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Author: Subject: RNZN part 2
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[*] posted on 15-7-2019 at 09:28 PM


BAE Systems looks to position Hunter-class frigate for New Zealand

Jon Grevatt - Jane's Defence Industry

14 July 2019


BAE Systems Australia has indicated a potential move to position its Hunter-class frigate, which has already been selected by Australia, to meet a future requirement within the RNZN. Source: Royal Australian Navy

BAE Systems Australia has confirmed a potential move to position the company's Hunter-class frigate design for the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN).

A spokesperson for BAE Systems Australia told Jane's on 12 July that given its commitment to deliver the Hunter-class platform to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) under its Sea 5000 project, it would be "logical" for the Australian government to also pursue international sales of the vessel.

When asked by Jane's to confirm that the company will look to export the Hunter-class frigate to New Zealand, the spokesperson said, "It is critical to understand that the programme to design and build nine world-leading Hunter-class frigates [for the RAN] will also see BAE Systems transfer technology and skills to Australia to enable the development of an enduring world-class naval shipbuilding industry for the nation.

"It would be a logical conclusion for the Australian government and its close allies to consider the potential export opportunities."

The spokesperson's comments followed a news report by the Financial Times newspaper on 11 July, which quoted Steve Timms, BAE managing director for naval ships, as saying "New Zealand is clearly interested" in the company's 6,900-tonne Type 26 frigate, on which the Hunter-class design in based.

According to the report, Timms said a deal with New Zealand could involve "two or three" vessels but declined to elaborate.

BAE Systems Australia signed a AUD35 billion (USD25 billion) contract in June 2018 with the Australian government to locally build nine Hunter-class frigates to replace the RAN's Anzac-class frigates, which have been in service since 1996 and were built by Australian shipbuilder Tenix Defence. Tenix Defence was acquired by BAE Systems in 2008.

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[*] posted on 15-7-2019 at 11:08 PM


Nice idea, but I can’t see this being affordable for NZ given how little they are willing to spend...



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[*] posted on 15-7-2019 at 11:32 PM


Maybe's, but the idea certainly has a lot of merit. We'll just have to see what the very energetic Defence Minister, Ron Mark, can pull out of the bag.

There is more than edge of concern creeping in about China's intentions...…….
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[*] posted on 29-8-2019 at 08:53 PM


New Zealand issues RFT for conversion work on dive tender

Tim Fish, Auckland - Jane's Navy International

28 August 2019

The New Zealand Ministry of Defence (MoD) has released a tender for conversion work on its new Diving and Hydrographic Vessel (DHV) to prepare it for operations.

Following an initial outfit in Denmark, HMNZS Manawanui was commissioned in June 2019. The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) wants the ship to be ready for military operations in 2020, and to achieve this it needs to complete a transformation from an oil and gas support vessel to naval DHV by the end of 2019.

The request for tender (RFT) is for a Stage 2b Modifications Project for mechanical and electrical system upgrades that will be carried out from October to December at Devonport Naval Base in Auckland.

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[*] posted on 8-11-2019 at 11:30 AM


New Zealand's Largest Navy Ship Christened in South Korea

(Source: New Zealand Defence Force; issued October 26, 2019)



Four of the more important words any Chief of Navy looks forward to hearing during their tenure are “I name this ship …” because it means a new addition to a navy fleet.

Yesterday in Ulsan, South Korea, Rear Admiral David Proctor was delighted to hear Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy name the Royal New Zealand Navy’s (RNZN) newest ship, Aotearoa at a ceremony at the Hyundai Shipyard.

Just five months after Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern named the RNZN’s replacement diving support and hydrographic vessel HMNZS Manawanui, Dame Patsy was able to do likewise for the RNZN’s new sustainment vessel.

After the ceremony, Dame Patsy said how proud she was to be given the honour of sponsoring Aotearoa and officially naming her.

“Aotearoa will carry the name of our country to all corners of the world, and I’m sure the ship and her crew will bring credit to all New Zealanders,” she said.

Aotearoa’s predecessor, HMNZS Endeavour, was built and launched at the Hyundai Shipyard in 1987, Rear Admiral Proctor said.

“Our excellent relationship with Hyundai Heavy Industries goes back more than 30 years and with Aotearoa the RNZN will take possession soon of a maritime sustainment vessel that will be one of the most technologically advanced available,” he said.

At 173m long, Aotearoa will be the largest ship the RNZN has ever had in the fleet. It boasts state-of-the-art design and capability features, including ice-strengthening and “winterisation” for operations in Antarctica.

She will operate as a fleet tanker and a supply ship and has the ability to produce 100 tonnes of fresh water each day – critical when providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

Following her sea trials, Aotearoa will sail to New Zealand in the second quarter of next year and will be formally commissioned at the Devonport Naval Base.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 8-11-2019 at 12:39 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
Nice idea, but I can’t see this being affordable for NZ given how little they are willing to spend...


Don't forget there is a wariness amongst left politicians there to be seen as spending money on capabilities that might, somehow be seen as being dragged into a conflict that Australia might be involved in.

That tripe was dragged up by the 'peace activists' during the Anzac purchase, too warlike and likely to see the NZDF dragged into a 'foreign war'.

Combined with their financial woes, it saw them back out of a joint purchase with Australia of C130Js, C17s, Boxers, A330s transports, pretty much any potential for dovetailing in with the ADF for an equipment purchase, even if it would deliver lower acquisition costs and opportunities for maintenance of the combined ADF / NZDF asset fleet.

Hell they walked away from the RANs Anzac upgrade program to go with something far cheaper that barely improves the ship's capabilities.

I really cannot see the RNZN getting the green light to buy frigates that are almost as big as an Arleigh Burke class destroyer, they're too 'warry' for the left wing peace lobby's sensitivities.

Instead I can imagine that the Anzacs will be replaced by large ice-strengthened OPVs, they're an easier sell to the NZ public and the politicians.




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[*] posted on 8-11-2019 at 01:39 PM


Quote:
I really cannot see the RNZN getting the green light to buy frigates that are almost as big as an Arleigh Burke class destroyer, they're too 'warry' for the left wing peace lobby's sensitivities.

Instead I can imagine that the Anzacs will be replaced by large ice-strengthened OPVs, they're an easier sell to the NZ public and the politicians.


The RNZN appear to be showing interest in the French FTI program. A delegation has apparently been sent over for the cutting of first steel.

But ditto on there being no hope of them getting on board with the RAN frigate development. The size and cost is astronomical by any standard.




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[*] posted on 9-11-2019 at 02:29 PM


Visually ugly but interesting bow design, makes good use of available space and length but still manages to provide the extra buoyancy to stop the nose going diving in higher sea states. Useful ship.
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[*] posted on 19-2-2020 at 10:06 PM


New Zealand progresses hydrographic vessel towards operational readiness

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

19 February 2020


HMNZS Manawanuithe, RNZN’s hydrographic survey and dive support vessel that was commissioned in 2019. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy

The Royal New Zealand Navy’s (RNZN’s) new hydrographic survey and diving support vessel, HMNZS Manawanui, has sailed out to sea for the first time since it was commissioned, the service announced on 17 February.

The operation is being done as part of the vessel’s Sea Acceptance Readiness Checks, said the RNZN via an official social media channel. The process also paves the way for Manawanui to attain its operational readiness status, the service added.

Manawanui was commissioned in June 2019 at the Devonport Naval Base in Auckland, New Zealand. Prior to its service with the RNZN, it existed as a commercial offshore support vessel known as Edda Fonn.

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[*] posted on 19-2-2020 at 10:09 PM


That grey colour is a little bit warlike for mine? Maybe it should be painted in ‘UN White’? Just so that nobody accidentally confuses it with a warship?

:lol:




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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