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Author: Subject: Coast Guard Navies
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[*] posted on 13-6-2019 at 02:49 PM


Saab Receives Order from the U.S. for Sea Giraffe MMR

(Source: Saab; issued June 11, 2019)

Saab has received an additional order from the U.S. Navy for the Sea Giraffe Multi Mode Radar (MMR) for the Coast Guard’s offshore patrol cutter.

This additional order exercises an option on an existing contract which was initially awarded in 2017 and includes multiple line item options for additional Sea Giraffe MMR systems. The initial contract covers manufacturing, inspection, testing and delivery of the radars, which will be deployed on the Coast Guard's Heritage class offshore patrol cutter. Deliveries will take place between 2020 and 2021.

Saab has continuously developed the standard Giraffe AMB sensor to meet multiple missions in the U.S. sea services from open-ocean blue-water applications into the littorals.

“The key to our success in the US is the combination of our efficient and flexible Sea Giraffe radar coupled with our technical expertise and understanding of the US customer’s needs and expectations”, says Anders Carp, Senior Vice President and Head of Saab business area Surveillance.

In addition to the offshore patrol cutter, Saab’s Sea Giraffe MMR radar is also being delivered for the Hershel Wilson Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB-4) class ship, operated by the U.S. Military Sealift Command. Saab’s Sea Giraffe variant referred to as AN/SPS-77 is currently being deployed on the U.S Navy’s Independence-class Littoral Combat Ships.

Saab is also developing an AN/SPN-50 variant to meet the air traffic control needs of the U.S. Naval Air Systems Command for deployment on the Nimitz class aircraft carrier (CVN) and America- (LHA) and Wasp- (LHD) class amphibious assault ships.

Saab will carry out the work in Syracuse, NY in the U.S. and Gothenburg, Sweden.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

-ends-

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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 06:16 PM


Coast Guard Polar Security Cutter will be Homeported in Seattle

By: Ben Werner - June 17, 2019 5:52 PM


US Heavy Ice Breaker Polar Star (WAGB-10). US Coast Guard Photo

The U.S. Coast Guard’s polar icebreaking fleet will remain based in Seattle after delivery of its new class of heavy icebreakers.

The first of a planned fleet of three heavy icebreakers, called Polar Security Cutters, is expected to deliver in 2023. The Coast Guard’s only working heavy icebreaker, USCGC Polar Star (WAGB-10), is based in Seattle. The Coast Guard also has one medium icebreaker, USCGC Healy (WAGB-20).

“I am pleased to announce that Seattle, Washington will be the home of the Coast Guard’s new Polar Security Cutters,” Adm. Karl L. Schultz, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, said in a statement. “The Pacific Northwest has been the home of our icebreaking fleet since 1976, and I am confident that the Seattle area will continue to provide the support we need to carry out our critical operations in the polar regions.”

In April, VT Halter Marine was awarded a $745 million detailed design and construction contract by the Coast Guard to build the new first-in-class Polar Security Cutter. The icebreaker will be constructed at the company’s Pascagoula, Miss., shipyard.

The contract with Halter Marine also includes options to build two more Polar Security Cutters. If both options are exercised, the contract value increases to $1.9 billion for the three icebreakers, according to the Coast Guard.


An artist’s rendering of VT Halter Marine’s winning bid for the U.S. Coast Guard Polar Security Cutter. VT Halter Marine image used with permission

Each winter, the Coast Guard sends icebreakers to the bottom of the world to lead supply ships into McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, to resupply the National Science Foundation’s research center. Each summer, the Coast Guard sends icebreakers to perform similar missions to assist shipping off the Alaskan coast. The Coast Guard also maintains a U.S. presence in the Arctic, defending national interests in the region which is increasingly becoming a focus for Russia and China.

“In terms of the maximum thickness of the ice to be broken, the annual McMurdo resupply mission generally poses the greatest icebreaking challenge for U.S. polar icebreakers, though Arctic ice can frequently pose its own significant icebreaking challenges for U.S. polar icebreakers.” states a May Congressional Research Service report.

After considering several homeport options, the Coast Guard determined Seattle remained the best port to support its Polar Security Cutter missions in the high latitudes, according to a Coast Guard statement.
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[*] posted on 26-7-2019 at 10:38 PM


US strengthens coastguard presence in Asia amid rise of ‘coercive and antagonistic’ behaviours

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

25 July 2019


The USCG cutter, USCGC Bertholf. The ship has been deployed to support US Seventh Fleet's activities in the Indo-Pacific. Source: US Pacific Fleet

Key Points

- The US Coast Guard is doubling down on its presence and engagement with partner countries across the Asia-Pacific
- Deployments are intended to strengthen maritime capabilities of partner countries and address threats to maritime safety and freedom in the region

The US Coast Guard (USCG) will be expanding its engagement with partner countries in what Washington refers to as the Indo-Pacific amid increasing threats to maritime safety and freedom of navigation in the region, said USCG Commandant Admiral Karl Schultz in a recent phone-in interview with reporters.

"In the face of coercive and antagonistic behaviour, the USCG offers transparent engagement and partnership," said Adm Schultz, without making references to any specific countries. "Our specialised capabilities and expansive international relationships enable us to build partnerships, and rules-based values and behaviours that we want to see in the region."

Adm Schultz noted that deployments of USCG vessels into the region will complement the existing presence of US Navy (USN) warships in the region and assist partner countries in asserting their own sovereignty.

"Many young Indo-Pacific nations lack the capacity and capability to fully police their sovereign waters, making them vulnerable to narcotics trafficking, human smuggling, illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, piracy, and other nefarious activities," he said. "Through engagement, partnership, and presence we are a maritime bridge between the Department of Defense's lethality and the State Department's diplomacy."

Adm Schultz expressed hope that countries in the region would see the USCG as the partner of choice as they seek out training providers to build their own capabilities.

"We tailor the services to the needs of nations we are supporting. Our long-term commitment to capacity building spans the range of coastguard expertise including the transfer of cutters as excess defence articles, multinational security exercises, bilateral search-and-rescue and law enforcement agreements, the hosting of ship riders on coastguard vessels, and the deploying of training teams to share technical expertise, and to build proficiency," he said.

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[*] posted on 14-8-2019 at 01:58 PM


Six New Icebreakers To Be Built For Canadian Coast Guard

By: Xavier Vavasseur

August 13, 2019 10:54 AM


Artist impression of Project Resolute

The Canadian Coast Guard will be procuring six new program icebreakers to replace its current aging fleet of icebreakers.
The announcement was made on Aug. 2 by Canada’s Minister for Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Jonathan Wilkinson.

Minister Wilkinson also announced that the Government of Canada is officially launching a competitive process, through an Invitation to Qualify, to add a third Canadian shipyard as a strategic partner under the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS). This new shipyard will build the new program icebreakers for the Coast Guard.

Coast Guard program icebreakers are essential to Canada’s economy by supporting year-round marine trade in Eastern Canada, the St. Lawrence waterway and the Great Lakes. They enable eastern Canadian ferries to operate during the wintertime, and are critical to Canada’s commercial fisheries.

The program icebreakers are also used to provide service to Canada’s northern residents by supporting the annual re-supply of goods to Canada’s Arctic communities and their industries.

“The Canadian Coast Guard saves lives at sea, maintains safe shipping, enables an otherwise ice-choked economy, protects the marine environment and supports Canadian sovereign presence in the Arctic. Demands on the Coast Guard will only grow as the impacts of climate change become more frequent and intense. By adding the new program icebreakers to renew the fleet, we are ensuring the women and men of the Canadian Coast Guard have the equipment they need to deliver icebreaking services in the Arctic, on the St. Lawrence waterway and on Canada’s East Coast.”
Jonathan Wilkinson
Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

On May 22, 2019, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that the Government of Canada is investing $15.7 billion to renew the Coast Guard fleet, with up to 16 Multi-Purpose Vessels to be built at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards and two new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships to be built at Irving Shipbuilding Inc.

The new program icebreakers will replace the Coast Guard’s heavy and medium icebreakers that operate in Atlantic Canada and the St. Lawrence waterways during the winter and in the Arctic during the summer. In Atlantic Canada, these program icebreakers help ensure year-long ferry service, escort ships through ice-covered waters and the clearance of ice from harbors and wharfs, which is essential to Canada’s commercial fisheries. In the Arctic, they provide icebreaking support to ships with vulnerable cargoes, such as dangerous goods and perishable products, and support vessels transporting cargo that is a vital part of the northern communities’ sealift and resupply.

The Canadian Coast Guard currently has a fleet of two heavy icebreakers (CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent and CCGS Terry Fox) and five medium icebreakers. Two interim medium icebreakers (Tor Viking and Balder Viking) are being converted for the CCG as part of project Resolute, while CCGS John G. Diefenbaker, a Polar icebreaker displacing 23,500 tons, is set to join the fleet in by 2022.

A version of this post originally appeared on Naval News. It’s been republished here with permission.
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[*] posted on 17-9-2019 at 01:07 PM


Polar Security Cutter Fuses Performance Requirements With Maintenance Needs

By: Ben Werner

September 16, 2019 7:15 PM


An artist’s rendering of VT Halter Marine’s winning bid for the U.S. Coast Guard Polar Security Cutter. VT Halter Marine image used with permission

WASHINGTON, D.C. – By building a heavy icebreaker designed to both withstand the frigid waters and accommodate major maintenance needs, the Coast Guard hopes to avoid the catastrophic failures that have hamstrung the service’s polar missions for a nearly a decade.

The Polar Security Cutter’s builder VT Halter Marine teamed up with New Orleans-based Technology Associates Inc. to focus on creating a cost-effective design that is flexible enough to accommodate new technologies, changing missions and complicated repairs. The Coast Guard awarded the $745.9 million contract to build the Polar Security Cutter in April and delivery is expected in 2024.

“We deliberately looked at how workers can get into spaces to fix components at sea,” said retired Marine Corps Brig. Gen. Ronald Baczkowski, now chief executive of VT Halter Marine, at last week’s American Society of Naval Engineers Arctic Day 2019 conference.

An example of how the icebreaker’s design and build teams weighed the placement of major components and which materials to use is the Polar Security Cutter’s engine space, said Anil Raj, the president of Technology Associates, at the conference. For inspiration, the designers looked at the Coast Guard’s current fleet of heavy icebreakers,
The Coast Guard’s ability to run Arctic and Antarctic missions has been hampered since June 2010, when USCGC Polar Sea (WAGB-11), one of the service’s two heavy icebreakers, suffered a catastrophic engine failure.

The cost of repairing Polar Sea would be astronomical to consider, Raj said. Its engine is buried in the ship, and the exotic high-strength steel used to build Polar Sea’s hull hasn’t been made in decades. Accessing the engine for repairs would mean cutting a hole in the hull with no realistic way to patch it when finished. Instead, the Coast Guard ‘s other heavy icebreaker, USCGC Polar Star (WAGB-10), remains operational by cannibalizing parts from Polar Sea.

“We said ‘that cannot be repeated’,” Raj said. “It was not part of the spec requirements, but it was something we wanted to rethink. We put our engines up high, and you can actually pull the block up through the stack if you had a catastrophic failure.”

The Polar Security Cutter will have split stacks, which provides the bridge a view of the helicopter pad in the aft of the ship, Raj said.

The type of steel used to build the icebreaker is also significant. Instead of using an exotic steal, VT Halter is using a kind of steel commonly rolled in the U.S., Baczkowski said. The design uses mostly flat plates with some compound curves, limiting the amount of forging and casting and saving on production costs.

A unique attribute of the Polar Security Cutter is the length of its midsection, Raj said. Compared to other heavy icebreakers, the Polar Security Cutter is longer than most because its mission requirements are different. The Polar Security Cutter will be 460-feet long. In comparison, Finland’s new IB Polaris heavy icebreaker is about 360-feet long, according to its builder Artia.

“An icebreaker shouldn’t have a long mid-body. That’s true for Baltic icebreakers, that’s true for the Russian icebreakers that have to keep the sea lanes open,” Raj said. “But that’s not necessarily true for the icebreaker that has to travel 9,000 miles to reach its target and keep the people comfortable and needs to carry the fuel to get there. So, you can see that we have a long body.”

The lengthened hull allows the Polar Security Cutter to do open water missions and has free space that could be used in the future for science missions, Raj said. The Coast Guard specs called for an icebreaker that could handle sea state four, marked by between 4-foot and 8-foot swells. Raj said the VT Halter and Technology Associates design has the icebreaker handling up to sea state 7, marked by a stomach-churning 20-foot to nearly 30-foot waves.

The Polar Security Cutter’s primary mission is breaking thick ice so cargo ships can bring supplies to the harshest harbors on Earth, such as the National Science Foundation’s research facility, McMurdo Station, in Antarctica.

VT Halter and Technology Associates team researched several heavy icebreakers, using one, two and three propeller pods for propulsion, Raj said. They settled on using two ABB Azipod V3000 pods and one standard propeller to give the icebreaker a combination of power, stability and maneuverability.

“The propellers are trying to eat the ice,” Raj said. “It’s basically like a blender on a margarita machine.”

Older icebreaker designs focused on protecting the propellers from ice, Raj said. Now, the materials used to build propellers have improved to the point that propellers are part of the icebreaking process.

“An interesting element of the icebreaker that us naval architects don’t really realize, this whole thing is steel, it’s really one big battering ram of steel and engines and propellers, and the rest is just fuel and mission,” Raj said. “So, concentrating on the steel element is an important portion of it.”
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[*] posted on 14-10-2019 at 08:38 PM


OCEA begins sea trials for Philippine Coast Guard’s 84 m OPV

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

14 October 2019


Gabriela Silang during its preliminary sea trials in October 2019. Source: OCEA

French shipbuilder OCEA has begun preliminary sea trials of a new 84 m offshore patrol vessel (OPV) on order for the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG).

The trials, which involved members of the vessel's pioneering crew from the PCG, began on 11 October. The vessel was launched in Les Sables d'Olonne, France, in July 2019.

During its trials, the OPV, which will be in service as BRP Gabriela Silang (8301) once commissioned, exceeded its contractual maximum speed by 1.5 kt, said OCEA in a statement.

Powered by twin MTU 16V 4000 M73 diesel engines, Gabriela Silang has a contractual maximum speed of 22 kt and a range of 8,000 n miles at 12 kt.

The OPV can accommodate a crew of 40, with 26 additional spaces for mission-specific crew. It can also take up to 35 evacuees when accommodated in more austere conditions. With its core crew, the vessel has an endurance of five weeks.

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[*] posted on 15-11-2019 at 09:03 PM


India launches 11th Sankalp-class vessel

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

15 November 2019


India's 11th Sankalp-class OPV, seen here at its launch ceremony. Source: Goa Shipyard Limited

India's Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL) has launched another 105 m improved Sankalp-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) ordered for the Indian Coast Guard (ICG).

The vessel was launched on 14 November at GSL's facilities in Goa. It will be the 11th vessel in the Sankalp class, which is referred to in India as the Samarth class after the programme's third ship, which features a longer beam than its predecessors.

The OPV is part of a five-vessel, INR20 billion (USD275 million) contract approved by the Indian government in August 2016. This contract is also referred to in country as the Samarth-class Flight II project.

It is a follow-on contract to the six 105 m Batch II Sankalp-class OPVs, also referred to as the Samarth-class Flight I, which GSL signed for in January 2012.

The improved Sankalp class has an overall beam of 13.6 m, a draught of about 3.7 m, and displaces 2,450 tonnes at full load. The OPV is powered by two MTU 20V 8000 M71L diesel engines driving two controllable pitch propellers, and has a top speed of 23 kt and a standard range of 6,500 n miles (12,038 km) at 12 kt.

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[*] posted on 20-12-2019 at 09:59 PM


OCEA hands over 84 m OPV to the Philippine Coast Guard

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

20 December 2019


Gabriela Silang during its preliminary sea trials in October 2019. Source: OCEA

French shipbuilder OCEA has delivered an 84 m offshore patrol vessel (OPV) that was on order for the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG).

The vessel, which will be known as BRP Gabriela Silang (8301) once in service, was handed over to the service at Saint Nazaire, France, on 18 December 2019. It was launched at by OCEA at Les Sables d'Olonne in July 2019.

Gabriela Silang is powered by twin MTU 16V 4000 M73 diesel engines and has a contractual maximum speed of 22 kt with a range of 8,000 n miles at 12 kt. It can accommodate a crew of 40, with 26 additional spaces for mission-specific crew.

The vessel, which has been built to OCEA's proprietary OPV 270 design, has a flight deck that can accommodate a five-tonne-class helicopter and two telescopic cranes that can launch and recover 9.2 m rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs).

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[*] posted on 14-1-2020 at 02:21 PM


South Korean coastguard receives additional Tae Geuk-class patrol boats

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar - Jane's Navy International

13 January 2020


(518) is one of several new 500-tonne patrol vessels that entered service with the KCG in 2019. It is one of three hulls built by Kangnam and based in Incheon, near the North Korean border. Source: KCG

The Korea Coast Guard (KCG) has taken delivery of at least six of eight 500-tonne Tae Geuk-class patrol vessels it ordered from Busan-based shipbuilders Kangnam Corporation and Hanjin Heavy Industries Corporation in late 2016.

The patrol boats will supplement the KCG's existing fleet of 15 Tae Geuk vessels.

Two of three being built at Kangnam's yard (with pennant numbers 518 and 523) were commissioned on 25 July and 5 December 2019, respectively. The delivery status of the third Kangnam-built hull, 526, remains unclear.

Hanjin Heavy Industries Corporation, meanwhile, carried out a mass launching of the remaining five hulls on 30 April 2019 at its shipyard in Yeongdo, Busan, although four of the hulls (519, 520, 521, and 522) were already outfitting in the water. Ships 519 and 522 were commissioned on 25 July and 27 December 2019, respectively; 520 was commissioned on 31 October 2019, and 521 was in service by 23 October 2019. Delivery of ship 525 is expected to take place before the end of February.

According to the KCG, the five hulls being built by Hanjin are one-for-one replacements for 30-year-old patrol vessels in the 250 tonne and 300 tonne categories.

The eight new Tae Geuk-class vessels are slightly longer, heavier, and faster than the first 15 of the class, which were built between 2008 and 2012. The latest variants have an overall length of 63.2 m, a beam of 9.1 m, a draft of 2.6 m, and a displacement of 640 tonnes fully loaded. Powered by four MJP waterjets, two MTU 16V 4000 M90, and two MTU 12 V 1163 TB93 diesel engines, the vessel can attain a top speed of more than 35 kt.

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[*] posted on 17-1-2020 at 04:08 PM


Surface Navy 2020: Insitu to outfit entire USCG national security cutter fleet with ScanEagles by end of year

Pat Host, Washington, DC - Jane's Navy International

15 January 2020

Insitu is on pace to supply its ScanEagle endurance mini-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the US Coast Guard’s (USCG’s) entire national security cutter (NSC) fleet by the end of 2020, according to a company official.

Ron Tremain, Insitu senior business executive for Department of Homeland Security (DHS), domestic, and international maritime operations, told Jane’s on 14 January at the Surface Navy trade show that the USCG currently has eight NSCs but plans to expand to 12 total ships in the next few years. Insitu has already built enough ScanEagles to fill out the current USCG NSC fleet in 2020, he said.

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[*] posted on 3-2-2020 at 08:24 PM


Indian Coast Guard commissions coastal interception craft

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

03 February 2020

The Indian Coast Guard (ICG) has commissioned another 28 m coastal interception craft.

The unnamed vessel, which bears the pennant number C-448, was commissioned on 29 January at New Mangalore in the western Indian state of Karnataka.

The vessel is equipped with water jet propulsion driven by two Caterpillar 3516C diesel engines, and can attain a maximum speed of 45 kt with a standard range of 500 n miles at 25 kt.

It can accommodate a crew of 15 including two officers, and has been equipped with a machine gun mount in the forward section.

The C-448 is expected to take on constabulary and maritime patrol duties with the ICG's Coast Guard District 3 when it is fully operationalised.

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[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 08:34 AM


Thats the largest 28 m vessel i have ever seen :lol:

Cheers
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[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 12:20 PM


The people on it are just very small.



Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 01:17 PM


Wot vessel? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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[*] posted on 4-2-2020 at 01:36 PM


The picture is gone. Or we collectively imagined the same thing.

The first glitch in the matrix appears...




Repent!

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[*] posted on 24-2-2020 at 12:26 PM


BREAKING: Coast Guard Releases New 'Tech Revolution' Road Map

2/20/2020

By Connie Lee


Adm. Karl Schultz
Photo: Connie Lee/National Defense


CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Coast Guard has released a new plan aimed at revolutionizing its data management capabilities, the service’s commandant announced Feb. 20.

Adm. Karl Schultz said the service is currently using 1990s-era hardware and software.

“We need a ‘tech revolution,’ a whole-of-service effort to empower our people with an information system that is reliable, mobile and integrated,” he said during his annual State of the Coast Guard Address in Charleston, South Carolina.

“In an era where data generates more revenue than oil, it is crucial that the Coast Guard modernizes its data management to help build and sustain its future force," he added.

The modernization blueprint, called the Tech Revolution Road Map, seeks to bring the service's information-technology into the 21st century.

The maritime force needs all of its IT equipment to match industry standards, which would reduce the risk of critical failures and address the long-term problem of deferred maintenance, Schultz noted.

According to a fact sheet released by the service, some mid- to long-term goals include implementing next-generation commercial satellite communications, enhancing network security and modernizing cyber defense tools. The Coast Guard will transition to Microsoft Office 365 this spring to increase email reliability. Plans also include making internet speeds 50 times faster this year and improving ship connectivity over the next three years, Schultz noted.

Master Chief Jason Vanderhaden, the service’s senior enlisted member and principal advisor to the commandant, said fiscal year 2020 is the first year the service has received funding for the initiative. The Coast Guard is taking a multi-phased approach that will involve upgrading its hardware, software and processes, he noted.

“This year we actually got funding in the budget to be able to work on some [command, control, communications, computers/information technology] enhancements,” he told National Defense after Schultz's address. “We're replacing a lot of our hardware infrastructure.”

The Coast Guard also wants more mobile systems and is looking into ways to incorporate tablets and other devices, Vanderhaden said.

“Our folks right now, oftentimes they have to carry manuals in their backpacks,” he said. “We're trying to go mobile there. … Anything that we might do where mobility would be better or more useful we’re trying to go with mobile apps.”

However, continuing these efforts will require additional funding, Schultz noted during his speech.

“While we’ve developed this new road map to a more technologically advanced and effective Coast Guard, we need an injection of funding now,” he said. “Closing our existing $300 million annual IT shortfall is an important step to modernize the Coast Guard’s technology landscape.”

Additionally, the service is pushing to improve its cyber capabilities to protect the nation from hostile actors, Schultz noted. In the past year, the Coast Guard’s new cyber protection team has assisted in eight intergovernmental responses to malicious attacks, he said. These occurred in multiple cities such as New York and New Orleans.

Addressing the threat will require a revamp of the service’s 2015 cyber strategy. The Coast Guard hopes to release a new document detailing its plans this summer or early fall, he said in an interview.

“That cyber domain is changing so fast that I've challenged the team to say, ‘Hey, let's take a refresh,’” he said. “We were building out some of our organic capabilities.”

The Coast Guard isn't just looking to play defense, he noted. It is also looking at conducting its own cyber attacks.

“There's interest in, ‘Hey what can you do in terms of operational effect for offensive cyber capabilities? Could we bring cyber as an effect against transnational criminals smuggling drugs or other things?’” he said. “There's increasing portfolio and we're updating our strategy because the world's changed that much in the last five years.”

President Donald Trump's 2021 budget request calls for adding 179 cyber personnel to the Coast Guard’s existing force, Schultz noted. The service currently has about 360 cyber personnel, and about 50 or 60 are coming on board this year.
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[*] posted on 4-3-2020 at 07:40 PM


Indian Coast Guard makes progress on OPV programmes

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar, Alameda, California - Jane's Navy International

03 March 2020

The Indian Coast Guard (ICG) made further progress on several offshore patrol vessel (OPV) programmes in February 2020.


The sixth Vikram-class offshore patrol vessel built for the Indian Coast Guard, Vajra. (L&T)

On 28th of the month, the service commissioned ICGS Varad (40), the fifth of seven 98 m Vikram-class OPVs built by Larsen and Toubro Shipbuilding (LTSB), at its Kattupalli shipyard near Chennai.

The commissioning comes two days after the sixth vessel in the same programme, Vajra , was launched at the same facility.

The Vikram class has an overall length of 98.2 m, a beam of 14.7 m, and a draft of about 3.6 m. The 2,900-tonne vessel is powered by a pair of MTU 20V 8000 M71L engines driving two Schottel propellers for a top speed of 26 kt.

Meanwhile, the service took delivery of Sachet , the ninth 105 m Sankalp-class OPV, from Goa Shipyard Limited, on 24 February. It has a beam of 13.62 m, a draft of 3.72 m, and a displacement of 2,400 tonnes.

Like the Vikram class, the Sankalp class is powered by two MTU 20V 8000 M71L diesels coupled to two WIL model 1MG-103W/1PTO gearboxes driving two licence-built Wärtsilä propellers for a maximum speed of 25 kt.

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[*] posted on 4-3-2020 at 07:42 PM


Singapore to receive 24 new coastguard vessels

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

03 March 2020

The Singapore Police Coast Guard (PCG) will be receiving a new batch of patrol boats as part of efforts to improve security along the country's coastal waters.


A Singapore Police Coast Guard vessel detaining

Speaking in parliament on 2 March, Singapore's Minister for Home Affairs (MHA), Kasiviswanathan Shanmugam, described the new vessels as "fifth generation PT-class patrol boats" that will replace the service's current fleet of "third-generation boats".

These third-generation vessels probably refer to the PCG's fleet of 18 m patrol craft that were built by Geraldton Boats in Australia, and delivered to the PCG from 1999. These vessels have a top speed of 40 kt, and are armed with manually operated 7.62 mm machine guns.

In response to queries from Jane's on 4 March, an MHA spokesperson has described the new fifth-generation vessels as having top speeds in excess of 55 kt, and equipped with "advanced surveillance capabilities". However, the ministry has stopped short of giving further elaboration on these capabilities.

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[*] posted on 21-3-2020 at 08:52 PM


Ares to build 122 patrol boats for Turkish Coast Guard

20th March 2020 - 15:30 GMT | by The Shephard News Team



Ares Shipyard is providing 122 fast patrol boats (FPB) to the Turkish Coast Guard as part of a programme which is nearing the end of design validation, with planned production expected in Q2 2020.

The Ares 35 FPB is a new design with a maximum speed of 35kt and a range of 160 nautical miles. It will be manufactured using carbon-reinforced advanced composites with two inboard diesel engines and water jets.

Utku Alanc, CEO of Ares Shipyard, said: ‘The project represents the largest volume serial production in Turkey’s shipbuilding history…the project is planned to last for five years.’

The company aims to deliver six boats every two months. The FPBs will be used for SAR and other maritime security-related missions in all coastal areas of Turkey.
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[*] posted on 27-3-2020 at 11:54 AM


South Korea to transfer two decommissioned patrol vessels to Ecuador’s coastguard

Mrityunjoy Mazumdar - Jane's Navy International

26 March 2020

The Korea Coast Guard (KCG) is working towards the transfer of two recently decommissioned 300-tonne patrol vessels to Ecuador. The vessels - with pennant numbers 302 and 303 - have a length of 53.7 m, a beam of 7.4 m, and a draught of 2.5 m. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), they entered service in December 1990 and December 1991 respectively and were decommissioned in October 2019 and January 2020. Both patrol vessels ended their service with the KCG's Jeju command.

The two vessels are currently being refitted and painted in Ecuadorian colours at unspecified small and medium shipyards ahead of the planned transfer to Ecuador in May-June, according to a KCG press release.

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