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Author: Subject: Future Submarines, part 57
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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 01:56 PM


Iran Unveils 'Cruise-Missile Equipped' Submarine

(Source: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty; issued Feb 17, 2019)


Iran’s new submarine, Fateh, is reported to displace 600 tonnes and is armed with torpedoes, naval mines, and subsurface-launch cruise missiles with a range of about 2,000 kms -- enough to reach Israel and U.S. military bases in the region. (IRNA photo)

According to Iranian state media, President Hassan Rohani has inaugurated a new domestically built submarine armed with cruise missiles, amid heightened tensions with the United States.

"Today, the Islamic Republic of Iran is fully self-reliant on land, air, and sea," Rohani told a launch ceremony in the southern port city of Bandar Abbas.

"Our defensive power is meant to defend our interests and we have never sought to attack any country," he also told the event broadcast live on the state-run Press TV.

Named the Fateh, or Conqueror in English, the submarine is Iran's first in the semi-heavy category, state media reported.

They said that the 600-ton submarine is equipped with torpedoes, naval mines, and subsurface-to-surface cruise missiles with a range of about 2,000 kilometers -- enough to reach Israel and U.S. military bases in the region.

U.S. President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the 2015 nuclear agreement between Tehran and world powers in May last year and imposed biting sanctions on Iran’s economy.

He said the accord was flawed because it did not address Iran's ballistic-missile program or its support for proxies across the Middle East.

The European signatories of the deal remained committed to the pact, which restricted Iran's nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief, but have stepped up criticism of Iran’s missiles program and its meddling in countries in the Middle East.

Tehran has developed a domestic arms industry in the face of international pressure and embargoes that have barred Iran from importing many weapons.

Addressing the ceremony in Bandar Abbas attended by top military officials and cabinet ministers, Rohani said: “Our enemy's pressure and sanctions imposed on Iran have instigated our progress."

"Maybe we would not have this motivation to industrialize our defense sector," Rohani also said, if Iran could just buy the weaponry it needed.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 03:45 PM


Giant submarine baptized in Kiel



In sunshine and spring mood was on Monday in Kiel, the largest ever built in Germany submarine baptized. The wife of Defense Minister Ng Eng Hen from Singapore performed the ceremony after old belly and gave the boat the name "Invincible".

The submarine, which is 70 meters long and weighs around 2,400 tons, is the first of four new naval vessels in the Republic of Singapore . Singapore initially ordered two submarines from ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems in 2013 for around € 1.7 billion. In 2017, an order for two more boats followed.

The boat is the first new construction of the new export type 218, developed by the shipyard in Kiel. The 70 meter long boat has a crew of only 28 soldiers and is also capable of arming with anti-ship missiles.
The propulsion system consists of a propeller and an X-rudder allowing high maneuverability in coastal and shallow waters.

The navies of Indonesia , India and South Korea also already have submarines from Kiel .

http://www.kn-online.de/…/Invincible-Riesen-U-Boot-in-Kiel...

PS: Note the flat-bottomed that it has, which allows it to sit on the seabed waiting for prey.

Via MJ Lawrence on ASEAN forum.............
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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 11:06 PM


Singapore discloses further details of Invincible-class submarines

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

19 February 2019

Key Points

- Singapore has given further details on the capabilities of its new Type 218SG submarines
- The vessels will be equipped with indigenously developed data analytics as well as sense-making systems


A model of the Type 218SG on display at IMDEX 2017. The first-of-class was launched on 18 February 2019. (IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Singapore’s Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) has disclosed further details of its new Type 218SG air-independent propulsion (AIP)-equipped submarines, which have been customised specifically for operations in shallow and congested waters.

The details were revealed in conjunction with the launch ceremony of the first-of-class, which will be known as RSS Invincible once commissioned, on 18 February. Invincible is one of four Type 218SG boats acquired under two separate contracts signed between ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) and the Singapore government in 2013 and 2017.

According to information released by MINDEF, the vessel will have maximum speeds in excess of 15 kt when submerged and 10 kt when dived. The submarine will also displace 2,200 tonnes when submerged and 2,000 tonnes when surfaced. Each boat is armed with eight tubes.

Although not disclosed, these tubes will likely deploy 533 mm torpedoes and other munitions via water-ram discharge devices such as those found on the German Navy’s Type 212A boats, which have been used as a reference for the Type 218SGs.

The vessel will also be able to stay submerged about 50% longer than the Archer (Västergötland) and Challenger (Sjöormen) classes of boat that it will eventually replace, and can “carry a wider range of mission payloads”, said MINDEF.

Given that the Archer and Challenger classes have submerged endurances of between 14 and 21 days respectively, this puts the Independence class’s endurance at about 28–42 days without snorkelling.

In addition, the submarines will be equipped with sense-making and “accelerated decision-making support systems”, which include data analytics and decision support engines that have been developed in-country by Singapore’s Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA).

(324 of 718 words)
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[*] posted on 27-2-2019 at 09:50 PM


Contenders line up for Netherlands replacement submarines

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

27 February 2019

Industry rivals for the Netherlands’ Walrus-class submarine replacement programme have laid out details of their propositions ahead of the government’s release of the all-important ‘B-letter’ that will start the definition phase of the programme.

France’s Naval Group, Navantia in Spain, Saab Kockums of Sweden, and German shipbuilding group thyssenkrupp Marine Systems are all proposing in-country construction of new non-nuclear boats, and promising significant opportunities for Dutch industry consistent with the government’s recently unveiled Defence Industry Strategy (DIS).

Local media reports suggest that Saab Kockums (teamed with Damen) and Naval Group (in partnership with Royal IHC) are set to be shortlisted to participate in the B-phase.

(129 of 1181 words)
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[*] posted on 28-2-2019 at 07:47 PM


Dutch sub program in bed with the Swedes: Would it make any sense?

By: Günther Hoffmann   18 hours ago


The Dutch submarine HNLMS Walrus sits moored to the pier at Submarine Base New London. (John Narewski/U.S. Navy)

The Netherlands’ new batch of submarines may come from the alliance between Dutch and Sweden shipyards. The decision is an attempt to save a dying industry, in a show of solidarity between European Union countries. But investing in Europe while NATO is the main defense provider on the continent is mixing apples and oranges — especially since Sweden isn’t a NATO member.

After many years of loyal service, the small fleet of Walrus-class submarines will soon be retired out of the Dutch Navy. They have served well, despite their old age, and can no longer be extended or upgraded. The new subs will have to be non-nuclear, but top of the line, as the Netherlands expects to keep up the good work it has been providing within NATO operations until now.

In recent years, with the resurrection of Russian military power, an increasing number of incursions into the Baltic Sea, North Sea and Bothnian Sea have been spotted, with the Russians gathering intelligence and re-establishing their blanket of power. The U.K. is no longer able to contain the mountain threat and needs partners inshore (such as the Netherlands), as explained by British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson: “In 2010, a Royal Navy ship was called on just once to respond to Russian Navy ships approaching U.K. territorial waters. Last year we had to respond 33 times.” Dutch submarine crews have done a good job hounding them so far, much to the satisfaction of NATO, and intend to do even better with the new ships.

So far it is rumored that the ships will be built by a consortium including national shipyard Damen, Swedish shipyard Kockums (a division of Saab) and maybe even German partner ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems — if TKMS survives that long. But this arrangement brings about many questions, and leaves observers puzzled.

The first worry to come to mind is technical and industrial. If Damen and Kockums do get the deal, it will indeed represent a breath of fresh air. Kockums hasn’t received an international order since the 1990s, which means that all its experienced engineers are now retired. The future Dutch subs not being nuclear doesn’t make them simple. Indeed, diesel-electrics are not a thing of the past: In fact, their technology is still roaring and developing fast. A long streak with no contracts, or the outright discovery of such technologies, will come with many trials and errors.

This challenge will be further complicated by Kockums’ recent past. After a heinous divorce from German partner TKMS (who would like to get back in the game), Kockums was reacquired by Saab in 2014, under government pressure. New partnership, new technology, new headquarters, low-production capacity: a lot of “ifs” for one of the most complex armament programs to exist.

Of course, the argument of European solidarity does stand. Europe has had the fantasy to tighten its military cooperation for many years, with regular mentions of a European army, even. Given the unlikelihood of such a development in the near future, starting with armament cooperation does make sense. Or does it?

So far, European defense has been an urban legend more than anything else. There has been some level of cooperation, a few experimental tries and even low-intensity military operations. But the fact remains that Europe is indeed well-defended, but not by Europe. NATO has been the cornerstone of European defense for decades and will likely remain so for many more.

Given that Sweden is an EU member, but not a NATO member, doesn’t building a submarine program with the Swedes amount to feeding the wrong horse? The Netherlands should know, as they are themselves very active NATO members, and fully appreciate, as continental defenders, the concept of military sovereignty.

Sovereignty: the keyword in the matter. In the old days, submarines were little more than underwater ships. Practical, indeed, but just another piece on the chessboard. Nowadays, with the evolution of submarine roles and capacities, they are sovereignty vector.

Submersibles now represent a military capacity to strike anywhere in the world, at a small or large scale, and to be everywhere and nowhere: the very definition of power. But sub programs are immensely complex and sensitive. To be successful, their design must be top notch, secret and properly implemented, and the builder must stay alongside the program throughout its life for maintenance, upgrades and troubleshooting.

The Damen-Kockums partnership, on the other hand, amounts to entrusting a foreign, non-NATO, private company, with limited technological command, with the Netherlands’ most valuable sovereignty vector. Kockums’ last order was the Australian Collins class, which was poorly designed and required levels of maintenance which Kockums struggled to provide. And things would probably get even worse in the case of a joint venture with former partner TKMS, who sold three submarines to bankrupt Greece but didn’t bother delivering them, and whose latest warships were thrown out by the German Navy over defects.

The EU is not a military force, nor will it be anytime soon. There is much to be said about intra-European cooperation, but do the Dutch actually want the country’s (and NATO’s) most valuable military asset to be within the hands of a foreign private company that still has everything to prove in its capacity to successfully carry out submarine programs? NATO has been asking European members to ramp up their defense efforts. For one of Europe’s main defenders to keep on defending Europe, it needs submarines that work.

Günther Hoffmann is a former officer of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Since retiring from the service, he has worked as a part-time civil servant for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, acting as an adviser on technological and industrial issues for the Navy.
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[*] posted on 28-2-2019 at 10:46 PM


Is he trying to say the Dutch should build their own boats?, buy Japanese boats, what?




Paddywhackery not included.
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[*] posted on 5-3-2019 at 06:11 PM


Saab Makes Case for Its Offer of New Submarines for Netherlands

(Source: Damen Saab; posted Feb 28, 2019)

Saab and Damen offer to build submarines for the Royal Dutch Navy, to replace the Walrus class, in balanced cooperation between the Netherlands and Sweden.

This is what the project would look like – and how it would benefit the naval industry of the Netherlands.

VIDEO: The new expeditionary submarine: https://youtu.be/OWyHEPjNvGI

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-3-2019 at 08:17 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Mupp  
Is he trying to say the Dutch should build their own boats?, buy Japanese boats, what?


Do not mess with Gunther!!! He will crush you! :smilegrin:





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 8-3-2019 at 10:46 AM


IRGCN commander sets sights on submarines

Jeremy Binnie, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

07 March 2019

The Islamic Revolution Guard Corps Navy (IRGCN) is looking to acquire submarines that are more advanced than Ghadir-class midget boats, the force’s commander, Rear Admiral Ali Reza Tangsiri, told the Tasnim news agency on 3 March.

He said the Fateh or Persian Gulf submarines that are currently being produced might be appropriate.

The first Fateh class was formally commissioned in February, which is said to displace 600 tonnes, compared with the Ghadir’s 125, but this is in service with Iran’s regular navy rather than the IRGCN, which is mainly equipped with small attack boats.

Iranian officials have in the past mentioned a plan to produce an even larger submarine with a displacement of 1,200 tonnes, but this was called the Besat rather than the Persian Gulf (Khalij Fars).

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[*] posted on 9-3-2019 at 02:45 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
Quote: Originally posted by Mupp  
Is he trying to say the Dutch should build their own boats?, buy Japanese boats, what?


Do not mess with Gunther!!! He will crush you! :smilegrin:



Ah....


Quote:

The Submarine Lobby (Source: De Groene Amsterdammer; posted March 06, 2019) (Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com The well-known American defense magazine Defense News has abruptly withdrawn an opinion article about Dutch submarines.

Reason were questions about the author Günther Hoffman and his alleged status as a former naval officer and advisor for the Dutch Ministry of Defense. This mysterious man, unknown to the world, plays a very special role in the rock-hard submarine lobby.

AMSTERDAM --- In an opinion piece entitled “Dutch sub program in bed with the Swedes” (cache), the author makes short work of a number of shipbuilders targeting a multi-billion dollar order for the new Dutch submarine fleet to replace the current Walrus class.




Quote:
In search of this Günther Hoffman, De Groene quickly ended up on a dead end: besides a presenter of the ZDF hit parade, a tax advisor from Oosterhout and a German colonel in the Ardennes offensive, there was no digital footprint of Mr. Hoffman.

Both the Navy and the Ministry of Defense looked at the workforce, the employee system and the e-mail system at the request of De Groene, but they could not find Günther Hoffman “nor anything similar.” The Navy also indicated that it is “not customary” to hire part-time civil servants for advice at this stage.

Inquiries at Defense News and a request to get in touch with Mr. Hoffman resulted in the withdrawal of the article: “we now believe the commentary author is a fraud.”

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/200...


TLDR...Defense news have withdrawn and deleted the article, seems the guy is fake...
:ninja:




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[*] posted on 9-3-2019 at 03:41 PM


Yup, something very strange about all of this. It'll be interesting to see what comes out in the end........................
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[*] posted on 14-3-2019 at 01:29 PM


It’s Easier to Rebuild

(Source: Swedish Armed Forces Ministry FMV; issued March 12, 2019)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

FMV is currently modernizing two submarines in the Gotland class. They are being extended by two meters and many systems are replaced -- among other things, the control and monitoring system is based on the latest digital technology.

First, the boat is cut in the middle, then she is extended by two meters to make the new technology fit. The cut facilitates assembly work, but it is still a complex job to modernize a 25-year-old submarine.

After 25 years of operation, it was time to take a holistic approach and pass a new eye over the two submarines in the Gotland class. Systems and equipment that are obsolete and are considered difficult to keep in operation during the remaining life are upgraded or replaced.

“It is a very extensive work. It is the most comprehensive modernization that has been done on Swedish submarines. We extend by two meters and we convert many systems on board to newer generations. Not only the management and sensor systems, but also the ship systems,” says Andreas Olsson, sub-project leader ship system for the modernization project at FMV.

Several systems installed on the Gotland submarines are the same as those that will be installed on the two new A26 submarines that FMV will deliver to the Armed Forces. The Stirling engines are an example, but there are also passive and active sonars, connection systems and line support systems. And also the new equipment which replaces the old periscope.

From periscope to camcorder

“Simply put, it can be said that the optronic mast is a video camera with many features. You can look at the screens directly and afterwards you can analyze the moving material on a separate console after you have taken down the mast again, under the surface.”

When the crew wants to track the surface, both for safety and for the tactical use of the boat, you send up the mast for a short time, collect the image material and then analyze them afterwards.

The air-independent Stirling engine has been in the Swedish submarines for 30 years. The basic principle is still the same, but around it has happened a lot.

“We have upgraded it with digital control system, a new generator and better recycling of the residual heat in the exhaust to produce hot water for the crew’s comfort on board,” says Andreas Olsson.

Integration is crucial

“I usually say that it is always more difficult to modernize boats than to build new ones. But modernization is what we do, we are rebuilding old and introducing new technology. And it is a great challenge to take care of the old boat with the new systems.”

On board the submarine there are a variety of systems, such as ship systems that produce compressed air, cooling and hydraulics and which supply many other systems on board. There are both open systems and secret systems and the systems talk to each other.

“The biggest challenge is the integration of all systems. That we switch to digital monitoring systems and that the systems are dependent on each other makes the integration crucial,” says Andreas Olsson.

Three steps ensure quality

FMV's design requirements are verified early in the process by checking drawings, specifications and more. After the systems have been installed on board, the verification takes place in two steps. Partly that they are installed as it is intended purely physically, some performance requirements that can be tested at quay. And finally, verification at sea with the conditions prevailing there and then tested how the submarine works as a whole.

The first of the two modified Gotland submarines is now conducting test tours where FMV ensures that the subsystems and submarine meet the specification agreed with the supplier, but also that the submarine is tested in its tactical utilization, including torpedo firing and submarine hunting together with other units. Then, you really test the submarine and see that it works as it is supposed to.

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[*] posted on 14-3-2019 at 03:30 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
It’s Easier to Rebuild

(Source: Swedish Armed Forces Ministry FMV; issued March 12, 2019)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)

FMV is currently modernizing two submarines in the Gotland class. They are being extended by two meters and many systems are replaced -- among other things, the control and monitoring system is based on the latest digital technology.

First, the boat is cut in the middle, then she is extended by two meters to make the new technology fit. The cut facilitates assembly work, but it is still a complex job to modernize a 25-year-old submarine.

They should be really, really careful with their welding. ;)
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[*] posted on 10-4-2019 at 04:50 PM


N. Korea 'Building New Ballistic Missile Submarine' (excerpt)

(Source: Digital Chosun; posted April 05, 2019)

By Yang Seung-sik, Yu Yong-weon

North Korea is building a new 3,000-ton submarine capable of launching ballistic missiles, a senior military spokesman here said Thursday.

"A large quantity of components presumably needed to build a 3,000-ton sub, which the North has been developing, have turned up recently at a shipyard in Sinpo, South Hamgyong Province," the spokesman said. "We've also spotted a floating dock deployed off Sinpo, apparently for a missile test."

Google Earth satellite imagery from March 2 shows piles of cylindrical components and materials presumed to be submarine bulkheads at the shipyard. None of them can be seen in satellite imagery from August last year.

Pictures also show that the facilities are well-maintained there and the floating dock, which was previously moored at the pier, is now floating offshore. "This suggests that the North has kept building a new sub and testing a submarine-launched ballistic missile," he said.

Construction seems to have been going on even as North Korea was in denuclearization talks with the U.S. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Chosun website.

http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2019/04/05/2019...

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[*] posted on 15-4-2019 at 10:33 PM


Dutch Cabinet Putting Off Decision on Submarines

(Source: Defense-Aerospace.com; posted April 15, 2019)

The Rutte Cabinet has been putting off the decision on four new submarines for weeks, and is avoiding a choice between Dutch or French boats. At the end of last year, the Cabinet decided in the Defense Industry Strategy to prioritize its own industry, just like other European countries do. But when it comes to actual decisions, the ministers dont dare offend Paris, Elsevier newsweekly reported Saturday.

Apparently, the government is afraid of a new confrontation with the government of President Emmanuel Macron after the earlier dispute about the shares of Air France / KLM. To the anger of the French, CDA Minister of Finance Wopke Hoekstra quietly acquired a 14 percent stake in the airline company six weeks ago, to get as much control over investment decisions as the French government. The minister called this a matter of national importance.

Replacement of current submarines is 2.5 to 3.5 billion euros

The replacement of the Dutch Navys current Walrus-class submarines involves big money. "More than 2.5 billion euros," as officially stated. Sources around the Ministry of Defense are talking about 3.5 billion euros, said Elsevier. Prime Minister Mark Rutte (VVD) says that we will simply buy the best kit for the best price. But its not that simple. National interests also play a role here: technological know-how, the continued existence of national naval construction, and a Dutch Royal Navy that is not dependent on what foreign arms producers are allowed to deliver.

The new submarines do not yet exist, but have yet to be developed. A German and a Spanish shipyard are also competing for the order, but insiders told Elsevier it has come to a contest between Frances Naval Group (in collaboration with the Dutch Royal IHC) and Damen Schelde (jointly with Swedens Saab).

The expectation was that VVD State Secretary Barbara Visser would send a so-called B letter to parliament in March, announcing the industrial project and, in particular, the model that the Defense Ministry had chosen. But the case was delayed. In an official porch of the Council of Ministers, defense officials recently pushed for a decision in favor of Damen, but according to sources officials from other ministries were bothered. As a way to lower the price, it was suggested that Damen and Naval could compete with each other for a few more years. And, anyway, it was diplomatically difficult to pass over the French yard, after all the fuss about the Air France / KLM shares.

Eight years for the development and construction of new submarines is very short

The four new submarines must be put into service from 2027. That seems like forever, but eight years is very short for developing and building a new type. With their hundreds of thousands of parts, submarines are extremely complicated.

The four current submarines have been in service for around thirty years. Their sensors have been modernized a few times, but the diesel-electric drive will be worn out in about eight years, and then you cannot call the ANWB while on a secret mission off the coast of Syria or in the Persian Gulf to come and tinker. That is why time is running out, and in naval circles people are waiting for the cabinet to make the decision.

Submarines are by definition secret and so you rarely hear anything about them. This raises the question why the Netherlands should actually have them. But the cabinet has no doubt about it: The four boats of the Walrus class, with their torpedoes, are the most powerful weapon of the armed forces. They can sink an aircraft carrier. But especially as an espionage platform, Zr Ms Walrus, Zeeleeuw, Dolfijn and Bruinvis have proven their worth.

Some NATO allies have large nuclear submarines that they use to navigate the oceans or they have small submarines that only operate in shallow waters close to home. The Walrus class is in between: the four boats can spy unseen and silently in shallow coastal waters at up to 6,000 kilometers from [the main Dutch naval base at] Den Helder. In exchange for this information, in recent years the Netherlands has received information from friendly countries that could protect its own soldiers and population.

"The intelligence world is and remains a barter trade where you only get something if you have something to offer yourself," says a source. In short, with that billion-dollar decision for new submarines, The Hague will be buying safety for the coming decades.

Damen Scheldewerf in Vlissingen is the preferred supplier

In defense circles there is a preference for Damen Scheldewerf in Vlissingen as a supplier. In this way the Netherlands can maintain its own naval shipbuilding. To be able to continue to innovate, the government must act as the first customer. Damen also provides export possibilities of the new submarine type in the long term.

The Naval Group builds - compared to Damen many more submarines, especially for the French navy. It wants to supply the Netherlands with a variant of the Barracuda nuclear-powered submarine. However, this type is larger and, according to insiders, less silent than what Damen could deliver.

Next week the issue will be discussed in a meeting between the ministers that are directly involved: the prime minister and his ministers and state secretaries of Defense, Foreign Affairs, Economic Affairs and Finance.

The signs are that they will not make a definitive choice for Damen de Schelde for the time being, Elsevier concluded.

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[*] posted on 16-4-2019 at 08:27 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Dutch Cabinet Putting Off Decision on Submarines

Eight years for the development and construction of new submarines is very short

The four new submarines must be put into service from 2027. That seems like forever, but eight years is very short for developing and building a new type....



Absolutely! World's best practice (Australia) dictates that even a design derived from an existing submarine should take no less than 18 years. :no:
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[*] posted on 16-4-2019 at 03:15 PM


Interesting comment, if true

It wants to supply the Netherlands with a variant of the Barracuda nuclear-powered submarine. However, this type is larger and, according to insiders, less silent than what Damen could deliver.





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the lips acquire stains,
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[*] posted on 16-4-2019 at 03:39 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
Interesting comment, if true

It wants to supply the Netherlands with a variant of the Barracuda nuclear-powered submarine. However, this type is larger and, according to insiders, less silent than what Damen could deliver.



I think you can be sure that the quietest submarine will always be be the one that doesn't exist. ;)
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[*] posted on 18-4-2019 at 08:53 PM


Turkey positions Type 209, 214 submarines for Indonesias third Nagapasa batch

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

18 April 2019


A computer-generated image of the Type 214 submarine, one of two boat types discussed in STM's presentation to the Indonesian Navy in February 2019. Source: TKMS

Key Points

- Turkey's STM has made a presentation on its Type 209 and Type 214 boats to the Indonesian Navy
- The service has further requirements for at least four more submarines beyond 2024

Turkish naval shipbuilder Savunma Teknolojileri Mhendislik ve Ticaret (STM) has made a formal presentation on its Type 214 and Type 209 submarine designs to senior Indonesian Navy (Tentara Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Laut: TNI-AL) officials, with the intention of eventually offering the boats for Jakarta's further submarine requirements.

The presentation was made at the Neptunus Building within the TNI-AL's headquarters in Cilangkap, East Jakarta, on 12 February 2019, according to de-classified meeting documents that have been provided to Jane's . Also present during the meeting were STM's local representative in Indonesia, PT Cipta Citra Perkasa, and the crew of Indonesia's second Nagapasa-class submarine, KRI Ardadedali (404).

Indonesia signed a contract for its first batch of three Type 209/1400 Nagapasa-class submarines with South Korea's Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) in 2011. Two of the vessels acquired under this batch, KRI Nagapasa (403), and Ardadedali , have been commissioned, while a third boat, Alugoro (405), was launched on 11 April 2019.

A day later Jakarta signed a contract for a second batch of Type 209/1400 submarines with DSME. This batch will bring Indonesia's fleet of submarines to eight by 2024, when including its pair of German-built Cakra-class boats that were commissioned in the early 1980s. This fleet strength is line with the revised objectives found in the Indonesian Armed Forces' modernisation blueprint known as Minimum Essential Force (MEF).

However, beyond 2024 Indonesian naval planners maintain the requirement for a total submarine fleet strength of 12 to adequately defend its vast archipelago. This means Jakarta could eventually acquire up to four vessels under its third submarine acquisition programme.

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[*] posted on 1-5-2019 at 07:39 PM


German, Norwegian officials huddle over joint submarine program

By: Sebastian Sprenger   16 hours ago


A sketch of the 212CD design, which Norway has decided to procure. (ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems via the Norwegian Ministry of Defence)

COLOGNE, Germany Senior German and Norwegian defense officials met in Munich on Monday to plot a path for the two countries multibillion-dollar joint submarine program.

Officials said the meeting by the naval chiefs and defense-acquisition leaders was meant to push toward an agreement on the timing, cost and performance characteristics of the 212-CD program. The plan, these officials said, is to have the program on contract with lead vendor ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems in 2020, with the first vessel delivered to Norway in late 2026.

A deal with the German shipyard was previously envisioned for this year.

The design of the new boats has yet to be locked down, which may reflect a last glimmer of hope in Berlin and Oslo that other countries in the market for submarines namely Italy, the Netherlands or Poland could join the effort.

Germany and Norway inked a strategic cooperation agreement on submarines in 2017. The idea is for TKMS to produce six identical boats two for Germany and four for Norway. Norwegian missile-maker Kongsberg, in turn, will outfit German Navy ships with an upgraded variant of its Naval Strike Missile.

The stakes are high for the program, as any delays in fielding the submarines would throw off military plans in either country. The German Navy has seen years of delays in its F-125 frigate program. According to the service, an industry consortium led by TKMS is to blame.

The German military, which is seeking a budget boost beyond what is on the books so far, is under pressure to field equipment on time and on budget. The idea is to prove that the defense-acquisition apparatus can convert additional money into additional capability. As a result, officials are increasingly tight-lipped about details surrounding big-ticket projects beyond rosy statements.

After a successful meeting: We are convinced that we want to make #U212CD a success story, German Navy chief Vice Adm. Andreas Krause wrote on Twitter late Monday. We will act and speak as if we were ONE Navy. Both navies need the new submarines delivered in time, cost and quality. Everyone involved in this project should never forget its relevance.

Sebastian Bruns, a naval analyst with the University of Kiel in northern Germany, said the interplay between the German and Norwegian defense bureaucracies will be crucial as the program progresses.

This type of integrated process is new for Germany, Bruns told Defense News. That is because everything from spare parts to training and operational aspects is designed to be bilateral from the start, possibly tying the two sea services together for decades.

We are talking about a time frame through the 2060s, he said.

Bruns added that questions remain about Germanys future defense budget and whether the submarine program will have to compete with other national priorities.

According to a Navy spokesman, the program is reflected in the Defence Ministrys broad budget outlines. Lawmakers are expected to get details for debate next year.
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[*] posted on 3-5-2019 at 01:41 PM


Dutch keep Walrus submarine race going for a bit longer

By: Sebastian Sprenger   9 hours ago


The Dutch Walrus-class submarine Bruinvis is docked in the port of Tallinn on Oct. 18, 2014. The Royal Netherlands Navy plans to replace the four-boat series in a hotly contested contract competition. (Pjotr Mahhonin via Wikimedia)

COLOGNE, Germany The Dutch government has postponed a supplier decision to replace its four Walrus submarines, telling parliament that further study of the issue is needed until the summer.

The development, announced in a letter late last month by State Secretary for Defence Barbara Visser, comes as some expected a decision this spring. Government officials now say they need more time to study the competitors latest offers related to domestic industry participation in their proposals.

The companies vying for the multibillion-dollar Walrus contract are Naval Group of France, Navantia of Spain, Saabs Kockums of Sweden, and ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems of Germany.

The additional study follows attempts by competitors to tweak their proposals in light of a new Dutch defense industry strategy released in November. That document prescribes that the production of maritime platforms remain mostly a national affair, with roughly 25 percent of projects sourced from international collaborations.

The Netherlands has the ambition to design and produce certain military capabilities itself, reads a summary of the strategy document. In doing so, we will take into account the industries that are already present in the Netherlands as well as the countrys capacity and possible limitations. What does this mean in concrete terms? We want to preserve and strengthen our naval shipbuilding industry, for example.

Saabs Kockums team, which includes Dutch shipyard Damen, has touted its emphasis on domestic industry work share, though competitor TKMS made a last-ditch effort earlier this year to trumpet a proposed Dutch production footprint if chosen.

According to local media, that strategy appeared to fall on deaf ears, with one newspaper reporting in February how one TKMS executive was led to believe his company was out of the running.

Vissers letter, however, makes clear that all four competitors are still in the field and subject to the additional industrial analysis. The vendor decision, known as the B-letter in Dutch defense procurement circles, is expected around the summer, she wrote. Also expected then are decisions on the number of boats and the budget, she added.
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[*] posted on 7-5-2019 at 02:23 PM


Naming and Launching of Third Egyptian Submarine Made in Germany

(Source: ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems; issued May 03, 2019)


The third of four Type 209/1400mod submarines being built by ThyssenKrupp Marine System for the Egyptian Navy was officially named S-43 and launched on May 3 in Kiel, Germany, and will now undergo sea trials. (TMKS photo)

The third of four 209/1400mod class submarines for the Navy of the Arab Republic of Egypt was named and launched on May3,2019 at the shipyard of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems in Kiel. As part of the ceremony, Vice Admiral Ahmed Khaled, Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Navy, officially named the boat S43.

The boat will now be intensively tested. Dr. Rolf Wirtz, CEO of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems: This significant milestone in the construction program for the Egyptian Navy is based on an open and trusting dialogue with our customer as well as the competence of our employees and suppliers. These are key factors on our successful way to become Europe's most modern naval company.

The contract for the delivery of the first two 209/1400mod class submarines to the Arab Republic of Egypt was signed in 2011. In 2015, Egypt decided to take the option for two additional units of the most recent version of the class 209 "family": A compact submarine featuring reliability, high combat strength, long submerged range, high submerged speeds, low signatures and excellent handling characteristics.

The first submarine, named S41, was handed over in December 2016and the second submarine, named S42, in August 2017. The program is planned to end with the handover of the fourth boat in 2021.

Key data for the S43:
-- Length o.a. approx. 62 m
-- Pressure hull diameter approx. 6.2 m
-- Surface displacement approx. 1,450 t
-- Dived displacement approx. 1,600 t
-- Crew 30

ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems is one of the worlds leading system suppliers for submarines and naval surface vessels as well as for maritime security technologies. The company has a history of naval shipbuilding that dates back centuries and offers state-of-the-art technologies, innovations and extensive and dependable services to customers around the world. With its Operating Units Submarines, Surface Vessels, Naval Electronic Systems and Services, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems is part of the ThyssenKrupp Group.

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[*] posted on 14-5-2019 at 09:31 AM


Taiwan Breaks Ground to Build Its Own Submarines (excerpt)

(Source: Los Angeles Times; published May 12, 2019)

By Ralph Jennings

TAIPEI, Taiwan --- Taiwans major shipbuilder has broken ground on a factory aimed at producing submarines to blunt threats from China while easing dependence on politically sensitive arms sales from the West.

Shipbuilder CSBC Corp. Taiwan will work with the Taiwanese navy to initially develop a $3.3-billion submarine at the factory in the southern port city Kaohsiung, scheduled to be completed next year after last weeks groundbreaking. A prototype of the diesel-electric submarine, a first for Taiwan, is due as early as 2024.

Taiwans aging fleet of four submarines, two from the United States and two from the Netherlands, cannot keep up with the military modernization of China, only 100 miles away across a narrow strait.

/

The submarines will not only enhance the navys asymmetric fighting ability, but to deploy them in waters to our islands southwest and northeast can make us more effective in deterring enemy ships from surrounding Taiwan, President Tsai Ing-wen said Thursday at the groundbreaking ceremony.

To produce our own is the only route to take, she said. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the LA Times website.

https://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-taiwan-china-submarines-...

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[*] posted on 14-5-2019 at 01:27 PM


With what design I wonder....



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
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[*] posted on 18-5-2019 at 11:34 AM


IMDEX 2019: Saab displays A26 AIP submarine scale models

POSTED ON THURSDAY, 16 MAY 2019 15:18

The Swedish Navys two new A26 submarines will be named HSwMS Blekinge and HSwMS Skne. The names of the two new submarines were approved by Swedish king Carl XVI Gustaf, according to the Swedish Navy ship naming tradition, the defense ministry said. The ministry further said that the first submarine would be delivered in 2024, and the second one in 2025. HSwMS Blekinge was originally scheduled to be delivered in 2022.


A26 submarine project (Picture source: Saab)

Saab Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP) submarines can remain submerged for longer periods of time, allowing a large range of missions in both peace and wartime. To meet diverse, international requirements across an extraordinary spectrum of missions, Saab offers conventional submarines that address three market segments: Pelagic, Oceanic and Oceanic Extended Range (ER). Each segment represents a technological achievement. By combining a unique range of capabilities, state-of-the-art stealth technology, Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP), high endurance, versatile combat system suite and various weapons, Saab has created a shock-resistant, modular submarine designed for maximum operational flexibility. Saab submarines are designed for operational interoperability with other organisations and stakeholders, both military and civilian.

The A26 air-independent propulsion submarines are being built by Swedish defense contractor Saab Kockums under a SEK8.6 billion (aprox. USD 950m) from 2015. Construction on the first submarine started in September 2015, according to a Saab announcement.

Saab offers three A26 variants of different lengths and displacements, based on mission requirements. The smallest is the 50-meter Pelagic version which has an AIP endurance of 20 days. Next is the Oceanic version which measures 65 meters in length with an endurance of over 30 days. The largest Extended Range model is over 80 meters long and has a range of over 10,000 nautical miles, according to the company.

The A26 built for Sweden will replace the current Gotland-class submarines, the first of which recently completed a mid-life upgrade receiving a two-meter hull extension to accommodate upgrades and new technologies that will be used in A26 boats.

The A26 will be capable of fielding missiles in addition to the traditional load of mines and torpedoes. The new design will also feature what Saab refers to as the Multi-Mission Portal, a special forces launcher placed next to the torpedo tubes in the nose of the boat would allow divers to swim out horizontally. The portal will be wide enough for the launch and retrieval of diverse mission payloads such as manned and unmanned vehicles.


A26 submarine project model showcased at IMDEX 2019 (Picture source: Navy Recognition)
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