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Author: Subject: Maritime Patrol Aircraft part 2
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[*] posted on 18-2-2018 at 01:12 PM


So did the UK......for a change!
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[*] posted on 7-3-2018 at 08:58 AM


First contract for Norway’s P-8As awarded

Gareth Jennings, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 March 2018


Norway is set to receive its five P-8As between 2022 and 2023. Source: IHS Markit/Patrick Allen

Norway’s procurement of five Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft (MMA) took a major leap forward on 5 March, with a contract awarded for the purchase of long-lead items for each of the platforms.

The USD282.3 million contract, which also included long-lead items for the last four of the United Kingdom’s planned nine P-8As as well as 10 more aircraft for the US Navy (USN), comes just under a year after Norway signed for its five aircraft on 29 March 2017. According to the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) that made the award, these particular aircraft are included in Lot 10 of the P-8A production process.

Norway is procuring the P-8A to replace the six ageing Lockheed Martin P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) and three Dassault Falcon DA-20 Jet Falcon surveillance aircraft that are currently flown by the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RoNAF). The overall programme is valued at NOK10 billion (USD1.29 billion), some of which will come from the country’s intelligence services budget.

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[*] posted on 13-3-2018 at 09:02 AM


Angola announces C295 maritime patrol aircraft order

Jeremy Binnie, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

12 March 2018

Angola will buy three Airbus C295 maritime patrol aircraft to enable its navy to monitor its exclusive economic zone, the state press agency reported on 9 March.

It said President João Lourenço signed a presidential order on 2 March, authorising the Angolan Ministry of Defence’s Simportex company to sign the EUR159.9 million (USD196.7 million) agreement with Airbus Defence and Space.

The finance minister has been authorised to negotiate funding with Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria, a Spanish bank.

Airbus, which is building the C295 in Spain, has not commented on the deal.

Lourenço visited Airbus facilities during a visit to Spain in March 2017, when he was serving as defence minister.

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[*] posted on 16-3-2018 at 11:04 AM


Controversy in South Korea: Rivals decry Boeing consultant hire

By: Jeff Jeong   5 hours ago


Boeing argues there is no legal problem in its consultant hire. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

SEOUL, South Korea — Boeing’s rivals in a South Korean tender for maritime patrol aircraft are crying foul over the U.S. aerospace giant’s hiring of a former high-ranking official at the agency in charge of the procurement.

The $1.8 billion competition, run by the Defence Acquisition Program Administration, is for the purchase of at least six new maritime patrol aircraft in addition to the existing fleet of 16 P-3Cs, DAPA spokesman Kang Hwan-seok said.

The complaints surround the hiring in 2016 of retired South Korean Air Force Lt. Gen. Park Shin-kyu as a consultant. Park had served as head of the DAPA’s weapons programs management bureau between 2014 and 2015.

Under the local rules of employment, a retired public official is not permitted to enter a company with duty relations for a certain period. This is meant to prevent influence peddling or illegal lobbying.

Park, however, signed a contract less than a year after retirement and didn’t undergo the government’s due scrutiny over duty relations, according to officials.

But Boeing argues the specific hiring process for Park didn’t require those steps and that there is no legal problem.

“Our legal team thoroughly reviewed the propriety of a contract with Park,” a Boeing Korea official said. “Park signed a contract with the Boeing headquarters, not Boeing Korea, so it doesn’t violate the employment rules.”

The DAPA has confirmed the exception.

“Overseas employment of a public servant is an exception of the duty relations rules,” a DAPA official said. “There is no legal problem, though some may raise ethical issues.”

“Park was in a top position at the DAPA, enough to wield an influence over key weapons procurement program,” a source from a European aircraft company told Defense News, speaking on condition of anonymity. “He could influence the MPA contest and other, such as an upcoming [airborne early warning and control system competition] competition.”

In response to the growing controversy over Boeing’s consultant contract, South Korea’s Ministry of National Defense is considering conducting an audit of the Boeing-Park contract.

“We’re collecting information on the MPA acquisition plan, as there are some reasonable suspicion over Boeing’s consultant contract,” a ministry official said. “If needed, we can launch an official audit of the contract problem.”
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[*] posted on 16-3-2018 at 11:11 AM


European firms challenge Boeing in South Korea maritime patrol aircraft tender

By: Jeff Jeong   6 hours ago


South Korea originally considered a private contract with Boeing for the P-8A Poseidon, as there were no tangible rivals. (Erik Hildebrandt/U.S. Navy)

SEOUL, South Korea — U.S. and European aircraft makers are gearing up for South Korea’s $1.8 billion contest to acquire new maritime patrol aircraft.

South Korea has long sought to boost its fleet of maritime patrol and surveillance jets in response of North Korea’s naval capabilities, including submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

The Defence Acquisition Program Administration plans to issue a request for proposals to foreign aircraft makers as early as May, DAPA spokesman Kang Hwan-seok said. The government is looking to buy at least six maritime patrol aircraft, or MPA, in addition to the existing fleet of 16 P-3Cs, she added.

“The RFP is expected to be issued when the DAPA’s executive committee makes a final decision over the method of acquiring MPA in late April or early May,” Kang said. “We’re now reviewing information of potential candidate aircraft.”

The DAPA originally considered a private contract with Boeing for the P-8A Poseidon, as there were no tangible rivals, but European aircraft makers are ready to throw their hats in the ring.

Sweden’s Saab is the most aggressive among the European contenders. The firm pitches the Swordfish MPA variant built on the airframe of the Bombardier Global 6000 business jet.

“Saab GlobalEye, an airborne early warning and control aircraft, has completed its first flight successfully,” an official representing Saab’s MPA campaign told Defense News on condition of anonymity.

“GlobalEye was built on the Bombardier Global 6000 jet, the same platform for the Swordfish, and shares mission systems and sensors as much as 80 percent with those of the Swordfish,” the official said. “So there is not a single problem for the Swordfish to compete for the South Korean MPA contest and undergo due test and evaluation procedures.”

The Global 6000 configuration has a maximum cruise speed of 450 knots and a long-range cruise speed of 360 knots.

According to Saab, the Swordfish, which is not yet in production, can be equipped with an active electronically scanned array radar that has a 360-degree detection capability, six torpedoes and anti-ship missiles.

Saab is ready to offer South Korea an opportunity to take part in the development and construction of Swordfish planes, according to the official. “We could propose South Korea build two to three of the initial Swordfish planes in Sweden, with the rest being assembled in South Korea,” the official said.

“This opportunity will help South Korea to build its own maritime patrol aircraft platform in the future.”

Airbus is said to offer either the C295 MPA or the militarized A320neo built for maritime warfare. Airbus Defence and Space, the defense unit of the European aerospace giant, held a news briefing at Gimpo Airport in July, ahead of the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition, to offer a potential candidate aircraft for South Korea’s MPA procurement effort.

During the briefing, an Airbus representative touted the C295 MPA fitted with Elta Systems AESA as a potential candidate for the South Korean Navy’s new MPA fleet. Airbus, however, has yet responded to the DAPA’s request for information on the MPA program, according to the agency.

Despite competition, Boeing is still confident about the P-8’s ability to stand out against against European contenders.

“The P-8 is proven, already deployed around the world and designed for multiple missions: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface, ISR, and search and rescue,” said Matt Carreon, global sales and marketing lead for the P-8 program. “It’s the only maritime patrol aircraft in operation today that enables complete interoperability between the U.S. and its allies.”

Modified from the 737-800 commercial jetliner, the P-8 can carry four anti-ship missiles, five torpedoes and 129 sonobuoys. The plane can fly 1,200 nautical miles and remain on station for more than four hours. It can reach a maximum altitude of 41,000 feet.

Canada’s KP-X MPA, built using the the Bombardier Challenger 650 platform, may also prove a contender in South Korea’s procurement effort.

“Field Aviation and General Dynamics Mission Systems of Canada have for decades been recognized as leaders in providing special-mission aircraft modifications and innovative anti-submarine warfare and maritime security solutions, respectively,” said Hwang In-kew, head of Hanbaek Aerospace, an agency for the Canadian firms’ MPA campaign in Seoul.

The aircraft’s endurance is in excess of 11 hours, Hwang said, adding that the company could offer 15 aircraft within the $1.8 billion budget.

“We already provided information on the KP-X to the DAPA,” he said. “Upon final requirements — including armament — being released, we’ll be able to make a decision on whether or not we can compete for the MPA program.”
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[*] posted on 22-3-2018 at 07:57 PM


Saab formally announces Swordfish bid for Korea

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

21 March 2018

Saab has officially announced its intention to offer its Swordfish maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) to the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN).

In a press conference in Seoul on 21 March Saab confirmed that it is preparing a proposal for the USD1.8 billion programme, which is expected to progress through a request for proposals (RFP) issued within the next few months.

In preparing its bid, Saab has positioned the Swordfish as a direct rival to Boeing’s P-8 Poseidon, which is thought to be the favoured option in South Korea as it seeks to acquire up to six MPAs.

The MPA programme was initially expected to proceed through the US Foreign Military Sale (FMS) mechanism, providing a clear route to contract for Boeing.

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[*] posted on 22-3-2018 at 09:04 PM


Should hear them rave on about how a tiny little luxury jet clearly out-matches the P-8A in range and persistence, sensor performance, mission systems, the list goes on and on...

One of their mouthpieces has been on DT lately... ;)





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 22-3-2018 at 09:20 PM


It has a place BUT a P-8 replacement? Errrrrmmmmmmmmmmmm NOPE!
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[*] posted on 23-3-2018 at 08:04 PM


For the uninitiated what can the P8 do that the Swordfish can not ?
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[*] posted on 23-3-2018 at 11:06 PM


P-8 carries more weaponry, benefit of 5 x internal and 6 x external (weapon & other) stations versus 4 x wing stations for the Swordfish.

Speed is the same (near enough)

Range is a thorny because of the way they define it in their respective data sheets - P-8 has a combat radius of 1,200 nmi with 4 hours on station, whilst Swordfish has a maritime surveillance range of 200 nmi with 11.5 hours on station OR 1,000 nmi with 7.3 hours on station. Whether you want call these "combat ranges" is a contentious question. Ferry range is 4,500 nmi for P-8 and 5,200 nmi for Swordfish, so pretty close to each other. Swordfish figures are based on ZERO external weaponry..............

P-8 obviously has a better growth capacity for the simple fact of its size. It also carries 2 x crew and 7 x operators PLUS should have a capacity to increase staff to suit more or less any need. Swordfish has 2 + 5, 2 x crew and 5 x operators..........

P-8 can be refuelled in the air via a boom receptacle forward, upper fuselage. Swordfish cannot..........
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[*] posted on 23-3-2018 at 11:49 PM


Quote: Originally posted by redcoat  
For the uninitiated what can the P8 do that the Swordfish can not ?


Carry weapons in an internal weapons bay, dedicate 5 workstations to ASW, 1 workstation to ASuW and still have a spare workstation leftover to manage EW, SIGINT or perhaps M-UMT control for an on-board launched UAV, if such things existed... Launch large diameter sonoboys / UAV’s of torpedoes internally, refuel in the air and still have plenty of on-board room for future growth...

Look at a cut away of the Swordfish, it’s space is already max’d out. Now I’m sure it will be a fine aircraft but one is based on a private jet designed for 17 persons on-board in total and one is based on a large commercial jet designed for a crew and 175 passengers...

They are different classes of aircraft. To me the Swordfish is not a P-8A competitor, but rather a C-295 MPA competitor.






In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 23-3-2018 at 11:55 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
P-8 carries more weaponry, benefit of 5 x internal and 6 x external (weapon & other) stations versus 4 x wing stations for the Swordfish.

Speed is the same (near enough)

Range is a thorny because of the way they define it in their respective data sheets - P-8 has a combat radius of 1,200 nmi with 4 hours on station, whilst Swordfish has a maritime surveillance range of 200 nmi with 11.5 hours on station OR 1,000 nmi with 7.3 hours on station. Whether you want call these "combat ranges" is a contentious question. Ferry range is 4,500 nmi for P-8 and 5,200 nmi for Swordfish, so pretty close to each other. Swordfish figures are based on ZERO external weaponry..............

P-8 obviously has a better growth capacity for the simple fact of its size. It also carries 2 x crew and 7 x operators PLUS should have a capacity to increase staff to suit more or less any need. Swordfish has 2 + 5, 2 x crew and 5 x operators..........

P-8 can be refuelled in the air via a boom receptacle forward, upper fuselage. Swordfish cannot..........


Yep the range is a funny one. P-8A weighs a lot more but then it carries a lot more fuel too. I would say the assumptions inherent in the figures need a very in-depth looking at and the various flight profiles and likely configurations would have to be known before any genuine comparison could be honestly attempted, but countries that really need range seem to have leaped at the opportunity for the P-8A and those that don’t...

To me that suggests the P-8A’s range and time on station is perfectly acceptable if not outstanding.




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 27-3-2018 at 01:03 PM


USN enhances P-8A capability with software upgrade

Dr. Lee Willett, Catania, Sicily - Jane's International Defence Review

26 March 2018

The US Navy (USN) is rolling out a software upgrade programme designed to improve mission system functionality, as well as support and maintenance, for its P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft (MPAs) Increment 1 and 2 variants.

The Fleet Release 40 (FR40) upgrade involves a number of elements, Lieutenant Fan Yang, a naval flight officer and tactical co-ordinator with Patrol Squadron 5 (VP-5), told Jane’s .

The primary content covers Increment 2 Engineering Change Proposal 2 (ECP 2) capabilities including Automatic Identification System (AIS) integration and significant enhancements to acoustic capabilities including Multistatic Active Coherent (MAC), based on fleet feedback in the context of making the Tactical Open Mission Software (TOMS) arrangement more user friendly.

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[*] posted on 10-4-2018 at 09:21 AM


France and Germany to push ahead with new joint MPA

09 April, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Dominic Perry London

France and Germany are to jointly develop a future maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), with a letter of intent covering the programme to be signed by the nations' defence ministers on 27 April.

Destined to replace the countries' respective fleets of Dassault Atlantique 2 and Lockheed Martin P-3C Orions, the new aircraft will be available to coincide with the out-of-service dates for both models, says the German navy. This is likely to be in the 2030s.

In 2017 the two sides indicated that they would seek a "European solution" to renew their MPA fleets, and would co-ordinate their capability requirements toward a common model.

Berlin has a fleet of eight Orions, which entered service from 2006. A recent operational readiness report indicated that in 2017 an average of two aircraft were in a deployable condition.

Germany plans to upgrade its P-3C fleet with new wings, avionics and mission systems, with the modernisation due to be completed by 2023-2024.

Flight Fleets Analyzer records France as operating 23 ATL-2s which have an average age of 23.8 years. Dassault is currently upgrading the fleet with new systems and sensors under a project running until 2023.

At the time of the contract award in 2013, Dassault suggested that the modernisation would keep the aircraft operating into the 2030s.

In its most recent defence white paper, covering the period 2019-2025, Paris indicated that it would begin the process of replacing the ATL-2s and intended to order an initial batch of seven MPAs.
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[*] posted on 10-4-2018 at 08:10 PM


Singapore’s Wigetworks readies production-spec Airfish 8 WIG craft

Kelvin Wong, Singapore - Jane's International Defence Review

09 April 2018


Singapore-based company Wigetworks has built and successfully flown two Airfish 8 wing-in-ground effect vehicle prototypes. Source: Wigetworks

Wigetworks, a Singapore-based firm specialising in wing-in-ground effect (WIG) technology research and development (R&D), is aiming to finalise the design of the production-ready version of its Airfish 8 (AF8) WIG craft prototype by the end of 2018 and is preparing to commence production when a launch customer is secured, company officials told Jane’s .

The AF8 is a 17 m Type A-class WIG craft with a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 5,550 kg and constructed from carbon and glass-fibre reinforced plastic sandwich material featuring a reverse delta wing airframe and has an overall height and wingspan of 3.5 m and 15 m respectively.

The craft will be powered by a pair of 550hp-class General Motors LS3 petrol engines, which drive reversible variable pitch propellers that enable it to achieve a maximum speed of 120 kt (222 km/h), although it typically cruises at speeds of 80–90 kt.

Maximum range is quoted as 300 n miles when equipped with a standard fuel tank.

In its standard configuration, the AF8 can accommodate a two-person flight crew and up to eight passengers, although it can also be configured to transport a 1,150 kg payload inclusive of fuel. The craft has a draught of only 0.5 m when fully laden, enabling it to operate and berth close to shore with minimal support or infrastructure.

Utilising the WIG effect, the craft primarily cruises at altitudes of 1–3 m while being supported by a field of high-pressure air beneath its wings and above the water surface, although it can also perform manoeuvres up to an altitude of 7 m when necessary, such as avoiding obstacles.

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[*] posted on 11-4-2018 at 10:00 AM


Boeing's 100th P-8 Poseidon enters final assembly

10 April, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Garrett Reim Los Angeles

The 100th Boeing P-8A Poseidon entered final assembly in Renton, Washington in March.

The maritime patrol aircraft is destined for the US Navy in fall 2018 and is part of a string of backorders that Boeing said will keep its P-8 production line running until 2022. The aerospace manufacturer said it has delivered 82 aircraft since the launch of the programme in 2011, and in total has 127 aircraft contracted to the US Navy, Australia, United Kingdom and India.

The company believes it can add more aircraft orders to the programme from current and new customers, eventually extending the total number of the aircraft delivered to 200.

Norway signed an agreement for five P-8A's in 2017 and Boeing is bidding to sell aircraft to South Korea, which is expected to decide on a maritime patrol aircraft by the end of 2018.



The P-8A is known for submarine hunting, but in the face of additional competition from aircraft such as the Saab Swordfish Boeing is keen to emphasize that the aircraft’s size gives it extra room for capabilities beyond anti-submarine missions.

“Especially for the countries in the Middle East and a lot of Asia Countries what makes the P-8 interesting is it is a multiple mission aircraft,” said Matt Carreon, global sales and marketing lead for the P-8, noting the jet’s anti-surface warfare, intellgence-collecting, and search and rescue capabilities. “We are able to incorporate new technologies, additional sensors, additional crewmembers which makes it really appealing for our customer who can’t afford another aircraft.”

The company also points out that it has produced more than 10,000 units of the 737 commercial airliner, the airframe on which the P-8 is based, and is able to pass on economies of scale savings onto its military customers. And though the 737 production line is transitioning to accommodate the larger 737 MAX, Boeing remains confident that the P-8 will continue to benefit from its commercial cousin.

“The 737 production line process has supported multiple models of the 737. That process is not changing,” the company said. “The P-8 has benefitted from those efficiencies, which have largely contributed to an overall 30% cost savings and 50% reduction in production time.”

Boeing added that the latest aircraft upgrade, Increment 3, also includes a wideband satellite communications link, which will increase the volume of data the plane can send and receive.
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[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 07:00 PM


April 25, 2018 / 11:03 AM / a day ago

Japan seeks role in French-German marine surveillance plane project - sources

Nobuhiro Kubo, Andrea Shalal



TOKYO/BERLIN, April 25 (Reuters) - In a fresh bid to win its first major foreign arms deal since World War Two, Japan is proposing its P-1 submarine hunter for a French-German project to develop a marine surveillance aircraft, two Japanese government sources said.

Discussion between the three governments began last year. Japanese officials also asked Kawasaki Heavy Industries , which makes the P-1, to discuss possible partnerships with France’s Dassault Aviation and Thales SA , said the sources, who have direct knowledge of the proposal but are not authorised to speak to the media.

“If they try and build it from scratch it will cost a lot and their potential market is small, even if Spain or other European countries buy it,” one of the sources said of the European project.

But the P-1 may be a tough sell in a competition with plenty of home-field heavyweights.

Airbus has said it is exploring military applications for its A320neo passenger jet family, including a maritime patrol version. Two European defence sources said French planemaker Dassault Aviation is ready to adapt its Falcon 8X business jet for such missions. Both companies declined to comment.

Boeing is also likely to offer its P-8A Poseidon.

“We have introduced the P-1 to other countries with the backing of the Japanese Ministry of Defence,” a Kawasaki Heavy spokeswoman said. “However, we are not able to discuss individual cases.”

Japan’s Ministry of Defense did not respond to a request for comment.

Germany wants to replace its ageing fleet of maritime surveillance planes in response to an increase in Russian submarine patrols to a level not seen since the end of the Cold War.

The defence ministers from Germany and France will sign a document at this week’s Berlin Airshow agreeing to explore the joint development of a new maritime surveillance aircraft, German military sources said.

A spokesman for the German defence ministry declined to comment on discussions, adding, “Germany and France are considering many possibilities to expand the existing good cooperation between the two countries’ militaries.”

The two countries are exploring several other joint procurement or development projects, including a new fighter jet and a military drone. The two countries will also jointly operate a new fleet of Lockheed Martin C-130J transport planes.

Officials at the French embassy in Tokyo were not immediately available to comment.

OVERSEAS SALES

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ended a decades-long ban on arms exports four years ago.

But since then, his government has been unable to sell defence gear overseas as long-isolated Japanese defence contractors struggled in the competitive global arms market.

In 2015, Japan offered the P-1 to Britain, which chose Boeing’s P-8 instead from a crowded field. In 2016 it lost out on a lucrative contract to supply Australia with a fleet of diesel-powered submarines, work that went to French naval contractor DCNS.

European defence analysts and military sources cautioned that the P-1 would face stiff competition for the French-German project, which aims to field a new aircraft by 2035.

“At this point, it’s completely premature to either say Japan and Kawasaki have a chance or that they do not,” said one of the military sources.

Japan, which wants stronger security ties with France and Germany, plans to display two of its P-1 aircraft at the five-day Berlin air show. The P-1, which is designed to operate both at high altitude and at low speeds closer to the water, is replacing Japan’s fleet of turboprop Lockheed Martin P-3C Orions.

Germany also operates the Orion, while France flies the Atlantique 2, or ATL2, produced by Dassault Aviation in the 1980s.

Saab, Bombardier, Israel Aerospace Industry and Leonardo are among other companies seeking to enter the maritime patrol market.

The P-1 patrols Japan’s territorial waters stretching from the Pacific to the East China Sea, where Beijing and Tokyo are locked in a territorial dispute over a group of uninhabited islets.

The four-engine aircraft, which was delayed by fuselage and wing cracks and engine problems, entered service in 2015. It is the world’s first production aircraft to use fibre optic cables to transmit flight control commands from its cockpit.

(Reporting by Nobuhiro Kubo in TOKYO and Andrea Shalal in BERLIN; writing by Tim Kelly; Editing by Gerry Doyle)
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[*] posted on 26-4-2018 at 09:01 PM


I can hear the EU bureacrats now. "That would be an interesting...and courageous decision Minister"



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[*] posted on 3-5-2018 at 10:56 AM


Japan yet to decide on P-1 fleet size

02 May, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Craig Hoyle Berlin

Japan has yet to reach a firm decision on the future size of its Kawasaki Heavy Industries P-1 maritime patrol aircraft fleet, or determine whether the surveillance asset could be exported to international buyers.

Developed as an indigenous replacement for the Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force's Lockheed Martin P-3C Orions, the four-engined type was first flown in 2007, and entered operational use in 2016.

"As a maritime patrol aircraft, it outperforms the P-3C in all areas," says Capt Ryota Ishida, P-1 programme manager for Japan's defence ministry. "In the future, more of these airplanes will be flying in the skies around the world."


Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force

Japan's navy has so far taken delivery of 15 P-1s, and Kawasaki has no further examples currently on contract. Tokyo has yet to define its long-term spending plans, but Flight Fleets Analyzer shows it as having previously indicated an intent to acquire up to a further 58, to fully replace its aged P-3C inventory. Ishida notes that the service is considering some updates for its future examples, but that it has "no specific plans at the moment".

Tokyo sent two P-1s to Germany in late April for a debut appearance at the ILA Berlin air show, with one participating in the flying display and the other parked in the static area. The deployment marked the latest in a string of European visits by the type, also including attending the UK's Royal International Air Tattoo in 2015 and last year's Paris air show. However, defence ministry officials stress that these visits have not been linked to sales campaigns.

"We have brought the aircraft here to promote Japan's very high level of technology to the world," Ishida says. "We have never made any sort of calculation on what it would cost for foreign customers," he adds, noting that the defence ministry currently has no intention of pursuing exports.

"The current objective is to deliver the P-1 and make it a strategic capability for Japan," the defence ministry's Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency says.

Declining to provide further details, Ishida says that the P-1s could participate in joint training with other operators as part of their latest deployment, which required stops in several nations.
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[*] posted on 3-5-2018 at 06:31 PM


Boeing plans affordability changes for new wave of P-8 orders

03 May, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Stephen Trimble Seattle

As Boeing assembles the 100th P-8 Poseidon in Renton, Washington, the company is laying the groundwork to secure dozens of new orders by revamping the design and production process to reduce costs.

“We think we’ll build another 100 of them,” says Carl Lang, Boeing’s deputy programme manager for the 737-800A, which is modified to become the anti-submarine warfare as the P-8.

So far, Boeing has delivered eight test aircraft and 84 operational P-8As to the US Navy, plus eight P-8Is for the Indian navy and seven P-8As for the Royal Australian Air Force.

The governments of Norway and the UK also have committed to buy the aircraft. The USN’s programme of record includes funding to buy at least 111 P-8As, although the navy’s approved requirement calls for a total of 117.

Boeing expects continued demand from the international market. If Boeing delivers a total of 200 P-8s, at least 75 of the orders should come from customers outside the USA, Lang says.

The international market, however, is getting crowded. Militaries around the world still operate scores of anti-submarine warfare aircraft, including Lockheed P-3Cs, Breguet Atlantiques and Ilyushin Il-38s.

Fourteen years after Boeing started developing the P-8 Poseidon, a number of competitors have appeared on the global market. Kawasaki has delivered the four-engined P-1, a clean-sheet design loosely modeled on the airframe of the P-3C. Saab, meanwhile, is developing the Bombardier Global 6000-based Swordfish for the UAE. Last month, Airbus also announced plans to develop an anti-submarine warfare version of the A321neo for the French and German militaries.

In Renton, Boeing’s challenge to keep the P-8 competitive is only getting harder. Boeing expects to deliver the last member of the 737NG family to an airline customer by the end of 2019, leaving the USN as the type’s only remaining customer as the Renton factory transitions to the re-engined and heavily updated 737 Max. Although the 737NG line is phasing out, Boeing has committed to supporting the P-8 programme.

The cost efficiencies gained by leveraging a production system scaled up to once deliver more than 40 737s per month will be lost, as output dwindles to only 1.5 P-8s per month.

To keep the P-8A competitive, Boeing has launched a push to improve the aircraft’s affordability. Inside the hangar in Renton where Boeing assembles P-8s, a sign reveals the existence of a staff working on creating a “future production system” for the type.

That staff is working on design and production system improvements to lower the cost of producing the P-8 in absolute terms as well as prevent potential cost growth as 737NG production is phased out, Lang says.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2018 at 07:41 PM


OPINION: Max success poses challenge for Poseidon

04 May, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Flight International London

For many nations, the ability to perform effective maritime surveillance from the air is an essential requirement, and one that is likely to become even more critical where territorial disputes risk flaring up, such as in parts of the Asia-Pacific region.

As the newest kid on the block, Boeing’s 737-800A-based P-8 Poseidon is today’s gold-standard product, with the US Navy relying on the type, along with ­export buyers Australia and India, who will soon be followed by European customers Norway and the UK.

Optimised for the anti-submarine warfare role, the P-8 is a potent symbol of defensive might and benefits significantly from being a derivative of one of the world’s two dominant narrowbody airliner families, orders for which are at record levels.

But as its 100th production example advances through a completion hangar near the fast-moving commercial final assembly lines in Renton, Washington, Boeing finds itself with an increasingly nagging headache. With its Max-family twinjets now flying off the line, how can it maintain efficiency on the Poseidon programme as the number of NG-series aircraft slows to a trickle, before ending entirely for airlines in late 2019, leaving just 1.5 P-8As heading for completion per month?

The company is now wrestling with this issue, having tasked staff with finding design and production system improvements on the Poseidon. But it remains bullish about future sales prospects with the product, which should at least double its current deliveries.

With next to no viable competition in the large ­maritime patrol aircraft sector, the company has every reason to be positive.

BAE Systems’ Nimrod MRA4 was scrapped long ago, Japan’s striking – and highly capable – Kawasaki P-1 is not available to export ­buyers, and Saab has yet to find a taker for its business jet-based Swordfish system. And while Airbus has the skills and capabilities required to develop a rival based on the re-engined A320neo family, it has no current programme to do so, as the current fleets of its most likely customers – France, Germany and Spain – are due to fly on for many more years.

With more than a dozen nations continuing to use combined fleets of more than 250 aged Lockheed ­Martin P-3 Orions, Boeing’s P-8 should have a very bright future on the international market: just so long as the company can manage to keep its costs under ­control as the NG era ramps down.
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[*] posted on 16-5-2018 at 01:45 PM


Boeing, Saab, Airbus to Bid for Korea's Patrol Aircraft

(Source: The Korea Times; published May 15, 2018)

By Lee Min-hyung

Three foreign aerospace firms ― Boeing, Saab and Airbus ― are expected to bid for Korea's lucrative maritime patrol aircraft project.

In February, the Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) unveiled its plan to sign a deal with an overseas aircraft manufacturer to introduce next-generation maritime patrol aircraft by 2020.

The project is worth 1.9 trillion won ($1.76 billion). Boeing has presented its P-8A Poseidon as a candidate model for the project, while Saab from Sweden is competing with its Swordfish long-range maritime patrol aircraft.

Airbus Defense and Space (DS) also expressed its willingness Tuesday to join the bidding process with its C295 Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA), a multi-role aircraft derived from the C295 military purpose transport aircraft.

"If the government adopts an open tender process for the project, we are willing to compete with other aircraft manufacturers," an Airbus spokesman said.

The company also plans to promote the new patrol aircraft on Thursday in Seoul by holding a press conference.

Initially, DAPA considered introducing the P-8A under the Foreign Military Sales program with the U.S. defense department. But the defense acquisition unit is opening the possibility to have a competitive bidding for the project.

DAPA plans to hold a meeting as early as this month to decide the form of the contract for the project.

The Republic of Korea Navy currently uses the P-3 patrol aircraft. But in a defense acquisition meeting in February, the defense ministry and DAPA decided to adopt new surveillance aircraft that offer a longer flight duration and heavier weapons payload.

Boeing's P-8A can fly at a maximum speed of 907 kilometers per hour. The aircraft is derived from Boeing 707 jet airliner.

To compete against Boeing, Saab mulls transferring its high-tech radar technology for Korea's KF-X fighter jet development project.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 31-5-2018 at 07:59 PM


KADEX 2018: UAC Showcased Maritime Patrol Variant of Il-114

Posted On Thursday, 31 May 2018 10:03

Russia's United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) has unveiled the Ilyushin Il-114MP maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) based on the Il-114-300 airlifter during KADEX 2018 defense exhibition in Kazakhstan.


Il-114 MP scale model unveiled at KADEX 2018

The Il-114MP has a take-off weight of 26,000 kg and features six-strong crew, including two pilots and four operators. The aircraft patrols an area with a radius of 300 km at an altitude of up to 8,000 m during 12 hours. The MPA is powered by two Klimov TV7-117ST turboprop engines with a power output of 3,000 hp each. The Il-114MP has a practical flight range of 4,500 km. The aircraft requires 950 m to take off and 530 m to land.


Artist impression of Il-114 MPA. Screencapture from Radio MMS video.

The Il-114MP can be fitted with the Kasatka-S search-and-targeting system, which comprises an information management subsystem, a multipurpose radar with an active electronically scanned array, a radio sonar subsystem, a magnetometer, and an optical-electronic turret with a thermal imager, a TV channel, and a laser rangefinder. The system allows carrying of two Kh-35E anti-ship missiles and a GSh-23-2 23 mm automatic cannon. An Il-114MP MPA fitted with the Kasatka-S can detect a target at a distance of 120 km.

A source from the Russian defence industry said the Kasatka system had been intensively tested in various regions of Russia, including the Arctic.

https://youtu.be/_tx75GwfNMk
Radio MMS video

At the MAKS 2015 international aerospace show, the Saint Petersburg-based Radar MMS company unveiled the Il-114LL (LL for ‘flying laboratory’) aircraft fitted with the Kasatka-S system. Radar MMS has developed several variants of the Kasatka for various air platforms, including light and medium utility helicopters (Kasatka-V and Kasatka-VB, respectively), medium and heavy MPAs (Kasatka-S and Kasatka-SB), unmanned aerial vehicles (Kasatka-BP), and aerostats (Kasatka-A).

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[*] posted on 26-6-2018 at 11:43 AM


S. Korea Chooses Boeing's P-8 Patrol Aircraft for Naval Procurement Project

(Source: Yonhap news agency; published June 25, 2018)

SEOUL --- South Korea decided Monday to purchase U.S. defense company Boeing's P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft in a US$1.7 billion project, Seoul's military acquisition agency has said.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said that Seoul's defense project promotion committee convened to make the decision to purchase the aircraft through a government-to-government "Foreign Military Sale" program.

"(We have decided) to purchase the latest maritime patrol aircraft for conducting patrol, search and rescue operations through the foreign military sale program from the U.S. government, in consideration of the cost, time schedule, capabilities as well as the legal aspect," the DAPA said in a press release.

Before the decision, a three-way competition had emerged, with Europe's Airbus Defense & Space and Sweden's Saab expressing their intentions to win the first major defense acquisition project since the Moon Jae-in government took office in May last year.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 26-6-2018 at 03:36 PM


Boeing's P8 seems to be everything the Pegasus isn't; on time, on budget and winning international sales.

It's a good thing Airbus hasn't tried competing that segment with an A321 NEO derivative, leaving it free for Boeing.




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