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Author: Subject: Maritime Patrol Aircraft part 2
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[*] posted on 26-6-2018 at 03:38 PM


LEAD) S. Korea chooses Boeing's P-8 patrol aircraft for naval procurement project

2018/06/25 18:38

(ATTN: ADDS more details from 5th para)

SEOUL, June 25 (Yonhap) -- South Korea decided Monday to purchase U.S. defense company Boeing's P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft in a US$1.7 billion project, Seoul's military acquisition agency has said.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said that Seoul's defense project promotion committee convened to make the decision to purchase the aircraft through a government-to-government "foreign military sale (FMS)" program.

"(We have decided) to purchase the latest maritime patrol aircraft for conducting patrol, search and rescue operations through the FMS program from the U.S. government, in consideration of the cost, time schedule, capabilities as well as the legal aspect," the DAPA said in a press release.

Before the decision, a three-way competition had emerged, with Europe's Airbus Defense & Space and Sweden's Saab expressing their intentions to win the first major defense acquisition project since the Moon Jae-in government took office in May last year.

Amid the prospect of a multiple-party contest, some observers said that the naval project should be put to an open bidder, which could help lower prices.

But a DAPA official said that the U.S. government proposed a reasonable price for the Boeing aircraft similar to that of Saab's Swordfish.

"Should we opt for an open contest, Poseidon's price will go up 10 to 28 percent per unit, which would go beyond the total budget," the official said on condition of anonymity.

"It appears that the plane that we can purchase at this point in time is the P-8A, and we don't believe there is any problem with the purchase decision," he added.

The South Korean military is pushing to introduce an unspecified number of maritime aircraft between 2022 and 2023.

The DAPA plans to send the letter of request (LOR) for the procurement project to Washington this month. But sources said the project could be delayed should the U.S. government fail to offer the letter of offer and acceptance (LOA) through a congressional approval process by November.

The P-8 Poseidon is based on the 737-800ERX short-to-medium-range airliner. It is capable of conducting various missions, including antisurface, antisubmarine, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance operations.
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[*] posted on 27-6-2018 at 08:52 PM


Balt Military Expo 2018: Leonardo Unveils MPA variant of the MC-27J ISR

Posted On Tuesday, 26 June 2018 23:09

At Balt Military Expo 2018, the naval defense exhibition currently held in Gdansk, Poland, Italian company Leonardo unveiled a scale model showing an MC-27J ISR aircraft configured as a maritime patrol aircraft (MPA).


The MC-27J ISR scale model configured for Maritime Patrol at Balt Military Expo 2018. Note the ASuW and ASW weapons as well as the openings to deploy sonobuyos.

The scale model unveiled at the show is fitted with 2x MBDA MARTE ER anti-ship missiles for anti-surface warfare (ASuW) missions and two MU90 lightweight torpedoes for anti-submarie warfare (ASW).

The MC-27J is also fitted with sensors dedicated to MPA missions: an underbelly Seaspray 6500 radar, EO/IR system, SIGINT/COMINT antennas, a magnetic anomaly detector (MAD) boom at the tail and 6x holes under the fuselage to deploy up to 60x sonobuoys.

According to company representatives at the show, with this configuration the MC-27J answers MPA requirements of several customers, including a potential need in Poland.


MPA variant of MC-27J fitted with Marte ER anti-ship missiles

This MC-27J retains its mission kits/pallets features: With a modular roll-on/roll-off system approach, the mission kits are designed for minimal airframe modification and offer acquisition and operating costs significantly lower than a dedicated platform.
Company representatives stressed that the aircraft can be reconfigured in a matters of hours (not days) for different missions.


Detailed view of the MAD boom on the MC-27J

According to Leonardo, the C-27Jvariants grouped under the MC-27J name are designed to cope with the current and future operational scenarios, requiring a flexible, effective and efficient multi-mission aircraft, quickly reconfigurable thanks to modular roll-on/roll-off systems to be, from time to time, a C3-ISR (Command, Control, Communication, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance), SIGINT (SIGnal INTelligence) or Fire Support asset.

Typical sensors and equipment which can be installed on the MC-27J in accordance with the specific customer requirements include:

• AESA Search radar, providing world classleading MP/SAR capabilities across maritime, overland and airborne domains.
• Electro-Optical/Infra-Red (EO/IR) system, in a stabilized platform.
• Electronic Support Measures (ESM) to detect, locate and identify radar emitting targets, essential for ISR and ELINT missions but also valuable in MP tasks, especially in hostile areas.
• Palletised, quickly removable Mission System to manage the sensors, analyze the gathered information and perform a true Data Fusion, providing both the operators and pilots with a detailed, real time overall tactical picture.
• Enhanced Communication System connected to the Mission System, including additional VUHF radios, data links and SATCOM capabilities.
• Gun Pallet: highly accurate gun mounted on a standard 463L pallet, able to fire through the LH rear door thanks to a specifically designed door
gun barrel interface plug.


MPA variant of MC-27J fitted with MU90 torpedoes
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[*] posted on 9-7-2018 at 07:14 PM


Wellington confirms deal for four P-8A Poseidons

09 July, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

New Zealand’s defence ministry has approved an order for four Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft.

The four aircraft, based on the 737 airliner, will replace the country’s aging fleet of Lockheed Martin P-3K Orions, says the ministry.

The deal will be conducted under the US government’s foreign military sales (FMS) mechanism. Deliveries will start in 2023.

“The P-8A will bring enhanced capability to the roles performed by the Orions over many decades such as contributing to the international rules-based order through peace and security operations, search and rescue, disaster response, resource and border protection, and environmental and marine resource monitoring,” says the ministry.

“Like the Orions before them, the P-8As are expected to serve New Zealand over several decades to come. The P-8A will enable New Zealand to continue to deploy to a wide range of airborne maritime situations independently, and when required, work effectively with partners, who will all be operating the aircraft at the time of delivery to New Zealand.”

New Zealand’s close ally, Australia, is a major operator of the P-8A. It has seven Poseidons in its fleet, and will have 12 by 2022.

The aircraft will be operated by the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s No. 5 Sqn., which now operates the Orions. The arrival of the new aircraft will see the squadron shift from RNZAF Whenuapai to Ohakea.

In May 2017 the US State Department approved a $1.46 billion deal for the sale of four P-8As to New Zealand. Other vendors interested in the deal include Kawasaki with its four-engined P-1 and Saab with its Swordfish MPA.

The RNZAF operates six P-3Ks with an average age of 48.6 years, and an age range of 33.2-51.9 years.

In addition, the defence ministry will consider other assets to complement the P-8As.

“The Government will further consider options for a complementary capability or capabilities for lower-end, civilian maritime tasks, through the use of cost-effective options that could include smaller manned aircraft, remotely-piloted aircraft systems, or satellites.”
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[*] posted on 14-7-2018 at 03:26 PM


Leonardo receives Italian order for ATR 72MP

13 July, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Dominic Perry London

Italy's Guardia di Finanza customs body has ordered an ATR 72-600 for maritime patrol missions, to be outfitted by prime contractor Leonardo.

Valued at €44 million ($51.2 million), including training and logistics support, the deal could eventually reach a total value of €250 million if an unspecified number of options are exercised.

An ATR 72-600 passenger aircraft has a list price of around $26 million.

Delivery of the ATR 72MP will take place in 2019, says Leonardo. The Guardia di Finanza already operates four smaller ATR 42MPs.

The twin-engine turboprop will be capable of performing a number of roles, including maritime patrol, search and rescue, anti-piracy and anti-drug smuggling operations, and surveillance of territorial waters.

Italy's air force already operates a version of the ATR 72MP, which it designates as the P-72A.

ATR is a joint venture between Airbus and Leonardo.
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[*] posted on 14-7-2018 at 05:00 PM


Really there are only three reasons not to buy the P8, which is as turnkey as such a proect can be.

1. You're protecting the local industry (Japan and Italy come to mind)
2. You're anti-US and not likely to be allowed to buy it anyway (Iran)
3. You're too broke to afford a decent MPA




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[*] posted on 16-7-2018 at 08:53 PM


FARNBOROUGH: Boeing sees sustained interest in P-8A Poseidon

16 July, 2018 SOURCE: Flight Daily News BY: Garrett Reim Farnborough

Despite competition from maritime patrol aircraft such as the Saab Swordfish and Kawasaki P-1, Boeing says it sees sustained interest in its P-8A Poseidon from Asian and Middle Eastern countries, especially after lowering its cost and adding an additional crew workstation.

Just last week the Royal New Zealand Air Force agreed to buy four of the maritime patrol aircraft for $1.6 billion. And, in June 2018, South Korea purchased four P-8A Poseidons for $1.7 billion.

The sustained interest has the manufacturer projecting that it could sell as many as 200 examples of the aircraft over the type's lifetime, including 75 orders from non-US customers. The aircraft has been ordered by the US, UK, Australia, New Zealand, India and Norway.

"Why you are seeing a lot of interest is because we have the price down to the lowest it's ever been," said Matt Carreon, head of global sales and marketing for the aircraft. "The costs have gone down over 30 percent from the start of the programme."

Boeing declined to share an approximate cost for the aircraft, saying that the price varies significantly depending on its configuration.

Carreon was keen to point out that the P-8A, which is a modified Boeing 737-800 jetliner, has a lot of room to support various configurations and missions, from maritime patrol to search and rescue operations. It can carry up to 21 people, though it typically holds three pilots and six crew members. The company recently added a sixth crew workstation to the aircraft.

"In terms of crew comfort, it’s much better [than the competition]," Carreon says. "When you are talking about 8, 9 to 10h missions, crews get less fatigue which helps them perform the mission better."
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[*] posted on 16-7-2018 at 09:12 PM


FARNBOROUGH: Airbus details maritime patrol plans for A320

16 July, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Craig Hoyle Farnborough

Airbus Defence & Space is advancing plans to adapt the top-selling A320 for a broad range of military applications, with the need to replace ageing maritime patrol aircraft fleets in Europe driving early activities.

The company is using the Farnborough air show to outline the potential of its planned modular multi-mission product – dubbed the A320M3 – in roles that could also cover airborne early warning, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and signals intelligence-gathering.

A leading application could come via a Franco-German requirement to replace the nations' existing Dassault ATL-2 Atlantique and Lockheed Martin P-3 Orion platforms. The partners earlier this year confirmed their intention to pursue a future maritime airborne warfare system, to enter use from around 2035.

"We are at the beginning of understanding exactly what that common requirement could be, but believe we have a platform which can easily be turned into a system which can match it," says Airbus Defence & Space head of strategy Antoine Noguier.

Beyond the needs of the European partners, he sees "a huge requirement with regard to replacing old maritime patrol aircraft", including those with other NATO nations.

"If you look at our portfolio, we have a very successful C295, which we turned into a very cheap, reliable multi-mission aircraft, and then we have the A330, which is a tanker but can do much more," Noguier says. "We have a gap in between, and we believe that the A320 can nicely fill this gap."

"In the past, we have been trying to promote the C295 maritime patrol aircraft in different parts of the world.

Frequently, we come to the point where the C295's legs are too short: some nations need a bigger platform," says head of military aircraft Fernando Alonso. "Why not use the availability, reliability and simplicity of the A320 and build more capabilities on it?"

Internally funded design studies are under way and the company expects to receive its first financial backing soon from the French and German governments to advance the activity.

Alonso says Airbus is also assessing whether to best serve the market by offering new-build Neo aircraft, or offering conversions of second-hand airframes. Key questions facing the company include where to perform such modification work, and conducting design studies on integrating a bomb bay and other sensors onto the narrowbody.

The A320M3 will enter the market after Boeing's 737NG-based P-8A Poseidon. The maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare derivative has already entered use with the US Navy and Australian and Indian militaries, with other future operators to include New Zealand, Norway and the UK. An AEW version of the 737 has also been delivered to the air forces of Australia, South Korea and Turkey.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2018 at 08:47 PM


FARNBOROUGH: L-3 Q400 MMA makes air show debut

17 July, 2018 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Farnborough

L3 Technologies has introduced its Q400 multimission aircraft at this year’s show, acknowledging a pressing market demand for aircraft to patrol the maritime domain.

Based on the Q400 airliner, the Q400 MMA is being pitched in various competitions. The aircraft is based on the Bombardier Dash-8 Q400 turboprop airliner, but features several major modifications.

L3 has mounted two large fuel tanks on either side of the aircraft, doubling its range and giving it 12h of endurance. A multimission systems bay has been added below the fuselage. This can house payloads based on customer requirements. In addition, there are hard points for weapons.

Darryl Conley, vice-president strategic capture for L3 Aerospace Systems, says the Q400 was chosen as L3's platform for several reasons, including the ability to fly at low levels, high horsepower, good endurance, its electrical power, and internal cooling.


BillyPix

"L3 has modified 1,500 aircraft in its history, so we were able to modify the Q400 without changes to its operating envelope," he says.

Internally, L3 foresees the aircraft having four to six operator stations, as well as a mission planning station. Generally, it expects the aircraft to have a crew of 10.

Conley’s colleague, programme manager Cliff Henry, stresses that the aircraft can perform several distinct missions: maritime patrol with anti-submarine warfare, maritime surveillance, and signals intelligence. It can also be reconfigured as a long-range passenger transport.

The company has added an observation window, but unlike other maritime patrol aircraft, this is flush with the fuselage and not a bubble. Conley says that the design of the window itself allows for an excellent view, without disrupting the line of the fuselage.

While the company has done extensive work, it has yet to test the full suite of sensors and weapons from the platform. This work will depend on customer requirements and commitments.
A feasibility study has been undertaken with Bombardier to look at how, if required, the aircraft could be modified for air-to-air refuelling.

Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that the aircraft on static, which bears the registration N404E, was delivered new to FlyBe in 2002, and operated by an airliner until 2012. It spent a few months in storage in late 2012 before being obtained by L-3.
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[*] posted on 19-7-2018 at 08:48 AM


Pakistan Navy receives first of two ATR-72 MPAs

Gabriel Dominguez, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

18 July 2018


The PN received the first of two ATR-72 twin-turboprops converted into MPAs in the second quarter of 2018. Source: Via Aerodata

The Pakistan Navy (PN) received the first of two ATR-72 twin-engine turboprops converted into maritime patrol aircraft (MPAs) in the second quarter of 2018, Aerodata, a company involved in the process, announced in a 2 July statement.

The delivery “represents a major milestone for Rheinland Air Service as prime contractor and Aerodata as the key project partner”, said the Germany-based company without revealing the expected delivery date for the second platform.

Rheinland Air Service had signed a contract in 2015 to convert two ATR-72 aircraft already owned by the Pakistan Navy into MPAs. The company performed the overall project management, acquisition of key components, all physical aircraft modification work, and pilot training, according to the statement.

Aerodata’s scope of work included the delivery of its AeroMission mission management system, all system integration activities, engineering tasks to convert the ATR-72 from the transport into a maritime patrol configuration, delivery of parts for the aircraft modification, as well as customer training and support.
Work on the project commenced in January 2016 after export approvals were received from the German government.

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[*] posted on 20-7-2018 at 09:05 AM


Farnborough 2018: Bird Aerosystems showcases ASIO solution

Giles Ebbutt, Farnborough - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

19 July 2018


Israeli company Bird Aerosystems showcased its ASIO solution installed on a Cessna Citation CJ4 business jet at the Farnborough International Airshow 2018. The belly fairing contains a Leonardo Seaspray 5000 radar and a Controp E/O system. The satcom aerial is under the small bulge between the engines. Source: Giles Ebbutt

Israeli company Bird Aerosystems showcased its Airborne Surveillance, Intelligence and Observation (ASIO) solution installed on a Cessna Citation CJ4 business jet at the Farnborough International Air Show 2018.

Shown in a maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) configuration, the system featured a Leonardo Seaspray 5000 multimode radar, a Controp 15-inch high-definition day/night electro-optical sensor in a belly-mounted fairing, an automatic identification system (AIS) receiver, satcom and line-of-sight datalink communications as well as Bird Aerosystems’ multi-sensor integration system (MSIS), which fuses the sensor data.

The MSIS consists of a single twin-screen workstation that enables the operator to control the individual sensors and the communications on one screen, with the other providing the overall situational awareness picture and mission management.

Tablet displays provide tailored views for the mission commander and the pilot. The system can share real-time data with a ground headquarters.

The latest version includes the Ocean Surveillance Control and Reconnaissance (OSCAR) system. This an offline system that supports pre-mission planning by analysing a range of surface tracks from multiple sources, including previous missions, using artificial intelligence to identify performance anomalies and isolate potential targets for investigation during a mission. This allows a more focused approach to maritime surveillance, given that the OSCAR system will suggest the best mission profile to investigate identified targets of interest.

Shaul Mazor, Bird Aerosystems’ vice president for marketing and business development, told Jane’s that a limited version of the OSCAR system is already available and has been considerably enhanced over the past year to enable it to deal with much larger quantities of data.

Mazor said that the CJ4 platform was chosen because it provides extended range and greater speed over some of the other intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms, adding that a jet aircraft is more effective for medium- and long-range tasks while remaining cost-effective.

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[*] posted on 21-7-2018 at 03:48 PM


Airbus Evaluates An A320neo Multi-Mission Version

(Source: Airbus; issued July 20, 2018)



Having made its mark in the commercial airline sector, the A320neo is now being considered by Airbus for new applications: as a highly-capable and cost-effective platform for ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) duties and as a military transport.

The variant – designated A320M3A – would be designed to fulfill a range of ISR roles, particularly maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare. It also can be outfitted with modular roll-on/roll-off payloads for airlift missions ranging from carrying passengers, troops and VIPs to medical evacuation (medevac) and transporting cargo.

Airbus’ consideration of the A320M3A is in response to market demand, spurred by the growing use of more capable ISR systems – which require physically larger host platforms with increased electrical power and more efficient cooling systems than previously were the case for C4ISR aircraft.

A proven, low-risk solution

One of the biggest applications of the A320M3A is for maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare, with countries in Europe and elsewhere seeking replacements for ageing aircraft – many of which will be encouraged to develop fleet commonality driven by the intensive growth of joint operations with member nations of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization).

Advantages in offering the new engine option (NEO) version of Airbus’ A320 commercial jetliner include an extensive capability for growth in a fuselage cross-section that is wider than its competitor in the same size category, the long range and endurance, as well as the lowest operational and life-cycle costs in its class. Other pluses for the A320M3A are the aircraft’s high reliability (proven in airline service), and the resources of an established worldwide supply chain and training network.

The A320M3A also benefits from being a low-risk solution: being based on Airbus’ highly-mature A320 airliner family in high-rate production; and building on the company’s proven capabilities in producing military derivatives of its commercial aircraft – such as the A330 Multi-Role Tanker Transport (MRTT), which is in use by military services around the globe.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 22-7-2018 at 01:59 AM


Translation: Boeing is cleaning up in the MPA space and we want a part of that action



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[*] posted on 22-7-2018 at 02:16 AM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
Translation: Boeing is cleaning up in the MPA space and we want a part of that action

Yep, this should have been out there 5+ years ago...they are talking about it coming in, in the early 2030's...good enough for the French/German requirements but a lot of other countries will have already had to decide years before that.




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[*] posted on 31-7-2018 at 04:02 PM


L3 Shows Multi-mission Conversion of Bombardier Q400

by Chris Pocock - July 26, 2018, 6:52 AM


The L3 Q400 multi-mission aircraft made its international debut at the Farnborough airshow. (Photo: Chris Pocock)

L3 Aerospace Systems flew its Q400 multi-mission aircraft (MMA) demonstrator to the Farnborough Airshow to make its international debut last week. The company has been developing this conversion of the Bombardier twin-turboprop airliner for more than five years. It has identified nine missions that can be performed, ranging from maritime surveillance through ISR to firefighting. There are “several interested customers,” Cliff Henry, senior program manager for airborne multi-mission systems, told AIN.

Henry said that L3 evaluated the ATR42/72 and Airbus C235/C295 turboprops and the Embraer KC-390 jet airlifter before choosing the Q400. The winning criteria included a robust airframe with good climb and cruise performance, plus no need for modifications to the electrical or cooling systems. L3 took delivery of a green airframe from Bombardier as long ago as November 2012, to conduct initial flight tests. The modified MMA demonstrator made its first flight last November.

The prominent, side-fuselage-mounted auxiliary tanks carry 10,000 pounds of fuel to provide an endurance of up to 12 hours but are removable when not required. The under-fuselage mission pod can be reconfigured with a variety of sensors, such as a rotating maritime surveillance radar, a side-looking multimode radar, SIGINT systems, and a line-of-sight datalink.

Alternatively or additionally, ESM/ELINT system antennas can be provided on the rear fuselage. EO/IR sensors can be fitted under the nose and rear fuselage in retractable turrets. There is a wideband satcom antenna above the fuselage and provision for self-protection systems on the fore and aft fuselage. The rear side door can be opened in flight.

Henry noted that L3 already has extensive integration experience with multiple sensors, having previously supplied modified P-3s, business jets, and turboprops to 14 countries.

The standard onboard fit on the Q400 MMA of two operator consoles offers multiple sensor fusion, aircraft flight path control, and built-in datalink management. Up to four more operator positions can be provided.

At Farnborough, the demonstrator was carrying a dummy lightweight torpedo attached to the port auxiliary tank. This indicated L3’s intent to develop anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare options, work on which will begin next January, Henry said.
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[*] posted on 10-8-2018 at 02:51 PM


India’s audit agency questions $2.13B deal with Boeing

By: Vivek Raghuvanshi   10 hours ago


An Indian Navy Boeing P-8I, center, flies in formation with Indian Navy MiG-29K fighters in New Delhi on Jan. 26, 2015. (Tengku Bahar/AFP via Getty Images)

NEW DELHI — India’s audit agency is questioning the decision by the Ministry of Defence to award a $2.13 billion contract to Boeing for eight P8-I Poseidon anti-submarine warfare aircraft in January 2009.

The Comptroller and Auditor General, or CAG, says the MoD awarded the contract to the American firm without the product support cost, while the rival company, CASA, was asked to refurbish the additional cost.

CAG’s audit report, tabled in Parliament on Tuesday, said the “MoD inflated the financial bid of EADS/CASA of Spain to include a 20-year product support cost package for its [maritime version of A-319] aircraft while ignoring this element in respect of Boeing. At a later date, Boeing offered the product support for its [maritime version Boeing 737] aircraft under a separate negotiable contract and consequently the deduced ranking of Boeing, as lowest bidder, or L-1, turned out to be incorrect.”

A spokesperson for Boeing in India declined to comment for this story.

The CAG stated that although a separate product support package was negotiated with Boeing, the overall package for anti-submarine aircraft offered by the company was more expensive than that offered by EADS/CASA.

It also asserted that under the $2.13 billion contract, Boeing was asked to execute offset contracts worth $614.2 million with Indian companies to be completed within seven years, but it has begun this process.

It is mandatory in India for overseas defense companies to discharge offsets — a minimum of 30 percent of the total value of the defense contract inked; the offset obligations can been fulfilled through either transfer of technology, direct purchase of components and systems from Indian defense companies, or creating specific manufacturing facilities and investments in skill, development and training.

Overseas defense companies sometimes find it difficult to find the right Indian partners to execute offset contracts, which can cause a delay in implementation.

CAG has accused Boeing of claiming offset credits on the mere placement of purchase orders, defeating the very purpose of offset obligations.

“Boeing cannot be blamed alone for this," one MoD official said. “Currently there is a huge gap between the filing of claims and award of (offset) credits.”

He added that in the past 10 years, no Indian defense company has won an order against a global tender to make use of the discharge of offsets.

The report also claims that desired critical equipment for the P8-I did not meet the Indian Navy’s requirements. Due to capability limitations of radars installed onboard, the aircraft is unable to achieve the envisaged coverage area requirements, the report explained. Contracts for torpedoes and depth charges, the P-8Is primary offensive weapons against submarines, had yet to be concluded, and therefore the anti-submarine warfare capability of the aircraft could not be fully met, according to CAG.

The report went on to say the MoD had procured sonobuoys in limited numbers, sufficient for only one year instead of three, and not the advanced longer-range version as recommended by the Indian Naval Tactical Evolution Group.

Sonobuoys are air-dropped floating devices that transmit the location of submarines to the ASW aircraft.

Arun Prakash, a retired Indian Navy admiral and former service chief, said past experience has shown that overreach, combined with pedantic hair splitting by CAG — which he accused of not understanding the practical nuances of the issues at hand — inflicts incalculable damage on India’s national security.

A senior Indian Navy official said the P8-I fleet is the mainstay ASW fleet of the service. The Navy currently operates 12 P8-I ASW aircraft, while four more are on order.
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[*] posted on 10-8-2018 at 03:13 PM


Classic example of why Indian Defence procurement remains a clusterfuck...............they issue an RFQ with disparate, unrelated categories and specification requirements to be met, that allow for differing responses and interpretations from each vendor. THEN they do not appear to make any attempt to re-synch the Bids to achieve a common base to allow for an apples for apples evaluation.

This "failure" immediately ALLOWS tossers like CAG to claim favouritism, cheating, blah blah blahhhh.

There is also the fact that the offer by AIRBUS was a massive RISK in both development and capability, more so the former. The A319 ASW aircraft is STILL only a paper aeroplane that has no physical reality or foundation. The same plane was offered to the UK with the same result..........

The other aspects are Operational problems and also endemic to Indian ops and approach to defence.........never buy enough, and cheap enough is good enough irrespective of increased capability offered by the more expensive item(s)........
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[*] posted on 11-8-2018 at 09:25 AM


Plus I love the fact they blame Boeing for the fact that India hasn't bought enough sonobuoys and that the contract for depth charges and torpedoes hasn't been enacted, thus the anti-submarine warfare capability of the aircraft could not be fully met.



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the lips acquire stains,
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It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
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[*] posted on 16-8-2018 at 09:38 AM


Indian P-8 Controversy Threatens Follow-on Buy

by Neelam Mathews - August 15, 2018, 12:26 PM


India's P-8I aircraft feature a magnetic anomaly detector in a tail boom. They replaced Tu-142s with Indian Naval Air Squadron 312. (photo: Boeing)

A desire of the Indian Navy to procure an additional 12 Boeing P-8I maritime patrol aircraft is lying in cold storage following a recent audit report by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), an authority that audits all receipts and expenditure of the government. The report has reprimanded the then-Congress government for ordering an initial eight P-8Is, despite their being priced higher than the competing EADS-CASA (now Airbus Defence and Space) A319. India’s rules state that the lowest price (L-1) equipment has to be considered for procurement.

In 2016, under the present government, India exercised its options for four more P-8Is, the delivery of which starts in 2020.

According to CAG, the financial bid was evaluated with EADS-CASA including a 20-year product support cost, while that for Boeing was not. The contract was concluded for eight P-8Is with Boeing in 2009 for $2.138 billion. “Later, Boeing offered product support under a separate negotiable contract,” said the audit.

An offset contract for $641.26 million (30 percent of the main contract value) signed with Boeing to be completed within seven years—by August 2016—has also not yet been fulfilled. Boeing declined to comment. A senior analyst said on condition of anonymity, “Honoring offsets is never considered seriously by foreign OEMs, many of whom have defaulted. Indian rules are very flexible on this. The government holds 15 percent of the bank guarantee of the contract and also charges a 5 percent penalty [on the cost of offsets]…so why go through the hassle?”

Some offsets were signed. Dynamatic Technologies signed a contract in 2010 with Boeing for the manufacture of cabinets to house critical power and mission equipment for the P-8I program. Boeing also entered into a contract with Tata Advanced Materials, a subsidiary of Tata Industries, in 2016 to source composite interior closeout panels for the P-8 that cover the interior wall structure of the aircraft. Bharat Electronics delivered Data Link II, a communications system, to Boeing for installation.

The discriminator against Boeing’s competitor was "the huge investment the U.S Navy is making…the tremendous range, speed, and the ability to patrol India's large coastline of more than 7,000 km [4,350 miles],” a Navy official told AIN.

However, CAG said the critical role equipment Boeing offers is not fully meeting the needs of the Indian Navy. “Owing to capability limitations of radars installed onboard, the aircraft is not able to achieve the envisaged coverage area requirements.”

EADS-CASA did not follow the development further following the loss of the contract.

There is concern that further procurement will be delayed and commonality will be lost, as has been the case in past military aviation buys. “The current audit system has become a roadblock to progress. Boeing’s P-8 is the world’s best maritime reconnaissance aircraft. By comparing it to CASA, the CAG once again demonstrated its ignorance and incompetence and affected defense preparedness,” said one OEM. Another called it “raising a stink” for no reason and said it is “time to jettison the idiotic notion of L-1 for judging the merits of complex weapon systems.”
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[*] posted on 20-8-2018 at 03:55 PM


Japan in talks to sell patrol plane tech to Germany and France
Exporting homegrown defense equipment remains a key goal for Tokyo


Nikkei staff writers

August 20, 2018 05:25 JST


Japan is in negotiations to export parts and technology used in the P-1 surveillance aircraft built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries. © Reuters

TOKYO -- Aiming to boost defense-related exports, Japan has entered into talks with the German and French governments to provide parts and technology for a patrol aircraft the European countries are developing together.

Germany and France use surveillance planes, mainly to monitor Russian submarines. Less reliant than the archipelago nation of Japan on the aircraft, they have flown older planes. The European duo signed a memorandum of understanding this April to develop a new one to cut costs.

Berlin and Paris are interested in advanced technology used in Kawasaki Heavy Industries' P-1 patrol aircraft, a Japanese government source said. The trio are now discussing which country will be in charge of what, with an eye toward three-way cooperation throughout the development process.

The P-1, used by Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force, is positioned as the successor to Lockheed Martin's P-3C patrol plane used around the world. The P-1 drops a sonic sensor into the water to capture minute sound waves emitted by submarines. The model is well-known for being fuel-efficient and quiet, as well as its ability to fly slowly at low altitudes.

The Japanese government greatly lowered barriers to exporting defense equipment and technology back in April 2014. But companies have failed to secure any overseas contracts for assembled equipment, partly because of the high cost of Japanese products. The P-1 costs about 16 billion yen ($145 million).

"It is important to work toward exporting finished products, but we will also focus on providing specific technologies and parts in response to the other countries' needs," explained an official at the Ministry of Defense here.
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[*] posted on 22-8-2018 at 01:07 PM


RAF P-8A Maritime Patrol Aircraft to be Known as 'Poseidon MRA Mk.1'

Posted On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 18:53

The Royal Air Force announced on its Twitter account that the UK’s new maritime patrol aircraft will be formally known in RAF service as the Poseidon MRA Mk.1.


Artist impression of a Royal Air Force Poseidon MRA Mk.1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft. British MoD image.

"The MRA reflects the types of missions it will undertake – maritime, reconnaissance, attack. Nine Poseidons currently on order will be stationed at RAF Lossiemouth from 2020." the tweet says.

The nine Poseidons will be based at RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson cut the first turf on a £132m facility for the new fleet in April 2018. The new facility will be completed in 2020, to coincide with initial operating capability of the Poseidon aircraft being available in the UK.

Built by Elgin-based Robertson Northern, it will comprise a tactical operations centre, an operational conversion unit, squadron accommodation, training and simulation facilities and a three-bay aircraft hangar.

At the peak of construction, the project will support 200 local jobs. When the fleet is fully operational, some 470 additional service personnel will be based at RAF Lossiemouth, taking the total number of people employed there to 2,200. Further roles are also expected when the training and support services are established at the new facility.


Artist impression of a Royal Air Force Poseidon MRA Mk.1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft. British MoD image.

The U.S. Navy accepted its 50th P-8A Poseidon in January this year. The U.S. Navy P-8A program of record calls for a total requirement for 117 of the 737-based anti-submarine warfare jets. In July 2016, The UK Ministry of Defence confirmed the deal to purchase nine P-8A Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) for the Royal Air Force. The Norwegian Ministry of Defence announced in November 2016 its intent to replace its ageing fleet of six P-3 Orion (four P-3C for ASW & two P-3N for SAR) and its three Dassault DA-20 ECM aircraft with five Boeing P-8A Poseidon MPA. Poseidon is also being fielded with the Indian Navy, the Royal Australian Air Force and has been selected by New Zealand and South Korea.

In may this year, the UK and Norway advanced their plans for international Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) co-operation in the North Atlantic. The allies ramped up discussions around how the nations will work together and might deploy their submarine-hunting aircraft fleet in the future. Areas of co-operation could range from maintenance to training and operations, which would not only cut costs but also boost operational power in the North Atlantic, a key area of submarine activity.

Based on Boeing’s Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8A Poseidon offers advanced anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2018 at 07:16 PM


Ecuador assessing Orion aircraft for territorial surveillance

Alejandro Sanchez, Washington, DC - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 September 2018

Ecuador is evaluating a Lockheed Martin P-3 Orion maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft that the United States has temporarily deployed to the country.

From 6 to 11 September the aircraft will be assessed for monitoring Ecuador’s maritime and land territories to help combat crimes such as drug trafficking and illegal fishing, particularly around the Galapagos Islands’ Exclusive Economic Zone.

The Orion will be operated by its US Customs and Border Protection crew, with Ecuadorian air force and navy personnel onboard. It will be flown out of the ‘Simon Bolivar’ Air Base in Guayaquil.

As well as assessing the aircraft, Ecuador is to be given access to the Cooperative Situational Information Integration system - a US information exchange platform.

(142 of 167 words)
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[*] posted on 8-9-2018 at 07:45 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
RAF P-8A Maritime Patrol Aircraft to be Known as 'Poseidon MRA Mk.1'

Posted On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 18:53

The Royal Air Force announced on its Twitter account that the UK’s new maritime patrol aircraft will be formally known in RAF service as the Poseidon MRA Mk.1.


Artist impression of a Royal Air Force Poseidon MRA Mk.1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft. British MoD image.

"The MRA reflects the types of missions it will undertake – maritime, reconnaissance, attack. Nine Poseidons currently on order will be stationed at RAF Lossiemouth from 2020." the tweet says.

The nine Poseidons will be based at RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson cut the first turf on a £132m facility for the new fleet in April 2018. The new facility will be completed in 2020, to coincide with initial operating capability of the Poseidon aircraft being available in the UK.

Built by Elgin-based Robertson Northern, it will comprise a tactical operations centre, an operational conversion unit, squadron accommodation, training and simulation facilities and a three-bay aircraft hangar.

At the peak of construction, the project will support 200 local jobs. When the fleet is fully operational, some 470 additional service personnel will be based at RAF Lossiemouth, taking the total number of people employed there to 2,200. Further roles are also expected when the training and support services are established at the new facility.


Artist impression of a Royal Air Force Poseidon MRA Mk.1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft. British MoD image.

The U.S. Navy accepted its 50th P-8A Poseidon in January this year. The U.S. Navy P-8A program of record calls for a total requirement for 117 of the 737-based anti-submarine warfare jets. In July 2016, The UK Ministry of Defence confirmed the deal to purchase nine P-8A Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) for the Royal Air Force. The Norwegian Ministry of Defence announced in November 2016 its intent to replace its ageing fleet of six P-3 Orion (four P-3C for ASW & two P-3N for SAR) and its three Dassault DA-20 ECM aircraft with five Boeing P-8A Poseidon MPA. Poseidon is also being fielded with the Indian Navy, the Royal Australian Air Force and has been selected by New Zealand and South Korea.

In may this year, the UK and Norway advanced their plans for international Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) co-operation in the North Atlantic. The allies ramped up discussions around how the nations will work together and might deploy their submarine-hunting aircraft fleet in the future. Areas of co-operation could range from maintenance to training and operations, which would not only cut costs but also boost operational power in the North Atlantic, a key area of submarine activity.

Based on Boeing’s Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8A Poseidon offers advanced anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.


Interesting to see if they buy an anti-ship missile to put on this, even an interim to actually give the entire UK forces their only such current ASM capability... Interesting capability choices for an island nation, eh?

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In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 25-10-2018 at 09:26 AM


The Armed Forces Ministry Orders the Modernization of Six ATL2

(Source: French Armed Forces Ministry; issued Oct 23, 2018)

(Issued in French; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

Armed Forces Minister Florence Parly announced at the Euronaval 2018 show that the Atlantic 2 maritime patrol aircraft will be modernized in depth, to be both more operational and more numerous.

The Directorate General of Armament (DGA) has just ordered the renovation of six Navy Atlantic 2 maritime patrol aircraft. In total, the fleet of refurbished maritime patrol aircraft will consist of eighteen aircraft, all delivered over the period of the 2019-2025 Military Planning Law.

The DGA awarded contracts to Dassault Aviation and Thales on October 11, 2018 for the upgrade of six Atlantic 2 maritime patrol aircraft (ATL2). The upgrade of the first twelve aircraft has already been contracted, so this new order will bring to eighteen upgraded aircraft the French Navy’s Atlantic 2 fleet, instead of the fifteen originally planned.

This increase in the upgraded fleet increases the capacity of the French Navy to counter the underwater threat that is increasing all over the world, and in particular in our areas of strategic interest.

Under DGA project management, the Atlantic 2 upgrade program provides these aircraft with the performance required for their operational missions until their withdrawal from service after 2030.

The modernization of the aircraft focuses on the replacement of certain equipment with digital equipment derived from the best technologies currently available: tactical computer, optronic and acoustic intelligence systems, and radar. In particular, the new radar -Searchmaster- benefits from the active antenna technology developed by Thales for the Rafale.

In addition to the two co-contractors Dassault Aviation and Thales, the project also involves Naval Group for information processing software and the Aeronautical Industry Service (SIAé) of the Ministry of the Armed Forces for the evolution of the visualization consoles as well as other minor modifications.

The delivery of the first two upgraded ATL2s is scheduled for 2019. The Navy will have all the refurbished aircraft available by 2025.

In addition, initial work on the Maritime Airborne Warfare System (MAWS) project are already underway in a Franco-German framework to prepare for the succession of the ATL2.

This project, to be launched by 2025, will provide an autonomous, efficient and sovereign maritime patrol capability in Europe by 2030.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 13-11-2018 at 09:30 AM


DGA Launches Definition Study for Future Maritime Surveillance and Intervention Aircraft

(Source: French defense procurement agency, DGA; issued Nov 09, 2018)

(Unofficial English translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


Dassault has been awarded a contract for the definition study for the French Navy’s new maritime surveillance aircraft, based on the Falcon 2000 LXS bizjet and which will replace the present Falcon 50M and Falcon 200 Gardians now in service. (Dassault photo)

PARIS --- The DGA has awarded Dassault Aviation the detailed definition study of the future surveillance and maritime intervention aircraft of the AVSIMAR (Maritime Surveillance and Response Plane) program.

This contract is part of a global effort to streamline the acquisition and support of specialized military aircraft, based on the design of Dassault Aviation's Falcon series business aircraft.

A first phase of the program has already identified the best technical solution, based on the Falcon 2000 LXS business aircraft, which is faster and more durable than the aircraft currently in service.

The recently awarded study, which has a duration of 12 months, is preparing the acquisition contract planned for 2020. In particular, it must define the necessary adaptations to fulfill the operational missions of surveillance and maritime intervention, which in essence are very varied.

The AVSIMAR program must renew the air component of the French Navy dedicated to the surveillance and intervention for the maritime defense of the territory and the action of the State at sea. This mission is currently performed by 8 Falcon 50M and 5 Falcon 200 Gardian, who will be nearly forty at the time of their replacement. The Falcon 50M has recently distinguished itself by allowing the detection of escaped oil slicks from the two cargo ships colliding off Corsica.

To guarantee the intervention capability of the French Navy, the 2019-2025 military programming law provides for the delivery of the first three aircraft by 2025.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 21-11-2018 at 09:37 PM


UK to procure Friend or Foe Interrogator systems for P-8A Poseidon

By George Allison - November 20, 2018

The US, UK and other P-8A Poseidon operators have ordered a system to verify forces as friendly and determine their bearing and range.

Telephonics Corp has been awarded a $15,130,351 contract for the procurement of a maximum quantity of 50 Identification Friend or Foe Interrogator (IFFI) AN/UPX-43(V) 1 and 50 IFFI mounting trays, repair of repairables and required technical data in support of P-8A Poseidon Production Lots 9, 10, and 11 for the US Navy, partner countries and foreign military sales customers.

The AN/UPX-43, say its manufacturers, is a ‘monopulse and AIMS certified IFF interrogator designed for command and control’.

It enables air traffic controllers and air defenders to identify military and civilian aircraft, verify forces as friendly and determine their bearing and range. The AN/UPX-43 also provides multi-channel Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) and has been deployed in airborne, shipboard and ground-based environments. The system complies with all US and international specifications that define interrogator modes, performance, control, reporting and interface say the company.

“To easily introduce performance upgrades, the system uses common module hardware and software for the detection, interrogation, identification, tracking and data extraction of small targets in severe environments.”

According to a contract notice, work will be performed in Farmingdale, New York, and is expected to be completed in November 2021.

“Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy); and FMS funds in the amount of $3,588,904 will be obligated at time of award; none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The first order combines purchases for the Navy ($2,687,946; 75 percent); and the government of the United Kingdom ($900,958; 25 percent).

This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity (N68335-19-D-0002).”

Systems like this are found on almost all types of military aircraft.
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