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[*] posted on 5-10-2017 at 05:49 PM
Coast Guard Navies


Saab to Provide Multi-Mode Radar for US Coast Guard Offshore Patrol Cutter

(Source: Saab; issued Oct 03, 2017)

Defense and security company Saab has received an order from the U.S. Navy to provide the Sea Giraffe Agile Multi Beam (AMB), Multi-Mode Radar (MMR). The order value amounts to $16.8M USD (140 MSEK).

Saab’s Sea Giraffe MMR – a 3D, electronically scanned phased array radar – will be deployed on the US Coast Guard’s (USCG) newest class of ship, the Offshore Patrol Cutter (OPC). The MMR provides high radiated power, selectable waveforms, and modern signal processing to consistently achieve high performance across various marine environments.

The initial order covers the procurement of two systems with options for additional radars providing a total potential contract value of up to $118.5M USD (960 MSEK).

“The US Coast Guard is increasingly called upon to support an array of critical missions in the most challenging conditions. Saab’s OPC MMR will support the customer in fulfilling those missions, from the tropics to the Arctic. The MMR radar provides simultaneous sea to sky radar coverage against the most challenging tracks to ensure total situational awareness”, says Erik Smith, President and CEO of Saab Defense and Security USA.

Saab is a world leader in radar and sensor technology. The company’s AN/SPS-77 radar is currently deployed on the US Navy’s Independence-class Littoral Combat Ship. Additionally, a derivative of AN/SPS-77 known as AN/SPN-50, is being developed to meet the Air Traffic Control needs on aircraft carrier and amphibious assault class ships for the US Naval Air Systems Command.

The addition of the OPC program to the current Sea Giraffe deliveries will allow Saab to further leverage commonality and provide additional value to the US Navy and Coast Guard.

The order will contribute new jobs to SDAS’ Sensor Systems facility in Syracuse, NY. In January, Saab signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with New York State aimed at expanding Saab’s presence in Central New York and creating more high-tech, local jobs in the region.

“This allows us to move forward on our Central New York growth strategy, and to expand our deliveries of Saab’s proven naval radar capabilities to these important US Navy and USCG customers”, says Erik Smith.

Saab Group serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defense and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 13-10-2017 at 10:30 PM


Fincantieri Delivers the Last Two OPVs to the Bangladesh Coast Guard

(Source: Fincantieri; issued Oct 12, 2017)


Fincantieri has converted and upgraded four former Italian navy corvettes into offshore patrol vessels for the Bangladesh Coast Guard. The first were handed over in August 2016 and the final two on Oct. 12. (Fincantieri photo)

TRIESTE, Italy --- Fincantieri today has delivered at its shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia) the last two units part of the supply contract of four Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV), to the Bangladesh Coast Guard (BCG), through the upgrading and conversion of the “Minerva” class corvettes, decommissioned by the Italian Navy.

These are the "Urania" and "Danaide" vessels, renamed “Karamuzzaman” and “Mansoor Ali”, which have been retired from the national fleet in March 2016 and shortly after arrived at Fincantieri’s dock in Genova, where the upgrading and conversion activities started. The units have been completed at the Integrated naval shipyard of Muggiano (La Spezia).

Attending the ceremony, among others, Mr Mostafa Kamal Uddin, Secretary to the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Rear Adm. AMMM Aurangzeb Chowdhury, Director General of the Bangladesh Coast Guard, while Fincantieri was represented by Paolo Frino, Deputy Senior Vice President Fincantieri Services.

Together with “Minerva” and “Sibilla”, renamed “Syed Nazrul” and “Tajuddin” and delivered in August 2016, these vessels will form the backbone of the Bangladesh Coast Guard’s fleet, with an extension of the lifespan by more than twenty years.

The units will be used to patrol the country's maritime boundaries and traffic in its Exclusive Economic Zone, with capabilities to contain environmental pollution and to rescue and assist civilian populations in the case of humanitarian emergencies.

This contract has confirmed, therefore, the ability of Fincantieri – the only one among the suppliers of naval vessels – to offer tailor-made solutions for every Navy and Coast Guard, according to individual needs and characteristics, by developing new projects or, alternatively, thanks to the precious support of the Italian Navy, by performing in-depth and strict refitting process on second-hand units.

Within the development of Fincantieri business in the Far East, this agreement is moreover particularly relevant for the supply of after-sales services for naval vessels, because it allows to provide a full range of services for both the platform and the combat system: from industrial Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul and Conversions to those related to the Life Cycle Management of the vessels, both through the supply of Integrated Logistic Support services, usually developed during construction or conversion, and of In Service Support activities, ensured after the delivery, during the operation of the vessels.

Headquartered in Trieste (Italy), Fincantieri has built more than 7,000 vessels in over 230 years of maritime history. With more than 19,400 employees, of whom more than 8,200 in Italy, 20 shipyards in 4 continents, today Fincantieri is the leading Western shipbuilder. It has among its clients the major cruise operators, the Italian and the U.S. Navy, in addition to several foreign navies, and it is partner of some of the main European defense companies within supranational programmes.

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[*] posted on 17-1-2018 at 04:27 PM


Coast Guard Eyes Leasing Civilian Jail Ship to Hold Detainees


A boarding team aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton apprehends four suspected drug smugglers in international waters in the drug transit zone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, February 23, 2017. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Mark Barney)

Military.com 16 Jan 2018 By Hope Hodge Seck

After a year in which the Coast Guard made a record number of maritime drug interdictions and sent unprecedented numbers of drug smugglers to the United States to stand trial, the service is considering the possibility of investing in a platform that would do nothing but hold detainees until they can be transported to the mainland.

Last November, The New York Times published an investigative story decrying the conditions under which suspected smugglers are held aboard Coast Guard vessels, sometimes for weeks or months at a time.

It quoted a former Coast Guard attorney who called the ships "floating Guantanamos" and detailed conditions that are often cramped and sometimes frigid aboard the service's cutters.
For the record, the commandant of the Coast Guard, Adm. Paul Zukunft, has little sympathy to spare for these detainees.

"We can't lose sight of the fact that these individuals who were detained, they're peddling poison. They are responsible for 64,000 deaths in the U.S.," Zukunft told Military.com during an exclusive interview in December. "These aren't just down-on-their-luck fishermen; they have a choice. You can either fish, or you can be a criminal."

The Times story was told sympathetically from the perspective of one of these detainees, who described scant meals and fear due to being separated from family. Zukunft called it slanted and without an appreciation for the conditions under which the Coast Guard crews themselves work and live below decks.

The Hamilton class of high-endurance cutters has been in service since 1965, and still has four ships in active service.

"Go below deck and look at where my crew is berthing," Zukunft said. "The living conditions in any prison system in the United States [are] better than the berthing areas in my 52-year-old ships. We are operating out of prisons."

While detainees were in the open air above deck, Zukunft said temperate climates in and around the U.S. Southern Command area of operations mitigate some of the hardship of exposure to the elements.

But while Zukunft said he isn't too concerned about the conditions these suspected smugglers have to contend with, he has other reasons for wanting to get out of the floating jail business.

"We're spending about a third of our ship time right now moving these detainees from one ship to another to provide them the best creature comforts at sea until we can land them in Panama, which is the only country right now that will accept detainees for further transport back to the United States," he said.

There's just one other option available to Coast Guard cutters: to transit through the Panama Canal and reach Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

In light of these challenging logistics, which contribute to the length of time detainees can spend on a Coast Guard vessel, Zukunft said the service is exploring the possibility of leasing a dedicated commercial vessel that would do nothing but hold suspects until they can be transferred to the United States.

The ship might actually be leased through the Department of Defense or SouthCom. It might be something like a commercial offshore supply vessel -- a platform abundantly available given limited offshore drilling activity.

While it would be a civilian ship, Zukunft said it would be staffed with Coast Guard law enforcement augmentees to supervise the detained population.

Though not the primary goal, he added that one outcome of acquiring such a vessel might be improved conditions for prisoners.

"That might have better accommodations than we have on ships with flight decks and helicopter hangars to at least get people out of the elements," Zukunft said.

-- Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at hope.seck@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 08:07 PM


US Coast Guard evaluating ScanEagle ocean surface anomaly detector payload

Pat Host, Washington, DC - Jane's Navy International

31 January 2018

The US Coast Guard (USCG) is assessing and evaluating a payload on its fleet of Insitu ScanEagle tactical unmanned aerial systems (UASs) that takes photos of the ocean surface, checks for anomalies, and alerts the aircraft’s operator for further investigation, according to a key official.


An Insitu ScanEagle UAS is launched from the USCG cutter <I>Stratton</I> . (Insitu)

Commander James O’Mara, USCG cutter Stratton operations officer, told Jane’s in a recent interview that the payload’s programme uses an algorithm to detect the anomaly before sending the operator a message, similar to an email that provides a photo and options for further investigation. The payload is one of three that the USCG is assessing and evaluating as part of a ScanEagle trial period before the coast guard holds a competition to acquire small UAS services for its entire fleet of cutters.

Cmdr O’Mara said the USCG is focusing on visual target detection and cueing for its current mission. He said this incorporates a number of tasks, such as looking at a vessel or target of interest and determining what is on board, how many people or engines, or, perhaps, contraband jettisoned. Cmdr O’Mara said image fidelity is crucial for this mission so the USCG can provide prosecutors with physical evidence for criminal prosecutions.

Unlike his US Air Force (USAF) counterparts, Cmdr O’Mara said the coast guard does not have issues with processing all the data coming in from its UAS. He said this is for two reasons, one being that the USCG is focused solely on visual cueing, for now, and secondly that the coast guard is in the middle of the ocean looking for isolated targets, as opposed to the USAF patrolling data-rich areas like Iraq or Afghanistan.

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[*] posted on 2-3-2018 at 06:01 PM


US Coast Guard to release new heavy icebreaker RFP

By: David B. Larter   11 hours ago


The Coast Guard heavy icebreaker Polar Star was commissioned in 1976. (U.S. Coast Guard)

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Coast Guard’s top officer announced Thursday that the service is set to release its request for proposals as early as March 2 for its long-awaited heavy icebreaker replacement.

Adm. Paul Zukunft told an audience at the annual State of the Coast Guard address that the RFP will go out to five potential vendors and will be a comprehensive set of requirements and specifications for the new cutter.

“We need the first one in the water by 2023 so we are on an accelerated timeline,” Zukunft told a group of reporters. “We are still predecisional on the ‘19 budget. But we’re optimistic that this isn’t just a request, but that the funding is there to match it. Now, this is just the first one, we’re looking at a fleet of six, but this gets the ball rolling. We’ve been working this for 20 years now, but we’re getting out the the starting blocks and we need to sprint.”

The Coast Guard is looking to build a fleet of three heavy and three medium icebreakers in the coming years.

Zukunft also left open the possibility that the Icebreaker will need to be armed to counter Russia’s increasing presence in the region.

“We need to build some modularity into this; so maybe you don’t need it up front, but one example is: We need to weaponize the heavy icebreaker,” Zukunft explained. “As you look at what is Russia’s intent in the Arctic, are they going to oppose U.S. presence in the Arctic? Can we use another tool other than submarines? Do we need some surface assets? And right now the only thing we have that can operate in an ice environment other than submarines will be these icebreakers.”

The Coast Guard’s one remaining active icebreaker, the Polar Star, was commissioned in 1976 and requires near constant maintenance to keep it running. The service estimates it can get five more years out of it, which has created an intense timeline to design and build its replacement.

Defense News Editor Jill Aitoro contributed to this report.
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[*] posted on 9-3-2018 at 09:00 PM


Japan Coast Guard expands Liquid-Robotics' Wave Glider Fleet

Posted On Thursday, 08 March 2018 15:09

The Japan Coast Guard (JCG) announced the expansion of their unmanned ocean observation fleet of Wave Gliders to the 9th Regional District,headquartered in Niigata, Japan. This growth is part of JCG’s multi-year, ocean monitoring program to provide enhanced, real-time situational awareness of ocean currents, wave activity, and weather along Japan’s coastlines.Prior to this expansion, JCG deployed fleets of Wave Gliders in four regional districts, forming the first, unmanned ocean observation network in Japan’s history.


Liquid Robotics’ Wave Glider floats on the surface of the ocean, but are propelled by a wave-powered undersea glider. (source: Liquid-Robotics)

In addition to extending this service to the 9th Regional District, JCG is publishing the environmental data for free and in real-time to Japan’s commercial fisheries and tourism industries. The availability of both current and historical oceanographic data from more geographic locations provides the commercial and tourism industries with increased insight into weather patterns and ocean conditions that could adversely affect the safety and efficiency of their maritime operations.

“We are honored to support JCG’s leadership to improve the level of maritime monitoring and safety around Japan through the use of autonomous ocean observation platforms like the Wave Glider,” said Gary Gysin, President and CEO of Liquid Robotics. “Together with Hydro Systems Development, we are excited to support the next phase of growth and are committed to their continued success.”

Wave Gliders are environmentally safe and a more effective way to expand national ocean observation systems when compared to traditional methods such as ships. By utilizing a network of unmanned systems, JCG isable to provide access to continuous, real-time meteorological and oceanographic information from seas where monitoring ships often cannot operate and without putting personnel at risk.

“It has been our pleasure to support the Japan Coast Guard in their mission to enhance monitoring and safety of Japan’s maritime environment,” saidTakashi Kitsuda, President of Hydro Systems Development. “We applaud Liquid Robotics for far exceeding all expectations in support of this truly innovative endeavor.”
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[*] posted on 14-3-2018 at 12:44 PM


DIMDEX 2018: Qatari coast guard orders more Ares vessels

Mohammed Najib, Doha - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

13 March 2018


Another three Ares 150 Hercules OPVs have been ordered for the Qatari coast guard. Source: BMT Group

The Qatari coast guard ordered another nine vessels from Turkey’s Ares Shipyard during the Doha International Maritime Defence Exhibition and Conference (DIMDEX) show held from 12 to 14 March.

The new order covers three 48 m Ares 150 Hercules offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) and six 24 m Ares 80 SAT craft, all of which are expected to be delivered by the end of 2020.

All the new boats will be armed with 30 mm weapon stations made by the Turkish company Aselsan, Brigadier General Ali Saif al-Badeed, the commander of the Qatar Coast and Borders Security Department (QCBSD), told Jane’s .

Qatar ordered 17 boats for the QCBSD from Ares in April 2014: two Ares 150, 10 Ares 110, and five Ares 75. Brig Gen al-Badeed said the last five of these should be delivered by the end of August 2018.

The remaining vessels include the two OPVs. BMT, a consultancy that has helped Ares design the Qatari vessels, announced on 26 February that the first of the Ares 150s had successfully completed sea trials and had demonstrated a top speed of 37 kt.

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[*] posted on 10-4-2018 at 04:37 PM


From record cocaine seizures to hybrid war, Coast Guard missions on the rise

By: Shawn Snow   12 hours ago


A gunner in an MH-68 Stingray helicopter from the Helicopter Interdiction Squadron of Jacksonville, Florida, patrols a drug transit zone alongside the Coast Guard cutter Gallatin. (PA2 Donnie Brzuska/ Coast Guard)

From cyber to hybrid war and cocaine busts, the U.S. Coast Guard has an ever-increasing role in addressing America’s national security challenges in today’s rapidly changing global landscape.

The Coast Guard is currently carrying out a record number of narcotics seizures, and at the same time developing plans for manufacturing three heavy polar icebreakers and one medium icebreaker to tackle rising maritime and security challenges in the Arctic.

All the while, the service is studying hybrid warfare tactics being employed by Chinese coast guard ships in the South China Sea.

The increasing roles of the Coast Guard highlight a rapidly evolving geopolitical landscape, one in which the service must quickly adapt to meet America’s security challenges.

Under the leadership of Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, the service has centered its focus on four strategic areas: the Western hemisphere, the Arctic, cyber, and energy and marine transportation, Vice Commandant Adm. Charles D. Michel told audience members at the annual Sea-Air-Space symposium on Monday.

“In the Western hemisphere, the good news is record cocaine seizures and record number of detainees,” Michel said. “Bad news is record flow rates.”

Regional instability in Mexico and Central America has been fueling transnational criminal gangs, an issue the Coast Guard has been front and center in addressing, Michel explained.

“It’s a tough world here in the Western Hemisphere,” he added, and the Coast Guard is “bringing great capability into the fight down there.”

Michel credited much of the counter-narcotics trafficking success to the service’s national security cutters, high-tech ships that can operate thousands of miles from U.S. coastlines in conjunction with U.S. Navy operations. The new cutters went into service in 2009 and are replacing the aging High Endurance Hamilton-class cutters.

“Best ship we ever fielded by far and it is paying tremendous results,” Michel said.

And soon, the service will float a new offshore patrol cutter into the effort. That ship will be built out of Panama City, Florida, according to Michel.

In the Arctic effort, the service just received its “second slug of money” to build the first heavy icebreaker since the 1970s, Michel told audience members.


The Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, a high-endurance icebreaker home-ported in Seattle, sits on the ice in the Ross Sea near Antarctica while underway in support of Operation Deep Freeze 2015, Jan. 9, 2015. Deep Freeze is a multi-agency operation, the military component of the U.S. Antarctic program, which is managed by the National Science Foundation. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class George Degener)

The Coast Guard currently only has one working heavy ice breaker, known as the Polar Star.

An evolving challenge in the Arctic is that the melting polar ice has opened up new maritime routes and energy exploration that were once closed off to the world, resulting in new security challenges and competition.

Making that challenge even more difficult to meet is an atrophied U.S. industrial base. Today, most cutting-edge icebreaker technology is developed abroad in places like Finland, Michel explained.

Hybrid warfare is also playing in the “wheelhouses” of the U.S. Coast Guard and the coast guards of other nations as well, according to Michel.

In the South China Sea, for example, China has increasingly pushed forward its coast guard in “an exercise of state sovereignty,” Michel said, and as a “different way of projecting national power.”

Recently, the Chinese military folded their coast guard under their defense establishment, an echo of the U.S. model.
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[*] posted on 10-4-2018 at 08:18 PM


Navy League 2018: Chinese coastguard becoming more like US, USCG vice commandant says

Michael Fabey, National Harbor, Maryland - Jane's Navy International

09 April 2018

China is beginning to turn its coastguard into more of an armed defence force that resembles the US Coast Guard (USCG), according to Admiral Charles Michel, USCG vice commandant.

China recently moved its coastguard forces under a defence command and out of the control by other government entities, Adm Michel said during a panel discussion at the Navy League Sea-Air-Space exposition in National Harbor, Maryland, on 9 April.

The Chinese coastguard, Adm Michel said, is “starting to take on the attributes of the US Coast Guard” – an armed force – while retaining the physical characteristics usually associated with a benign coastal patrol.

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[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 07:47 PM


Japan Coast Guard Bolsters Fleet with Additional H225 Order

(Source: Airbus Helicopters; issued April 25, 2018)


Japan’s Coast Guard has ordered another Airbus H225 Super Puma helicopter, which when delivered will increase its fleet to 13 helicopters, and make the Coast Guard Japan’s largest Super Puma operator. (Airbus photo)

BERLIN --- Airbus Helicopters has secured an additional order of one H225 helicopter from the Japan Coast Guard (JCG), bringing JCG’s H225 fleet to ten units. JCG currently operates three AS332s and five H225s, both from the Super Puma family. With this new order, the customer’s Super Puma fleet will grow to 13 units by March 2021, becoming the largest Super Puma operator in Japan.

The new H225 will join the rest of the fleet in security enforcement, territorial coastal activities, as well as disaster relief missions in Japan.

“We are honoured by the renewed H225 order from our customer of over 25 years, as it bears testament to the quality of our long-standing partnership and our customer’s full trust in Airbus’ products and support. We are also delighted to see how our Super Puma helicopters continue to perform excellently in all the missions. With its inherent versatility and reliability, we know the H225 will continue to be a capable workhorse for the JCG’s missions. The Airbus Helicopters team in Japan remains committed in our support to ensure continued availability of the fleet,” said Olivier Tillier, Managing Director of Airbus Helicopters in Japan.

The 11-ton-category twin-turbine H225 is the latest member of Airbus Helicopters’ Super Puma family which accommodates up to 19 passengers. Equipped with state-of-the-art electronic instruments and the renowned 4-axis autopilot system, the H225 offers outstanding endurance and fast cruise speed, and can be fitted with various equipment to suit any role.

In Japan alone, a total of 21 helicopters from the Super Puma family are currently flown by civil, parapublic operators and Japan’s Ministry of Defense for various search and rescue missions, offshore operations, VIP, fire-fighting, and passenger and goods transportation.

Airbus is a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services. In 2017 it generated reported revenues of € 67 billion – or € 59 billion restated for IFRS 15 - and employed a workforce of around 129,000. Airbus offers the most comprehensive range of passenger airliners from 100 to more than 600 seats. Airbus is also a European leader providing tanker, combat, transport and mission aircraft, as well as one of the world’s leading space companies. In helicopters, Airbus provides the most efficient civil and military rotorcraft solutions worldwide.

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[*] posted on 5-6-2018 at 11:37 AM


Second Project 22100 Okean-class patrol craft launched for Russian Coast Guard

Posted On Monday, 04 June 2018 17:23

A launch ceremony was held at the Gorky shipyard in Zelenodolsk to float the Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky second serial coast guard ship of project 22100, the shipyard said.


On June 1, 2018, JSC Zelenodolsky Plant named after AM Gorky in Zelenodolsk launched the second patrol craft for the Coast Guard of the Federal Security Service of Russia.

The Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky was laid on June 15, 2015. The Polyarnaya Zvezda lead ship is operational in the Russian Border Service in the Western Arctic region. The shipyard is currently building the third serial ship of project 22100 which was laid on April 27, 2018.

The Ocean-class ships of project 22100 can navigate in 80-cm thick ice. They are armed with 76.2mm automatic artillery gun AK-176M and two 14.5mm large-caliber machineguns. The ship has a helipad for Ka-27 rotorcraft and its modifications and a hangar. The device to float and lift inspection boats on the run is in the stern. The crew is 44 men.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 8-6-2018 at 07:58 PM


India approves acquisition of hovercraft for coastguard, army

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

07 June 2018


One of the 8000TD hovercraft in service with the Indian Coast Guard. Source: Griffon Hoverwork

Key Points

- India has approved plans to acquire hovercraft for the country’s coastguard, army
- Vehicles will improve the respective service’s operational capabilities in shallow waters and riverine environments

New Delhi has approved acquisition requests for ‘air cushion vehicles’ (ACVs) for the Indian Coast Guard and the Indian Army.

The approval has been granted by the defence acquisition council (DAC), the country’s Ministry of Defence announced on 7 June. The DAC is chaired by India’s Minister of Defence, Nirmala Sitharaman.

“These vessels would offer great advantage over conventional boats [and] crafts with their ability to travel at very high speeds over shallow water, sand banks, mud flats, and swamps which are non-navigable by [the smaller vessels] due to draught restrictions [and] uncharted depths,” said the defence ministry in a statement.

“These craft offer capability enhancement for the services, and would prove useful for amphibious [and] riverine operations, especially where there is a requirement to move men and materiel from one island to another island, across riverine terrain, creeks et cetera,” it added.

The ministry has, however, not given details on how many vehicles will be acquired for each of the services under the approval, adding only that the vehicles should be acquired from an Indian shipyard.

The Indian Coast Guard currently operates a fleet of 18 Griffon 8000TD hovercraft, which have been built under a technical collaboration between India’s Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE) and the United Kingdom’s Griffon Hoverwork.

These vehicles were commissioned between 2000 and 2014.

The 21.3 m hovercraft displaces 25 tonnes at full load, and can accommodate a crew of 16 including two officers. The vehicle can attain a top speed of 50 kt on the water, a standard range of 400 n miles at 45 kt, and can operate up to Sea State 4.
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[*] posted on 27-6-2018 at 09:50 AM


VARD Secures Contract for Three Coast Guard Vessels for the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency

(Source: Vard Holdings Ltd.; issued June 25, 2018)


An artist’s impression of the three Offshore Patrol Vessels that the Vard shipyard has been contracted to supply to the Norwegian coastguard. (Vard image)

I would suggest that three of these wouldn't go amiss for our Southern Ocean patrols, otherwise China will run rampant, never mind the pirate fishing that already goes on..............

We are pleased to announce a new contract for the construction of three coast guard vessels for the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency (NDMA) in Norway. The value of the contract exceeds NOK 5 billion. (approx. $620m—Ed.)

The Norwegian Government had originally announced plans for the construction of three new coast guard vessels in September 2016. Following review of offers from three competing yards, Vard Langsten was selected to continue negotiations in October 2017. The investments were approved by the Norwegian Parliament in the beginning of June 2018, and the final negotiations have been completed and finalized in the following weeks.

The purpose of the new series of vessels is to replace the Nordkapp-class coast guard vessels. The new tailor-made vessels are developed for worldwide operations in all weather and sea conditions, both inshore and offshore. Specially designed to withstand operations in demanding arctic areas, the new coast guard vessels will have ice-strengthened hull and ice-class notation, and will be built according to the latest requirements for such specialized vessels.

With a length of 136 meters and a beam of 22 meters, the vessels feature strong ocean-going capacities for long-distance transits, search-and-rescue operations, surveillance, and oil recovery.

VARD has based its offer on the reference design developed by LMG Marin on behalf of NDMA. VARD has, in cooperation with LMG Marin further developed the concept design in order to ensure that all requirements and needs demanded by NDMA are solved with a high focus on sustainability, life cycle cost and reliability.

Mr. Roy Reite, CEO and Executive Director of VARD, commented: “Our longstanding experience in the design and shipbuilding of highly specialized vessels has been of vital importance in the competition and development of this project. Our strength lies in recognizing and understanding the customer’s and the market’s needs, and introducing innovative solutions based on the vessel’s objective, services, operative window and geographical scope. We have worked hard to achieve this contract and are excited to be awarded.”

Ms. Mette Sørfonden, Director General of NDMA, commented: “Due to national security interests, the Norwegian Government decided that the competition should be restricted to Norwegian yards only. Vard Group with its Vard Langsten yard was the provider that overall satisfied the defined requirements for solution and the Navy and the Coast Guard’s needs in the best manner.”

Mr. Roy Reite, added: “It is a pleasure to cooperate with NDMA’s team again. We have previously built several unique and state-of-the-art vessels together, and we look forward to building the Norwegian Coast Guard’s new flagships.”

Deliveries of the three vessels are scheduled from Vard Langsten in Norway in 1Q 2022, 1Q 2023 and 1Q 2024 respectively. The hulls will be built at Vard Tulcea in Romania.

Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency (NDMA) / Forsvarsmateriell (FMA) is an agency directly subordinate to the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Defence. The main task is to continuously develop and modernize the Norwegian Armed forces.

(ends)

Vard Will Build Three Vessels for the Norwegian Coast Guard

(Source: Fincantieri; issued June 25, 2018)

TRIESTE --- Fincantieri’s subsidiary Vard Holdings Limited (VARD), one of the major global designers and shipbuilders of specialized vessels, has announced that it has signed a new contract for the construction of three coast guard vessels for the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency (NDMA), the agency directly subordinate to the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Defence whose main task is to develop and modernize the Norwegian Armed forces.

The value of the contract exceeds 5 billion Norwegian crowns, equal to about 550 million euro. The effectiveness of the contract is subject to certain conditions being lifted.

The Norwegian Government had originally announced plans for the construction of three new coast guard vessels in September 2016. Following review of offers from three competing yards, Vard was selected to continue negotiations in October 2017. The investments were finally approved by the Norwegian Parliament in the beginning of June 2018.

The vessels will be built within the company’s production network, with deliveries scheduled from Vard Langsten in Norway in 1Q respectively 2022, 2023 and 2024.

The purpose of the new series of vessels is to replace the Nordkapp-class coast guard vessels. The new vessels are developed for worldwide operations in all weather and sea conditions, both inshore and offshore.

Specially designed to withstand operations in arctic areas, the new coast guard vessels will have ice-strengthened hull and ice-class notation, and will be built according to the latest requirements for such specialized vessels and following the needs demanded by NDMA. With a length of 136 meters and a beam of 22 meters, the vessels feature strong ocean-going capacities for long-distance transits, search-and-rescue operations, surveillance, and oil recovery.

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[*] posted on 27-6-2018 at 11:19 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
VARD Secures Contract for Three Coast Guard Vessels for the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency

(Source: Vard Holdings Ltd.; issued June 25, 2018)

I would suggest that three of these wouldn't go amiss for our Southern Ocean patrols, otherwise China will run rampant, never mind the pirate fishing that already goes on..............


Or we could just ice strengthen the hulls of a couple of Anzacs as they are replaced. Perhaps return them to "for, but not with" configuration … and paint them white, of course. ;)
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[*] posted on 27-6-2018 at 11:24 AM


Errrrrr nope! Even with additional strengthening, they are far from suited to Ops there, apart from an occasional quick visit...............
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[*] posted on 29-10-2018 at 06:35 PM


Japan makes inaugural deployment of coastguard vessel to Australia

Kosuke Takahashi, Tokyo - Jane's Navy International

29 October 2018

The Japan Coast Guard (JCG) will for the first time deploy a vessel to Australia, as part of efforts to strengthen counter-piracy measures in Southeast Asia.

The vessel, the 3,300-tonne Souya-class patrol ship Echigo (PLH 08), will be deployed for a month starting from 30 October, according to the Japanese foreign ministry. The ship will be embarked with one Sikorsky S-76D helicopter.

Besides being involved in activities with the Australian Border Force, Echigo will also take part in maritime security exercises with the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG).

"Through these efforts, we aim to further promote free, open, and safe seas based on the rule of law in the Indo-Pacific region," the ministry added.

(113 of 222 words)
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[*] posted on 27-11-2018 at 09:32 AM


Canadian Coast Guard prepares for first Chantier Davie icebreaker

Ian Keddie, Toronto - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

26 November 2018

The first of three icebreakers converted by shipbuilder Chantier Davie is scheduled to enter the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) service by the beginning of December.

The ex-Vidar Viking icebreaker was floated out of Davie's Champlain drydock on 13 November with a fresh coat of paint in CCG colours.

The Canadian government originally announced the CAD610 million (USD462 million) contract on 10 August after concluding Davie's proposal to convert three civilian medium icebreakers would meet the CCG's urgent capability gap.

"The conversion works on the first icebreaker have been minimal - mostly painting - since this vessel needs to begin operations soon for the upcoming icebreaking season to add immediate capability to the Canadian Cost Guard," Frédérik Boisvert, vice-president of Public Affairs for Chantier Davie, told Jane's .

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[*] posted on 17-1-2019 at 10:40 PM


Philippine commissions third, fourth Boracay-class patrol vessels

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

16 January 2019

Key Points

- The Philippine Coast Guard has inducted the final Boracay-class vessels ordered in a 2012 contract
- Vessels will be jointly operated by customs and coastguard officials to bolster the country's anti-smuggling efforts

The Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) has commissioned its third and fourth Boracay- (OCEA FPB 72 Mk II) class patrol boats.

The vessels, which have been named BRP Malamawi (2403) and BRP Kalanggaman (2404) respectively, were commissioned at the National Headquarters Philippine Coast Guard in Manila on 16 January.

The first two boats in the class, BRP Boracay (2401) and BRP Panglao (2402), were commissioned on 15 October 2018.

(125 of 324 words)
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[*] posted on 7-2-2019 at 10:12 PM


Small Motor Adds Powerful Punch to Coast Guard's Next Offshore Cutter


Work is underway at Eastern Shipbuilding Group in Panama City, Florida, on the Offshore Patrol Cutter. (Eastern Shipbuilding Group)

5 Feb 2019

Military.com | By Patricia Kime

It's not much bigger than a dishwasher, but the Leonardo DRS permanent magnet motor, used for years to power oil rigs, will help propel the Coast Guard's new offshore patrol cutter, or OPC.

The Arlington, Virginia-based company was awarded a $10.7 million contract in 2017 to furnish nine hybrid electric drive systems for the Heritage-class OPC, the first of which is under construction in Panama City, Florida, by Eastern Shipbuilding Group.

Leonardo DRS is currently building its second system for the second OPC, the Chase, even as Eastern Shipbuilding just began cutting steel in January for the first ship in the class, the Argus.

Two 625-horsepower permanent magnet motors will power the OPC’s hybrid-electric drive system, designed to provide auxiliary propulsion to the ship's main diesel engines. The system will increase fuel efficiency, decrease emissions and reduce wear and tear on the main diesel engines, according to Greg Reed, senior director for business development in Leonardo DRS' naval power unit.

Reed said the auxiliary system will allow the ship to operate at slow speeds or "low load," reducing the need to run diesel engines at low loads, which causes significant stress and deposits buildup.

"[We think the Coast Guard] selected this out of maintenance concerns," Reed said during an interview at the Surface Warfare Association's annual conference in January. "But the other thing is, the U.S. is behind on this technology. Navies internationally, with their frigates and other ships, if they aren't using full-on electric drives, they have hybrid-electric drive systems."

Leonardo DRS' 30- x 26- x 8-inch permanent magnet motor has been used by the oil and gas industry for more than 20 years for drive applications. But in terms of ship propulsion, larger versions have been patrol-tested by the Republic of Korea's Navy, which uses them to power the Daegu-class multipurpose frigates, also known as FFX II.

Working alongside -- and in many cases instead of -- the Daegu class' gas turbine engines, the Leonardo DRS motors provide quiet operations at speeds up to 8 knots -- slow, Reed said, but well-suited for anti-submarine warfare operations and other types of patrols.

The company hopes the U.S. Navy might see the benefits of such a propulsion system for its new frigate, the FFG[X]. According to Reed, in addition to offering fuel savings and whisper-quiet propulsion, it provides greater power efficiency than induction motors and redundancy in case main propulsion systems fail.

"We are trying to convince the Navy that this isn't just about fuel savings and efficiency, it's about capability," he said.

Reed said Leonardo DRS is excited to be working with Eastern Shipbuilding Group, which is expected to deliver the Argus to the Coast Guard in 2021. Work on the 360-foot ship restarted this month following a hiatus after Hurricane Michael nearly wiped out Eastern's shipyards last October.

In addition to cutting steel for Argus, Eastern is pulling together the propulsion systems and machinery for the Chase. The Coast Guard intends to buy 25 OPCs, according to the service.
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[*] posted on 20-2-2019 at 09:40 PM


US Coast Guard begins testing MH-65E helicopters

19 FEBRUARY, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GARRETT REIM LOS ANGELES

The US Coast Guard commenced low-rate initial production of its service life extension and avionics upgrade programme for its Eurocopter HH-65 Dolphin short range recovery helicopters.

Three aircraft have been converted into the upgraded MH-65E “Echo” variant, with the first helicopter rolling off the production line on 18 December 2018, the US Coast Guard says. On 7 January, the programme began initial operational and test evaluation (IOT&E) activities on two of those three aircraft, the service says.

The MH-65E Service Life Extension programme replaces five major structure components within the helicopter – the nine-degree frame, canopy, centre console floor assembly, floorboards and side panels. Those improvements are designed to extend the service life of the helicopter by 10,000 flight hours, says the service.

The avionics upgrades include reliability and capability improvements for the Automatic Flight Control System; installation of a digital cockpit display system and an upgraded digital weather and surface search radar; integration of a robust command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance suite, and modernisation of the digital flight deck with Common Avionics Architecture System. The Common Avionics Architecture is shared with Coast Guard Sikorsky H-60 medium range recovery helicopters and similar Department of Defense aircraft.


US Coast Guard MQ-65E helicopter
US Coast Guard


As part of IOT&E, the Coast Guard plans 21 ground events and 56 flights. There will be three test periods and one make-up test period that take place in a three-month window, the service says.

A final test report of data collected from both the operational assessment and IOT&E will be used to support a decision for the programme to move into full-rate production, says the Coast Guard. The program anticipates an acquisition decision in the first quarter of fiscal year 2020.

Projected completion of the MH-65E conversion for all 98 aircraft is fiscal year 2024, says the Coast Guard.
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[*] posted on 11-3-2019 at 07:36 PM


Japan launches third Shikishima-class vessel

Kosuke Takahashi, Tokyo - Jane's Navy International

10 March 2019


Reimei, at its launch ceremony on 8 March. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries)

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) launched a 6,500-tonne patrol vessel for the Japan Coast Guard (JCG) on 8 March.

The 150 m vessel, which has been named Reimei , will be the third Shikishima-class ship in service with the JCG once it is commissioned in 2020.

The vessel has an overall beam of 17 m, and can accommodate a helicopter on its flight deck. It has also been equipped for high-tempo search and surveillance operations, and can also take on roles as a command ship, a JCG spokesperson told Jane’s .

The total cost of acquiring the vessel, and its accompanying helicopter is about JPY30 billion (USD270 million), the spokesperson added.

(134 of 246 words)
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[*] posted on 30-4-2019 at 08:46 PM


Shipbuilder Named to Build Coast Guards New Icebreaker


The Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star cuts through Antarctic ice in the Ross Sea (Photo: U.S. Coast Guard, Chief Petty Officer David Mosley)

24 Apr 2019

Military.com | By Patricia Kime

A Pascagoula, Mississippi, shipbuilder has been awarded the contract to build the Coast Guard's long-awaited new icebreaker, an agreement worth up to $1.9 billion if an additional two ships are optioned.

The Coast Guard announced Tuesday that VT Halter Marine Inc. received the initial $746 million contract award to design and construct a first-in-class Polar Security Cutter, the service's first heavy icebreaker in more than 40 years.

In a contract award process that involved Naval Sea Systems Command, VT Halter Marine was selected over two other finalists, Bollinger Shipyards of Lockport, Louisiana, and a Philadelphia- and Wisconsin-based partnership between Philly Shipyard and Fincantieri Marinette Marine, according to The Associated Press.

The VT Halter Marine shipyard is known for making specialty vessels such as the U.S. Navy's Mark V patrol boat, the U.S. Army's logistics support vessel, oceanographic survey ships and commercial vessels like the state of Virginia's newest James River ferry.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2019 at 01:42 PM


US Coast Guard to deploy Insitu Scan Eagles on cutters in 2019

08 MAY, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GARRETT REIM WASHINGTON DC

The US Coast Guard will significantly expand its use of Insitu Scan Eagles when it deploys the unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) aboard four National Security Cutters by the end of 2019.

While one cutter, USCGC Stratton, has hosted Scan Eagles for about a year and a half, the 2019 deployment represents the beginning of the services effort to expand the use of the small drone. Three UAVs will be deployed per cutter, with a staff of Insitu operators on a service contract to fly the aircraft up to 200h per month for the service. The USCG anticipates deploying Scan Eagles aboard all of its 11 National Security Cutters, once the fleet of ships have been built.


Insitu Scan Eagle US Coast Guard

The Scan Eagle has a range up to 80nm (148km) and an endurance of up to 18h. It is launched from the cutter deck using a catapult and recovered with a skyhook. The UAVs will carry a variety of payloads for the USCG, including electro-optical, mid-wave infrared, and visual detection and ranging sensors, as well as a laser pointer and communications relay hardware.

The UAVs will help extend the range of the USCGs cutters, says Captain Carl Riedlin, USCG chief of aviation.

Its a chance for the cutter to be able to push away from their immediate area, not necessarily have to launch a helicopter to be able to see further out, he says.

The UAVs will be used to assist in search and rescue, stopping drug smuggling and ice-breaking missions, among other applications.
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[*] posted on 15-5-2019 at 09:12 PM


IMDEX 2019: Philippine Coast Guard in talks with Israel Shipyards for Shaldag Mk II

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

14 May 2019


A model of the Shaldag Mk II, on display at IMDEX 2019. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- The Philippine Coast Guard is in talks with Israel Shipyards on the Shaldag Mk II patrol craft
- The service has requirements for a new class of fast interceptors within the 25-35 m range

The Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) is considering the Shaldag Mk II patrol craft to fulfil the service's outstanding requirement for a new class of 25-35 m interception vessels.

A senior service official who spoke to Jane's at the IMDEX 2019 defence and maritime exhibition has confirmed that a meeting between PCG leaders and Israel Shipyards was held at the same event on 14 May. The meeting was held to understand the vessel type further, including whether it can be configured according to PCG preferences.

"Some of the matters that we discussed include the types of engines that can be fitted on the Shaldag Mk II. We very much prefer the brands of engines that are currently already in service on our coastguard boats, so we wanted more confirmation on this," said the senior official.

Other matters that were discussed are namely the scope of possible government-to-government programmes that can be utilised between the two countries should a procurement programme materialise, including funding programmes, payment plans, co-build programmes, and transfer-of-technology arrangements.

The Shaldag Mk II has an overall length of 24.8 m, a maximum beam of 6 m, and a maximum draught of 1.2 m. The vessel type displaces about 58 tonnes, and is powered by MTU engines in the original configuration. The patrol craft is propelled by waterjets, and can attain a maximum speed of over 40 kt with a standard range of 650 n miles at 32 kt.

(298 of 479 words)
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[*] posted on 30-5-2019 at 04:17 PM


Canada Announces New Coast Guard Shipbuilding Plans

(Source: Forecast International; posted May 28, 2019)

By Shaun McDougall


Canadas first Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship, the Harry DeWolf, one of the six AOPS that Irving Shipbuilding is making for the Royal Canadian Navy; two more variants of this design will be built for the Canadian Coast Guard. (RCN photo)

The Canadian government announced a series of coast guard shipbuilding initiatives that include the construction of 18 new vessels. The Coast Guard is set to receive two new Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships, modified for Coast Guard missions. Irving Shipbuilding is already building a fleet of six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy. The 5,200-ton ships are 103.6 meters long and have an open-water speed of 17 knots and a range of 6,800 nautical miles.

The Coast Guard is also investing in a fleet of up to 16 Multi-Purpose Vessels, which will conduct a variety of missions including light icebreaking, environmental response, and offshore search and rescue. These vessels will be constructed at Seaspans Vancouver Shipyards.

The government estimates these 18 vessels will cost CAD15.7 billion ($11.7 billion). This figure includes construction, logistics and support, management and infrastructure costs, as well as contingency funding for unexpected costs. The program budget is an early estimate, however, and is likely to change. The cost of each ship remains to be seen, and will be announced after contracts have been negotiated.

The government also plans to pursue a competition for a new class of small Mid-Shore Multimission Ships, which will be utilized in shallower waters and for mid-shore science operations.

To support future shipbuilding requirements, the government plans to add a third shipyard as a partner under the National Shipbuilding Strategy. Under the original framework of the NSS, Irving Shipbuilding was tasked with constructing combat vessels for the Navy, while Vancouver Shipyards was put in charge of building non-combat vessels. A competitive process will be used to select the third shipyard in the coming months.

Quebec-based Davie is a frontrunner to be the third NSS partner. Davie has conducted a wide range of work for the Navy and Coast Guard. For example, the company converted a commercial container ship into a Navy supply ship, helps maintain the Navys Halifax class frigates, and received a contract for the acquisition and conversion of three medium Anchor Handling Tug Supply icebreakers for the Coast Guard.

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