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Author: Subject: Maritime Patrol Aircraft part 2
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[*] posted on 5-2-2020 at 07:17 PM


LRASM integration planned for P-8A Poseidon

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Missiles & Rockets

05 February 2020

The US Navy (USN) is moving forward with the integration of the Lockheed Martin AGM-158C Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) on the Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft, and has also revealed plans to integrate a range of additional weapon systems in due course.

In a pre-solicitation notice released on 28 January, the Naval Air Systems Command's (NAVAIR's) Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft programme office (PMA-290) said it was requesting information from industry to "determine potential contractors who have the skills, experience, qualifications, and knowledge required to perform aeromechanical and software integration of [LRASM] onto the P-8A aircraft", adding, "Engineering tasks for this effort includes, but are not limited to upgrades to the Boeing Tactical Open Mission Systems (TOMS) and Stores Management Computer (SMC) software and interfaces, test planning, execution, data reduction, and reporting on flight test efforts."

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[*] posted on 12-2-2020 at 02:33 PM


There’s no shortage of threats in the Southeast Asian seas. So why aren’t residents buying maritime patrol aircraft?

By: Mike Yeo   18 hours ago


A Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force P-3C aircraft releases anti-infrared missile flares. (Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images)

MELBOURNE, Australia — Maritime patrol and maritime surveillance aircraft are a vital tool in ensuring what is known as maritime domain awareness, and they serve as a complementary asset for navies and coast guards protecting their nation’s maritime interests.

The aircraft’s chief advantages are speed and operating altitude, which bestow faster response times in getting to where they are needed, as well as improved sensor performance compared to seagoing vessels.

Maritime domain awareness, or MDA, is defined by the International Maritime Organization as the “effective understanding of anything that could impact the security, safety, economy, or environment” of all areas and things “of, on, under, relating to, adjacent to, or bordering on a sea, ocean, or other navigable waterway.” These include “all maritime-related activities, infrastructure, people, cargo, and vessels and other conveyances.”

In recent years, the issue of MDA in Southeast Asia has received significant attention. The Strait of Malacca and the South China Sea run through the region, and the importance of both waterways to global maritime trade cannot be understated, as they’re the fastest routes through which ships travel from Europe, the Middle East and Africa to the East Asian economic powerhouses of China, Japan and South Korea.

The numbers bear this out. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development estimated that roughly one-third of all global shipping passed through the South China Sea in 2015, while the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that in the same period, 16 million barrels of petroleum and other liquids transited the Strait of Malacca each day.

However, maritime security challenges abound in the waters of this vital route. Disputes over the ownership of potentially resource-rich islands in the South China Sea — involving China and six other regional states — as well as illegal fishing are the most prominent challenges. But they’re not alone.

Modern-day piracy along the Southeast Asian coastline and particularly in the Strait of Malacca is an issue. At its narrowest point in the Phillips Channel of the Singapore Strait, the waterway is about 1.7 miles wide, which, in addition to forcing ships to move slowly, rendering them vulnerable to pirate attacks, creates a natural bottleneck with the potential for collisions and grounding, and thus oil spills.

Elsewhere in the region, tourists to the coastal resorts along the eastern half of Malaysia occasionally become kidnapping victims to gangs that travel by boat from the southern Philippines. Separatist insurgents have also find sanctuary in eastern Malaysia.

Despite the myriad challenges, regional nations have not actively pursued maritime patrol aircraft, or MPA, preferring instead to prioritize other acquisitions in the face of budget requirements.

Singapore, one of the more prosperous regional states, was at one point considered a potential operator of the Boeing P-8A multimission aircraft. It previously sought to acquire a new aircraft type as a replacement for its Fokker 50 twin-engine turboprop aircraft, although that has been put on hold.


Indonesian 1st Lt. Meka Ediyanto, left, uses binoculars alongside Singaporean Master Sgt. Ng Meng Thiam in a Singaporean Fokker 50. (Achmad Ibrahim/AP)

It currently operates a fleet of nine Fokker 50s configured in a mix of MPAs and transports acquired in the 1990s, which it decided against modernizing a few years ago.

Alternatives

Instead of costly, sophisticated aircraft like the P-8A, regional operators are most likely to turn to less complex platforms with an emphasis on the basic maritime surveillance mission.

For example, the Philippines recently accepted refurbished Beechcraft TC-90 aircraft donated by Japan as well as Cessna 208 surveillance aircraft paid for by the U.S. Defense Department under a security assistance program. These aircraft have a lot of the advanced equipment found on other MPAs. The TC-90s are dependent on the eyes of the crew while the Cessnas are fitted with an electro-optical turret to aid surveillance missions.

Malaysia also had a longstanding requirement for a new armed MPA, with that need gaining more attention after the 2016 crash of one of its Beechcraft King Air 200 planes used for maritime surveillance. But a budget crunch means any acquisition effort has been put on ice, and instead Malaysia will likely convert a small number of its Indonesian-built IPTN/CASA CN-235 turboprop transports into maritime surveillance aircraft.


Indonesia operates CASA/IPTN CN-235 aircraft. (Mike Yeo/Staff)

Such a conversion could make the five CN-235s similar to those operated by neighboring Indonesia’s Air Force and Navy, which were modified by Indonesian Aerospace in cooperation with U.S. company Integrated Surveillance and Defense.

And there’s an advantage to these modifications: Having platforms able to perform a number of different missions could be the key for regional nations seeking a versatile MPA option.
Some of Singapore’s Fokker 50 transports, which can be fitted as troop carriers, VIP transports or intelligence-gathering aircraft, can also be converted into an “MPA-lite” configuration by equipping each with a belly radar.

Furthermore, operators of the Airbus C295 Persuader aircraft, such as the Philippines and Vietnam, could realize the advantages of operating a single aircraft type in both transport and MPA roles, given the C295′s MPA variant has sufficient cabin space to act as a transport.

And Lockheed Martin could market its proposed SC-130J Sea Hercules MPA to potential customers looking to also replace their older C-130 Hercules transports. The company’s proposal sees a roll-on/roll-off pallet containing MPA mission systems and operator consoles that could be switched out as needs dictate, allowing the C-130 to swing between the airlifter and MPA roles.

Indeed, amid limited budgets and competing priorities, it may be up to industry to come up solutions to address a market segment that exists, but has yet to be satisfied.
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[*] posted on 12-2-2020 at 02:38 PM


Quote:
There’s no shortage of threats in the Southeast Asian seas. So why aren’t residents buying maritime patrol aircraft?


You answered your own question, Mike...

Because they’re fucking broke, that’s why... They would all love a brand new fleet of armed P-8A’s, or C-295 MPA’s, no-one denies the utility and capability they provide...

But they ain’t got the cash...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 14-2-2020 at 12:10 PM


Singapore air show 2020

Boeing sees P-8’s new capabilities expanding international market

By Garrett Reim, Singapore14 February 2020

Boeing believes possible upgrades to its P-8 maritime patrol aircraft, including the integration of new anti-ship cruise missiles, bombs, sea mines and decoys, among other payloads, could help it increase international sales potential.

The US Naval Air Systems Command solicited potential contractors on 28 January to integrate a variety of weapons on the aircraft via a request for information notice posted online.


Source: Boeing
US Navy’s Boeing P-8A Poseidon


“The capability opportunities for the P-8 are quite endless,” says Tim Flood, senior manager for international sales of commercial derivative aircraft, at the Singapore air show. “So by adding the capabilities, whether it be weapons or new sensors, that opens up that aperture for greater demand.”

The P-8 is based on the commercial 737-800, but its airframe has been ruggedised. That means it wouldn’t take much modification for the aircraft to carry new weapons, especially on its wing pylons, says Flood.

“There’s no real modification required,” he says. “It’s more of an airworthiness certification process.”

Flood declines to say what nations are potential customers in Asia. Boeing is awaiting finalisation of a contract with New Zealand for four examples of the P-8 and another contract with South Korea for six examples.
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[*] posted on 19-2-2020 at 10:44 AM


18 February 2020 News

Leonardo delivers two King Air 350ERs for maritime patrol duties

Leonardo has delivered two King Air 350 extended-range (ER) multi-mission, twin-engine turboprop aircraft with pre-installed surveillance sensors and mission system.

The aircraft have entered service with an undisclosed African Navy. Leonardo has served as the prime contractor and systems integrator for the project.

The mission-ready aircraft has been certified to be airborne by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) are equipped with a fully integrated package with built-in surveillance sensors, including its Seaspray E-scan surveillance radar and ATOS mission system.

The MPAs also feature an Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) transponder and interrogator, Link 11 datalink and third-party electro-optical turret.

They are capable of conducting a range of operations including search and rescue, littoral security, and the monitoring of illegal migration, fishing and pollution.

Leonardo’s E-scan ‘Seaspray’ maritime radar is available in a patented small-target-detection function.

The ATOS mission system augments all the data together into reducing the workload of ‘single tactical picture’ for operators.

ATOS is in operation on-board more than different aircraft types, with more than 60 systems installed on various platforms.

The King Air 350ER is designed and manufactured by Beechcraft Augsburg, a subsidiary of Textron Aviation.

The company noted that its ‘surveillance-ready’ offering has attracted interest from Asia Pacific and the Middle East customers.

The company said in a statement: “Leonardo sees this model as a growth area for the company, with its ability to draw on its broad in-house expertise in sensors, mission systems and platform integration allowing it to offer a tailored, mission-ready aircraft to customers in a cost-effective manner.”
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[*] posted on 25-2-2020 at 07:12 PM


Amid political tumult, Kuala Lumpur edges towards maritime patrol aircraft RFP

By Greg Waldron25 February 2020

Kuala Lumpur is getting close to issuing a request for proposals (RFP) for a new maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), with conversion work pending to convert a pair of CN235 tactical transports to perform maritime surveillance.

The RFP shows an intention to revisit a previous MPA acquisition that was abruptly terminated by the Pakatan Harapan coalition that took power in 2018.


Source: Greg Waldron
The ATR 72MP on static display at the 2017 LIMA show


According to a source familiar with the proposed deal, Kuala Lumpur seeks “five or six” aircraft capable of performing the full MPA mission, with the ability to detect submarines and prosecute them with torpedoes.

The timing of the RFP, however, could be challenged by the 24 February decision of Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad to resign. The decision could result in a tumultuous political situation that in all likelihood will delay military procurements. Still, Kuala Lumpur is clearly waking up to the importance of building its maritime surveillance capabilities.

The RFP is likely to attract interest from companies such as Leonardo, Indonesian Aerospace, and Airbus Defence & Space.

The potential requirement has been a theme of recent editions of the Langkawi Maritime and Aerospace (LIMA) Exhibition.

Leonardo used the 2017 show for the public debut of the ATR 72MP, displaying an Italian Navy version in the static park.

Separately, Indonesian Aerospace (also known as PTDI) will convert a pair of Royal Malaysian Air Force CN235 tactical transports to the maritime surveillance mission.

The work is being funded by the US government under its Maritime Security Initiative, and will be carried out under the Foreign Military Sales programme. It will see a full mission system provided by US firm Integrated Surveillance and Defense (ISD) installed on the two aircraft. This includes operator console, communications equipment, harnesses, and electro-optical infrared (EO/IR) sensor, and a radar.

The work will be undertaken by Indonesian Aerospace, which originally produced the aircraft under licence, in Bandung. The first aircraft will arrive at Indonesian Aerospace in April, the second in May or June. The plan calls for both examples to be ready for year-end. Kuala Lumpur also has an option to convert a third CN235.

The installation mirrors a similar project to convert three Indonesian aircraft (two for the navy and one for the air force) to maritime surveillance assets.
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