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[*] posted on 15-9-2017 at 08:14 PM
RNZN part 2


Another legacy thread lost due to Spammers....................

Hyundai selects Kelvin Hughes bridge system for New Zealand Navy’s fleet tanker

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

15 September 2017


A computer-generated image of the Royal New Zealand's Maritime Sustainment Capability vessel. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy

Key Points
- The Royal New Zealand Navy’s new fleet tanker will feature a navigation bridge system from Kelvin Hughes
- System also eliminates the need for helicopter transponders, and allows for better awareness against potentially hostile small targets in the air, and on the surface

British maritime systems supplier Kelvin Hughes announced on 14 September that it has been awarded a contract by Hyundai Heavy Industries to supply an integrated navigation bridge system (INBS) for the Royal New Zealand Navy’s (RNZN’s) new 24,000-tonne maritime sustainment capability (MSC) vessel.

The system will include one solid state SharpEye navigation radar with S- and X-band capabilities, and one S-band SharpEye radar that has been optimised for helicopter approach and control. These sensors will be integrated with a dual redundant data distribution system and multifunction displays, said the company.

The radar system will also feature enhanced pulse compression, and moving target detection processing, which allows for the detection of small targets on the sea surface and helicopters close to the horizon, even in severe weather conditions, said Kelvin Hughes in a statement on the contract.

“The combination of these radar techniques enables the sea and rain clutter to be filtered out without losing the radar targets of interest,” it said. “This is especially important when protecting the ship from threats such as swimmers, RHIBs [rigid hull inflatable boats], and other low radar cross section [RCS] threats,” the company noted, adding that system’s aircraft approach and control system also eliminate the need for helicopter transponders.

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[*] posted on 11-1-2018 at 02:00 PM


Government Resolves Defence Cost Blowout

(Source: New Zealand Ministry of Defence; issued Dec. 13, 2017)

Defence Minister Ron Mark has announced that a revised contract has been signed with Lockheed Martin Canada to deliver the installation phase of the Anzac Frigate Systems Upgrade (FSU) project.

The project, which had a budget of $491 million after contract signature in 2014, has experienced a cost overrun of $148 million, around 30 per cent of the budget. The revised project budget now sits at $639 million.

Mr Mark said that the FSU cost overrun was the largest example of procurement overspends under the previous Government yet identified.

“This Government has discovered a range of cost pressures and procurement overspends across several portfolios. This Defence project is the largest such example to date.

“This project is the biggest commitment of a series of mid-life upgrades on the frigates that have taken place since the mid-2000s, which have kept systems up to date with modern technology," he said.

“There has been a series of inaccurate estimates and project management errors by the Ministry of Defence, compounded by a failure to act by previous Ministers.

“The scale of this overrun is deeply disappointing, and I have made it clear to officials that under this Government, Defence procurement must and will be accurately costed, scoped and delivered on time and within budget. This is not good enough.

"While this Government has acted quickly on this issue, through making a fiscally neutral transfer within the Defence Budget allocation at no additional cost to taxpayers, the same cannot be said about the previous Government.

“After first becoming aware of this issue in September 2016, when additional costs were first estimated at between $65-74 million, they failed to resolve it over a year, while costs continued to increase, and schedule delays became longer and longer.

"Crucially, the contractor provided a final fixed firm price in June 2017, and this was not taken up in the run-up to the election. This decision imposed a real further cost to taxpayers and the Navy, with the contract having to be reopened and renegotiated, causing additional costs to be incurred, and a significant delay to the point at which installation of this essential equipment on the frigates could begin.”

To fund the cost overrun, and consistent with the Coalition’s commitment to fiscal prudence, Cabinet has agreed to reallocate a portion of the money that was provisioned in Budget 2017 for the Littoral Operations Support Capability project. This trade-off will mean that a contemporary, off-the-shelf commercial dive and hydrographic vessel will be procured, rather than a more advanced, specifically designed military vessel.

“While this is a trade-off in capability for Defence, this innovative response means that a dive and hydrographic vessel will be able to be delivered to the Defence Force sooner than the military-specification option,” Mr Mark said.

“It will be significantly more capable than HMNZS Manawanui and HMNZS Resolution, the two vessels it is replacing, particularly in regards to support to underwater search and recovery operations, and in capacity, speed, and versatility in response to domestic and regional natural disasters. This trade-off was made on the advice of Defence

-ends-
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[*] posted on 12-2-2018 at 08:22 PM


HHI Cut 1st Steel of Royal New Zealand Navy Future HMNZS Aotearoa Tanker

Posted On Sunday, 11 February 2018 11:49

Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) started construction of the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) future fleet tanker HMNZS Aotearoa. The first steel cutting ceremony took place on January 31st 2018 at HHI's Ulsan shipyard in South Korea.


(Picture source: Royal New Zealand Navy)

HMNZS Aotearoa will replace the fleet tanker HMNZS Endeavour that decommissions next year after more than 30 years of loyal service. Aotearoa will boast state of the art design and capability features including ice-strengthening and ‘winterisation’ features for operations in Antarctica. She will also be able to carry 12 containers of supplies and have the ability to produce 100 tonnes of fresh water each day which will make her invaluable when providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

She will carry 8,000 tonnes of diesel fuel which is enough to ‘fill up’ a frigate like Te Mana or Te Kaha 13.87 times. And she’ll be able to carry and operate a RNZAF NH90 helicopter. Aotearoa will have a core crew of 64 plus 11 flight crew.

The 24,000-tonne vessel is set to become the largest vessel ever operated by the Royal New Zealand Navy. It will be launched in March next year, and enter service in 2020.


First steel cut for New Zealand's future fleet tanker. Picture source: Royal New Zealand Navy

HMNZS Aotearoa will be a world-first naval “Environship”, with Hyundai using the Rolls-Royce Environship concept design under licence. The design incorporates a new wave-piercing hull, which reduces resistance and lowers fuel use, while its combined diesel electric and diesel propulsion plant has lower fuel emissions than older vessels.

The design and capabilities of HMNZS Aotearoa were announced by the Ministry of Defence in 2016. The cost includes the tanker’s enhanced “winterisation” capabilities, such as ice-strengthening for operations in Antarctica, including resupplying McMurdo Station and Scott Base. HMNZS Endeavour is not Antarctic-capable.

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/phUN1aohVXs?t=321
Our video coverage on the design at Euronaval 2016
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[*] posted on 7-3-2018 at 07:28 PM


HMNZS Te Kaha Arrives In Canada for Major Systems Upgrade

(Source: New Zealand Ministry of Defence; issued March 06, 2018)

Minister of Defence Ron Mark announced today the arrival of HMNZS Te Kaha in Canada, where a major upgrade of its sensor and weapons systems will be undertaken.

Focused on the frigates’ surveillance, combat and self-defence capabilities, this upgrade is the latest in a series of projects that will extend the vessels’ operational life to around 2030. Earlier projects delivered a refit of the frigates’ propulsion, heating and air-conditioning systems, and the close-in weapon system.

“There is a significant programme of work to upgrade or replace New Zealand’s defence equipment that aims to maintain the safety of our military personnel and the country’s ability and readiness to deploy when needed, both in this country and overseas,” says Mr Mark.

An additional $148 million was approved by Cabinet to ensure the upgrade could proceed, bringing the total project budget to $639 million. To fund the cost overrun, and consistent with the Coalition’s commitment to fiscal prudence, Cabinet agreed to reallocate a portion of the money that was provisioned in Budget 2017 for the Littoral Operations Support Capability project.

“The Government’s decision reflects the value placed on our frigates and their ability to operate across and support a wide range of operations.

“In the time the frigates have been operational New Zealanders have come to expect their involvement in constabulary and humanitarian, to combat roles as part of a multinational coalition. These contributions are valued by our international partners.”

When completed, the frigate will have updated equipment and systems including the combat management system, radar and underwater sonar.

Following an international tendering process, the contract for the work was awarded to Lockheed Martin Canada. The company’s design for the systems upgrade of 12 Royal Canadian Navy Halifax Class frigates has been adapted for use in New Zealand’s vessels.

“New Zealand and Canada have a close and enduring partnership based on shared history and common interests. Our cooperation on the Frigate System Upgrade is a demonstration of the maturity of our bilateral relationship, which continues to strengthen in 2018,” says Mr Mark.

The 25-day passage to Esquimalt in British Columbia, where the upgrade will take place, was marked by a brief port visit in Hawaii’s Pearl Harbor where Te Kaha and her crew represented New Zealand as part of the United States’ commemoration of Presidents’ Day.

For the final leg of the voyage, the crew was supplemented by a group of 10 Royal Canadian Naval Reserve personnel who had an opportunity to experience working life on board the frigate.

The upgrade of the second frigate, HMNZS Te Mana, is scheduled to take place in 2019.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 24-4-2018 at 08:07 PM


RNZN tanker gets FarSounder sonar

24th April 2018 - 05:30 GMT | by The Shephard News Team



The Royal New Zealand Navy's future fleet replenishment tanker, HMNZS Aotearoa, will be fitted with FarSounder's forward-looking sonar, the FarSounder-1000.

The FarSounder-1000 long range sonar will provide real-time 3D data on what is ahead as the tanker navigates the seas, giving the vessel's crew an elevated level of safety and security.

HMNZS Aotearoa is a Maritime Sustainment Capability vessel that will replace HMNZS Endeavour. Being built by South Korea's Hyundai Heavy Industries Shipyard, the tanker will be equipped with ice-strengthened and winterized steel for a full range of operations in Antarctica, and will be used for logistics support, maritime protection, humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

The FarSounder-1000 will be an important addition to the 24,000-metric ton vessel as it carries out operations in disaster zones with dangerous debris and changing seafloors.
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[*] posted on 1-5-2018 at 08:11 PM


Lockheed Martin Canada Begins Modernization Work of ANZAC Frigate HMNZS TE KAHA

Posted On Monday, 30 April 2018 12:10

Her Majesty’s New Zealand Ship (HMNZS) TE KAHA was transfered into the care of Lockheed Martin Canada and Seaspan Victoria Shipyards Co. Ltd in Victoria, BC, April 26, 2018 to commence the shipyard industrial refit phase of the ANZAC Frigate Systems Upgrade project.


Her Majesty's New Zealand Ship (HMNZS) TE KAHA during a fleet review in Singapore last year.

This marks the first time that a foreign warship has been modernized in Canada since the Second World War.

“For the past four years, Lockheed Martin Canada’s Combat System Integration team has been preparing for this day by designing, integrating and testing the Combat System as well as the ship platform design changes for HMNZ Ships TE KAHA and TE MANA next year. Installation of an advanced combat system will ensure New Zealand has a credible maritime combat capability,” says Acting Vice President and General Manager of Lockheed Martin Canada Rotary Mission Systems (RMS), Gary Fudge.

During the handover ceremony, held in Esquimalt, BC, Fudge expressed his feelings of satisfaction with this milestone after receiving HMNZS TE KAHA.

“On behalf of Lockheed Martin Canada and the Seaspan team, I wish to express our gratitude for this opportunity to complete the final phase of modernizing TE KAHA, with TE MANA to follow. Our continued partnership with the Royal New Zealand Navy is something we are very proud of and you may all return to New Zealand secure in the knowledge that your ship is in good hands,” said Fudge.

Quick facts

HMNZS TE KAHA arrived in Canada on March 6, where it proceeded to the Royal Canadian Navy’s Fleet Maintenance Facility (FMF) Cape Breton for de-storing of equipment and preservation of ship systems in preparation for the handover and start of the industrial refit.

As Prime Systems Integrator, Lockheed Martin Canada is responsible for designing and supplying the upgraded combat system for each ANZAC Class Frigate, including a new combat management system – based on Lockheed Martin Canada’s Combat Management System 330 – along with the supply and integration of various sensors, a missile system and a Combat Systems Trainer.

Lockheed Martin Canada is also responsible for the platform design and implementation and has subcontracted Seaspan Victoria Shipyards Co. Ltd in Victoria, BC, to install the new systems on the ship platforms.

Today, Lockheed Martin Canada is the Combat Systems Integrator (CSI) for four major active programs across three countries, including New Zealand’s ANZAC Frigate Systems Upgrade project, the Chilean Navy’s Type 23 modernization, Canada’s Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship, and the lead program which saw the initial development of the CMS 330, the Halifax Class Modernization program.

HMNZS TE MANA is scheduled to arrive in 2019. Under Lockheed Martin Canada supervision and direction, Seaspan Shipyards will refit and install the new systems with an expected completion date of 2020 for the entire contract.
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[*] posted on 2-5-2018 at 11:58 AM


I notice they very carefully did not commit to a completion date for this refit.



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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 08:31 PM


Hyundai lays keel for New Zealand’s naval fleet tanker

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

14 August 2018


Computer generated imagery of the Royal New Zealand Navy's new fleet tanker, which was laid down by Hyundai Heavy Industries in August 2018. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy/Hyundai Heavy Industries

Key Points

- Hyundai has laid down a 173 m fleet tanker on order for the Royal New Zealand Navy
- Country is on track to receive the vessel, which will support global deployments of the New Zealand Defence Force, by 2020

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has laid down the fleet tanker on order for the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN).

Keel for the vessel, which will be in service as HMNZS Aotearoa (A 12) once commissioned, was laid down on 13 August at HHI’s facilities in Ulsan, the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) announced via an official social publishing platform on the same day. The tanker was acquired under a NZD493 million (USD323 million) contract announced in 2016.

Once completed, Aotearoa will displace 24,000 tonnes with an overall length of 166 m, an overall beam of 24.5 m, and a design draught of 8.5 m – making it the largest vessel to be operated by the RNZN. The tanker will incorporate an ‘axe bow’ design in its forward section for fuel efficiency, has a top speed of 16 kt, and a maximum range of 6,750 n miles.

The ship, which has been described by the NZDF as one that is “built specifically to address global requirements of the New Zealand Defence Force and government agencies for deployment from Antarctica to the Arabian Gulf”, will have liquid cargo capacity for 8,000 tonnes of diesel fuel, 1,550 tonnes of aviation fuel, and 250 tonnes of fresh water. Fuel for vessels can be delivered via two NATO-compliant replenishment-at-sea (RAS) masts, one each on the port and starboard sides.

Besides fuels and conventional cargo, the tanker can also accommodate up to 12 standardised 20 ft containers, four of which can contain dangerous goods such as ammunition. The ship will be equipped with a winterised crane that can lift to 25 tonnes.

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[*] posted on 22-8-2018 at 08:32 PM


New Zealand to procure Norwegian support vessel

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

22 August 2018



The New Zealand government said on 22 August that it will procure a multirole offshore support vessel currently operated by a Norwegian offshore services provider to meet its dive and hydrographic requirements.

The government said in a statement that the acquisition of the 85 m vessel, MV Edda Fonn , which was built in 2003, will cost NZD103 million (USD69 million).

It added that following the purchase, the vessel will be outfitted with the dive and hydrographic systems required by the government before being delivered to the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) in May 2019. Local industry is expected to be involved in the refurbishment programme.

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[*] posted on 22-8-2018 at 08:34 PM


More info from one of the Ship's Agents................

Edda Fonn

Through our JV with Reach Subsea we offer you Edda Fonn that is a high quality, cost effective and flexible vessel for IMR, survey and light construction services. The vessel has an overall length of 84.7 meters, 18 meters abeam, 700 square meters aft deck and a 7.2×7.2 meters working moonpool. Prepared for module handling.

Edda Fonn is a DP2 IMR, Survey and Light Construction Vessel.

- The vessel is equipped with a deck hangar suitable for 1 x ROV launching through side door.
- The vessel is in general certified for 20 marine crew and 46 special purpose personnel.
- The vessel is equipped with a 100MT (AHC) offshore crane with a working depth of 2000 m.
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[*] posted on 28-8-2018 at 08:03 PM


More on this...............

New Dive and Hydrographic Support Vessel for Royal New Zealand Navy

Posted On Tuesday, 28 August 2018 11:15

On 22 August, New Zealand's Minister of Defence Ron Mark announced the purchase of the 85-metre Edda Fonn, a 15-year-old offshore support vessel from Norwegian firm Østensjø Rederi AS, as the replacement for decommissioned dive tender HMNZS Manawanui and hydrographic survey ship HMNZS Resolution.


Image of what the future HMNZS Manawanui will look like.

The new ship will be renamed HMNZS Manawanui, the fourth RNZN ship to bear that name. The former Manawanui’s home port was Whitianga.

Gisborne was chosen as the home port for the new Manawanui because it was the home port of HMNZS Resolution and HMNZS Monowai. Resolution paid a final visit to Gisborne before she was decommissioned on 27 April, 2012.

The practice of home ports relates to the awarding of charters to individual ships and the name of the ship. HMNZS Resolution had a charter with Gisborne, which gave permission for the ship’s company to conduct formal parades in the district.

Ships such HMNZS Otago and HMNZS Wellington would automatically have Dunedin and Wellington respectively as their home ports.

Commander Matt Wray, a Hydrographic Survey officer and the last Commanding Officer of HMNZS Resolution, said a ship’s visit to its home port was an occasion the ship’s company looked forward to.

“Gisborne always made Resolution welcome and it is wonderful the Navy is reconnecting with the district after six years. I said to the Mayor, Meng Foon, when the Resolution had its last visit that the Navy won’t forget Gisborne,” Commander Wray said.

“It’s really pleasing for me to see our traditional link with Gisborne renewed with the hydrographic trade, and now the diving trade.”

The Edda Fonn was chosen as the most suitable option from a list of 150 vessels reviewed.

The Ministry of Defence procurement team has had an excellent relationship with the owner, Østensjø Rederi AS, which will undertake the first RNZN-required modifications before the ship sails for New Zealand in March 2019.

Once commissioned in New Zealand, HMNZS Manawanui will have final modifications and be in service by November 2019. The budget for the project is $103 million.

Mr Mark described the vessel as a great addition to the RNZN, filling capability gaps in diving, salvage and hydrography.

“It will be in service three years earlier than a purpose-built ship would have been."
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[*] posted on 28-8-2018 at 10:50 PM


Where are the Harpoon ASM’s supposed to fit on that?

Oh, wait. It’s the NZ “navy”... 😂




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[*] posted on 31-8-2018 at 02:56 PM


The Kiwi's are definitely trying for a lock on the title of ugliest naval ship, between this and their new tanker...



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[*] posted on 3-10-2018 at 08:08 PM


Hyundai to launch New Zealand’s naval fleet tanker in April 2019

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

02 October 2018

Key Points

- A fleet tanker on order for the Royal New Zealand Navy will be launched in April 2019
- Country is on track to receive its largest-ever naval vessel by 2020

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) will launch a fleet tanker on order for the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) in April 2019, the service has confirmed.

The vessel, which will be in service as HMNZS Aotearoa (A 12) once commissioned, was laid down in August 2018 at HHI’s facilities in Ulsan. It was acquired under the NZD493 million (USD324 million) Maritime Sustainment Capability (MSC) programme to replace its decommissioned fleet oiler, Endeavour .

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[*] posted on 20-1-2019 at 06:27 PM


New Zealand Navy gets Cougar ROV onboard HMZS Resolution

POSTED ON FRIDAY, 18 JANUARY 2019 16:10

Norway-based Østensjø Rederi is contracted to deliver the future HMZS Resolution (also known as ‘Edda Fonn’) to the New Zealand Ministry of Defense in 2019 with an integrated ROV and dive system amongst its upgrades.


The Cougar XT ROV (Picture source: Saab )

To meet the Navy’s operational requirements, Østensjø Rederi expanded and extended the technical specification for the complete system including : the Cougar, the control room, and in particular, the Launch and Recovery System (LARS).Østensjø Rederi will provide a modified dipping and extending LARS with snubber, heave compensation and electric winch motors for the Cougar. Along with the LARS, the complete system includes a standard Cougar XT with minor modification to include three cameras and sonar system, together with its tether management system and three individual tool skids with manipulators, cutters and water jetting system.

Initially, the New Zealand Navy was scheduled to receive a custom new-build vessel but an NZ$148 million cost in the country’s frigate upgrade project forced the government to consider a used vessel. Defense officials identified the MV Edda Fonn, owned and operated by Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi, as the most suitable option from an initial list of over 150 candidate offshore and subsea support vessels.

HMZS Resolution is scheduled to be delivered to Devonport Naval Base in May 2019. Final modifications will be undertaken in New Zealand. The ship is expected to be in service with the Navy by November 2019.
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[*] posted on 12-2-2019 at 09:11 PM


New Zealand’s future hydrography ship begins conversion into naval platform

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

11 February 2019


MV Edda Fonn, pictured at Haugesund, Norway. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy

The Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) future hydrographic and diving support vessel, MV Edda Fonn , has arrived in Frederickshavn, Denmark, for a fitting-out process that will be conducted according to naval requirements.

The 85 m vessel, which will be in service as HMNZS Manawanui once commissioned, departed its previous homeport of Haugesund, Norway, on 31 January, and arrived in Frederickshavn on 1 February, according to data from IHS Markit's Maritime Portal.

Edda Fonn was acquired by the New Zealand government in 2018 for NZD103 million (USD69 million) to fulfil existing gaps in the RNZN's diving support and hydrographic survey capabilities.

These operational gaps arose following the decommissioning of the hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution in 2012 and the retirement of the RNZN's namesake dive tender HMNZS Manawanui in 2018.

Edda Fonn has an overall length of 84.7 m, an overall beam of 18 m, and a hull draught of 6.3 m. It is equipped with a 100-tonne salvage crane that can be used to launch and recover remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).

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[*] posted on 15-3-2019 at 09:17 PM


New Zealand’s future hydrography ship begins sea trials

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

15 March 2019

Key Points

- A hydrographic and diving support vessel meant for the Royal New Zealand Navy has begun trials to validate its naval equipment
- The service is on track to operate the ship by November


The future HMNZS Manawanui, seen here in Royal New Zealand Navy livery and hull number. (Royal New Zealand Navy)

The Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) future hydrographic and diving support vessel, which will be known as HMNZS Manawanui once commissioned, has received its service livery and begun a series of sea trials off the coast of Denmark.

The trials are being used to confirm that naval equipment on board the ship are performing as expected, the RNZN said via its official social media account on 15 March.

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[*] posted on 17-4-2019 at 09:54 PM


New Zealand Replenishment Ship for launching by South Korean shipbuilder soon

APRIL 17, 2019


The HMNZS Aotearoa while under construction in HHI's yard in South Korea. Photo c/o RNZN.

The HMNZS Aotearoa (A11), a replenishment tanker being constructed by South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries for the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) under a US$493 million contract, is nearing its launching date, which is expected to happen within April 2019.

The ship is considered as the largest ship ever constructed for the RNZN, and will provide logistics support to New Zealand and coalition maritime, land, and air units. It is expected that the ship will be commissioned with the RNZN by early 2020.

The ship is capable of providing fuel resupply to ships, as well as supplying dry goods, water, ammunition, and spare parts.

The HMNZS Aotearoa has a crew of 64, features a wave-piercing hull, and will be 173.2 meters long and displaces at 26,000 tons. It is capable of operations in the Antarctic with ice-strengthened hull and considerations of winter operations.

It can carry twelve 20-foot shipping containers, aviation and marine fuel tanks, a dual all-electric replenishment at sea rigs, and high capacity freshwater generation plants.

It will have facilities to carry helicopters of the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) including the Kaman SH-2 Seasprite naval helicopter and the NH Industries NH90 medium helicopter.
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[*] posted on 26-4-2019 at 05:01 PM


South Koreas HHI launches RNZNs future fleet support vessel

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

25 April 2019


South Korean shipbuilder HHI launched the RNZNs future fleet replenishment vessel, Aotearoa, on 24 April at the companys dockyard in Ulsan. Source: HHI

South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) launched the Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) future fleet tanker/replenishment vessel at the company's dockyard in the southeastern coastal city of Ulsan on 24 April.

The 173 m-long auxiliary oiler replenishment (AOR) ship, which will be known as HMNZS Aotearoa once commissioned, was floated in the drydock at Ulsan in a ceremony attended by RNZN chief Rear Admiral David Proctor, among others.

Ordered for NZD493 million (USD323 million) in 2016 under New Zealand's Maritime Sustainment Capability (MSC) programme, the vessel was laid down in August 2018 and is expected to be delivered and commissioned in 2020 when it will replace fleet replenishment tanker Endeavour , which was decommissioned in December 2017.

The ship's home port will be New Plymouth in the country's western region of Taranaki.

Aotearoa , which will have twice the displacement of Endeavour and carry 30% more fuel, will be the largest vessel to be operated by the RNZN. It was designed to have a full-load displacement of 26,000 tonnes, an overall beam of 24.5 m, and a draught of 8.5 m.

The vessel will be able to carry 8,000 tonnes of diesel fuel, 1,550 tonnes of aviation fuel, and 250 tonnes of fresh water for resupply operations. It will also be capable of carrying 12 standard 20 ft containers - four of which can contain dangerous goods - and of producing 100 tonnes of fresh water each day, according to the RNZN.

Aotearoa will be capable of embarking one SH-2G(NZ) Seasprite or NH90 medium utility helicopter, and will be equipped with self-defence systems, integrated communications and bridge systems, an integrated platform management system, and two NATO-compliant replenishment-at-sea (RAS) masts.

(304 of 616 words)
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[*] posted on 26-4-2019 at 08:46 PM


Looks even worse in real photos...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 26-4-2019 at 09:28 PM


Well, she's an AOR with an Icebreaker bow, that's NEVER going to look pretty.........personally, I'm not too sure about Korean icebreaker design capability, but you never know, they might have gotten input from the Scandinavians, or Others with the knowledge?

One good thing, she comes across interference from the Chinese (PRC variety) in the so-called Maritime Militia, she can just steam through the middle of them and sink any that get in the way..............:blush:
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[*] posted on 22-5-2019 at 07:02 PM


RNZNs future hydrography ship arrives in New Zealand

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

21 May 2019


The RNZN's future hydrography ship, Manawanui (front), is seen here arriving in Auckland, New Zealand, in mid-May accompanied by HMNZS Canterbury (back). Source: RNZN

The Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) future hydrographic and diving support vessel has arrived in New Zealand following a 46 day-long journey from Denmark.

The service announced in mid-May that the 84.7 m-long vessel, which will be known as HMNZS Manawanui once commissioned, sailed into Wellington Harbour on 12 May after leaving the Danish port of Frederikshavn on her delivery voyage to New Zealand via the Panama Canal: a distance of 11,570 n miles (21,427 km).

The vessel, which is expected to be officially commissioned in early June during a ceremony at the Devonport Naval Base, is set to be home-ported at Gisborne on New Zealand's North Island.

In February the vessel arrived in Denmark from Norway to be fitted out and conduct subsequent sea trials according to RNZN requirements.

The ship, which had previously been in service as a commercial offshore support vessel known as Edda Fonn , was acquired by New Zealand in 2018 for NZD103 million (USD67.3 million) to fulfil operational gaps in the RNZN's diving support and maritime survey capabilities following the retirement of the service᾿s hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution in 2012 and of dive tender HMNZS Manawanu i in 2018, as Jane's reported.

The vessel has an overall beam of 18 m, a hull draught of 6.3 m, and is equipped with a 100-tonne salvage crane. Powered by four diesel-electric engines driving two azimuth propulsion systems, the 5,700-tonne vessel can reach a top speed of 13 kt.

The vessel, which is also fitted with a diving chamber and a helicopter flight deck, can accommodate a core crew of 39, with 27 more bunks for mission-specific personnel.

(295 of 486 words)
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[*] posted on 8-6-2019 at 12:56 PM


RNZN commissions new hydrographic vessel

Gabriel Dominguez, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

07 June 2019


The RNZNs new hydrography ship, HMNZS Manawanui, is seen here before it was commissioned on 7 June at the Devonport Naval Base in Auckland. Source: RNZN

The Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) new hydrographic and diving support vessel has entered service, according to a statement issued by the government of New Zealand.

HMNZS Manawanui was commissioned on 7 June in a ceremony held at the Devonport Naval Base in Auckland, and presided over by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

The 84.7 m-long vessel, which is set to be home-ported at Gisborne on the country's North Island, had arrived in New Zealand a few weeks earlier following a 46 day-long journey from Denmark.

It sailed into Wellington Harbour on 12 May after leaving the Danish port of Frederikshavn on its delivery voyage to New Zealand via the Panama Canal: a distance of 11,570 n miles (21,427 km). Manawanui had been sent to Denmark from Norway in February to be fitted out and conduct subsequent sea trials according to RNZN requirements.

The ship, which had previously been in service as a commercial offshore support vessel known as Edda Fonn, was procured by New Zealand in August 2018 for NZD103 million (USD67.3 million) to fulfil operational gaps in the RNZN's diving support and maritime survey capabilities following the retirement of the service᾿s hydrographic ship, HMNZS Resolution, in 2012 and of the dive tender HMNZS Manawanui in 2018.

The new vessel, which bears pennant number A 09, has an overall beam of 18 m, a hull draught of 6.3 m, and is equipped with a 100-tonne salvage crane. Powered by four diesel-electric engines driving two azimuth propulsion systems, the 5,700-tonne vessel can reach a top speed of 13 kt.

The ship, which is also fitted with a diving chamber and a helicopter flight deck, can accommodate a core crew of 39, with 27 more bunks for mission-specific personnel.

(313 of 610 words)
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[*] posted on 12-7-2019 at 10:24 PM


Could New Zealand join the Type 26 Frigate programme?

By George Allison - July 12, 201932



BAE Systems is promoting the Type 26 frigate in a potential deal with New Zealand.

No decision is likely to be made for a number of years for a ship not likely to hit the water towards the end of next decade, however.

Steve Timms, BAE managing director for naval ships was reported as saying:

New Zealand is clearly interested, adding that a deal could involve two or three vessels.

New Zealand would join the UK, Australia and Canada in ordering the design.

In addition, the Financial Times reported recently that Boris Johnson, former UK foreign secretary and a favourite to replace Theresa May as Prime Minister, told members of the Conservative party in Perth last week that he thought New Zealand would come in to the Type 26 programme.

The Type 26 frigate represents the future backbone of the Royal Navy and a massive leap forward in terms of flexibility of surface vessels enjoyed by the service.

The class will replace 8 of the 13 Type 23 frigates of the Royal Navy and export orders are being sought after by BAE.

The programme has been underway since 1998, initially under the name Future Surface Combatant. The programme was brought forward in the 2008 budget at the expense of Type 45 destroyers 7 and 8.
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[*] posted on 13-7-2019 at 01:15 PM


I wouldn't be holding my breath on that front (it just seems like way more warship than the Kiwi are willing to pay for), but it'd be a hell of a coup if BAe could pull it off.
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