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Author: Subject: Future Submarines, part 57
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[*] posted on 20-5-2019 at 09:10 PM


Siemens unveils new FLEX PM modular submarine propulsion motors

Alex Pape, Stockholm - Jane's International Defence Review

20 May 2019

Siemens premiered its new generation of modular scalable permanent magnet submarine propulsion motors at the Underwater Defence Technology (UDT) 2019 exhibition in Stockholm.

To provide solutions across a wider range of applications, Siemens is evolving its Permasyn permanent magnet compact submarine propulsion motor.

The current Permasyn offering is available with ratings of approximately 2 MW and 4 MW, and has to date been used on Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems' Type 212A and Type 214 submarine designs, with the first motor delivered for installation in 2000.

Several years ago, the company sought to develop a new, larger motor in the 6 MW class.

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[*] posted on 14-6-2019 at 03:55 AM


Status Submarine Project

(Source: Norwegian Ministry of Defence; issued June 12, 2019)

A thorough evaluation of the offer form tkMS has been finalised, and the process towards the shipyard has entered a new phase.

The procurement agencies, Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency (NDMA) in Norway and Bundesamt für Ausrüstnung, Informationstechnik und Nutzung der Bundeswehr (BAAINBw) in Germany, have conducted a thorough evaluation of the offer from tkMS, and have now entered into a new and challenging phase which involves a comprehensive dialogue with the shipyard.

“Norway and Germany aim at having an agreed upon contract ready by the end of 2019, with a signature date in the first half of 2020, and delivery from 2026 and onwards. The agreements regarding industrial cooperation will signed in parallel with the submarine contract,” states Defence Minister Frank Bakke Jensen.

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[*] posted on 17-6-2019 at 08:12 PM


South Korea’s first KSS-3 submarine begins sea trials

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

17 June 2019


South Korea’s first KSS-3 submarine, seen here at its ceremonial launch in September 2018. Source: Republic of Korea Navy

Key Points

- South Korea has begun sea trials for its first KSS-3 diesel-electric submarine
- The Republic of Korea Navy is on track to receive the land-attack cruise missile-capable vessel by 2020

South Korea's Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) has begun initial sea trials for the country's first KSS-3 diesel-electric submarine (SSK), an industry source close to the matter has confirmed with Jane's.

The vessel, Dosan Ahn Chang-ho, began the trials during the week of 10 June, and these involved mainly tests of the vessel's propulsion systems and steering equipment. The latter included validations carried out remotely from the bridge and manually from the submarine's aft section, the source added.

Dosan Ahn Chang-ho is the first of three KSS-3 submarines ordered for the Republic of Korea Navy (RoKN). The keel for the vessel was laid down in May 2016 and the SSK was ceremoniously launched by DSME in September 2018.

The submarine has an overall length of 83.5 m, an overall beam of 7.7 m, and a hull draught of 7.62 m. It displaces approximately 3,400 tonnes when surfaced, 3,800 tonnes when dived, and can accommodate a crew of 50. The SSK is air-independent propulsion-capable, and has a top speed of 20 kt when dived, 11 kt when surfaced, and a standard surfaced range of 10,000 n miles (18,520 km) at 8 kt.

The boat is equipped with eight 533 mm tubes that are capable of deploying an improved version of the Baek Sang Eo (White Shark) heavyweight torpedo from local company LIG NEX, and six vertical launching system tubes that can launch land-attack cruise missiles such as the Cheong Ryong.

The submarine will be equipped with the Weapon Handling Launch System from Babcock, and a locally developed submarine combat system from Hanwha Systems.

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[*] posted on 18-6-2019 at 09:06 PM


Sweden set to test ‘Double Stirling’ AIP plant

Richard Scott, London - Jane's International Defence Review

17 June 2019

Saab Kockums and Sweden's Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) are preparing to begin testing of a prototype 'Double Stirling' air-independent propulsion (AIP) system aimed at a nascent Swedish future submarine programme.

The 150 kW module, which occupies the same footprint as the original 75 kW Type A19 Gotland-class installation, represents the fifth generation of Stirling cycle AIP to be developed for Swedish submarines.

Saab Kockums' Stirling engines burn oxygen (stored in liquid form [LOX] in cryogenic tanks) and diesel fuel in a pressurised combustion chamber to generate electricity for propulsion or for charging batteries within a conventional diesel-electric plant.

The company has iteratively developed Stirling AIP technology since testing a prototype plant that went to sea in 1989; the latest Mk 4 version was refitted to HMS Gotland and HMS Uppland as part of the Gotland-class mid-life update (MLU).

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[*] posted on 20-6-2019 at 09:10 PM


Sweden’s second upgraded Gotland submarine returns to the water

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

20 June 2019

The second Royal Swedish Navy (RSwN) A19 Gotland-class submarine to undergo a mid-life upgrade (MLU) has been relaunched by Saab's Kockums business.


Sweden's second upgraded Gotland submarine, HMS Uppland, was relaunched at Saab Kockum's Karlskrona facility on 19 June. (Saab)

HMS Uppland was lowered from the shiplift at the company's Karlskrona facility on 19 June. The milestone occurred 12 months after the relaunch of sister boat HMS Gotland .

Sweden's Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) awarded Saab Kockums a SEK 2.1 billion (USD220.5 million) contract in June 2015 for the upgrade of two of the RSwN's three Gotland-class submarines. Combining a major platform overhaul with a substantial modernisation package, the MLU Gotland programme will allow Gotland and Uppland to remain in service until at least 2030.

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[*] posted on 26-6-2019 at 03:15 PM


Taking a Closer Look at Japan's Futuristic Attack Submarine

The sleek underwater warship will ensure the country is defended by the best non-nuclear submarines around.

By Kyle Mizokami

Jun 25, 2019



Japan has unveiled what is very likely the design for its next-generation attack submarine. The 29SS submarines would replace the existing Sōryū class submarines starting in the early 2030s. The futuristic undersea warship will ensure that Tokyo retains its reputation for the quietest, most modern non-nuclear submarines in the world.


A Sōryū class submarine anchored at the naval base at Kure, Japan. Note x-shaped stern planes emerging from the water at a 45 degree angle.

One of the largest submarine powers in the world is a country that technically doesn’t even have a navy: Japan. Japan’s Maritime Self Defense Force has over twenty diesel electric submarines that are considered the finest in the world. The current Sōryū class is a large, quiet submarine equipped with extensive soundproofing, automated combat systems, and an air-independent propulsion system that allows the submarine to operate for weeks without surfacing. Last year Japan upgraded the class by installing large banks of lithium-ion batteries as a quiet source of power.

The Sōryū class is relatively young: the first sub was launched in 2009, and in many navies it’s difficult to imagine work already proceeding on a replacement. Japan however typically keeps its submarines in service for just twenty years, a relatively short time for modern warships. So it’s not exactly surprising that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, one of Japan’s top submarine builders, has already unveiled the country’s next-generation submarine design, designated 29SS. The sub due in the late-2020s. (The designation “29SS” is derived from the 29th year of the reign of Emperor Akihito, otherwise known to everyone else as 2017, and SS is the international shorthand for non-nuclear attack submarine.)

Noted submarine authority H.I. Sutton says 29SS is a "new design...based on the Sōryū class with its distinctive bow form and hull outline, but [it] differs significantly in the sail and hydroplane arrangement."

29SS retains the general hull form of earlier submarines but with some important changes. The sail is substantially reduced and blended into the hull, which should reduce hydrodynamic drag. This will make the submarine quieter, perhaps a little faster, but also more energy efficient. Non-nuclear powered submarines, operating underwater under combat conditions, must carefully manage their power or risk being forced to surface. The dive planes have also been moved from what’s left of the sail to the hull.


Depiction of 29SS submarine.
H.I. Sutton/Covert Shores

29SS also features a pumpjet instead of the traditional propeller for propulsion. Unlike traditional propellers, which use unshrouded blades to churn through the water, a pumpjet sucks in water and ejects it under pressure from the rear of the pumpjet. Pumpjets are quieter and more maneuverable than bare propellers and are generally used on faster, nuclear-powered submarines.

Although Japan will likely not field a nuclear-powered ship anytime soon alternate propulsion systems, such as all-electric drives, could provide a speed boost.

“After the Second World War there was a hiatus in Japanese submarine building," H.I. Sutton told Popular Mechanics. "When it resumed it was heavily influenced by American submarines, but over time Japan has gone its own way in submarine design.”

"Modern Japanese submarines have a reputation for sophistication, pioneering the application of new technologies, like lithium-ion batteries."

"The new submarine design, says Sutton, "focuses on improving the actual fabric of the submarine and shows that the Japanese navy will continue pushing the by building highly capable submarines which are arguably the best non-nuclear submarines in the world."


MHI concept art for 29SS submarine.
Twitter

29SS will likely retain the same armament as the Sōryū boats, which consists of six bow-mounted 533-millimeter torpedo tubes. The submarine can carry up to thirty torpedo-launched weapons, a mixture of the Type 89 heavyweight torpedo and the Sub Harpoon anti-ship missile. Although there is a general trend towards installing vertical launch silos behind a submarine’s sail, Japan does not have the missiles to fill them.

The research and development phase will take place from 2025 to 2028, and the first ship of this class will probably hit the water around 2031.
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[*] posted on 13-7-2019 at 08:15 PM


France and Australia are working on the same sub, but they’ll be powered differently

By: Christina Mackenzie   14 hours ago

CHERBOURG, France — The presence of Australia’s defense minister and the director general of future submarines at Friday’s launch of France’s Suffren, the first-in-class Barracuda nuclear-powered attack submarine, has sent a strong signal that France considers Australia a critical partner in the project.
In his speech at the launch ceremony in Cherbourg, Normandy, French President Emmanuel Macron stressed that “France will be by Australia’s side to accompany it for the duration of this contract, which sealed an essential alliance between our two nations.” Australia has bought 12 of these subs.

The Australian ships will be conventionally powered, as the country does not have a nuclear energy program and thus does not have the know-how to implement atomic power in a submarine. This will mean design changes to allow for a different engine type. It also means Australia’s submarines will not have the capacity to remain submerged for up to 70 days nonstop as the French one can.

Naval Group’s chief executive, Hervé Guillou, said he had “zero worries” about the ability to deliver a conventionally powered submarine to Australia, given the group’s extensive experience. “Every day a conventionally powered Naval Group submarine is sailing somewhere in the world,” he told reporters, adding that those sold to Brazil, Malaysia, Chile, Pakistan and India were all conventionally powered.

The launch also served as an opportunity for Naval Group to talk about its agreement with Dutch company Royal IHC. The two are preparing a joint bid for the Netherlands’ program to replace its four 30-year-old Walrus-class submarines.

The kingdom’s recent Defence Industry Strategy specifies that, whenever possible, the government should “buy Dutch,” so that any shipyard interested in bidding must partner with a Dutch company. Sweden’s Saab-Kockums has teamed with Damen, a private, family-owned Dutch defense, shipbuilding and engineering conglomerate.

The official call to tender — or “B-Letter” as it is referred to in the Netherlands — which would signal the start of the definition phase of the program, should have been published six months ago but is now likely postponed until the end of the year. The delay is due to some Dutch political parties questioning the need for the kingdom to have any submarines at all.

Spain’s Navantia and Germany’s ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems have also expressed interest in this project.
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[*] posted on 14-7-2019 at 10:39 PM


‘Japan doesn’t have the missiles to fill them...’

Yeah, as if acquiring a batch of 100 or so missiles will be a bigger task than building a fleet of submarines...

;)




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 25-7-2019 at 09:07 AM


Lessons learnt and relearnt: Barracuda programme underscores France’s long-term commitment to its nuclear submarine enterprise

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International

24 July 2019


Suffren was officially launched on 12 July in a ceremony presided over by President Emmanuel Macron. Source: Richard Scott/NAVYPIX

The official launch of Suffren , the first Barracuda nuclear-powered attack submarine, is emblematic of the French government's determination to maintain a sovereign capability for the design, development, build, and support of nuclear-powered submarines. But, as Richard Scott reports, the programme has not been without its challenges.

On 12 July French President Emmanuel Macron presided over the official launch of Suffren , the first of six new-generation nuclear-powered attack submarines (SSNs) to be built under the Barracuda programme, at Naval Group's Cherbourg facility.

Long in the making - preliminary studies began in the late 1990s and a design-and-build contract was placed as far back as December 2006 - the programme represents a EUR9.1 billion (USD10.2 billion) investment to create a new class of fleet submarine that will far outstrip the French Navy's six Rubis-class SSNs in capability and utility.

The Rubis class, commissioned between 1983 and 1993, is now beginning to retire. Saphir , the first boat to decommission, arrived in Cherbourg for disposal on 3 July, just two days before Suffren was 'walked out' of the giant assembly hall on the same site.

The new Barracuda submarines will reprise the key missions assigned to the Rubis class: namely, support to the deterrent, support to the task group, and covert intelligence gathering. At the same time, Suffren and its sisters will add two new powerful assets: the ability to fire the Missile De Croisière Naval (MdCN) cruise missile to strike at land targets deep inland; and purpose-designed facilities, including a dry deck shelter, to embark, support, and deliver special forces elements.

At 5,300 tonnes submerged displacement, the Barracuda design is larger than the Rubis class, able to carry an increased weapon outload (up to 20 weapons comprising a mix of F21 heavyweight torpedoes, SM39 Exocet anti-ship missiles, and MdCN cruise missiles), significantly quieter (enabling it to operate at higher tactical speeds), and capable of double the endurance.

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[*] posted on 6-8-2019 at 07:27 PM


Brazil expected to start sea trials for first-of-class Riachuelo submarine

Victor Barreira, Rio de Janeiro - Jane's Navy International

06 August 2019

The Brazilian shipbuilder Itaguaí Construções Navais (ICN) – a joint venture between Naval Group and Odebrecht Engenharia e Construção – and the Brazilian Navy will begin sea trials of the first of four Riachuelo-class diesel-electric attack submarines, Riachuelo (S40) in August, the navy told Jane’s on 1 August.

The sea trials are scheduled to last until the first half of 2020, while commissioning of the submarine is scheduled to take place in October 2020, the navy said.

Riachuelo was launched in a ceremony that took place at the Itaguaí Naval Complex on 14 December 2018.

A 533 mm Naval Group F21 heavyweight torpedo and a mock-up of an MBDA Exocet SM39 Block 2 Mod 2 anti-ship missile will be launched during Riachuelo 's sea trials, the navy said.

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[*] posted on 7-9-2019 at 03:12 PM


ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems Unveils 4th Generation Fuel Cell System

(Source: ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems; issued Sept 06, 2019)

During its quadrennial SubCon submarine conference held in Kiel, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems unveiled the 4th Generation Fuel Cell (FC4G) for submarine applications after having finished an extensive test program with more than 70,000 operating hours in the test environment. This is an improvement of an already unrivalled and proven system.

Dr. Rolf Wirtz, CEO of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems: "Our customers have been using our fuel cell systems for more than 15 years now. With this 4th generation we are making something great even greater. This is the next big step with huge improvements in availability, redundancy, and stealth. I am proud that we are again advancing our customers by setting new standards."

The FC4G is designed to be a high-availability modular system composed of redundant components to retain a maximum performance at all times. In terms of H2-storage, the systems rely on the well-proven and exceptionally safe system of metal hydride cylinders as previous generations. These cylinders do not contain any active components; thus, reducing failure to a minimum holding hydrogen molecules safe in place in the crystal lattice of the hydride. Since hydrogen is fed to the system in its purest form, no chemical conversion is required and, therewith, the efficiency of the overall system remains very high.

In contrast, reformer systems inevitably create CO2 out of a liquid fuel such as diesel oil leaving a trace of CO2 – and potentially other by-products contained in diesel oil such as Sulphur – that must be dissolved into the surrounding sea water by operating electrical pumps. The same applies to AIP systems based on other principles, such as Stirling engines, closed-cycle diesels, or closed-cycle steam turbines.

Not so the FC4G system. The only by-product besides electrical energy is pure water, which is stored on board for weight compensation. H2 is easily available where ever chemical industry is operative, typically in every customer country, or may be produced by utilizing green energy sources by splitting water into H2 and O2.

Overall signatures of the FC4G are the most favorable ones on the market. No by-products put overboard, the thermal and the acoustic signatures are kept to a minimum while the overall system efficiency is twice as good as any combustion engine.

Philipp Schön, Head of Product Sales Submarines: "These are the reasons, why 38 systems were contracted so far with 7 customer navies, another 10 systems presently being under negotiation."

With around 6,000 employees, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems is one of the world's leading marine companies and a systems provider in submarine and surface shipbuilding as well as maritime electronics and security technology. Over 180 years of history and the constant pursuit of improvements are the basis for the company's success in constantly setting new standards.

ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems offers customized solutions for highly complex challenges in a changing world. The driving forces behind this are the employees of the company, who shape the future of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems with passion and commitment every day.

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[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 03:55 PM


New Combat System for Submarines

(Source: Kongsberg; issued Sept 06, 2019)

At the 7th International Submarine Conference SubCon 2019, KTA Naval Systems, a joint venture of Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems and Kongsberg, presented its new combat system for non-nuclear submarines.

The system called ORCCA combines for the first-time maximum adaptability with the highest level of IT security. It enables its operator to conduct an integrated data analysis from a wide range of systems on board via one multifunctional console – for a sound and quick decision-making process.

Kathrin Rohloff, CEO of KTA Naval Systems: “ORCCA is the most modern combat system for non-nuclear submarines on the market. We brought together the expertise of our colleagues at ATLAS Elektronik and Kongsberg Defense & Aerospace to create a unique combat system. We will equip all future submarines from Thyssen Krupp with this highly integrated system."

The modular design enables the integration of new technologies and the adaptation to changing deployment scenarios throughout the lifetime of the system. Customers can constantly advance their combat system onboard to adapt to new requirements and to ensure that they always have the most recent available technology on board; no matter if in 10, 20 or 30 years.

The system shows this kind of flexibility already at installation: Subsystems from the respective customer countries can easily be integrated. In addition, the system can be used for all submarine classes of Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems – whether newly built or retrofitted.

ORCCA enables its operators to interact as part of a unit in multinational missions like NATO or EU missions. The communication between the systems on board and to the national and in addition to the international domain modules is separated by a special IT infrastructure. ORCCA guarantees high speed and maximum security across the various communication channels.

KTA Naval Systems sets new standards with combat systems for non-nuclear submarines. The company was founded in October 2017 as a joint venture between Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems, its Naval Electronic Systems business unit (ATLAS Elektronik) and Kongsberg Defense & Aerospace.

With around 6,000 employees, Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems is one of the world's leading marine companies and a systems provider in submarine and surface shipbuilding as well as maritime electronics and security technology. The driving forces behind this are the employees of the company, who shape the future of Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems with passion and commitment every day.

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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 09:51 AM


Taiwan Sending Teams to Europe, US to Verify Submarine Prototype Components

(Source: Taiwan News; posted Sept 09, 2019)

By Duncan DeAeth

TAIPEI --- As Taiwan’s indigenous submarine project approaches construction of the first prototype, the Ministry of National Defense (MND) is preparing to dispatch teams of experts to consult with international partners in the defense industry.

According to a report from Liberty Times, the MND has secured all necessary licenses and permits from the Legislative Yuan’s Foreign and National Defense Committee. To ensure the project faces no budgetary constraints, the MND has reportedly made an additional NT$1.5 billion (US$48 million) available for expenditures in 2020, as the prototype begins construction.

Naval Commander Li Zong-hsiao recently said that the MND has established partnerships with 15 global industry giants from Europe and the United States that are eager to work with Taiwan on its indigenous submarine project. The MND is now organizing teams to be dispatched to Europe and the U.S. to supervise and verify the equipment procurement process.

Liberty Times reports that next year the MND will send a six-person team to the United States for an eight-day trip to verify the construction of components for the prototype submarine. Likewise, a six-person team will also be dispatched to Europe for an 11-day visit in 2020 for the same purpose.

According to official budgetary records, the MND has allocated NT$49.3 billion (US$1.5 billion) for a six-year project to construct a prototype submarine. This year, the ministry has spent more than NT$7.51 billion of that budget on the project, including NT$3.7 billion for the new facility.

The MND and the CSBC Shipbuilding Corporation anticipate construction of the prototype to begin next year, and for the vessel to be ready for sea tests by late 2024 or early 2025. A scale model of the vessel’s exterior design was revealed in May at a groundbreaking ceremony at the facility where the submarine will be constructed.

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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 04:20 PM


Sweden’s second overhauled Gotland-class sub in sea trials as Saab anticipates more upgrade needs

By: David B. Larter   21 hours ago


The Swedish submarine Gotland underway on sea trials. The second boat of the class, the Uppland, is participating in sea trials now. (Saab)

LONDON — Saab’s Kockums shipyard is wrapping up the second of two midlife overhauls for Sweden’s Gotland-class submarines, with the second boat going through sea trials now, a company executive said Tuesday.

The air-independent propulsion submarine Gotland was delivered in June with upgrades to the engines, combat system and sensors, many of which will be part of the two-ship A26 program, also under construction at Kockums.

“We signed a contract for these quite brutal midlife upgrades and that was signed four years ago,” said Gunnar Wieslander, head of the shipyard. “The first boat has been delivered by the end of June of this year. Boat No. 2 is now in its sea trial period.

“Boat No. 3 — that has to go through government. The Defence Commission has recommended we do the same with boat No. 3.”

Sweden signed a roughly $163.5 million contract for the two overhauls in 2015, along with another roughly $1 billion for the two A26 submarines.

In an earnings call in July, Saab CEO Hskan Buskhe told investors that Kockums has seen declining revenue as it wraps up the Gotland upgrades, but he was hopeful that will turn around as opportunities open up, including a potential multibillion-dollar contract with the Netherlands to replace its four Walrus-class submarines.

Saab, which is partnering with the Dutch shipbuilder Damen Group, is competing against France’s Naval Group, Navantia of Spain and Germany’s ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems for the Netherlands contract.

But the opportunities for Kockums don’t begin and end with the Netherlands, Wieslander said.

“If you look at a map and at the number of boats out there older than 25 years, you will find that between 50 and almost 90 boats need to be [recapitalized],” he said. “The world is only becoming more open, and the value of operating and being unseen keeps increasing. So we think the relative value of submarines will go up.”
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[*] posted on 27-9-2019 at 08:55 AM


Peru looks set to take Brazilian submarines in return for LSD

Jose Higuera, Santiago - Jane's Defence Weekly

26 September 2019

The future of part of Brazil’s fleet of German-designed U209-class diesel-electric submarines (SSKs) has started to become clearer, as it transpires that negotiations to barter two of the boats for a Peruvian-built amphibious assault ship are under way, according to sources in Rio de Janeiro and Lima.

Peru, which has a requirement for a couple of modern submarines to replace two older Islay (U209-1100)-class SSKs, is offering to barter a landing ship dock (LSD) identical to the 122 m long, 11,000-ton (full) BAP Pisco , to be built by the SIMA naval shipyard at Callao at a cost of around USD170 million.

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[*] posted on 28-9-2019 at 05:25 PM


Margarita Robles Travels to Cartagena to Review the Status of the S-80 Program

(Source: Spanish Ministry of Defence; issued Sept 24, 2019)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


Spanish Defense Minister Margarita Robles (C) and Navantia CEO Susana de Sarià (3rd left) and other Navantia officials pose in front of the first S-80 submarine at Navantia’s Cartagena shipyard. (Spanish MoD photo)

Acting Defense Minister Margarita Robles traveled to Cartagena today to oversee the evolution of the S-80 program, the next-generation submarines for the Spanish Navy fleet and a priority to meet the national defense strategy needs.

"There were some delays that worried us, but now the Ministry of Defense is convinced that the S-80 is going to leave on time and there will be no failure or technical problem," the minister told media representatives.

Robles, accompanied by Secretary of State for Defense Angel Olivares, started her visit at the Arsenal of Cartagena, which will host the new S-80, where they were shown the facilities of the Center for Data Analysis Supervision (CESADAR).

As detailed by the Admiral of the Arsenal, Aniceto Rosique, this is an innovative center where all the data that Naval Force ships send in every day is collected and, with the application of big data programs, allows detailed analysis of the situation of the fleet and anticipate the incidents that the boats may present.

Its objective is to predict future failures of equipment and systems, increase their operational availability and reduce the costs of foreseeable repairs.

In this meeting, the minister also obtained detailed information on the S-80 program.

According to the latest schedule, the Navy will receive in 2022 the first of four submarines that are being acquired. Consequently, the Arsenal has had to approve a work and remodeling plan to adapt its infrastructure.

From Arsenal, the minister moved on to the Navantia Shipyard, a public company responsible for the development of the S-80 program. Robles visited the submarine construction facilities, guided by the company's president, Susana de Sarriá.

The program is in the construction and integration phase; which includes the assembly and verification of the elements that make up the submarine. Of the five sections in which it is divided, the first three are already joined, and the rest will be added before the end of the year.

This will allow the start of tests to begin in the first half of 2020, followed by the launch.

"I am pleasantly impressed by what I have seen," said the minister, who wanted to congratulate Navantia for her work. “It is a tremendously thorough work, and very complicated engineering. The deadlines are being met, as planned and, if it continues, they will be met until the end,” she said.

In addition, she stressed that the submarine S-80 will be good news for the Navy and for Navantia “for which we want the best international projection. Its rigor and precision will turn Spain into a power, not only for the Navy, but also on an industrial level,” and recalled that these projects “involve innovation, science and technology.”

In this sense, Robles has hoped that the efforts that are being made to publicize the project bear fruit and can be sold internationally.

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[*] posted on 30-9-2019 at 04:50 PM


Brazilian Navy has started sea trials of Riachuelo Scorpene-class submarine

Posted On Saturday, 28 September 2019 20:49

Brazilian navy has started the first sea trial of its Riachuelo submarine, a modified version of Scorpene-class diesel-electric submarine. Sea trials of the new Riachuelo submarine are scheduled to be performed until the first half of 2020, while the new submarine could be commissioned in October 2020.


First sea trials for the Riachuelo Scorpene-class submarine of Brazilian navy. (Picture source www.naval.com.br)

During the sea trials, Brazilian Navy has planned to launch mockup of Exocet SM39 Block 2 Mod 2 anti-ship missile and F21 Torpedo. The Riachuelo submarine is armed with six torpedo launching tubes, 18 heavy weapons, tube-launched MBDA SM-39 Exocet anti-ship missiles and precision-guided weapons. The weapons are carried in weapon launching tubes and can be easily reloaded at sea.

The F21 is a heavy-weight torpedo developed in France by DCNS (now Naval Group) for the French Navy. It features a range of over 50 kilometers and a top speed in excess of 50 knots. Its warhead is being designed to take out any kind of surface fighting ships and submarines while delivering outstanding safety standards needed for deployment aboard ballistic submarines.

The Exocet is a French-built anti-ship missile whose various versions can be launched from surface vessels, submarines, helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. The Exocet missile Block 2 Mod 2 has a maximum firing range of 72 km.

In December 2018, the Brazilian Navy has launched its first Brazilian-built Scorpène submarine, the Riachuelo. The ceremony took place at the Itaguaí Navy base in presence of the President of the Federal Republic of Brazil and of the elected President.

In 2009, French Company Naval Group was entrusted by the Brazilian Navy with designing and transferring the technology for four conventional Scorpène® submarines, and for the design and manufacturing assistance for the non-nuclear part of Brazil’s first nuclear-powered submarine. The contract also included the support for the construction of a naval base and a shipyard in Brazil.

The Scorpène-class submarines are a class of diesel-electric attack submarines jointly developed by the French Direction des Constructions Navales (DCN) and the Spanish company Navantia, and now by Naval Group. In 2008, the Brazilian Navy ordered four Scorpènes.

The propulsion system of Scorpène-class submarines consists of 4 x MTU 12V396 SE84 series diesel engines coupled with Kermount Industries 580kW generators. Sensors and processing will be made up of an acoustic surveillance system, digital-assisted attack, and dedicated analysis and monitoring hardware. The sonar system will be provided by Thales.
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[*] posted on 3-10-2019 at 09:52 PM


Saab pulls out of Indian submarine project, citing industrial policy concerns

Jon Grevatt - Jane's Defence Weekly

02 October 2019

Key Points

- The Swedish defence group withdraws from India’s Project 75(I) submarine procurement programme
- The move highlights the growing burden on foreign OEMs in India and concerns about project control

Swedish defence group Saab has withdrawn from India’s long-deferred Project 75(I) programme to procure six diesel-electric attack submarines for the Indian Navy, the company told Jane’s on 2 October.

It said the decision was based on scheduling and risks related to engaging with India’s ‘Strategic Partnership’ policy, which mandates local construction supported by technologies and knowledge transferred from foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

A Saab spokesperson said, “It is a decision we have made due to the customer’s requirements regarding the time schedule and issues related to the Strategic Partnership policy where there is a disparity between Saab’s ability to retain control versus our obligations and liabilities.

(161 of 761 words)

Bottom paragraph is the key...…..we will build them in India BUT if it doesn't work it's your (SAAB) fault, and YOU are liable...…...not the cockheads we employ! :no: :no: :no:
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[*] posted on 3-10-2019 at 11:51 PM


Same as with Rafale it seems. Indian defence procurement are hard learners indeed!



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[*] posted on 25-10-2019 at 07:07 PM


Brazil acquires equipment for its nuclear sub programme

Victor Barreira, Paris - Jane's Navy International

24 October 2019

The Brazilian state-controlled company Nuclebrás Equipamentos Pesados (NUCLEP) was awarded a contract earlier this month by another local state-controlled company, Amazônia Azul Tecnologias de Defesa (AMAZUL), to manufacture equipment for the onshore 48 MW nuclear power plant pressurised water reactor prototype.

AMAZUL ordered the pressure cylinder, internal containment structures, and a primary reinforced tank from NUCLEP on 11 October.

The Electronuclear Energy Generation Laboratory (LABGENE), which is being built at the Brazilian Navy Technological Center in São Paulo (CTMSP) facilities at Iperó in the state of São Paulo as part of the Navy Nuclear Program (PNM), is intended to serve as a test bed for developing the nuclear propulsion for the Brazilian Navy nuclear-powered attack submarine SN Álvaro Alberto .

(144 of 157 words)
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[*] posted on 25-10-2019 at 08:25 PM


MADEX 2019: DSME unveils new submarine design for export market

Manash Pratim Boruah, Busan - Jane's Navy International

25 October 2019


DSME's new diesel-electric attack submarine concept targeted for the export market, DSME 2000. (IHS Markit/M Boruah)

Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) showcased a new diesel-electric attack submarine concept, DSME 2000, for the first time at the International Maritime Defense Industry Exhibition (MADEX) 2019 in Busan.

The product is targeted at the export market, particularly of Southeast Asia and South America.

The submarine has a submerged displacement of 2,180 tonnes and will likely incorporate technologies indigenously developed by Korean original equipment manufacturers that are involved in the KSS-3 programme. Preliminary design work was completed in January 2019, but the final variant can be tailored according to customer requirements.

The 71.1 m-long and 6.5 m-wide single-hulled submarine will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries and an AC propulsion motor.

(111 of 296 words)
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[*] posted on 27-10-2019 at 04:55 PM


The acquisition of four submarines by the Dutch Navy is becoming clearer

Posted On Friday, 25 October 2019 14:18

The Hague is preparing to appoint the two candidates who will remain in the running for this contract estimated at some 3.5 billion. The French Naval Group would keep his chances. The signing of the agreement with a single builder is planned for 2022.


Walrus-class submarine Bruinvis, last of the class (Picture source: Navy Recognition)

Announced a year ago, the purchase of four submarines by the Dutch Navy to replace its former Walrus-class ships is taking shape. A new stage will soon be reached in The Hague, where we enter the last phase of the competition for this contract estimated between 2.5 and 3.5 billion euros.

The prospect of signing firm orders is therefore postponed by one year to 2022, while the official calendar still provides the delivery of the first submarine from 2027. According to the Ministry of Defense, only two out of four candidates in the running should be retained.

If we believe the Dutch press, the joint offer of the Dutch shipyards Damen and Swedish Saab would hold the rope to enter the next round of negotiations. In response to employee and employer unions demanding job creation in the Netherlands, this consortium has promised to provide a workload equivalent to 15,000 jobs for one year.

In front of the national manufacturer, the French group Naval Group has teamed up with the Dutch shipyard Royal IHC, specialized in off-shore construction, to increase its chances of being among the two manufacturers chosen by the Netherlands, and thus promises also a significant part of production in the Netherlands. Always in the pipeline, Naval Group is proposing an adapted version of the oceanic submarine Barracuda currently under construction for the French Navy.

But the German TKMS, who has already won a tender for four submarines in Norway, will put his experience and a series effect to stay in the race. Even though the German shipyard seems today in difficulty in the face of uncertainties about its parent company. By inference, the Spanish group Navantia who had put himself in the ranks is the one who has the least chance of being selected for the final race.

The Walrus-class submarines are unusual in that instead of a cross-shaped assembly of stern diving planes and rudders, they mount four combined rudders and diving planes in an "X" configuration. This tail configuration was first tested in 1960 on the United States Navy's USS Albacore and has since been used by the Walrus class, all Swedish Navy submarines since the Sjöormen class, the Royal Australian Navy's Collins-class, the German Type 212A and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's Sōryū class. The X configuration is a complex system and therefore not in use by a lot of navies around the world.

The submarines of the Walrus-class are invisible when submerged, silent and therefore difficult to detect by ships, planes and other submarines once they go into hiding. This makes the boats very suitable for the combatting surface vessels and submarines, the protection of own units, information gathering, and early warning, and supporting of special operations. The submarines can also be used to enforce international sanctions, as they did during the Yugoslav Wars.
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[*] posted on 27-10-2019 at 05:31 PM


Quote:
The prospect of signing firm orders is therefore postponed by one year to 2022, while the official calendar still provides the delivery of the first submarine from 2027.


There is no reason on earth why something similar to this wouldn't be able to manage for the RAN, coming in service about a decade sooner, and depending on how you budget things, at about a third to a fifth the price.




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[*] posted on 27-10-2019 at 08:17 PM


Monsieur! Vee haf no way of making obscene profits doing zis so vite…………..vee need the 15 years to develop our own next three models bevor we build this old one!

(We could build VIRGINIA Block V SSN's, starting from scratch, in this timeframe...……..they'd be FAR more useful for our needs than any redeveloped Barracuda)
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[*] posted on 12-11-2019 at 06:58 PM



Scale mock-up of the new Hangor-class submarine presented by Karachi Shipyards & Engineering Works (KSEW) at IDEAS 2018. Photo Source: Quwa

Nov 11, 2019

Bilal Khan

Profile: Pakistan’s New Hangor Submarine

With a deal for three Type 214 submarines falling through, in 2011, the Pakistan Navy (PN) started talks with China Shipbuilding & Offshore International Co. Ltd (CSOC) for six air-independent propulsion (AIP)-equipped submarines. In April 2015, the Pakistani government approved the purchase, but of eight AIP-equipped submarines which, at the time, the Ministry of Defence Production (MoDP) termed as the S20.

Reports about the submarine deal pegged its value at $4-5 billion US (Financial Times), but it was unlikely to include only the submarines. However, in late 2017 and early 2018, the PN signed deals for four Type 054A/P frigates from China. It is possible that the $4-5 billion US figure included those ships.

In August 2016, the Chief Project Director of the Navy’s new submarine program disclosed to the National Assembly’s Standing Committee on Defence that the first four of these submarines are due in 2022-2023, and the remaining four by 2028. The last four will be built by Karachi Shipyard & Engineering Works (KSEW)

In January 2017, the then Chief of Naval Staff (CNS) of the PN, Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah, announced that the new Chinese submarines would be christened the Hangor-class, in honour of the Daphne diesel-electric submarines (SSK) the PN procured from France in the late 1960s.

The PN did not disclose the subsystems or specific weapon systems of the new Hangor-class submarine, nor did it reveal the type of AIP the submarines will use. However, CSOC’s S26 design, which a number of observers believe the Hangor is based on, uses a Stirling AIP system. Thailand is procuring three S26Ts for $1.04 billion US, i.e., roughly $347 million US per submarine.

During the 2018 International Defence Exhibition and Seminar (IDEAS), KSEW revealed a scale mock-up of the Hangor submarine as well as some of its specifications. Like the S26 design, the Hangor model showed six torpedo tubes for heavyweight torpedoes and anti-ship cruising missiles (ASCM).


Specifications of the new Hangor-class submarine presented by Karachi Shipyards & Engineering Works (KSEW) at IDEAS 2018. Photo Source: Quwa

Hangor Submarine Specifications (Source: KSEW):
Length: 76 m
Displacement: 2,800 tons
Draught: 6.2 m
Speed: 10 knots

But the Hangor also had a number of differences, mainly a heavier displacement (2,800 tons vs. the S26’s 2,550 tons). Moreover, it appeared that KSEW did not disclose the maximum cruising of the Hangor. The Hangor’s hull was also slightly shorter (76 m vs. the S26’s 77.7 m).

Thus far, these are the only official or verifiable details of the new Hangor submarine. However, in addition to heavyweight torpedoes and ASCMs, the PN is likely to use submarine-launched cruise missiles (SLCM) from the Hangor as well, notably the Babur 3 SLCM, which has a stated range of 450 km.
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