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Author: Subject: Maritime Patrol Aircraft part 2
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[*] posted on 12-10-2017 at 09:31 PM
Maritime Patrol Aircraft part 2


Another resurrected thread.....................

BIRD details African ASIO project

Jeremy Binnie and Yaakov Lappin - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

12 October 2017

BIRD Aerosystems has delivered its Airborne Surveillance, Information, and Observation (ASIO) solution to an African state, the Israeli defence company has told Jane’s . It did not identify the client.


The Cessna Citation MPA that BIRD Aerosystems has delivered to an African client. (BIRD Aerosystems)

Worth about USD20 million, the contract included delivering a maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), a ground-based command-and-control (C2) centre, and the installation of ASIO workstations on existing naval vessels. Additional aircraft will be delivered in the future.

The MPA is a Cessna Citation business jet, which can cover wide areas of sea and travel rapidly. It is fitted with Leonardo's SeaSpray active electronically scanned array (AESA) multimode surveillance radar and a Controp electro-optical (EO) sensor system in a belly fairing. It has an automatic identification system (AIS) receiver for tracking transponder signals from ships and line-of-sight and satellite communications systems to keep it connected with the land-based C2 centre.

The ASIO system is now being operated by the country's security forces for maritime security missions that include protecting offshore energy infrastructure from terrorist attacks and countering piracy, smuggling, and illegal fishing.

"The client wants to be able to identify motherships that remain outside of the [country’s exclusive economic zone] waters and the smaller associated satellite fishing vessels that enter its waters," Shaul Mazor, vice-president of marketing and business development at BIRD, told Jane's .

"The ASIO system takes all of the inputs from the maritime radar and the EO, placing them on a digital map along with the [AIS] transponder broadcasts,” he said. Mazor added that the system can work semi-automatically to identify false AIS signals to enable the client to identify suspicious activity at sea.

The ASIO workstation installed on the bridges of the clients’ naval vessels enables them “to receive the real-time information from the aircraft and jointly build a common maritime situation awareness picture”, he said.

(321 of 415 words)
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[*] posted on 12-10-2017 at 09:36 PM


Bangladeshi Navy orders two Do 228s for MPA mission

12 October, 2017 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Bangladesh's navy has ordered two additional Dornier Do 228s for use in maritime patrol mission.

The contract will see the service's fleet of the type grow to four, says manufacturer Ruag in a statement.

"The new Dornier 228s will build on [the navy's] existing capabilities in the patrolling of the sea routes, territorial waters, coastal areas, and wetlands, essential to secure fishery operations, and critical vessel tracking," says Ruag.

"The two additional Dornier 228 will also extend BN’s reach and endurance options for SAR and natural disaster missions."

Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that the Bangladeshi Navy's two in service Dornier 228's were ordered in 2011 and delivered in 2013. Both serve as maritime patrol aircraft (MPA).

It also operates to Leonardo Helicopters AW109Es, and has orders for two Harbin Z-9 rotorcraft.
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[*] posted on 17-10-2017 at 11:52 AM


ADEX 2017: Boeing’s Poseidon takes centre-stage following MSA’s axing

Gareth Jennings - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

16 October 2017

Boeing is focusing all of its maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) attentions at this year’s International Aerospace and Defence Exhibition (ADEX) in Seoul on its P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft (MMA), following the company decision earlier this year to axe its smaller Maritime Surveillance Aircraft (MSA) stablemate.


Being showcased at ADEX by the US Navy, the P-8A Poseidon is looking to secure further regional sales in addition to those already chalked up by Australia, India, and New Zealand. (IHS Markit / Gareth Jennings)

With the US Navy (USN) showcasing one of its Poseidons at the event taking place from 17 to 22 October at Seoul Air Base, Boeing will be looking to attract regional interest in the airliner-based MMA after it revealed in June that it cancelled its business jet-based MSA due to a lack of customer interest.

(101 of 737 words)
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[*] posted on 18-10-2017 at 06:02 PM


ADEX: Big MPAs hunt for Seoul maritime requirement

18 October, 2017 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Seoul

Industry players expect South Korea to issue a formal requirement for new antisubmarine warfare (ASW) aircraft.

Boeing and Saab had a high profile presence at this year's ADEX, discussing their ASW capabilities. This follows a promotional visit by the Airbus Defence & Space C295 maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) in mid-2017.

Boeing and the US Navy briefed reporters on the P-8A Poseidon, of which 61 have entered service with the US Navy. This included a tour of a navy P-8A that appeared on static.

They stressed the aircraft's weapons carriage and sensor suite.

They also discussed a search and rescue kit that can be deployed from the aircraft's weapons bay. Several industry executives mentioned that rapid SAR is a priority for Seoul following the sinking of a ferry in 2014 that claimed the lives of 304, most of them children.

Saab promoted its Swordfish MPA, which it would base on the Bombardier Global 6000 airframe. Though the aircraft has yet to be developed, Saab stressed that it would be a capable, affordable system. The company also holds forth the prospect of extensive South Korean industry participation.

Saab's analysis indicates that up to eight torpedoes or other weapons could be carried on four wing hardpoints.

Saab also feels that South Korea may have a need for Airborne Early Warning & Control aircraft in addition to its in-service 737 AEW&C aircraft. For this possible requirement, it is offering its Globaleye system, which can also be deployed on the Global 6000.

Having both its ASW & AEW&C aircraft based on the same aircraft would offer a sensible degree of commonality, say Saab officials.

No formal requirements, however, have been issued for either new ASW or AEW&C aircraft.

John Balderston, senior director of business development Korea for Lockheed Martin, says that Seoul's MPA/ASW requirements appear to have moved toward a larger aircraft since the last iteration of ADEX in 2015.

At that time, Lockheed was actively promoting 12 former US navy S-3 Viking aircraft. Balderston says that while Seoul liked the capability that would have been offered by refurbished S-3s, it became concerned by the type's retirement from US military service.

He feels that the S-3 still offers opportunities for Seoul, with extensive industrial participation in the offing.

Meanwhile, upgrade work on eight Korean navy Lot 1 P-3C Orions continues. Five have received upgrades, and the final three will complete the programme in 2018.

The work is being undertaken by Korean Air. It takes five months per aircraft, and sees upgrades primarily to sensors an avionics. When the upgrade of the Lot 1 aircraft is completed, all of Seoul's 16 P-3Cs will be of Lot 2 standard.
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[*] posted on 14-11-2017 at 06:58 PM


Taiwan to Commission 12 Anti-Submarine Aircraft Next Month

(Source: Focus Taiwan; posted Nov 12, 2017)

TAIPEI --- Taiwan will hold a ceremony in December to commission 12 military aircraft acquired from the United States to boost its anti-submarine warfare capabilities, the Air Force said Sunday.

In a statement, the Air Force said it has taken full delivery of the 12 P-3C Orion aircraft, which are equipped with torpedoes and depth bombs designed to sink fast, deep-diving nuclear submarines and high-performance surface ships.

The 12 American-made P-3Cs will replace a fleet of 11 S-2T anti-submarine aircraft that has been in service for more than 40 years, the Air Force said.

The 12 aircraft, along with relevant equipment and services, were procured from the U.S. for US$1.9 billion in 2007, after a six-year delay that stemmed from political infighting in Taiwan.

The P-3Cs will play an essential role in anti-submarine warfare in the defense of Taiwan against China, according to the Ministry of National Defense.

In view of the rapid pace of China's naval modernization and expansion, Taiwan's military has been working to bolster not only its undersea warfare capabilities but also its anti-submarine warfare (ASW), which uses surface warships, aircraft, or other submarines to find, track and deter, damage or destroy enemy submarines.

The P-3C Orion is a four-engine turboprop anti-submarine and maritime surveillance aircraft with multi-mission capabilities. It is equipped with advanced submarine detection sensors and an integrated avionics system and carries a mixed payload of weapons internally and on its wings.

It is said to be the most capable of Lockheed's P-3 submarine-detecting aircraft.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 14-11-2017 at 10:21 PM


MQ-9 UAS supports ASW demonstration

Richard Scott - IHS Jane's Navy International

14 November 2017

Key Points
- The MQ-9 air vehicle was fitted with a sonobuoy receiver and a data processor for the purposes of the demonstration
- Testing saw the MQ-9 receive and process sonobuoy data and then relay track data via a satellite communications link

A General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-9 unmanned air system has demonstrated remote detection and tracking of underwater targets during a US Navy (USN) exercise

Testing on the Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) west of San Clemente Island in October saw the MQ-9 receive and process sonobuoy data and then relay track data via a satellite communications (SATCOM) link.

The test, performed on 12 October, was designed to demonstrate the embodiment of a persistent, long-range anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol and relay capability on the MQ-9 alongside above-water maritime mission sets.

(154 of 371 words)
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[*] posted on 25-11-2017 at 12:16 PM


UK aims to certify P-8 by early 2019

Tim Ripley - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

24 November 2017

UK military aviation safety authorities hope to certify the Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft by early 2019, on time for it to enter Royal Air Force (RAF) service later that year.

The UK Military Aviation Authority (MAA) announced on 22 November that it expected experts collecting evidence for the nine P-8As’ Military Type Certification (MTC) process to have completed that work by late 2018.

According to the MAA, the bulk of this work will involve studying data and certification documents already collected by the US Naval Air Systems Command’s (NAVAIR’s), airworthiness regulator, the 4.0P Division.

This is a new way of working for the UK military airworthiness authorities, which until 2014 usually conducted some of their own live ground and flight testing for both UK and foreign built aircraft.

(154 of 551 words)
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 08:31 PM


Malaysia discloses line of aircraft shortlisted for maritime patrol requirements

Ridzwan Rahmat - Jane's Navy International

19 December 2017

Key Points
-The Royal Malaysian Air Force has shortlisted four aircraft types for its maritime patrol requirements
- Service has been allocated funds for up to four airframes to meet its maritime surveillance, and search-and-rescue requirements


The ATR 72MP, one of four options currently being evaluated by the Royal Malaysian Air Force for its maritime patrol aircraft requirement (Leonardo)

The Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) has disclosed a line of aircraft types that the country is currently considering for its maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) requirements.

During his presentation at a maritime security conference in Singapore, the RMAF’s Head of Staff for Air Region 1 Headquarters, Brigadier General Yazid Bin Arshad, showed a title slide with images of four aircraft types.

Although he stopped short of naming them, Jane’s has identified the four aircraft types to be the Airbus CN295, the ATR 72MP from Leonardo, the Boeing P-8 Poseidon, and the CN-235, the last of which could possibly be supplied by Bandung-based PT Dirgantara Indonesia.

“Those are the four shortlisted, however the door is not closed yet,” said General Yazid, adding that the service is still open to proposals from other aircraft manufacturers that can fulfil its operational and budgetary requirements. However, for now the RMAF has formed a special team to further evaluate these four options, he added.

Funds for the acquisition of four MPAs were made available in Malaysia’s 2018 national budget allocation. “Our MPA, the Beechcraft 200 is already 23 years old and its capabilities are limited. So this is the right time for the RMAF to consider a few options that could enhance our maritime patrol capabilities,” he added, in reference to the service’s fleet of three remaining B200Ts.

“The RMAF wants a dedicated maritime patrol aircraft capable of intelligence gathering surveillance and reconnaissance with synthetic aperture radar capabilities,” said General Yazid in a brief outline of the programme’s requirements. “These MPAs need to perform anti-submarine warfare, search-and-rescue, and also electronic intelligence,” he added.

(327 of 378 words)
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[*] posted on 23-12-2017 at 12:15 PM


Pentagon Contract Announcement

(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Dec. 21, 2017)

This is the first three for the Brits..............

The Boeing Co., Seattle, Washington, is being awarded a $1,232,654,575 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00019-14-C-0067) for the manufacture and delivery of 10 Lot 9 full-rate production P-8A aircraft, seven for the Navy and three for the government of the United Kingdom.

In addition, this modification also provides for Lot 9 segregable efforts consisting of unknown obsolescence, class I change assessments, and obsolescence monitoring.

Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington (82.6 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (2.6 percent); Greenlawn, New York (2.4 percent); Cambridge, United Kingdom (1.6 percent); North Amityville, New York (0.9 percent); Rockford, Illinois (0.7 percent); Rancho Santa Margarita, California (0.6 percent); Dickinson, North Dakota (0.6 percent); and various locations in the U.S. (8 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2020.

Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy); and foreign military sales (FMS) funds in the amount of $1,232,654,575 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

This contract combines purchase for the Navy ($858,242,867; 69.7 percent); and FMS partners ($374,411,708; 30.3 percent).

The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 23-12-2017 at 04:22 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
ADEX 2017: Boeing’s Poseidon takes centre-stage following MSA’s axing

Gareth Jennings - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

16 October 2017

Boeing is focusing all of its maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) attentions at this year’s International Aerospace and Defence Exhibition (ADEX) in Seoul on its P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft (MMA), following the company decision earlier this year to axe its smaller Maritime Surveillance Aircraft (MSA) stablemate.


Being showcased at ADEX by the US Navy, the P-8A Poseidon is looking to secure further regional sales in addition to those already chalked up by Australia, India, and New Zealand. (IHS Markit / Gareth Jennings)

With the US Navy (USN) showcasing one of its Poseidons at the event taking place from 17 to 22 October at Seoul Air Base, Boeing will be looking to attract regional interest in the airliner-based MMA after it revealed in June that it cancelled its business jet-based MSA due to a lack of customer interest.

(101 of 737 words)


Really? Boeing has just announced NZ have already bought the P-8A, eh?

Either they have jumped the gun or there will be some unhappy pollies in NZ who have had their moment in sun taken away from them...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 10-1-2018 at 07:29 PM


PAX Anechoic Chamber Tests P-8A Poseidon

(Source: US Naval Air Systems Command; issued Jan 8, 2018)

By Denver Beaulieu-Hains


The P-8A Poseidon, the U.S. Navy's latest aircraft for maritime patrol and reconnaissance has consistently deployed since 2013. Testing the aircraft in the live, virtual and constructive environments along with simulation saves time and money. (Navair photo)

Officials at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station (PAX) say its Anechoic Chamber is a viable option for rapid testing and mission readiness: “it’s a win-win. It’s about speed to the fleet, safety, efficiency and cost savings.”

Recent live, virtual, and constructive infrastructure development of the AN/UPX-43 IFF Interrogator AIMS Certification test process, which is just one of the projects executed at PAX’s Anechoic Chamber, this fall resulted in reduced scheduling and costs for future certification testing. By conducting the AIMS certification in the chamber, versus inflight, the savings were achieved from 12 weeks at $5.31 million, producing 3.6 hours of data to approximately, 3.5 weeks of testing at about $800 thousand, yielding about 15 hours of data.

“Right now, one of the most important things we do for the warfighter is to get them the technology they need to complete their mission,” said Lt. Denver White, aircraft [P-8A] project officer. “With the Anechoic Chamber, we are not susceptible to weather or other flight test issues that might cause test delays.”

The P-8A’s Interrogator IFF-I infrastructure development results using the Multi-Jammer Characterization Wall is compared using previous flight test results at the AIMS Program Office to prove the capability for future P-8A AIMS certifications.

“It is historic and important; the P-8A had not been in the chamber for several years, and when it was in the chamber, these specific systems were not tested nor was infrastructure developed for them,” said White. “Since we are not in the air, and we have a lot more instrumentation on the ground we can slow down, look into a deficiency more to isolate it.”

About 75 percent of the required tests were conducted from inside the chamber. Once inside, UPX-43 Identification Friend or Foe; Interrogator, ALQ-240 Electronic Support Measures system; APY-10 Radar; GPS and cyber security of communications and navigation systems testing were all conducted; Saving time, money and wear-and-tear on the aircraft and parts. The aircraft was stressed during real-world flight test scenarios, using the navigation simulation equipment.

There was simulated motion, position and altitude, which allowed the P-8A mission systems to experience airborne environments and engage with other systems and platforms.

In the controlled environment, testers may try a lot of methods that aren’t options when airborne, he said. The testing gets to the root cause, which ultimately allows the deficiency to be evaluated, repaired and gets the aircraft back to the fleet mission ready.

If the test methods are approved and deemed successful, these methods may be used for other Navy aircraft, such as, the MQ-25 Stingray, F-18 Super Hornet, MH-60R Seahawk and F-35 Lightning II. The initial testing using this method was used on the P-8A Poseidon and its mission systems.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 10:33 PM


Russian Navy to Upgrade its Soviet-era Be-12 ASW Amphibious Aircraft

Posted On Sunday, 21 January 2018 16:57

The main Russian Navy command decided to upgrade antisubmarine amphibious Be-12 aircraft. They will be able to take off and land both on ground airfields and on water. The modernization will give Be-12 a completely new targeting system and modern arms. Be-12 are the oldest aircraft operational in the Russian armed forces, the Izvestia daily reported.


The Beriev Be-12 Chayka ("Seagull", NATO reporting name: Mail) is a Soviet turboprop-powered amphibious aircraft designed for anti-submarine and maritime patrol duties. Picture by Romanoff via airforce.ru.

The Navy command told the newspaper the decision to modernize Be-12 had been adopted. At present the technical assignment is drafted, as well as documents to launch R&D to upgrade onboard equipment of the aircraft.

Be-12 will radically modernize all the three sets for obtaining reconnaissance information on adversary submarines: hydro-acoustic (detects the submarine noise), radar and magnetic (finds submarines by magnetic emission of the hull). The upgraded aircraft will have modern antisubmarine torpedoes and depth bombs.

Be-12 made its maiden flight in 1960. It has a V-shaped arched wing to facilitate takeoff from water. The lower part of the fuselage has a ship outline which allows Be-12 to land and take off from water in three-force storm. The speed is over 500 km/h. Fuel reserve allows the aircraft to fly over 4 thousand km or conduct a patrol mission for several hours. The plane is armed with mines, torpedoes and bombs.


The Beriev Be-12 Chayka ("Seagull", NATO reporting name: Mail) is a Soviet turboprop-powered amphibious aircraft designed for anti-submarine and maritime patrol duties. Picture by Romanoff via airforce.ru.

Expert Oleg Panteleyev said the examination of the existing Be-12 fleet showed the amphibious aircraft still have sufficient resource of the glider and the power plant and an upgrade will keep them operational.

"Combat effectiveness of Be-12 can be considerably increased by upgrading submarine-detecting equipment and other systems, mostly communications which will integrate the aircraft into the common contour of antisubmarine warfare control," he said.

Expert Alexander Mozgovoy said Be-12 upgrade will enhance antisubmarine capabilities of the Navy in coastal areas. "It was a very successful aircraft for its time. With upgraded equipment it will effectively control coastal waters. Be-12 is necessary for small water areas, for example, the Black and Baltic Seas. It is not intended for long-term patrol over the ocean or operations in rough seas," he said.

143 Be-12 were produced in 1960-1973. They were operational in all Soviet fleets. In the Pacific fleet Be-12 operated in the 289th separate antisubmarine and 317th combined air regiments. The Black Sea and Northern fleets had one antisubmarine amphibious aircraft regiment each. The 49th separate squadron of Be-12 of the Baltic fleet was deployed in Kaliningrad.

Practically all Be-12 were decommissioned in 1993-1998. The last six aircraft are operational in the 318th air regiment of the Black Sea fleet. Close to a dozen are kept at the air works in Taganrog and the Ostrov airfield, the Izvestia writes.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 23-1-2018 at 10:41 AM


Brazil signs option for third SAR-roled C295

22 January, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com

BY: Craig Hoyle London

Brazil has exercised a contract option that will lead to it operating a three-strong fleet of Airbus Defence & Space C295 search and rescue (SAR) aircraft by 2020.

Signed at the end of last year, the update "constitutes the firming of an option included in an earlier contract in 2014", the European airframer says. The previous commitment was for two of the adapted twin-turboprops – the first of which, registered 6550, was handed over in June 2017.


Airbus Defence & Space

"The second C295 SAR will be delivered in 2019, and the third in 2020," Airbus Defence & Space confirms. The company has already supplied the Brazilian air force with 12 examples assigned for medium transport duties, with Flight Fleets Analyzer showing 11 of these as in current operational use.
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[*] posted on 30-1-2018 at 09:24 PM


ANALYSIS: ASEAN eyes fixed-wing MPA renaissance

30 January, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Airline passengers who land at Changi airport in a window seat will observe the crowded seas off the city state's coast. Here one sees countless ships at anchor. Farther west Singapore's container port is among the busiest in the world. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) estimates that a third of global shipping traverses the South China Sea and the Straits of Malacca. China's implacable claims in the South China Sea, simmering territorial disputes, and the likelihood of vast oil reserves under the Spratly Islands will yet again see fixed-wing maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities as key themes as this year's Singapore Airshow.

"For many of the world’s largest economies, the South China Sea is an essential maritime crossroads for trade," says ChinaPower, a think tank focused on China's rise. "Over 64% of China’s maritime trade transited the waterway in 2016, while nearly 42 of Japan’s maritime trade passed through the South China Sea in the same year."

While helicopters are well-suited for MPA, ASW and search and rescue (SAR) work, fixed-wing assets offer distinct advantages, such as payload, range, speed and coverage area. They can also be deployed across large regions at relatively short notice.

These are important considerations for nations such as Indonesia, with more than 13,000 islands spread across a geography as wide as the United States, the Philippines, with more than 7,000 islands, and Malaysia, with two large land masses separated by the South China Sea.

All that said, the main reason fixed-wing MPA/ASW will feature at the show – as they did in 2016 – is the dubious state of Southeast Asian capability in this vital arena. Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that the nine militaries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) possess just 73 fixed-wing aircraft of various capabilities earmarked for the MPA/ASW mission – and the operational status of a good portion of these aircraft is open to question. Despite the growing submarine threat in the region, few of these aircraft are capable of actually finding – let alone prosecuting – submerged submarines.

Boeing's P-8A is replacing the Lockheed P-3C in US Navy service

Boeing

Gary Shand is director of sales & marketing at Saab, which is actively promoting its Swordfish capability in the region. He gives several reasons for a growing regional emphasis on MPA capabilities. "The region is seeing a significant rise in the number of submarines being operated and procured, with a senior naval officer noting recently that over 120 submarines are expected to be operational in the region by year 2020.

"Submarines by their nature will always be a powerful asymmetrical force that can tip the balance of power in a conflict and thus need to be located, tracked, identified and if required attacked," he adds. "Second, the area has some of the densest shipping traffic in the world, which passes through several very narrow choke points. The safe flow of passengers, goods and utilities is essential for countries to function and flourish. Connected to this is the last point, piracy, where Southeast Asia has the highest number of recent global incidents at 129 (West Africa is next with 95)."

Shand's colleague Stephen Murphy, systems and conops operations manager for Airborne ISR at Saab, lists several challenges with Southeast Asia's littoral environment.

"There are complex littoral regions with challenging bathymetrical and sound velocity profiles, as well as high ambient noise due to shipping. Deep water conditions mean that the very, very best acoustic systems with littoral optimisation and high detection capabilities are needed."

Murphy says the company's track data fusion engine, combined with a powerful maritime radar that tracks and fuses all contacts, can help. "When the fleeting opportunity to detect a [submarine] mast comes, it is seized upon by the system and operator."

Just spotting the mast of a diesel electric submarine is enough.

An ASW expert recently told FlightGlobal that a "mission kill" can be obtained merely by disabling a submarine's snorkel with an anti-tank missile, such as Lockheed Martin's AGM-114 Hellfire or similar weapon. While this would not necessarily sink the submarine, it would eliminate the vessels ability to re-charge its batteries, as this can only be done while travelling on the surface.

FlightGlobal's World Air Forces directory indicates that Indonesia has the largest fleet of MPAs with 45 aircraft. Of these, 28 are GAF Nomads. While listed as in service, these have reportedly been phased out. The mainstays of the fleet are five modern Airbus Defence & Space CN-235 MPAs.

Indonesian CN-235 MPAs are equipped with the Thales AMASCOS system, including the Thales/EADS Ocean Master Mk II search radar, thermal imaging from Thales, Elettronica's ALR 733 radar warning receiver, and CAE's AN/ASQ-508 magnetic anomaly detection system. They can also carry MBDA's AM-39 Exocet missiles, or Raytheon's Mk 46 light torpedoes. These aircraft are complemented by six NC-212s's equipped with an electro-optical/infrared sensor as well as a surface search radar.

Revealingly, when Jakarta's first CN-235 entered service in 2013, Purnomo Yusgiantoro, the defence minister at the time, said the country needed 33 NC-212s and 21 CN235s in order "to fully control its territory".

Indonesia's air force also possesses what are arguably the most exotic Boeing 737s in the world: three 737-2X9 Surveillers. These are equipped with Motorola's AN/APS-135V Side Looking Airborne Multi-Mission Radar (SLAMMR) in housings on the upper rear fuselage. The AN/APS-135V, which has its origins in the 1950s, can reportedly locate small vessels more than 100nm away. The average age of these aircraft is 35 years and their serviceability is open to question, with their last major upgrade in the early 1990s. They lack the weapons and datalinks consistent with a modern MPA mission, but offer a transport capability with 102 passenger seats.

Saab's Swordfish would be based on the Bombardier Global 6000 business jet

Saab

Singapore, acutely aware of its reliance on seaborne trade, has five Fokker 50 MPA Enforcer Mk 2 aircraft, which also have an ASW capability. These aircraft are 23.5 years old, and Singapore is believed to be looking for a replacement. The Boeing P-8A Poseidon is mooted as a possibility, but other purveyors of MPA and special missions capabilities had a high profile at the 2015 Singapore Air Show to create awareness around other platforms.

Malaysia is perhaps most in need of a stronger MPA capability.

It has just three Hawker Beechcraft King Air B200Ts equipped in an MPA configuration – a fourth was lost in a crash in December 2016. These are supplemented by a single 37-year-old Lockheed Martin C-130H. Kuala Lumpur's maritime enforcement agency operates a pair of Bombardier CL-415 amphibians.

Kuala Lumpur appears to be taking the issue more seriously. In November 2017, state news agency Bernama reported that the Royal Malaysian Air Force had set up a team to evaluate MPAs.

This follows a provision for the acquisition four aircraft in the government's 2018 budget. The report, quoting air force chief Affendi Buang, adds that the participation of local industry will be a key factor.

Sources have previously told FlightGlobal that Kuala Lumpur has two needs: the first for a long-range, militarised MPA mission to be conducted with a larger aircraft; and for a shorter-range mission closer to shore, which would be operated by parapublic bodies.

The Philippines, meanwhile, has just three dedicated MPA assets: two King Air C90s operated by the navy, and a single coast guard-operated Britten-Norman BN-2A-21.

Vietnam, arguably the country most challenged by Chinese assertiveness, has just six aircraft dedicated to the MPA mission: two marine police C-212s, one air force Sikorsky M28 Skytruck, and three Viking Air DHC-6 Guardians. The marine police also have orders for three NC-212is.

Defence contractors see these capability gaps as opportunities. Boeing touts the P-8A Poseidon as the benchmark for the high-end MPA/ASW mission, and points out that the 737-based type is operated by two of the world's pre-eminent maritime powers: the United States and Australia. India also operates a variant of the Poseidon designated P-8I Neptune. For a while Boeing pushed an unarmed MPA concept known as the Maritime Surveillance Aircraft (MSA). To be based on the P-8A mission system, the MSA never won orders.

In mid-2017, Airbus Defence & Space conducted a two-week demonstration tour in the Asia-Pacific with its C295 maritime surveillance aircraft. In March 2017, Leonardo used the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace (LIMA) show for the public debut of the ATR 72MP, which is now in service with Italy.

Saab's Swordfish MPA, meanwhile, would be based on the Bombardier Global 6000 airframe. Though the aircraft has yet to be developed, Saab stressed that it would be a capable, affordable system.

"We put huge on emphasis on Swordfish being a capability, not just an aircraft," says Shand. "It is about designing a system that marries platform and sensor performance, smartly integrated to ensure a cutting-edge capability. Sensors and equipment are becoming smaller, weigh less, require less electrical and cooling yet have more processing power."

With automation, he continues, the number of operators can be reduced, while operational output can be increased.

In 1614 Sir Walter Raleigh wrote: "Whosoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself." Up-to-date fixed-wing MPAs might not help the states of ASEAN rule the world, but they would provide valuable deterrent and surveillance capabilities in what is probably the world's most important oceanic frontier.
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[*] posted on 30-1-2018 at 10:21 PM


Design of New Russian Maritime Patrol Aircraft Nearing Completion

Posted On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 12:01

The United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) continues fulfilling the contract with the Russian Defense Ministry to upgrade antisubmarine warfare Il-38 aircraft. They are operational in the Russian naval aviation. The Ilyushin Company is extending the life cycle of remaining aircraft and equipping them with modern onboard complexes. The aircraft are engaged both in defense and rescue operations. In the meantime, the Russian Navy plans to order a new-generation antisubmarine patrol aircraft. Its design for the naval aviation is nearing completion, the UAC said.


A Il-38N MPA of the Russian Navy. Picture by Paul Shumilo

Il-38 has marked the 35th anniversary of the maiden flight. Head of the naval aviation, Hero of Russia Major-General Igor Kozhin said the aircraft in its initial concept "has worthily fulfilled the missions to search for and detect underwater targets and to protect the national sea borders." He believes the aerodynamics of the aircraft are so good that it is hardly possible to design something better.

At present, the Ilyushin is upgrading the aircraft. "The latest Novella complex is mounted on modernized Il-38 to increase searching efficiency and detection of submarines four times," Russian Navy Commander-in-Chief Admiral Vladimir Korolev said in February 2017.

The naval aviation is developing synchronously with other navy components. The potential of Il-38N is much broader. Korolev said "the upgraded antisubmarine aircraft received the Novella radio-electronic complex which increases the efficiency of the search and detection of submarines. It also has reconnaissance and targeting capabilities. Due to the new search and targeting system the aircraft can find and destroy submarines with a wider range of arms against the basic Il-38," Korolev said.


Artist impression of Il-114 MPA. Screencapture from Radio MMS video.

In January 2017 Kozhin said the Russian naval aviation will receive close to 30 upgraded Il-38N. The delivery of all of them has to be completed not later than 2025.

"We are saying that morally outdated aircraft are becoming modern due to modernization. They help implement the tasks, which the Russian president set before us, in particular, to reach a 70-percent share of new naval aircraft. Despite major age, the modernized Il-38 will rise to a new quality level. Our partners will be surprised to see the capabilities which will be soon demonstrated by upgraded aircraft," he said.

"The naval aviation enters its second century by actively upgrading the hardware and combat skills. Naval pilots are capable of accomplishing most complicated missions in all latitudes of the world ocean," Kozhin said.

In the meantime, a new aircraft is being designed to replace the upgraded Il-38 in future. "The work to create antisubmarine patrol aircraft of a new generation for the Russian naval aviation is nearing completion," Kozhin said.

Radio MMS video: https://youtu.be/_tx75GwfNMk

He was referring to a new uniform platform. It is a modern craft which will surpass foreign analogues in many aspects. The design will replace all available naval patrol aircraft.

Expert Vladimir Karnozov said Il-114 will be a proper replacement for the Il-18 family which is still operational in the Russian armed forces. "Naval patrol Il-114 can be equipped with Novella which does not demand major retraining of pilots and technicians. Its flight and technical characteristics which are close and sometimes superior to those of Il-38 allow engaging new tactical means of searching and destroying adversary submarines accumulated by Il-38N crews," he said.

In the 1970s, India acquired several Il-38. In February 2017, the Indian Navy confirmed at the Aero India 2017 aerospace show it wants to extend the life cycle of all available Il-38SD. "We liked the attitude of Indian military officials and their interest in antisubmarine aviation," Ilyushin Designer General Nikolai Talikov said. "They asked their Russian interlocutors whether it was possible to create a modern aircraft with enhanced antisubmarine capabilities," he added.

Two-engine turbofan Il-114-300 was offered to replace Il-38 as a platform for the design of new-generation antisubmarine aircraft. It was reported at Aero India-2017 that Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) plans to produce both civilian and military Il-114 in the framework of the Make in India program. The parties considered how HAL and other Indian companies can supply components and parts to complete new Il-114 construction in Russia, the UAC said.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 08:12 PM


SINGAPORE: Boeing pursues P-8 Poseidon refinements

06 February, 2018 SOURCE: Flight Dashboard BY: Aaron Chong Singapore

Boeing has made several updates about its P-8 Poseidon programme, as it pursues further refinements for the platform.

Speaking to media during a programme update briefing at the Singapore air show, Matt Carreon, head of global sales and marketing for Boeing Defence, Space and Security, listed over four updates that the manufacturer will implement on the P-8.

Updates include a sixth workstation for all newly built P-8s, up from the current five, thereby improving operational capability.

The US Navy has also requested Boeing to make enhancements to the anti-submarine warfare aircraft to operate at a higher altitude.

Although Carreon did not specify the figure, he says that having a higher operating altitude would allow the P-8 "to have less wear and tear" and to give the aircraft's radar further range.
Boeing adds that it is in the process of replacing the Defence Satellite Communications Systems and Global Broadcast Service with a Wideband Global satellite communications system. This change will greatly improve bandwidth.

In addition, Carreon says that although the 737NG will eventually be replaced with the 737 Max, Boeing can continue manufacturing P-8s "as long as there is a demand".
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[*] posted on 7-2-2018 at 08:10 PM


Singapore Airshow 2018: Thailand enters ‘pre-contract’ negotiations for three MPA

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

07 February 2018

Key Points

- Thailand and Indonesia are in advanced negotiations over the acquisition of three maritime patrol aircraft
- Platforms will improve Thailand’s maritime surveillance capabilities in the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand

The Royal Thai Navy (RTN) and Indonesian state-owned aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PTDI) are now in ‘pre-contract’ negotiations over the procurement of three CN-235-220 aircraft in the maritime patrol configuration.

Speaking to Jane’s at the 2018 iteration of the Singapore Airshow, PTDI’s Vice President of Sales, Ade Yuyu Wahyuna, said negotiations in this stage begun in late-January 2018, and a formal contract can be expected to materialise before the end of the year.

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[*] posted on 9-2-2018 at 01:07 PM


Seoul moves closer to MPA decision

09 February, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Seoul is moving closer to a decision for new maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) to bolster its anti-submarine warfare capabilities.

According to an unsourced report from official news agency Yonhap, the country's Defense Acquisition Program Administraion (DAPA) has decided to obtain six aircraft, though it gave no timeframe and did not specify the type of aircrat it will buy.

At the Seoul ADEX defence show in October 2017, Boeing promoted its P-8A Poseidon and Saab promoted its Swordfish MPA.

Airbus Defence & Space sent its C295 MPA to South Korea during a 2017 demonstration tour. Airbus used the Singapore Air Show this week to moot the possibility of an A320neo converted for missions such as VIP transport, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and maritime patrol.

The new aircraft would add to Seoul's fleet of 16 P-3Cs, which have undergone modernisation of their sensors and avionics.
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[*] posted on 10-2-2018 at 12:17 PM


Singapore Airshow 2018: Boeing and Saab position for South Korea’s MPA requirement

Jon Grevatt, Singapore - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

09 February 2018


South Korea's MPA requirement will see Saab's Swordfish MPA compete against Boeing's P-8 Poseidon. Source: Source: Saab

Boeing and Saab have confirmed to Jane’s their plans to launch bids to compete for South Korea’s newly announced programme to procure a maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) capability.

Speaking at the Singapore Airshow 2018, company officials said they were engaged with South Korea over the requirement and that they planned to offer proposals to win the contract. Boeing will offer its P-8 Poseidon MPA while Saab will propose its Swordfish MPA.

On 7 February, South Korea’s military procurement agency, the Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA), announced that it was planning to launch the MPA procurement programme in direct response to North Korea’s growing emphasis on developing and deploying submarines equipped with ballistic missiles.

DAPA said in a press release that it plans to procure the MPA from a foreign supplier in light of several factors, including a lack of indigenous capability in producing such aircraft, the required timing of the requirement, and economic efficiencies.

“With the introduction of the maritime patrol aircraft, the maritime and underwater surveillance capabilities will be greatly improved and countermeasures against submarines equipped with submarine-launched ballistic missiles [SLBMs] will be reinforced,” the DAPA press release stated.

DAPA did not disclose the time frame for the procurement but industry officials said they expect a request for information (RFI) in 2018.

The programme is expected to feature the Republic of Korea Navy’s (RoKN’s) acquisition of six MPAs for a reported cost of about USD1.7 billion. The acquired aircraft will initially augment service’s 16 Lockheed Martin P-3 MPAs, which have been in service since the mid-1990s. However, the programme could also expand substantially in the future when the RoKN starts to replace the P-3.

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[*] posted on 10-2-2018 at 03:16 PM


IOMAX may adapt its Archangel aircraft to patrol Asian coastlines

By: Valerie Insinna   12 hours ago


IOMAX has sold its Archangel attack planes in the Middle East. The company came to Singapore Airshow 2018 to see if it could find a customer base in the Asia-Pacific region. (IOMAX)

SINGAPORE — After seeing the demand for inexpensive maritime surveillance from Southeast Asian countries like Indonesia, signals intelligence specialist IOMAX is considering marketing a maritime surveillance version of its Archangel light-attack aircraft, a company official told Defense News on Thursday.

The Singapore Airshow, which runs Feb. 6 to 11 at the Changi Exhibition Center, marks IOMAX’s first venture to the Asia-Pacific region. The company is a regular exhibitor at defense trade shows in the Middle East — sometimes even bringing the plane as a static display to show potential buyers. It has thus far cultivated customers such as the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and Yemen.

This year, the company decided to come to Singapore to better understand the security problems of Southeast Asian countries and whether Archangel could meet their needs, said Seamus Flatley, IOMAX’s vice president of business development.

“I solicited folks to come and meet with us from the various embassies in the region to gain an understanding of their host nation’s requirements and buying habits and funding mechanisms,” he said. “And then we had a number of folks stop by to talk about their business in country X, Y or Z ,and how they could assist us in our efforts to make an introduction to the country’s military organization.”

IOMAX’s flagship product is Archangel, an inexpensive turboprop attack aircraft comprised of a Thrush S2R-660 crop duster that the company modifies with weapons, new avionics and a Wescam MX-15 electro-optical/infrared sensor.

The aircraft has been used in Middle Eastern counterinsurgency missions, giving countries like the UAE a cost-effective air combat capability.

However, Flatley said his conversations in Singapore made him realize that a different configuration of the aircraft might be popular with countries like Indonesia that are more interested in intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

“If you talk to folks that are familiar with the requirements in Indonesia, well, it’s an island nation of 7,000 islands, and they’re not so much interested in a weaponized solution. They’re interested in a maritime domain awareness platform,” he said.

“For the Archangel, with the EO/IR sensor and the Osprey radar [from Italian defense firm Leonardo], this airplane becomes and ideal coastal patrol platform with the ability to go out there and see at extended ranges. Marry that up with the sensor and you’ve got the ability to patrol your coastline, patrol out to 100 miles.”

Because of an emerging requirement from the UAE — so far the biggest customer of the Archangel — IOMAX has already begun working out how to incorporate the Osprey radar on the aircraft.

The company has completed the design work and technical specifications, but it still needs to physically integrate the radar and conduct testing, he said.

The aircraft also has enough size, weight and power to accept additional payloads, if capability in signals or electronic intelligence was desired, for instance.

“Because of the way the pylons are set up, there’s an Ethernet in the pylons, so if you wanted to put other sensors on the aircraft, it’s a smart pylon,” he said. “If you’re looking at some kind of sigint [signals intelligence] or elint [electronic intelligence] capability, you can tie that into the sensor solution on the aircraft. The platform is agnostic.”
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[*] posted on 16-2-2018 at 09:21 AM


Poland, Canada join NATO members in potential maritime surveillance aircraft buy

By: Aaron Mehta   3 hours ago


The Saab Swordfish — based on a Bombardier Global 6000 body — would likely be a contender. (Saab)

BRUSSELS — Poland and Canada have agreed to join a coalition of NATO countries seeking to jointly buy a fleet of maritime surveillance aircraft.

The two countries bring the total number of nations investing in the Multinational Maritime Multi Mission Aircraft Capabilities program to eight. The program launched with France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain and Turkey in June 2017.

“This joint effort recognizes the fact that the majority of Allies’ maritime patrol aircraft fleets will be reaching the end of their operational lives between 2025 and 2035,“ NATO Deputy Secretary General Rose Gottemoeller said in a statement through the alliance.

However, Gottemoeller emphasized that “the goal here isn’t just a drawing board design — we need a new generation of aircraft, in the air, fulfilling what is an increasingly important mission.”
And indeed, the program is still in the earliest stages, and it is unclear what may actually come from it.

The NATO announcement notes that the partners have been working to “define a common requirements document,” with the goal of having those requirements laid out by the end of this year.

In terms of potential aircraft, Boeing will undoubtedly encourage the partners to buy the P-8, which is already operated by the U.S., U.K. and Norway.

Those three NATO partners have an agreement on joint procurement for maintenance and equipment on that plane, which could potentially be expanded for the eight nations in the MMMA program.

Additionally, the U.S. is close to beginning construction at the Keflavik base in Iceland to allow the P-8 to be stationed there to better monitor the Atlantic for Russian submarine activity, a big enough priority for NATO as it moves to increase its focus on maritime security.

However, Airbus is likely to offer its A319 maritime patrol aircraft option, which could appeal to the European nations in the program.

Additionally, Canada is embroiled in a spat with Boeing due to the American company’s battle with Canadian commercial aviation giant Bombardier. The row has already cost Boeing an expected sale of F/A-18 Super Hornet fighters; as a result, Canada may not be enthusiastic about buying the P-8.

Along those lines, the Saab Swordfish — based on a Bombardier Global 6000 body — would likely be another contender. The company has marketed the plane as having four “NATO-compatible hardpoints” that can accommodate up to six lightweight torpedoes for anti-submarine operations.
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[*] posted on 17-2-2018 at 11:51 AM


Canada will probably cancel and then reinstate this program about 40 times before it actually gets up though...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 17-2-2018 at 03:42 PM


At least.



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[*] posted on 17-2-2018 at 07:30 PM
well there you go


Canada will probably cancel and then reinstate this program about 40 times before it actually gets up though...

Well doh ! -that is the only way to make a simple acquisition totally unaffordable I am sure that is the policy in Canada and the UK and dare b I say it Australia as well
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[*] posted on 17-2-2018 at 11:44 PM


Quote: Originally posted by redcoat  
Canada will probably cancel and then reinstate this program about 40 times before it actually gets up though...

Well doh ! -that is the only way to make a simple acquisition totally unaffordable I am sure that is the policy in Canada and the UK and dare b I say it Australia as well


Well we just went and bought a new fleet of P-8A’s without all the BS, so...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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