The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  4    6  
Author: Subject: NATO Naval
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-12-2019 at 06:42 PM


Cabinet Postpones Choice of Submarine Builder

(Source: Defense-Aerospace.com; posted Dec. 09, 2019)

PARIS --- Three teams remain in the race to build new submarines for the Royal Netherlands Navy, and although the goal is to get boats that are "as Dutch as possible," the Saab / Damen team will for the time being continue to face competition from France’s Naval Group and Germany’s ThyssenKrupp (TKMS), the Dutch daily Die Telegraaf reported Friday.

Dutch State Secretary of Defense Barbara Visser is expected to inform the House of Representatives this week about the next step of a program whose cost is estimated at approximately €3.5 billion. Despite the postponement of the selection of the winning bidder, previously scheduled this month, the defense ministry will confirm that it wants to buy four submarines, replacing the current Walrus-class boats one-for-one.

Extending the competition is somewhat of a surprise, Die Telegraaf reported. The Ministry of Defense and the Lower House feel it is better to go further with only Saab / Damen, a team that is seen as the most Dutch, and this government had promised to award large defense orders to Dutch industry as far as possible. With Damen, furthermore, valuable know-how about submarine construction would be retained in-country.

Afraid of a new Walrus affair

Others cabinet members, however, are concerned about the risks if the design and construction contracts are awarded to a single consortium. The government is apprehensive about a new "Walrus affair," the financial fiasco in the 1980s that led to the construction of four Walrus-class submarines with a 65% cost overrun. Moreover, there are opposite insights from the other departments involved: Economic Affairs, Finance, Foreign Affairs and General Affairs.

For Damen it is a disappointment. The Dutch shipbuilder is the best in the candidate comparison, Die Telegraaf reported, but it now fears that Naval Group has more "endurance" because of state aid. Moreover, Damen would benefit from a quick contract award, as it already has problems with a low order portfolio.

To meet the government's wish to involve Dutch industry in the project, France’s Naval Group has teamed with Royal IHC, a Dutch builder of offshore and dredging vessels. In TKMS’ bid, the submarines would be built by the naval company in Den Helder. A fourth player, Spain’s Navantia, is dropped.

The final choice for the builder of the new submarines will now be taken in 2021, and they will have to enter service six years later.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-12-2019 at 09:25 PM


Danish Arctic frigate deployment highlights requirement to augment regional C2

Dr. Lee Willett, London - Jane's Navy International

11 December 2019


The Royal Danish Navy Iver Huitfeldt-class frigate HDMS (right), the US Military Sealift Command auxiliary ship USNS centre), and the Royal Netherlands Navy M-class frigate HNLMS sail in the Atlantic Ocean in September 2019, during Canada’s ‘Cutlass Fury’ exercise off Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. deployed under Denmark’s Joint Arctic Command between June and July 2019. Source: US Navy

Key Points

- The Royal Danish Navy recently deployed an Iver Huitfeldt frigate and an Absalon combat support ship to its Greenland-based Joint Arctic Command for the first time, and is planning to deploy such platforms routinely to the region
- The frigate's capabilities have highlighted Denmark's requirement to improve Arctic command-and-control (C2) to maximise the impact of such capabilities

The Royal Danish Navy (RDN) has completed deployment of an Iver Huitfeldt-class frigate and an Absalon-class combat support ship to the High North to operate under Denmark's Joint Arctic Command for the first time.

Rear Admiral Torben Mikkelsen, Admiral Danish Fleet, told Jane's the RDN would "on a routine basis from now on [be] deploying large ships up there".

The plan to build on these deployments has also demonstrated Denmark's need to augment Arctic command-and-control (C2) capacity to maximise the operational benefits of deploying its larger warships to the region.

The RDN's second-in-class frigate HDMS Peter Willemoes deployed across the region between June and September 2019. Peter Willemoes was followed by HDMS Absalon , which operated in the region from mid-July to mid-August.

As regards Peter Willemoes , "The main task for the frigate was to conduct peacetime routine surveillance, [so] contributing to the sovereignty of the Kingdom. The frigates are deployed to the region to strengthen surveillance, command, control, and communication [C3]," Rear Adm Mikkelsen added.

Deploying such ships has brought new capability to the region for the RDN and the Joint Arctic Command. Frigates, for example, bring more modern sensors and improved air surveillance in particular, when compared to the Thetis-class patrol ships (which have been providing RDN presence in the region).

"As a whole one could argue that the on-board sensors of the frigate enhance Joint Arctic Command ability to build domain awareness," Rear Adm Mikkelsen said.

(323 of 780 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-12-2019 at 09:22 AM


Indra signs contract with Lockheed Martin to supply S-band radar components for Spanish F-110 frigates

David Ing, Madrid - Jane's Navy International

12 December 2019

Indra has signed a contract worth more than EUR150 million with Lockheed Martin to supply some of the main components of the S-band radar for the Spanish Navy’s five new F-110 frigates.

Announcing the deal on 12 September, the company said it forms part of an overall package for the anti-aircraft system signed the previous week between the US group and Spanish shipbuilder Navantia.

It also represents the company’s first order for the F-110 since the government approved at the end of November a EUR1.63 billion tranche to get construction under way.

The key parts it supplies will form part of the Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) S-band anti-air warfare radar antenna, “one of the sensors that will make this frigate one of the most advanced of its kind in the world”, said Indra.

(159 of 340 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-12-2019 at 11:59 AM


Indra Signs Contract for Over 150 Million Euros with Lockheed Martin to Manufacture the AESA S-Band Radar of the F110 Frigate

(Source: Navantia; issued December 12, 2019)


A computer-generated image of the Spanish Navy’s next-generation F110 class frigates, five of which are to be built by the Navantia shipyards with some components supplied by Lockheed Martin, including their S-Band radar. (Navantia image)

MADRID --- Indra has signed a contract with the US company Lockheed Martin to supply the main components of the AESA (Active Electronically scanned Arrays) S-band anti-air warfare radar antenna of the future F110, one of the sensors that will make this frigate one of the most advanced of its kind in the world.

The value of the contract amounts to over €150 million and will last for 7 years.

Lockheed Martin's Vice President & General Manager of the Integrated Warfare Systems and Sensors line of business, Paul Lemmo, and Indra's Executive Director of Transportation and Defence, Ignacio Mataix, sealed the agreement at an event held at Navantia’s headquarters in Madrid, Spain. The signing of the agreement was immediately preceded by the signature of Lockheed Martin’s contract with Navantia to equip the Spanish Navy’s five F110 frigates with S-band radars, as well as the Integrated Ground Systems Center (CIST) in which the system will be tested.

This subcontract signed with Indra is within the framework of Lockheed Martin’s S-band Radar contract and will supply the critical elements to support the digital transmission and reception of each of the radar’s elements.

This is the first of the contracts that Indra expects to be awarded during the construction phase of the five frigates to equip them with the sensors that their built-in mast carries.

The S-band anti-air warfare radar is one of the ship's key sensors and will give it supremacy and a dominant edge in combat.

It is a fully digitized system composed of hundreds of small independent blocks or tiles. Its flat facets laid out around the mast minimize the ship's radar profile.

Thanks to these digital tiles, this system will be able to operate as if it had several radars working simultaneously, which gives it its multitasking capability. It may, for example, operate as a long-range radar and integrate missile control, as well as setting tracking on multiple targets.

First Naval Division

The combat system, sensors and electronic defence systems that equip a naval vessel constitute an increasing percentage in the construction of military ships.

Indra leads the development within the F110 Program of some of the most advanced sensors that will be available in the international market in the coming years. In addition to the aforementioned tiles for the S-band radar, Indra is developing:

-- The 25X Prisma Radar, whose mission is surveillance of the surface and low-altitude aerial targets.

-- The IFF System, which will identify allied from enemy aircraft and will have an integrated ADS-B surveillance system that will give support to air control in international missions.

-- Electronic defence systems, which will track the communications band and the radar band. They will detect and identify any vessel, submarine or nearby aerial or land platform, allowing the ship to circumvent multiple threats simultaneously

-- IRST i110, which will provide protection capacity against sea-skimming missiles or swarms of vessels, which typically attempt to impact the waterline of ships. It is a system on which Indra is working in conjunction with Tecnobit.

Indra is positioned as one of the companies best suited to meet the needs of the most modern navies in the world, which are interested in acquiring new frigates with the operational capabilities needed to face new threats at a competitive price.

Indra is a company that provides systems to the world's leading shipbuilders. More than a hundred naval ships from all five continents use its technology in the most demanding missions.

Indra (www.indracompany.com) is one of the leading global technology and consulting companies and the technological partner for core business operations of its customers world-wide. Its business model is based on a comprehensive range of proprietary products, with an end-to-end approach that has high value and a significant innovative component. In 2018 Indra received income totaling 3.104 billion euros and had 43,000 employees, a local presence in 46 countries and business operations in more than 140 countries.

-ends-

View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-1-2020 at 02:58 PM


German Navy selects Damen/Blohm + Voss for construction MKS180 frigates

Posted On Tuesday, 14 January 2020 16:25

The German government has announced its intention to select Damen as the main contractor, together with partners Blohm + Voss and Thales, for supplying at least four Multi-Purpose Combat Ship MKS 180 frigates to the German Navy. The Dutch naval shipbuilder is extremely proud of, and satisfied with, the result of the evaluation process announced today by the German Government, though of course awaits parliamentary approval in Germany.


MKS 180 Concept graphic of the Bundeswehr (Picture source: Damen)

The ships will be built at Blohm + Voss shipyard in Hamburg and at other shipyard locations of the North German Lürssen Group. Damen intends to build in this way in order to spend around 80% of the total net investment as added value in Germany. The same applies to the electronic application systems that are supplied by Thales Nederland to its own design. Around 70% of the services will be provided by the German subsidiary of Thales and by other German subcontractors.

With the North German shipyard group Lürssen – the parent company of Blohm + Voss – and the Damen Shipyards Group, the partnership is based on two stable family businesses that have been successfully active in marine and commercial shipbuilding for more than 140 years.

The only naval builder in the Netherlands is pleased with this selection to be the main contractor in the German project and the division of work between the German and Dutch industry. For the Netherlands, it provides national knowledge and expertise.

This offers the Dutch Government the option, in the coming Dutch naval construction projects for frigates and submarines, to have these types of strategic programmes devised, engineered, managed and deployed in their own country.

The MKS 180 project contributes to securing the export power and self-creation of both Dutch and German naval construction in the longer term. The project also opens perspectives for the requested European (defence equipment) cooperation.

In terms of specifications, the MSK 180 has a length of 155 meters, a displacement of 9,000 tonnes, a cruising speed of 18 knots at Sea State 4 and a maximum range of 4,000 nm at 18 knots.

The ship can accommodate 110 persons including 70 troops and one medium/large helicopter (maximum 15 tonnes) with anti-ship missiles; two VTOL UAS.

It is equipped with one 127mm naval gun; four to eight medium/heavy anti-ship missiles with land-attack capability, two 21-cell launchers for RAM Block II; two MLG27 cannons; two MASS decoy launchers and multiple armoured, NVG-capable weapon stands for manually operated .50-calibre machine guns and 40mm grenade launchers, snipers and MANPADS/anti-tank guided missile crews.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-1-2020 at 09:53 PM


Italian Navy landing helicopter dock Trieste to replace Giuseppe Garibaldi

Posted On Wednesday, 15 January 2020 10:38

The new 33,000 tons Italian Landing helicopter dock (LHD) Trieste has arrived in the Gulf of La Spezia on January 7, 2020, to continue her fitting-out in preparation for her commissioning in 2022.


Italian Landing helicopter dock (Picture source: Twitter account: John Currin)

Trieste (L9890) is a landing helicopter dock (LHD) of the Italian Navy. It is expected to replace the Giuseppe Garibaldi around 2022.

The ship will be equipped with heavy and medium helicopters (EH101 and NH90 respectively) and Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II aircraft. It will have a floodable well deck below the hangar level able to accommodate amphibious landing vessels such as LCM (new Cantieri Navali Vittoria LCM23 type), LCAC, and newer L-CAT (Landing Catamaran) vessels. It also can carry Ariete MBT, B1 Centauro tank destroyers, and up to 600 soldiers. Its base will be in Taranto.

The unit is being built at Fincantieri's Castellamare di Stabia facility near Naples. The first cut was 12 January 2017 and completed construction of the hull on 25 May 2019, while the official delivery to the Italian Navy will be around the first half of 2022. It is the largest Italian military ship built after the Second World War.

It will be the largest vessel of the Italian Navy along with Cavour.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 17-1-2020 at 08:09 PM


Germany’s $6.7 billion frigate deal with Dutch shipbuilder Damen may be the last of its kind

By: Sebastian Sprenger   19 hours ago


Dutch naval shipbuilder Damen has won the selection process for the German Navy's new MKS 180 frigates, shown here in an artist's rendering. (Courtesy of Damen)

COLOGNE, Germany — Following the pick of Dutch shipbuilder Damen this week to build at least four new frigates for the German Navy, officials in Germany are finalizing a new policy meant to steer similar contracts to local shipyards in the future.

As drafted, the multi-ministry policy would establish the construction of surface ships as a key technology area in Germany’s security-industry fabric. The designation means Berlin may seek an exception from certain European Union acquisition regulations. Chief among those is a requirement to compete national programs across the bloc, which was the case with the large-frigate-style MKS 180 ships.

German Naval Yards, which teamed with ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, also had been vying for the deal, portraying their offer as the most German of the proposals, with the promise of jobs and technology kept in the country. Damen, in turn, said this week it would build the ships at the plants of its bid partner Lürssen Group, most notably Blohm+Voss in Hamburg.

New rules on Germany's key strategic industries have been in the works since the governing parties CDU and SPD agreed on a coalition agreement in 2018. That pact said surface shipbuilding would get the designation as a key technology area, but it didn't say when or how.

For the Defence Ministry, the upcoming revision of the 2015 “Strategy Paper of the Federal Government on Strengthening the Defence Industry in Germany,” as the document is titled, is the vehicle that would make it so.

The document is still stuck in the interagency review process, which is more comprehensive this time around because the new version combines defense and civilian aspects for the first time, a spokeswoman for the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy told Defense News.

A Cabinet decision on the text is expected within weeks, the spokeswoman said.

Without Cabinet approval, however, the Defence Ministry doesn’t feel tied to the kind of protectionist bent that some lawmakers have previously urged for the MKS 180 competition.

“As the process is not yet completed, surface shipbuilding is currently not a key technology area,” a spokeswoman for the Defence Ministry told Defense News. “Once the Cabinet has approved the document, a purely national competition can unfold.”

The German Navy wants the ships as quickly as possible, and some service officials still harbor hard feelings toward ThyssenKrupp for what they consider a botched F125 frigate program caused by years of delays.

German Naval Yards is still weighing its options to challenge the Damen selection, a possibility that Thomas Silberhorn, a parliamentary deputy defense secretary, noted in a Jan. 13 letter to lawmakers. Ministry officials plan to submit a detailed contract proposal for parliamentary debate in the spring, he wrote.

Tobias Lindner, the point man on defense issues for the Green Party in the Bundestag, said he would await details of the proposed contract before making a judgment on the Damen pick.

“It's good that the long competition process has come to an end,” he said in a statement. “I hope that the selection has legal standing.”

As for the merits of going through an EU-wide project solicitation for the new ships, “we’ll probably know only after the last ship has been delivered,” he added.

Even after losing the MKS 180 program, there should be plenty of business for German Naval Yards and the other domestic shipbuilders, according to Sebastian Bruns, who heads the Center for Maritime Strategy and Security at the University of Kiel in northern Germany.

“The military should now quickly move to explain what other naval new-build programs are in the pipeline,” he said, citing corvettes, oilers, reconnaissance ships, mine hunters and support vessels that are expected to be on the table.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-1-2020 at 02:56 PM


German Naval Yards Kiel Takes Legal Actions Against MKS 180 Procurement

(Source: German Naval Yards; issued Jan. 20, 2020)

The Kiel-based shipyard German Naval Yards (GNYK) will take legal action against the procurement decision of the Federal Ministry of Defence to grant the MKS project to a Dutch led consortium.

"After a thorough examination, we have decided to file a complaint against the award decision," said a spokesman of the shipyard. He added: "We have serious doubts about the legality of the decision and will therefore exhaust all legal possibilities at our disposal."

GNYK is thus exercising its right under public procurement law to have the decision reviewed.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 22-1-2020 at 11:16 AM


21 January 2020 News

GNYK to take legal action over MKS 180 procurement decision

Kiel-based shipyard German Naval Yards (GNYK) is set to take legal action against the decision to procure Multi-Purpose Combat Ship MKS 180 frigates from a Dutch-led consortium.

The procurement decision was given by the Federal Ministry of Defence (MoD) to Dutch shipbuilder Damen along with Hamburg-based Blohm + Voss and Thales.

The legal challenge is GNYK’s right used under the public procurement law to sue the decision.

The four-hull contract is valued at $6.7bn and includes options for two additional hulls and the possibility of future sales. The first ship is expected to be delivered by 2027.

With Damen as the prime contractor, construction of the ships will be carried out at the Blohm + Voss shipyard in Hamburg and other North German Lürssen Group shipyard locations.

This approach will see 80% of the investment spent in Germany. Additionally, 70% of electronic application services will be provided by Thales German subsidiary and other subcontractors in the country.

German shipbuilder ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems had fallen out of the race early in the bidding process.

ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, along with GNYK and American defence contractor Alion, partnered to participate in the process, which was also rejected.

A GYNK spokesman said: “After a thorough examination, we have decided to file a complaint against the award decision.

“We have serious doubts about the legality of the decision and will, therefore, exhaust all legal possibilities at our disposal.”

Meanwhile, the selection of Damen and Blohm + Voss for the construction of MKS180 frigates still awaits parliamentary approval in Germany.

In the past, GYNK has successfully delivered orders of two modern Meko A-200 frigates for the Algerian Navy and four corvettes for the Israeli Navy.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 22-1-2020 at 02:33 PM


Industry protest ensnares Germany’s multibillion-dollar combat ship

By: Sebastian Sprenger   12 hours ago


German Naval Yards, based in Kiel, Germany, has challenged the pick of Dutch shipbuilder Damen for the German Navy's new MKS 180 combat ship. (Karl-Heinz Hochhaus via Wikipedia)

COLOGNE, Germany — The losing bidder for Germany’s MKS 180 large-frigate program has filed a protest against the government’s pick of Dutch shipyard Damen for the $6.7 billion job.

German Naval Yards, based in Kiel, Germany, on Monday said it had “serious doubts about the legality of the decision” and would “exhaust all legal possibilities at our disposal” to have the decision overturned.

The Defence Ministry announced Jan. 13 it selected Damen to build an initial four copies of the new multipurpose combat ships. The pick capped a source-selection process that had become controversial because the government decided to compete the project throughout the European Union. The strategy followed the bloc’s principle of a unified market, but it left the domestic shipbuilding lobby miffed.

The protest by German Naval Yards and its bid partner ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems kicks off a dispute process that begins with the Defence Ministry reviewing the complaint and then, if it remains unresolved, could wind its way through the German court system.

There is no telling how long the process will take — some protests get resolved within weeks, but the process can take a year or longer. The Defence Ministry is expected to offer an indication later this month on whether its attorneys believe the Damen pick can withstand legal scrutiny.

Damen has said it wants to build the ships at the shipyards of its German bid partner Lürssen, vowing to invest 80 percent of the contract's value in Germany.

The protest comes at a time when Berlin is adopting a new policy that grants an exception to the EU competition mandate when national security is at stake. Specifically, the construction of surface warships would be designated as a “key technology area” so worthy of protection that future programs would be automatically awarded to German manufacturers.

For that to be the case, however, two political initiatives have yet to play out: The German parliament must approve a revision of national source-selection rules from October 2019, which formally enable EU acquisition exceptions on national security grounds. In addition, the Cabinet has to greenlight a draft strategy document on nurturing domestic security- and defense-related industries, currently in interagency review, that confers the rank of “key technology area” to naval surface combatants.

The strategy document, overseen by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, is expected to be ready for Cabinet consideration within weeks, as Defense News reported last week.

Legal experts said the “key technology” debate has no immediate bearing on the German Naval Yards protest. At the same time, it is possible that the complaint’s resolution, whichever way it goes, will come at a time when a domestic award preference for similar contracts is already in effect.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 23-1-2020 at 09:28 PM


23 January 2020 News

Dutch Navy allows female sailors in submarine services

The Dutch Navy is allowing female sailors in its fleet of submarines after the successful completion of a test involving the participation of women.

NLTimes.nl quoted the government as saying in a statement that the women functioned as ‘one of the crew’ during the year-long experiment.

In the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN), sailing positions were open only to men as no separate facilities were offered onboard the existing submarines. Women failed to perform all functions in this Armed Forces’ Submarine Service.

NAVALNEWS quoted the Dutch Ministry of Defense as saying: “It was already certain that women would be admitted to the submarine service, but only then with the arrival of new ships equipped for mixed crews.

“The situation in (Nato) partner countries, however, showed that separate onboard facilities are not necessary and sometimes hinder integration.”

Based on a joint study carried out in Australia and Canada, it was found that strict separation in living areas, as well as sanitary facilities, had a negative impact on the integration of female crew members on board.

Following this, the navy decided to experiment with the ‘one of the crew’ concept. As part of this, no separate facilities were provided for women on board, and both women and men were treated equally.

Submarine Service group commander Captain Herman de Groot said that the test allowed the navy to be able to determine the rules of conduct that need to be introduced to enable women to participate in submarine services.

Only small adjustments were made to create more privacy for women.

AFP reported that a female student recently entered Japan’s Maritime Self-Defense Force (MSDF), which had previously only allowed men to serve on submarines.

The MSDF amended the rules in 2018 after assessing that gender-specific privacy needs can be met without major submarine remodelling.

After the restrictions were overturned, Saki Takenouchi entered the academy along with around 20 other men.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 28-1-2020 at 03:40 PM


The Tenth Multipurpose Frigate "Emilio Bianchi" Launched: final ship of the Italo-French FREMM program

(Source: Fincantieri; issued January 25, 2020)


The Italian Navy’s tenth and final FREMM multipurpose frigate, the future ITS Emilio Bianchi, was launched on Jan. 25 at the Fincantieri shipyard near Genoa. She will be handed over to the customer in 2021 after fitting out. (Fincantieri photo)

TRIESTE, Italy --- The ceremony for the launch of the frigate "Emilio Bianchi," the tenth and final ship of the FREMM (European Multi Mission Frigate) class, took place today at the integrated shipyard of Riva Trigoso (Genoa), with Italian Minister of Defence Lorenzo Guerini in attendance.

The ten Fremm ships were ordered from Fincantieri by the Italian Navy within the framework of an Italian--French cooperative program coordinated by OCCAR (Organisation Conjointe de Cooperation sur l'Armement), the international organization for cooperation on armaments.

The godmother of the ceremony was Mrs. Maria Elisabetta Bianchi, eldest daughter of Emilio Bianchi, winner of the Italian Gold Medal for Military Valor.

Fincantieri President Giampiero Massolo welcomed the Chief of Staff of the Italian Navy, Admiral Giuseppe Cavo Dragone, representing the Chief of Defence, General Enzo Vecciarelli, the Governor of the Liguria Region, Giovanni Toti, in addition to other civil and military authorities.

After the launch, fitting-out activities will continue at the integrated naval shipyard of Muggiano (La Spezia), with delivery scheduled in 2021. The "Emilio Bianchi," like her sister-ships, features a high degree of flexibility and is capable of operating in all tactical situations. With a length of 144 metres and a beam of 19.7 metres, the ship will have a displacement of approximately 6,700 tonnes at full load. She has a top speed of over 27 knots and will be able to accommodate a up to 200 people, including crew and passengers.

The FREMM program, representing the European and Italian state of the art in naval systems, stems from the Italian Navy’s requirement to replace the "Lupo"-class (now all retired) and "Maestrale"-class frigates (now being decommissioned), both built by Fincantieri in the 1970s.

The ships "Carlo Bergamini" and "Virginio Fasan" were delivered in 2013, the "Carlo Margottini" in 2014, the "Carabiniere" in 2015, the "Alpino" in 2016, the "Luigi Rizzo" in 2017, the "Federico Martinengo" in 2018, and the "Antonio Marceglia" in 2019.

The Italian portion of the Fremm program was fully implemented with the option exercised in April 2015 for the construction of the ninth and tenth ships, whose delivery is scheduled after 2020.

Orizzonte Sistemi Navali (51% Fincantieri, 49% Leonardo) acts as prime contractor for Italy in the initiative, while Armaris (Naval Group + Thales) is prime contractor for France.

This cooperation has applied the positive experience gained in the previous Italo-French program "Orizzonte" that led to the construction for the Italian Navy of the two frigates "Andrea Doria" and "Caio Duilio".

Fincantieri is one of the world’s largest shipbuilding groups and number one for diversification and innovation. It is leader in cruise ship design and construction and a reference player in all high-tech shipbuilding industry sectors, from naval to offshore vessels. With over 8,900 employees in Italy and a supplier network that employs nearly 50,000 people, Fincantieri has enhanced a fragmented production capacity over several shipyards into strength, acquiring the widest portfolio of clients and products in the cruise segment.

(ends)

Launch of the Ship Emilio Bianchi

(Source: Italian Navy; issued January 25, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

On January 25, the launching ceremony of the tenth European Multi Mission Frigate took place at the Riva Trigoso shipyard, which bears the name of the Combat Diver chief Emilio Bianchi, who was decorated with the Gold Medal for Military Valor.

The godmother of the launch was Elisabetta Bianchi, daughter of the hero who passed away in 2015, who cut the ribbon for the auspicious breaking of the bottle on ths ship’s bow. Attending the ceremony was the Minister of Defense, Lorenzo Guerini, and the Chief of Staff of the Navy, Admiral Giuseppe Cavo Dragone.

The future ITS Bianchi (F 589) is the final unit of the FREMM Italian-French international cooperation program, created to compensate for the growing age of the Navy fleet. This program provided for the acquisition of 10 multi-mission frigates of which six "General Purpose" variants (high operational flexibility) and four anti-submarine variants (reinforced ASW capabilities.

The Bianchi, with 144 meters in length and 6900 tons of displacement at full load, is the sixth FREMM in General Purpose (GP) configuration. In this version, the most relevant features concern the caliber of the 127/64 forward cannon and the presence of a stern slide necessary for launching fast dinghies for special forces operations.

The FREMM, the national shipbuilding state-of-the-art, represent the backbone of the Italian Navy for the coming decades and are designed to perform a multiplicity of functions and activities not only distinctly military but also to support the community.

The new and increasingly technological "gray ships", built according to the concepts of modularity and both economic and environmental sustainability, require careful control and verification, in the implementation phase, of what has been established in the study and design phase.

This scenario testifies to the work by the Navy through the New Naval Construction Set-up Center (MARINALLES) which follows the set-up and online processes of the new Units, carried out at private shipyards. A plurality of actors is involved and multiple activities are interconnected.

The Bianchi will begin its operational life in 2021 after a further year of fitting out and crew training at the Fincantieri Muggiano plant in La Spezia.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 28-1-2020 at 03:43 PM


FREMM Normandie Sails on Long-Term Maiden Cruise

(Source: French Navy; issued Jan 24, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

The multi-mission frigate (FREMM) FS Normandie left Brest, her future home port, on December 16, 2019 to carry out her long-term maiden cruise as she prepares for admission to active service. She embarked a Caiman Marine (NH90) helicopter detachment, bringing her total on-board personnel to 145 officers and ratings.

One of the objectives of this cruise, due to last for over three months in the northern Atlantic Ocean, is to verify, over time, the military capabilities of the vessel through a wide range of aero-maritime activities close to her future operational role.

The first phase of the cruise was marked by three port calls on the East Coast of the United States: New York, Norfolk and Boston, and by several joint training opportunities, notably with the US Navy.

The FREMM program aims to renew the frigate component of the French Navy. By 2025, the Navy will operate 15 first-rank frigates, including eight FREMMs. The “Normandie” is the sixth in the series after “Aquitaine,” “Provence,” “Languedoc,” “Auvergne” and “Bretagne” and will be followed by “Alsace” and “Lorraine,” both of which will have will have reinforced air-defense capabilities.

The FREMMs are intended to provide missions such as the control of an air-maritime operating area, precision strike in depth with the naval cruise missile (MdCN), anti-ship, anti-submarine and anti-aircraft warfare, crisis prevention, support and support for projection operations, command of a national or international naval force, and participation in maritime security missions.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-1-2020 at 05:53 PM


Turkey reveals more details for Barbaros frigate MLU

Cem Devrim Yaylali, Istanbul - Jane's Navy International

29 January 2020


TCG , the second Barbaros-class frigate, taking part in a naval parade through Istanbul on 9 March 2019. Source: Cem Devrim Yaylali

The Turkish Presidency of Defence Industries (SSB) has published further details of the mid-life upgrade (MLU) being undertaken for the country's MEKO 200 (Track IIA/IIB) Barbaros-class frigates.

The four frigates have already completed an initial round of modernisation, under which the Thales Smart-S Mk 2 air/surface surveillance radar has replaced the BAE Systems AWS-9 radar in all four ships, and the MK 29 Sea Sparrow launchers have been replaced with Mk 41 vertical launch systems (VLSs) in the two Track IIA frigates.

The second phase of the MLU is more extensive, however. Under contracts awarded to Havelsan and Aselsan in 2018, all existing radar (with the exception of the Smart-S), the electronic warfare and sonar suites, and self-defence systems will be replaced.

According to a graphic depiction of a Barbaros-class frigate following the completion of its MLU, published by the SSB in January, the most obvious change to the topside layout is the new masts. A closed solid mast similar to the main mast on the Turkish Navy's Ada-class corvettes will replace the old lattice mast and be fitted with the SMART-S Mk 2 radar (relocated from its current position on the second mast), with the antennas of the ARES-2NC electronic support measures system just below.

The receiving and transmitting antennas of the AREAS-2NC electronic countermeasure and electronic attack system are located on both sides of the mast.

The MAR-D solid-state active electronically scanned array air search radar developed by Aselsan will be located at the top of a new second mast. The MAR-D has a reported range of 100 km.

Under the MLU the Turkish Navy is planning to remove the Oerlikon-Contravers Sea Zenith gun mounts and Contraves Sea Guard fire control radar.

(309 of 769 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 01:55 PM


Keel Laying of the New "Emden"

(Source: Bundeswehr; issued Jan 31, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

A rendering of the German Navy’s second batch of K130 corvettes; ships of the original batch already in service will be brought up to the same standard as they go though scheduled maintenance periods. (GE Navy image)

The "Emden" is the seventh ship in the Braunschweig class of the German Navy. The Navy put the first five of this type of warship into service between 2008 and 2013. The Bundeswehr deploys them internationally, including for the UNIFIL United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon mission off the coast of Lebanon.

In 2017, the Bundeswehr placed an order for five additional class K130 corvettes. Work on the new “Koln” corvette then began in February 2019.

From 2022, ships six to ten will join the Navy. They are supplied by a consortium of three companies: Fr. Lürssen Werft, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems and German Naval Yards Kiel.

"Today's keel laying shows impressively how the team of employees from different companies has grown together and works in close cooperation with the customer," said Tim Wagner, Managing Director of Lürssen Werft.

Two of the five foreships are being built at the Lürssen shipyard in Bremen, three are being manufactured and pre-equipped at the German Naval Yards site in Kiel. The final five ships are manufactured at the Wolgaster Peene shipyard. The Lürssen subsidiary Blohm + Voss in Hamburg is responsible for the union of the fore and aft sections of the ship.

The roughly 89-meter-long corvettes will also be fully equipped and put into operation there. They also go through their functional tests and approvals from Hamburg - in coordination with the specialist departments of the client, the Bundeswehr and the Navy.

Adjustments to new standards and five traditional names

For the new ships in the class, changes to the first five corvettes in some systems and in the IT information technology systems are necessary to take account of the current status of laws and regulations.

Future upgrades during scheduled docking times should also bring the older corvettes up to date. These changes are visible in a new cladding for the turret of the main gun and in a second speed boat as a dinghy for the ships.

Last but not least, the construction of the "Emden" is a special step for the navy, because the new corvette will take on a traditional name. As the third ship of the Bundeswehr, it will be called "Emden". The Navy's previous “Emden” was a Bremen-class frigate that had been decommissioned in 2013. The Navy decided on the name in 2018.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-3-2020 at 09:27 AM


Sonar Equipped Drone Fleets Could be Key to Future Submarine Warfare

By: Megan Eckstein

March 9, 2020 12:25 PM


A NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE) Ocean Explorer autonomous unmanned vehicle operates in the foreground with NATO Research Vessel NRV Alliance in the background. NATO CMRE photo.

CATANIA, Sicily – The future of anti-submarine warfare for countries who can’t afford to invest in top-of-the-line submarines and maritime patrol aircraft could be a netted fleet of unmanned platforms that can create “passive acoustic barriers” at chokepoints or drag towed arrays through a country’s territorial waters.

NATO’s Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation is showcasing these ideas at NATO exercises such as the ongoing Dynamic Manta annual ASW exercise, showing off novel operations that could one day be commonplace if navies and their industrial bases decide to invest.

CMRE Director Catherine Warner said the organization has been working with autonomous vehicles in the undersea warfare area for the past 20 years to understand how they can contribute to perhaps the most complex type of naval warfare.

“The big idea in this whole realm of unmanned systems is figuring out the right systems with the right sensors and the right scenario that’s going to be cost and operationally effective,” she told USNI News after the kickoff of Dynamic Manta. She said ASW is “high-end asset-intensive” and that, while unmanned vessels can’t do everything a manned sub or plane can, they can perform some specific missions that would be cost-prohibitive to do with manned vehicles.

One prime example is the passive acoustic barrier. Noting that CMRE puts passive sensors on all the autonomous vehicles, buoys and seabed devices the organization puts in the water, Warner said CMRE used all its sensors to demonstrate a passive acoustic barrier off the coast of Sicily in the days leading up to the start of Dynamic Manta.

While in this demonstration they tracked the flow of commercial ships across the “barrier,” the ultimate idea would be to track the movement of submarines at chokepoints such as the Greenland-Iceland-United Kingdom (GIUK) Gap. The specifics of the unmanned vehicle wouldn’t matter as much as the quality of the sensor and the ability to differentiate the clutter from the sounds of submarines.


NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE) graphic.

On the more active side of sub-hunting, CMRE has been particularly focused on the idea of multi-nation multistatic ASW, where an active sonar source would create pings for dozens or hundreds of passive sensors listening for those sound waves to bounce off of enemy submarines. The more sensors that are in the water, the better they can detect pings and recognize what kind of submarine is moving through the water and in what direction.

During Dynamic Manta, CMRE operated alongside manned warships to join in the hunt for submarines, using its “network”: NATO research vessel NRV Alliance, two Ocean Explorer 21-inch diameter autonomous underwater vehicles named Harpo and Groucho, and a fleet of Liquid Robotics’ Wave Gliders that serve as communication nodes between the ship and the AUVs. Harpo and Groucho have a towed array to listen for pings, and more recently CMRE developed a towed array for the Wave Gliders as well to put more ears in the water.

“Having that extra set of sensors makes a huge difference” in multistatic ASW, Warner said, because when an active sonar source like the variable depth sonar on Alliance or a warship like Italian frigate ITS Carabiniere (F 581) sends out energy, they want as many passive sensors in the water as possible to listen for pings.

“When you do multistatic, there’s so many more advantages because of the geometry and the extra chances for reflections.

So we can do it with ourselves, but if we could do it with all the nations – and that is something that we strive to do with our interaction with the nations … – then everybody, wherever they are, that has a sensor, being able to know the sound source and sync to it and coordinate on the reflections – it is very power to be able to do that.”

The key to multi-nation multistatic ASW is information-sharing: they’d all have to know where exactly the active sonar source is, so they could correctly calculate what the pings they pick up mean, and then they’d have to share what they’re hearing with all the other nations involved, too, so they could all adjust their positions as needed to get the best chance at hearing the target submarine and help track it through the water.

Information-sharing can be a hurdle with something as sensitive as ASW, with nations often not wanting others to know the exact nature of their capabilities, but Warner said the scale to which NATO could track submarines under the water would be powerful if everyone could find a way to come together.

Today, Harpo and Groucho talk to each other while looking for subs, and if one picks up a sound they will coordinate amongst themselves to get into the best positions for the best geometries to hear sonar pings. The more AUVS in the water collaborating, the better.

“We’ve done it. We’ve already shown that multistatic ASW works. That’s our system: we’ve been doing it since 2012 in Dynamic Manta, we’ve demonstrated it operationally, and we just keep adding things onto it. So it can be done. So, whether other nations want to do it with us, that’s up to them,” Warner said.


NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE) operates two Ocean Explorer autonomous unmanned vehicles named Harpo and Groucho. NATO CMRE photo.

Warner said Harpo and Groucho are 21-inch diameter AUVs that were built by Florida Atlantic University. The vehicles themselves are 18 years old, but the batteries and sensors are constantly being upgraded, meaning the vehicle that originally had four hours of battery life can now operate for 72 hours without intervention.

CMRE’s Dan Hutt told USNI News that the next step would be to scale up these operations. To conduct multistatic ASW in the GIUK Gap, for example, would require hundreds of AUVs from participating NATO nations. The idea, though, would be to “flood the ocean with lots of cheap assets – they all have sensors, potentially different kinds of sensors, they can all talk to each other over a vast network – that’s a really powerful concept for ASW. We only have a handful of these, so we want to scale up and work with the nations to do a bigger demonstration.”

While several NATO countries are upgrading their fleets of “high-end submarines and frigates,” many cannot afford such exquisite systems, Warner said.

“But they certainly can afford a fleet of unmanned vehicles with towed arrays. And if they were all using the same standard, they could all buy from their own countries’ industry – that’s what we’re about, we’re not competing with industry, we’re developing standards,” she continued.

“Every nation’s industry would benefit from building these vehicles and the towed arrays, and then they could all operate together.”

CMRE has already done a machine learning effort to support the back end of this effort – researchers collected 52 days worth of sonar echoes from diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) and created algorithms to help the unmanned vehicles recognize SSK sounds and ignore the clutter. This could be shared with the NATO members who want to join in this effort. Warner said Norway, Belgium and the Netherlands are taking steps to incorporate AUVs into their ASW efforts, but she’s hoping to see more.

A final technology CMRE is showing off at Dynamic Manta is an undersea communication network. NATO nations had previously agreed to use the JANUS as the digital underwater communications standard, but CMRE is still hard at work developing waveforms that will be cyber-secure and low-probability of intercept, as well as developing concepts of operations for its usage.

Ahead of Dynamic Manta, CMRE demonstrated they could use JANUS to send submarines the surface picture with Automatic Identification System (AIS) tracks – so the submarines could know how to safely surface – by sending the message from a ship, through the Wave Gliders as comms nodes, and to the submarine underwater.

Warner said they call this setup “WetsApp” – a nod to the WhatsApp digital communication app on cellphones – and said it’s a vast improvement over the voice communication tools they previously used to send messages to submarines, which could easily get garbled or lost altogether.

“Before, when they were submerged, submarines could only use something called an underwater telephone, which is very difficult to use, it’s distorted, hard to understand,” she said.

“But we can actually text them – we have a little program, we call it WetsApp, sort of WhatsApp, and we can send them for example the surface picture – if they were going to come to the surface, they would know where all the ships are on the surface. So that’s very important technology that we’ve already helped insert into the industrial base.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-4-2020 at 04:11 PM


Sweden could sell two second-hand A17 Södermanland class Submarines to Poland

POSTED ON SUNDAY, 19 APRIL 2020 12:07

The Swedish government has started the process for the sale of two second-hand A17 Södermanland class Submarines to Poland. According to news published by the Polish military website Defence24, the Swedish government has asked the parliament to issue an approval of the sale of two used submarines to Poland including the HSwMS “Södermanland” and the HSwMS “Östergötland”.


HMS Södermanland in Stockholm 2010. (Picture source Wikipedia)

The Swedish Södermanland class of diesel-electric submarines consists of HSwMS Södermanland and HSwMS Östergötland. These two submarines were originally launched as Västergötland-class submarines in 1987 and 1990, and have been relaunched as a new class after extensive modernization in 2003 and 2004 by Kockums AB.

The two Södermanland Class diesel-electric submarines were upgraded in 2000. HMS Södermanland was relaunched in September 2003 and returned to service in mid 2004. HMS Östergötland was relaunched in September 2004 and returned to service in 2005. According to military navy sources, the upgraded submarines will be able to be operational for another 20 years without further modernisation.

In January 2006, Swedish Company Saab Systems has received an order from FMV, the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, to modernize the command and control systems on Sweden’s Gotland and Södermanland class submarines with the SESUB 960 providing network enabled defence capabilities to the submarines. In 2010, the submarines were also upgraded with new inertial navigation systems from Northrop Grumman.

The Södermanland Class submarine is armed with six conventional 533 mm torpedo tubes and three 400 mm bow torpedo tubes. The 533 mm tubes can launch type 613 heavy-weight, anti-surface ship torpedoes. Type 613 can carry a 240 kg warhead up to a range of 20km. The 400 mm tubes can fire Type 43 lightweight anti-submarine torpedoes.

The Södermanland Class submarine is powered by a diesel-electric and Stirling AIP system integrating two Hedemora diesel-electric engines and two Kockums v4-275R Sterling AIP units.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-4-2020 at 04:13 PM


The problem here is that one of the subs has been laid up for quite a while, and stripped of Spares to keep the other one going..........see this article from Polish Defence blog DEFENCE24.........

https://www.defence24.com/swedish-parliament-discusses-the-s...

View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 02:06 PM


"Baden-Württemberg" Returns from Hot Water Testing

(Source: German Navy; issued April 17, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


FGS Baden-Wuerttemberg, the lead ship of the German Navy’s Type 125 class of frigates, returned to her home port on April 16 after having completed two months of hot weather trials in Brazilian waters. (Bundeswehr file photo)

WILHELMSHAVEN, Germany --- For several weeks, the Type 125 frigate Baden-Württemberg tested her technical systems under extreme climatic conditions and in realistic combat situations. She left for Brazil on February 7 to test the on-board facilities and equipment near the equator, and returned here on April 16.

A large number of technical systems aboard a ship require cooling - either by air or water. On a warship, this includes not only the drive and ventilation, but also sensors such as the radars. With increasing temperatures in the ship's environment, the cooling systems for these systems are also in greater demand. In order to find out whether a new warship can also withstand the requirements in hot areas of operation and at the same time as expected under realistic conditions, the cooling systems must also go through various test programs before they are actually used.

Under combat conditions, only the Navy can inspect itself

In order to be able to test a naval ship in a meaningful way, complex long-term programs are necessary, which replicate as closely as possible an operational scenario. This is only possible after commissioning. While industry together with the Bundeswehr provides the purely technical functional evidence of a ship before this date, the Bundeswehr then carries out significantly expanded tests that also include operational framework conditions.

The current results from waters off the Brazilian coast have now confirmed that the systems of the "Baden-Württemberg" are resilient even under extreme conditions. The class 125 frigates are basically designed for outside air temperatures between minus 15 and plus 45 degrees Celsius and for water temperatures from just below zero to over 30 degrees. The counterpart to hot water testing is cold water testing, which “Baden-Württemberg” had previously completed.

Overall, cold and hot water testing belong to several steps of the operational test for the ship. Accordingly, experts from the Naval Operations Testing Center on the “Baden-Württemberg” were on the way to the equator.

No restrictions on the test program due to the coronavirus situation

When the frigate left her home port of Wilhelmshaven in early February, restrictions on public life in Germany and in large parts of the world due to the corona pandemic were not yet in place. Since March 10, however, no one has been allowed to leave the ship to protect the crew, and no one has been allowed on board. A planned shore leave lasting several days in the Brazilian port of Salvador de Bahia, for example, had to be canceled. However, the new situation had no effect on the ship’s trials.

The Baden-Württemberg traveled a total of around 13,500 nautical miles on its journey to Brazil and back. In addition to Salvador de Bahia, she has also visited other ports for fuel bunkering, but again without the crew going ashore.

The next step for the ship is from the beginning of May about a three-month warranty period at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 02:07 PM


Every time I look at a German warship design, I think "top heavy"!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 02:19 PM


Estonian Navy to Receive Force Protection Boats

(Source: Estonia Ministry of Defence; issued April 17, 2020)



Within the framework of the current four-year development plan Estonian Ministry of Defence is set to acquire two force protection patrol boats built by an Estonian company Baltic Workboats AS, as a result of which up to 50 people will be employed until the end of the year on the island of Saaremaa, which is one of the most suffered regions in Estonia due to COVID-19 pandemic.

‘In the broader sense, the acquisition of new equipment sends a strong signal that we will continue the development of our national defence, which simply cannot be paused even in the middle of a crisis. However, it is important that we are also able to provide support in this way to the country's economy and people as they emerge from the crisis,' said Minister of Defence Jüri Luik, according to whom the acquisition of the patrol boats will, in particular, enable to fill smaller naval capability gaps, something that has been needed for many years.

The main function of the patrol boats is to ensure force protection, at sea and in ports, of NATO and Partner naval vessels visiting Estonia. The boats can also support in other tasks as identifying foreign vessels, commanding units at sea, conducting exercises, securing live-fire exercises, providing navigation practice for the cadets, as well as support other state agencies, especially the Police and Border Guard.

Baltic Workboats AS has nearly 20 years of experience, similar type of patrol boats will also be built for the Omani police.

‘This is a very important contract for us at a very complicated time, and we are very grateful that the Estonian state took such a bold step and turned directly to a local builder. Orders of this type create a much-needed reference for us, allowing us to participate in defence industry procurements in other parts of the world and thereby increase Estonian exports,’ said Margus Vanaselja, Chairman of the Management Board of Baltic Workboats AS.

The patrol boats are 18 metres in length, have partial ballistic protection and are equipped with two 12.7 mm heavy machine guns. A remote-controlled weapon position can be added if necessary. The patrol boats have a top speed of over 30 knots. The boats are scheduled to be completed by the end of this year and enter into service with the Navy in 2021. The transaction is valued at EUR 3.9 million.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 21-4-2020 at 04:56 PM


NATO’s ‘startup’ charts a bold future in maritime unmanned systems

By: Michael D. Brasseur , Rob Murray , and Sean Trevethan   20 hours ago


An unmanned maritime vessel stands on display in Troia, Portugal, during the unmanned systems drill Exercise REP(MUS) 19, which was designed to integrate multinational platforms with NATO forces. (NATO)

Last December, at their meeting in London, NATO leaders declared: “To stay secure, we must look to the future together. We are addressing the breadth and scale of new technologies to maintain our technological edge, while preserving our values and norms.” These two sentences were, in part, a nod to a significant piece of work the alliance is undertaking within the broader mandate of alliance innovation — NATO’s Maritime Unmanned Systems Initiative.

Granted, on its own this sounds both technical and narrow within the context of emerging technology, a context that includes: artificial intelligence, data, space, hypersonic weapons, bio technologies, quantum research, autonomy and more. So why are maritime unmanned systems relevant now? Simply put, developing the numbers of manned submarines, aircraft and ships required to keep pace with potential adversaries is simply not economically viable (almost $3 billion per Virginia-class U.S. submarine).

Not since the Cold War has NATO needed the volume of maritime forces to protect our seas and oceans from would-be foes.

NATO’s areas of interest are expanding. As climate change affects the Arctic, new maritime routes are being created, which Russia in particular is exploiting with its submarines and ships. This matters because it exposes a new flank on NATO’s high-north periphery, and if left unchecked is a potential vulnerability whilst also being a potential opportunity; this, coupled with an increasing need to protect our undersea data infrastructure means NATO’s geostrategic responsibilities continue to grow.

Therefore, if allies are to reinforce NATO’s maritime posture, deter Russian aggression, guard against Chinese activity, and protect both critical national infrastructure and our sea lines of communication, NATO must do things differently and at the speed of relevance.

NATO’s Maritime Unmanned Systems Initiative was agreed by 13 defense ministers in October 2018. Since then, the initiative’s success has attracted the participation of three more allies and garnered significant interest from all of NATO’s maritime nations. The political agreement struck in 2018 provided the mandate for NATO to bring together disparate strands of common work ongoing within nations. NATO, acting as a network, enabled allies to become greater than the sum of their parts.

The focus is threefold: utilize world-leading research to increase allied interoperability between conventional forces and unmanned drones; establish new tactics for our sailors to truly leverage these technologies; and develop secure digital communications for military drones across all domains (air, sea and land). Addressing these priorities together will enable this effort to be scaled across the alliance, at pace.

To date, the speed of this effort has been breathtaking. So much so that even the United States and the United Kingdom — two allies who have invested the most in this area — are using the NATO initiative as a catalyst for their own national efforts. The last 12-plus months has seen the creation of a NATO project office, a governance body, as well as the planning and successful execution of the world’s largest and most complex maritime unmanned systems exercise off the Portuguese coast in September 2019. This event brought together the very best from our navies, industry, scientific institutes and academia. The results were hugely impressive, with many “world firsts” including maritime unmanned systems augmenting conventional forces through multiple scenarios.

We now have vast swaths of insight and information to start achieving those three goals of improving interoperability, enhancing our tactics and developing secure communications. The goal of improving allied interoperability is actually about enhancing standards. A topic often overlooked at the policy level but critical to the DNA of the NATO alliance. Standards drive interoperability, which in turn drives readiness, which ultimately aids deterrence.

As NATO leads the development of new technologies, so too must come new standards that our industries and military can implement. Open architectures will be key, but allies and industry need to realize that we need to solve problems — not address requirements. No perfect solution will ever be delivered on the first attempt. The alliance will need to both innovate and iterate on operations in order to maintain advantage. This may be a cultural shift to some acquisition purists who are used to developing complex warships over 20-plus-year time frames.

However, the challenge remains our ability to scale. With this project we have an agile global team functioning across multiple national and allied bureaucracies, each with their own culture and ways of working. Through engagement and investment, this team is yielding disproportionate results. Indeed, 2019 demonstrated what can be done with some imagination, effort and focus. But continual growth at speed will require faith by allies to maintain the course. Such is the nature of true change and innovation.

There is a lot to do, and the stakes are high. Near-peer competitors are once again very real. Despite the global lockdown caused by the new coronavirus, COVID-19, the initiative continues to progress through synthetic networks and simulation, driven by passion and intent. Our economy, our data and its infrastructure still need protecting, now more than ever. This effort strives to accelerate maritime unmanned systems into NATO’s arsenal to patrol the vast swaths of ocean and offset evolving threats. Success will be seen because it is being built on allied nations’ shared values and norms, the same values and norms that NATO leaders recognized in London last year.

Michael D. Brasseur is the director of naval armaments cooperation for the U.S. mission to NATO. He is also the first director of NATO’s “startup,” the Maritime Unmanned Systems Innovation and Coordination Cell. Rob Murray is the head of innovation at NATO Headquarters. Sean Trevethan is the fleet robotics officer of the British Royal Navy, working in the future capability division at Navy Command Headquarters in Portsmouth, England.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-4-2020 at 09:44 AM


U 33 Goes into Drydock

(Source: German Navy; issued April 28, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


The German Navy Type 212 submarine U-33 had to return to Kiel yesterday to enter drydock, as a leak it sprung could not be located and fixed while she was at sea. (GE Navy photo)

KIEL, Germany --- The submarine U 33 sailed to the Kiel shipyard on April 28 where she went into drydock. There, a repair team will locate a leak in a torpedo tube that could not be precisely located while the boat was at sea. Then, the shipyard will fix the error.

The leak was detected at sea by the crew last week. To allow accurate fault-finding and repair, the boat unloaded its torpedoes in the ammunition depot on April 27.

The Class 212A boat will be out of service for maintenance, and is expected to resume normal operations no later than May 11. In addition to U 33, this week two more submarines were at sea.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-5-2020 at 10:43 PM


New project helps NATO talk with non-NATO organizations at sea

POSTED ON TUESDAY, 05 MAY 2020 17:09

Allied Maritime Command (MARCOM) asked the NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency to find a way to make it easier for the Alliance's maritime assets to exchange unclassified information with outside organizations on a 24/7 basis. The Agency delivered in April a public cloud-based solution to allow NATO and non-NATO organizations and vessels to share maritime awareness information on an easily-accessible platform.


New public cloud based solution helps NATO talk with non NATO organizations at sea 1"With this new capability, NATO has unlocked the ability to share information easily with non-NATO partners at sea. Cloud-based solutions are the key to building NATO's future: a future that is smarter, faster and more collaborative than ever before," said Detlef Janezic, Chief Service Engineering and Architecture at the NCI Agency (Picture source: Wikimedia)

"The project is a perfect example of how the NCI Agency was able to quickly tailor a commercial off-the-shelf solution towards an operational command such as the Allied Maritime Command, and effectively improve our ability to enhance maritime situational awareness overnight," said Christopher Smith, a Navy Signals Engineer in MARCOM. "As COVID-19 impacted our way of working towards the end of the project, we found this new tool to be even more necessary than previously envisioned."

NATO and non-NATO organizations alike can access the platform using any internet-connected device. "With this new capability, NATO has unlocked the ability to share information easily with non-NATO partners at sea. Cloud-based solutions are the key to building NATO's future: a future that is smarter, faster and more collaborative than ever before," said Detlef Janezic, Chief Service Engineering and Architecture at the NCI Agency.

This platform will be used for the first time for the Mediterranean area and 50 possible users have already been identified. "This is a fantastic result, and we expect use of the platform to grow over time as new maritime communities are incorporated," said Jose Luis Herrero Pascual, Head of Service Engineering at the NCI Agency. Herrero Pascual looks for new technologies that can be applied to solve customers' problems.

While deployed, NATO will sometimes establish contacts with non-NATO entities such as Nations, shipping companies, and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs). Before this technology was delivered, however, the command could only do so on an ad-hoc basis because there was not a common platform for everyone to share information.

For example, in the past NATO executed an operation focused on combating piracy. If at the time, an NGO monitoring the situation had discovered that a commercial vessel had been hijacked, it could have used such a platform to let NATO know. Sending NATO that information quickly could have given the Alliance an opportunity to take quick action.

To make that kind of communication possible, the NCI Agency proposed a cloud-based platform to give people the tools they would find in an office on land, such as chat, email and document collaboration. "The secret to the success of this project was the participation of all the actors needed, from the technical perspective to that of the users," said LCDR Giampietro Lungarella, A Navy Signals Cyberspace Requirement and Project Officer for MARCOM.

Security concerns were a big part of the Agency's rationale for choosing the new industry solution. Though NATO has some networks of a low-level classification, they are not considered suitable for supporting operations. The Agency chose a subscription that would offer the maximum number of security features, Herrero Pascual said. The solution also needed to address a problem common to the maritime environment: low bandwidth.

The platform the Agency chose will enable people on board a vessel to continue to work even when the connection doesn't hit the minimum bandwidth. They will be able to continue to work offline, and the data will be synchronized when the ship finds a better connection.

Although this is a commercial off-the-shelf solution, it needed some adjustments to make it fit for NATO use. As Project Manager, CPT Gary Cataldo in Core Enterprise Services at the Agency coordinated, monitored and executed those adjustments.

"We are taking this as a blueprint project, as a way to show that for a certain number of scenarios we can use public cloud solutions," CPT Cataldo said. "This kind of exchange of information with non-military actors can be done through a public cloud solution."
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 24155
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-5-2020 at 09:00 AM


New Innovation Advisory Board to Boost NATO Maritime Unmanned Systems Initiative

(Source: NATO; issued May 11, 2020)


A sensor buoy is taken off the Portuguese Navy survey vessel NRP Dom Carlos I during an unmanned systems exercise testing the ability of NATO Allies to integrate and share information gathered by unmanned systems in operational contexts. (NATO photo)

Participants of the NATO Maritime Unmanned Systems (MUS) initiative decided to create a new Innovation Advisory Board to address multiple challenges for developing unmanned solutions operating below, above and on the water. The NATO MUS initiative was originally launched in October 2018 by 13 Allied Defence Ministers with an ambitious agenda.

“The goal of NATO’s Maritime Unmanned Systems initiative is to accelerate the introduction of innovative unmanned solutions in the maritime domain to help maintain NATO’s technological edge” stressed the NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Defence Investment Skip Davis.

Members of the Innovation Advisory Board will bring together a diverse set of backgrounds and areas of expertise from the public and private sectors, adding an important element to the MUS initiative’s work. “The newly created MUS Innovation Advisory Board is a highly promising contribution to the NATO effort, meant to leverage fresh perspectives and creative thinking from outside the defence establishment. This is a very exciting and practical example of NATO innovation in practice.” adds Skip Davis in his role as the NATO representative on the Innovation Advisory Board. The first meeting of the Innovation Advisory Board in early June will focus on how unmanned systems can most effectively be integrated across the entire spectrum of the maritime domain.

At the Brussels Summit in 2018 NATO leaders reaffirmed the strategic importance of the maritime domain and the criticality of investing in new unmanned capabilities. They can complement conventional ships and serve as a force multiplier to expand the area of coverage and number of tasks Allied navies can address. Equally they offer the ability to remove military personnel from dangerous tasks such as mine clearing.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  4    6  

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 69.4% - SQL: 30.6%]