC-3 MSE interceptors. Romania is the 14th Patriot customer worldwide.

Poland is also expected to be a Patriot customer soon, with contract negotiations underway. The State Department in November cleared a potential sale to Poland that included 208 PAC-3 MSE missiles. However, a top defense official told Defense News that there is concern over the price of those weapons.

Five PAC-3 interceptors recently took out four tactical ballistic missile targets in a test at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, that will pave the way for a full-rate production decision for the MSE variant.
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[*] posted on 28-12-2017 at 03:42 PM


December 27 2017 11:52:00

S-400 deal with Russia done for $2.5 bln: Gov’t

MOSCOW - Reuters

Turkish Defense Minister Nurettin Canikli said on Dec. 27 that a deal was reached with Russia over the purchase of two S-400 defense missile systems and four batteries, confirming a top Russian representative’s comments.

Russia will supply Turkey with four batteries of S-400 surface-to-air missiles for $2.5 billion under a deal that is almost complete, Sergei Chemezov, head of Russian state conglomerate Rostec, told the Kommersant daily on Dec. 27.

Chemezov told Kommersant that Turkey was the first NATO member state to acquire the advanced S-400 missile system.

He said the Russian and Turkish finance ministries had already completed talks on financing the deal and that the final documents just needed to be approved.

Canikli confirmed the report, noting that Ankara would purchase two S-400 systems and four batteries and that all agreements were made, state-run Anadolu Agency reported.

He said that the financial aspect of the contracts was the last hurdle that was needed to overcome in meetings between the two countries and all agreements were made.

“Do we use a loan? Or finance the deal by ourselves? In the end we have agreed on covering some part of the deal with credit after negotiations. Other than this, the deal was already finalized,” he told reporters in Tunis.

Turkey will pay 45 percent of the cost up front with Russia providing loans to cover the remaining 55 percent, Chemezov also said.

Moscow expects to begin the first deliveries in March 2020, he also said.

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and his counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdoğan had discussed the deal during Putin’s visit to Ankara early in December.

The agreement to purchase the latest Russian surface-to-air missile defense batteries is Turkey’s most significant deal with a non-NATO military supplier, and comes amid strained relations between Ankara and several Western countries.

Turkey’s decision to buy the Russian system has raised hostility from NATO members, with the Pentagon saying previously that “generally it’s a good idea” to buy equipment that is interoperable with the military alliance’s other systems.
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[*] posted on 1-1-2018 at 07:26 PM


Russia to Introduce Prometheus, a Successor to S-400 in 2020

By Tamir Eshel - Jan 1, 2018


Russia will begin deploying the new S-500 air defense systems in 2020. They will replace the S-400 (in picture) currently used in 19 air defense divisions. Photo: RIA-Novosti

Amid growing demand for its current S-400 system, Almaz Antey continues development of a successor to the ‘Triumf’.

Known as ‘Prometheus’, the S-500 is a more advanced air and missile defense system originally scheduled for deployment by the Russian air defense forces by the end of the decade. A navalized version could follow in 3-5 years. According to Russian officials, testing of the new interceptors is said to be on schedule for fielding by 2020, three years later than the original schedule.

The new system employs two new interceptors – 77N6-N and 77N6-N1, both are designed to perform at hypersonic speed (above 5,000 meters/second), using ‘Hit-To-Kill’ (HTK) effect. In their HTK capacity, the new Russian air defense system will be similar to the latest U.S. interceptors, such as THAAD and Patriot PAC-3, but the speed and range of the Russian system are expected to exceed the performance of the American systems. The interceptors of the current S-400 system that excels in medium and long-range performance uses proximity fusing.

Other new elements in the S-500 system are four types of radars – a battle management radar (91N6AM) and 96L6-TsP acquisition radar, 76T6 multimode engagement radar and anti-ballistic engagement radar 77T6. According to Russian sources, the S-500 has an operational radius of 600 kilometers, and the capability to simultaneously engage 10 targets, including aircraft, ballistic missiles, and even high speed hypersonic aerial targets.

The S-500 system employs specialized transporter/erector/launcher (TEL) vehicles that will enter developmental engineering this year (2018). The vehicle is based on a BAZ-69096 10×10 truck. The Almaz Antey Corporation began development of the new SAM system in 2011 and is currently proceeding with developmental testing. The new missile will be able to operate as part of Integrated Air Defense Systems (IADS), along with existing assets such as the S-400, S300, S-350, Buk-2M and short-range SA-11 or SA-15 units.

The S-500 is positioned to become the successor of the S-400 Triumf currently deployed throughout Russia and offered for export. Comparable to the Terminal High Altitude Air Defense (THAAD) system (the Russians claimed it will be superior), S-500 is superior to the S-400in intercepting air-breathing targets (aircraft and cruise missiles) at longer ranges, and ballistic missiles flying at higher velocities. With a response time of three seconds, S-500 is three-times faster to respond to new threats, over the S-400. Since it will be able to intercept targets at altitudes of 200 km above the earth atmosphere, S-500 is also considered to become an anti-satellite weapon.

S-400, also known under the designation S-300 PMU-3 is currently the heaviest air defense asset in the Russian air defense array. 19 systems are currently deployed throughout Russia, with an undisclosed number of S-400 units being exported to China, and Algeria. The sale of such system to Turkey has been confirmed. Russia also negotiates the sale of S-400 with India, and Saudi Arabia, with no results yet.

The S-400 comprises four types interceptors, covering different segments of the airspace protected by the unit. The system can operate four 40N6 interceptors able to hit large targets at ranges of up to 400 km (namely strategic platforms such as airborne warning and control – AWACS, Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) or aerial tankers). Alternatively, four 48N6 interceptors can be stored in the same canisters, providing long-range intercept capability at a range of up to 250 km. Two types of shorter-range interceptors can be used, four of these smaller interceptors are stored in each canister that carries the larger missiles. These smaller interceptors are designated 9M96E2 and 9M96E, they cover the medium (120 km) and Short (40km) range. Those shorter-range missiles are also employed in smaller, individual canisters in tactical air defense systems, such as the S-350 Vityaz.
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[*] posted on 3-1-2018 at 12:14 PM


Russia’s radar shortcomings are a US problem now

By: Kelsey Atherton   9 hours ago


This file photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile, ICBM, in North Korea's northwest, Tuesday, July 4, 2017. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

Lost in the overall frenzy of North Korea’s first intercontinental ballistic missile test last July was a peculiar detail of understated significance: While the United States, Japan, South Korea, and North Korea all agreed that the Hwasong-14 was an ICBM, one country did not.

Spoiler alert: It was Russia.

Russia instead claimed the missile was only an intermediate range (and not intercontinental) ballistic missile. In July, The Diplomat walked through some possibilities of what this might mean, be it technical error, political gamesmanship, or a genuine deficiency in capability.

After the second North Korean test of an ICBM in July, Russia again refused match the rest of the world in declaring the ICBM test as an ICBM. This repeated failure suggests a limitation in current Russian early-warning radars.

From The Diplomat:

Quote:

Given the relatively large wavelength of UHF radars such as Russia’s Voronezh systems, which are primarily designed to detect incoming U.S. ICBMs, it isn’t implausible that the Russian platforms were simply incapable of detecting the comparatively smaller North Korean Hwasong-14’s second stage. (Other phenomena, such as radar refraction over the curvature of the earth, can affect the effectiveness of these radar systems.)


In December 2016 Russia boasted that it completed construction of its early-warning coverage, and in December 2017, Russia’s Air and Space Forces announced the start of combat operations at its last three early warning sites.

And there remains a curious omission: Russia’s foreign minister Sergey Lavrov took until December to acknowledge that North Korea had any ICBMs at all, and even then, only acknowledged the November test of the much larger Hwasong-15.

All this leaves a distinct possibility that, should North Korea launch a Hwasong-14, Russia would be unable to see the smaller ICBM as what it actually is, and in what would invariably be a tense hour, might misread actions and intentions after that point. Which, in turn, casts a lot of doubt on the success and utility of even the newly completed early warning system.
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[*] posted on 3-1-2018 at 02:40 PM


Aegis Ashore Should Be Operational In Japan In Five Years

Jan 2, 2018

Bradley Perrett | Aviation Week & Space Technology

A long-anticipated Japanese decision to acquire two U.S. Aegis Ashore systems will offer national coverage against North Korean ballistic missiles but, the government suggests, not until 2022–23. The acquisition will release Japan’s Aegis destroyers for other duties, including protecting islands claimed by China.

Aegis Ashore is very similar to the shipborne Aegis system. Both versions are built by Lockheed Martin and use Standard Missile (SM) interceptors, made mainly by Raytheon. For Japan’s land installations the specific interceptor variant will be the SM-3 Block 2A. It was developed in partnership with Japan for hitting farther-flying and faster targets and, according to Raytheon, is on track for deployment on land and at sea in 2018.

- Missile interceptors will be Raytheon SM-3 Block 2As
- They will be able to deal with intermediate-range ballistic missiles
- There will be two sites with overlapping coverage

The first operational Aegis Ashore has been built in Romania; one in Poland should be operational next year. Japan has been considering introduction of Aegis Ashore or the Lockheed Martin THAAD system since 2014 or earlier. THAAD would have cost more, because its range is shorter. Many batteries would have been required for national coverage.

Announcing the acquisition on Dec. 19, Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera noted that an Aegis destroyer took five years to acquire. “Although we would like to introduce the new system, as soon as possible, we will consider this as a guideline time frame,” he told reporters. That implies entry into service in 2022–23.


The first Aegis Ashore installation was completed in Romania in 2016. Credit: U.S. Navy

The schedule does not leave Japan vulnerable in the meantime, because the destroyers provide ballistic missile defense (BMD) and will do so more effectively in the next few years. Indeed, the main effect of the acquisition is to take pressure off them. “Currently, the [navy’s] Aegis-equipped destroyers are responsible for missile defense, but given that this task must be performed continually, on a 24-hr.-a-day, 365-days-a-year basis, it is desirable to deploy a land-based system, Onodera says.

The pressure on the ships is declining anyway, for two reasons. First, the number with BMD capability is growing: The Atago is being upgraded to join the four Kongou-class units with this function. Atago’s sister ship, Ashigara, will be similarly upgraded and by 2021 the fleet will be joined by two new destroyers of the 27DD type.

Second, SM-3 Block 2A is presumably being introduced into the fleet, though the government has not publicly said so. Since Block 2A missiles have longer reach than the fleet’s current SM-3 Block 1A rounds, fewer destroyers are needed on station.

In 2005 Rear Adm. (ret.) Brad Hicks,at the time head of the U.S. Navy’s Aegis BMD program, said that with Block 2A just one destroyer instead of three could cover Japan. Nonetheless, the Aegis Ashore acquisition suggests that, before the land installations are operational, the government would want to keep two BMD ships with SM-3 Block 2A at sea, probably for redundancy. That is a heavy burden on the fleet.

The government wants more availability from the ships for other roles. “The Aegis-equipped destroyers are originally not intended only for BMD, but also for performing various tasks, including the defense of the southwestern region,” Onodera notes. The southwest includes the Senkaku Islands, which China claims.

SM-3 Block 2As will bring an ability to deal with intermediate-range ballistic missiles, those that can fly 3,000–5,500 km (1,900–3,400 mi.), such as the North Korean Hwasong 12, tested in 2017. The Blocks 1A and 1B can intercept medium-range ballistic missiles, such as North Korea’s Nodong 1.

Raytheon said in 2017 that SM-3 Block 2A could be upgraded to deal with intercontinental ballistic missiles. North Korea tested two in 2017, the Hwasong 14 and Hwasong 15.

North Korea can reach all of Japan’s population with medium-range missiles, but it could choose to challenge defenses by firing missiles that can fly farther and therefore faster. To hit Japan, they would go very high rather than very far.

Although the navy has experience with Aegis, the land installations will be operated by the army. It already has Lockheed Martin PAC-3 batteries, which are effective against short-range ballistic missiles.

Hicks’s statements suggest Japan’s two Aegis Ashore installations will have largely overlapping defense footprints. A U.S. Defense Department diagram shows even SM-3 Block 1Bs can protect European territory within 1,500 km of their launchers against missiles fired from Iran. Japan is 3,000 km long, measured from the most northeasterly of islands, off Hokkaido, to those farthest to the southwest, near Taiwan. The Asahi Shimbun newspaper says Aegis Ashore installations will be built at the north and south ends of the biggest island, Honshu.

They will deal with missiles coming from closer ranges than those faced by Aegis Ashore in Eastern Europe. Possible North Korean launch positions are variously 600–1,400 km from the Honshu sites. The Polish and Romanian sites are 1,700–4,800 km from Iranian territory.

Tokyo is 1,000 km from the safest locations for North Korean ballistic missile launchers, near the border with China.
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 05:14 PM


DRDO Successfully Conducts Interceptor Missile Test

(Source: Indian Ministry of Defence; issued Dec 28, 2017)



Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) System of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) successfully scored a direct hit on incoming missile today at around 09:45 am from Dr Abdul Kalam Island off the coast of Odisha. The interceptor directly hit the target at an altitude of about 15 kilometres and destroyed it into fragments. The spectacular success puts India in the league of a very few select nations world over in the arena of critical defence technology.

Today’s direct interception is fourth in a row, where the missiles have scored a perfect hit on the incoming missile.

In text book style launch, the incoming ballistic missile was launched from LC-III complex of ITR, which followed the exact path of intended ballistic missile. Radars located at different stations far-off, acquired the target, tracked them and passed on to the Master Control Centre (MCC), which generated the expected trajectory of the target and alerted the interceptor missile.

The interceptor was launched from Dr A P J Abdul Kalam Island at appropriate time for interception, which was initially guided by the Inertial Navigational System and the radars. Later, the seeker took over after a proper lock on to the target and guided the missile towards the target. All the radars, Electro Optical and Telemetry Stations tracked both the missiles and recorded the final interception.

The event was witnessed by Vice Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal Sirish Deo and other senior officials of Armed Forces. Directors of DRDO laboratories namely RCI, ASL, LRDE and ITR reviewed the entire launch operations.

Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri & Director General (Missiles & Strategic Systems) Dr G Sateesh Reddy was present during the launch operation said that the repeat performance of the interception demonstrates the country’s professional capability in high technology oriented Ballistic Missile Defence.

Chairman DRDO & Secretary Department of Defence Research & Development Dr S Christopher, congratulated the scientists behind the magnificent feat and said that the test paved the way for self-reliance.

Raksha Mantri Smt Nirmala Sitharaman congratulated DRDO for elevating the country to few select nations having such BMD capability.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 07:57 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
DRDO Successfully Conducts Interceptor Missile Test

(Source: Indian Ministry of Defence; issued Dec 28, 2017)



Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) System of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) successfully scored a direct hit on incoming missile today at around 09:45 am from Dr Abdul Kalam Island off the coast of Odisha. The interceptor directly hit the target at an altitude of about 15 kilometres and destroyed it into fragments. The spectacular success puts India in the league of a very few select nations world over in the arena of critical defence technology.

Today’s direct interception is fourth in a row, where the missiles have scored a perfect hit on the incoming missile.

In text book style launch, the incoming ballistic missile was launched from LC-III complex of ITR, which followed the exact path of intended ballistic missile. Radars located at different stations far-off, acquired the target, tracked them and passed on to the Master Control Centre (MCC), which generated the expected trajectory of the target and alerted the interceptor missile.

The interceptor was launched from Dr A P J Abdul Kalam Island at appropriate time for interception, which was initially guided by the Inertial Navigational System and the radars. Later, the seeker took over after a proper lock on to the target and guided the missile towards the target. All the radars, Electro Optical and Telemetry Stations tracked both the missiles and recorded the final interception.

The event was witnessed by Vice Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal Sirish Deo and other senior officials of Armed Forces. Directors of DRDO laboratories namely RCI, ASL, LRDE and ITR reviewed the entire launch operations.

Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri & Director General (Missiles & Strategic Systems) Dr G Sateesh Reddy was present during the launch operation said that the repeat performance of the interception demonstrates the country’s professional capability in high technology oriented Ballistic Missile Defence.

Chairman DRDO & Secretary Department of Defence Research & Development Dr S Christopher, congratulated the scientists behind the magnificent feat and said that the test paved the way for self-reliance.

Raksha Mantri Smt Nirmala Sitharaman congratulated DRDO for elevating the country to few select nations having such BMD capability.

-ends-


Why do I find this just ever so slightly suspicious... :lol:




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 08:51 PM


Previous experience?
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[*] posted on 4-1-2018 at 09:42 PM


Induiia's oft-demonstrated capability to monumentally frak things up, all the while claiming unmitigated success for 'indignous systems".

See also Tejas...





It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
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[*] posted on 5-1-2018 at 08:07 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Previous experience?


Well I can think of several possibilities...

1. They managed something that Russia, China and the US struggle with, despite the fact they struggle to build helicopters let alone fighter jets...

2. They scripted this with the script reading ‘launch a rocket-ish looking object, fire a target missile and command detonate both in flight somewhere near each other and claim complete success.’

3. Lie entirely and claim complete success.





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 5-1-2018 at 08:15 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Previous experience?


Well I can think of several possibilities...

1. They managed something that Russia, China and the US struggle with, despite the fact they struggle to build helicopters let alone fighter jets...

2. They scripted this with the script reading ‘launch a rocket-ish looking object, fire a target missile and command detonate both in flight somewhere near each other and claim complete success.’

3. Lie entirely and claim complete success.



I'm so shocked you would think that..............:cool: :cool: :cool:
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