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Author: Subject: Assault Rifles, all calibres
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[*] posted on 26-9-2017 at 02:35 PM


G36 Replacement Candidates Leaked Through Jane’s

Posted 1 min ago in AR-15, Companies, Daily News, Defense, Guns & Gear, News, Other Gear & Gadgets, Rifles by Nathaniel F



The G36’s replacement is now known to be one of five guns – or at least that’s the report coming from reputable defense outlet IHS Jane’s. Competing in Germany’s System Sturmgewehr Bundeswehr (Bundeswehr Assault Rifle System) will be the Rheinmetall RS556, Heckler & Koch HK433, Haenel Defence MK556, SIG MCX, and FNH SCAR. For four contestants, no known 7.62mm variants exist; only the FN SCAR has a 7.62mm variant – the SCAR-H – that is known publicly. This means the Bundeswehr will likely not be going back to .30 caliber infantry rifles any time soon.

The testing and evaluation segment of the program was begun in July of this year, and is expected to be completed by November 2018. Between December of 2018 and April of 2019, the Bundeswehr will deliberate on the winner of the contract, which is expected to be awarded the following month in May.

Final testing and troop trials will be conducted over the course of the next year, and fielding is expected to occur starting in September of 2020. Notably, it seems the new weapon is certainly not considered an “interim” item, as it is expected to serve through 2046.

The SSB program requires that the winning weapon have both a long and short barrel, which must be interchangeable, as well as ambidextrous controls, and 1913 rails on the top, and on the sides and bottom of the handguard. It also specifies a receiver life of 30,000 rounds, and a barrel life of 15,000 rounds (with lead cored or SS109 ammunition), barrel life of 7,500 rounds (with hard core ammunition). Interestingly, it is not specified whether the new rifle should be in caliber 5.56mm or 7.62mm, instead leaving the decision tothe manufacturers. However, the requirement does include a 3.6 kilogram weight limit, making it very unlikely that the winner will be a 7.62mm platform. The solicitation references, but does not require, suppressors, additional magazine stowage, and a maintenance shot counter.

Thanks to W for the tip!
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[*] posted on 27-9-2017 at 05:07 PM


Army Close to Authorizing Large Unit Buys of Gen M3 PMAG


U.S. combat forces have used Magpul PMAGs for years because of their extreme reliability. Photo: U.S. Army.

Posted By: Matthew Cox September 26, 2017

The U.S. Army is not giving up on its Enhanced Performance Magazine despite the findings in its own 2015 test report that show the Magpul Gen M3 PMAG performed better than the EPM which the service fielded in 2016.

The Marine Corps and the Air Force have decided to replace the Enhanced Performance Magazine with the Gen M3 PMAG. U.S. Special Operations Command has also authorized the Gen M3.

The Army’s Program Executive Office Soldier, however was unsure that this latest version of the PMAG is safe for use in Army weapons, Brig. Gen. Brian Cummings, the commander of PEO  Soldier, said in a Sept. 22 interview with Military.com.

PEO Soldiers is close to wrapping up an exhaustive test on the PMAG Gen M3 to ensure it doesn’t damage Army weapons.

In my Sept. 25 Military.com story, Cummings maintains that he didn’t trust the 2015 test findings that show the Gen M3 outperforming the Enhanced Performance Magazine because testers didn’t fire enough ammunition.

I am still unclear why PEO Soldier approved the test methodology and then didn’t trust the findings once it was complete.

In this latest evaluation, after testers have fired more than 100,000 rounds, Cumming is now confident that the Gen M3 is safe for Army weapons.

“Right now, there are no degradations to the weapons and all of the reliability numbers are good,” he said. “Testing is not complete, but enough testing has been done that the results are clear that the magazine with the weapon is reliable.”

For now, the plan is to continue fielding the Enhanced Performance Magazine. If Army units want the Magpul PMAG Gen M3, they will be allowed to purchase it with unit funds once the Army authorizes it, Cummings said.

There is an NSN for both the windowed and non-windowed versions of the Gen M3, so units can buy them but only in small amounts using discretionary unit funds, according to Duane Liptak, executive vice president for Magpul Industries.

“The issue is the Army is not added as an authorized user to either of those NSNs,” Liptak said. “It’s almost impossible for a unit to completely field Gen M3 PMAG based on the amount of dollars that they have to spend in discretionary fashion.”

The Marine Corps created the NSN for the window Gen M3 version and then added itself as an authorized user Dec. 16, Liptak said. Then SOCOM, a long-time user of PMAGs, also added itself as an authorized user of the Gen M3 in January.

The Air Force did the same thing in July after using the Army’s 2015 test report to make the decision to replace the Army EPM with the Gen M3.
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[*] posted on 28-9-2017 at 02:41 PM


Rheinmetall & Steyr Mannlicher Detail RS556 Assault Rifle


The RS556 and RS40 are the outcome of German – Austrian cooperation projects, thanks to which Rheinmetall has now added two new key components to its portfolio of infantry products. The RS556 is based on the STM556, which Steyr Mannlicher first unveiled in 2012. Outstanding modularity characterises this easy-to-use, future-proof 5.56mm x45 cal.weapon. (All Photos: Rheinmetall)

On 19 September, Rheinmetall held its annual dynamic field demonstration at its Unterlüss, Germany test centre, this year showcasing the IdZ-ES soldier modernisation system, its RS556 assault rifle with which Rheinmetall is bidding to replace the Bundeswehr's G36 assault rifle, a BOXER 8x8 armoured vehicle with a LANCE turret manned and Rheinmetall Canada's Multi Mission Unmanned Ground Vehicle (MM UGV), all networked sharing a common picture of the battlefield. This article is focusing on Rheinmetall and Steyr Mannlicher's  RS556 modular assault rifle system and RS40 grenade launcher co-operation.

Rheinmetall and Steyr Mannlicher are offering the RS556 assault rifle as a jointly produced product, made in Germany, with a German valued added share of 60%, having set their sights on the German market, touting it as a possible candidate for the new German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) Assault Rifle System programme (System Sturmgewehr Bundeswehr - SSB): the Bundeswehr intends to replace their standard G36 assault rifle with a more advanced system starting in 2019.

In a matter of seconds and without tools, the hammer-forged barrel can be easily exchanged. This means that the RS556 can be readily modified for various missions. A number of standard barrel lengths are available (14.5in, 16in, 18in, and 20in); however, customer-specific barrel and rifling lengths can be easily created. The RS556 features several standard and optional NATO accessory rails with receiver systems designed in accordance with MIL-STD-1913, STANAG 2324 and STANAG 4694. This means that the weapon can be fitted with various optics and night observation devices or laser light modules. A 40mm grenade launcher (in this case the RS40) can also be mounted on the new assault rifle. Moreover, the RS556 is compatible with Rheinmetall’s modular IdZ-ES, and can also be connected to other soldier systems. A special breech system with an emergency operation feature ensures that the weapon always functions reliably even in extreme operating conditions, e.g. in severely hot and cold environments.


Featuring an adjustable short-stroke gas piston system and rotating bolt, the gas-operated RS556 modular assault rifle is based on the tried-and-tested Steyr Mannlicher AUG (Universal Army Rifle), a design concept that has proven itself in decades of service on every continent, according to Steyr Mannlicher. With a 16in barrel (406mm) and a fully loaded, 30-round magazine, the RS556 weighs around 4.2kg, just over nine pounds. The adjustable-length light-weight stock clicks into seven different positions, meaning that operators can adjust the RS556 to match their individual equipment profile in optimum fashion.
  
The RS40 grenade launcher is based on the Steyr Mannlicher GL40. This weapon, 850mm long, can be mounted to a rifle as an add-on module or, with a separate shoulder stock, serve as a standalone grenade launcher. The rifle-mounted variant weighs approx. 1,040g, the grenade launcher, 2,180 grammes. The RS40 is a breech-loader that can beo pened on the side. It can fire any standard 40mm x 46 cal in the low-velocity spectrum, attaining ranges of up to 400 metres. The RS40 complements Rheinmetall’s extensive array of 40mm systems, which also features a versatile ammunition family and advanced fire control technology, for which the company now touts itself as a on-stop-shop for soldiers.


 
DPM
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[*] posted on 29-9-2017 at 05:12 PM


US Army Still Seeking M4A2+ Carbines?

Posted 1 min ago in AR-15, Daily News, Defense, Guns & Gear, News, Other Gear & Gadgets, Rifles by Nathaniel F


Spc. Landrew Sappa, of Aua, Pago Pago, American Samoa deployed with the Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, man's the gunner's hatch of a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle. He maintained security for more than four hours on this convoy. (Photo by: Sgt. Justin Graff)

After being cancelled in mid-2016, could the M4 Carbine upgrade program still be alive? That is the suggestion from a line in the US Army’s justification for its research budget in the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, which references an “M4A2 Plus Rifle” as a new weapons development effort:



The justification is a little dated – having been posted in May of this year – but it still indicates that the M4 upgrade program may be hanging on, even over a year since its cancellation.

Whatever the future Army procurement needs may be, the development and fielding of an upgraded M4 Carbine specification is an obvious first next step. The current M4A1 is a good rifle, but lacks substantial refinements which have been available on the commercial market for close to a decade.

Higher quality cold hammer forged barrels that last longer, rail systems that free float the barrel and gas tube assembly improving practical accuracy while maintaining a low POI shift for laser attachments, and new trigger assemblies which substantially improve trigger weight and feel, all are potential upgrades that could turn the “good” M4A1 into an excellent weapon that is competitive with the very latest rifles on the international market. If such a program were conducted, the Army could piggyback developments onto the US SOCOM’s Upper Receiver Group program, which aims to accomplish the same upgrade to the M4 Carbine platform. Perhaps at the same time, they could court USMC interest, possibly preserving the inter-service weapons commonality maintained with the successful M4 platform.

Thanks to Ramlaen for the tip!
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[*] posted on 10-10-2017 at 11:32 PM


FIRST LOOK: Textron’s 6.5mm Cased Telescoped Carbine at [AUSA 2017]

Posted 4 mins ago in Ammunition, AR-15, Best Gear, Daily News, Defense, Guns & Gear, News, Other Gear & Gadgets, Rifles by Nathaniel F



At the 2017 Association of the US Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting, Textron System displayed for the very first time their firing 6.5mm CT Carbine prototype. Previously, only non-firing mockups had been shown to the public, but after successful tests this summer the real thing was brought out to show at the conference, where TFB got its first look at the weapon.

In the meantime, the 6.5mm CT Carbine has gotten a little lighter, shrinking from 8.7 pounds unloaded to about 8.3 pounds, thanks to a weight reduction effort on the part of Textron’s engineers. Handling the rifle, it felt significantly lighter than it looked, although it should be noted that no optics or other major accessories were mounted to it. The entire upper receiver of the weapon was rapid prototyped from 3D printed sintered aluminum, but Textron representatives said the production weapon would use another production method, such as casting or forging for its receiver.

At the Textron booth was also a shooting demo for both the 6.5mm CT Carbine and the 5.56mm CT belt fed light machine gun, which TFB did not yet get a chance to try (tomorrow!). Interestingly, the Carbine mockup for the demo was based on an M4 or airsoft clone, hinting a little at the Carbine’s subtle AR-15 lineage.
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[*] posted on 11-10-2017 at 09:32 PM


7.62 TAVOR 7 from IWI USA on Display at [AUSA 2017]

Posted 4 mins ago in Daily News, Guns & Gear, Other Gear & Gadgets, Rifles by Nathaniel F with 37 Comments



The 2017 Association of the US Army annual meeting was the public debut of Israel’s new full caliber bullpup rifle, the Tavor 7. Announced in late June via IWI’s Facebook page, the Tavor 7 is a 7.62mm / .308 Winchester caliber semiautomatic bullpup rifle patterned after the Tavor family of 5.56mm (etc.) caliber bullpups.

The Tavor 7 hybridizes features of both the TAR-21 and the Micro Tavor/X95, as well as incorporating some brand new features like a toolless ejection port switching procedure and front MLOK slots on the Tavor-like handguard.

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/QqDTcFhYRIo

Unlike the original Tavor, the Tavor 7’s ejection swapping procedure is very quick and simple, as partially demonstrated in the video above. To complete the procedure, it is also necessary to remove the bolt and rotate about its axis, then replace it. The charging handle can also be swapped right to left via an even simpler process using just a bullet tip, without weapon disassembly.



It would be, strictly speaking, inaccurate to say that the Tavor 7 is, well, a Tavor, as it deviates from the original design significantly. Where the Tavor family has previously used a Desert Eagle-style bolt profile with non-axisymmetrical lugs, the Tavor 7 utilizes a Stoner-type bolt, similar to an AR-15 or AR-10:

My initial impression over the Tavor 7 is that its design is an improvement over that of the Tavor’s. Notably, the rifle clocks in at a very modest 8.6 pounds, which is scarcely heavier than the original Tavor itself, despite being designed for a much larger caliber, and sporting a substantially beefier barrel. Having said that, I’m increasingly of the opinion that .308-class bullpups are just not a great idea. They have annoying balance due to their massive rear-mounted receivers, and bring the considerable muzzle blast and volume of noise of the full-power round much closer to your face than their conventional counterparts. The latter is particularly exacerbated by the fact that most lightweight .308 semiautomatics beg for a muzzle brake (which the Tavor 7 already has), making the experience that much more unpleasant. The Tavor 7 is certainly not an exception to the former,  either, with its point of balance being behind the hand (roughly below the round barrel removal access point), and the whole rifle having that a very chunky and piggish feeling.

Having said that, I bet IWI will sell a truckload.



IWI USA representatives told me that the Tavor 7 will be available in .308/7.62 only to start, with the possibility for other calibers down the line. They said that if a 5.56mm-class version of the Tavor 7 is introduced, it will not be very soon. The Tavor 7 takes SR-25 magazines.
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[*] posted on 13-10-2017 at 11:01 PM


German Special Forces Adopt HK416A7


KSK will receive the HK416A7 as a new standard firearm and it will be called the G95. (Photo: HK)

MONS learned via news sources that on 10 October, the Federal Office for Equipment, Information Technology of the German Armed Forces (BAAINBw) contracted Heckler & Koch to supply 1,745 HK 416 A7 weapons and accessories.

The German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) designation is expected to be G95. This designation is a bit surprising as the HK 416 A5 is called G38. A press release from the BAAINBw states that the HK416A7 is a gas piston rifle in the calibre 5.56mm x45 NATO. The weapon has a weight of 3,690kg and a barrel length of 14.5 inches. The G95 is to be the new standard gun of the KSK ( Kommando Spezialkräfte) and the Special Forces command of the Navy (KSM) and is expected to be delivered to the force beginning January 2019.

Technical testing at the military service center 91 (WTD91) as well as tactical testing by KSK starts in November 2017. This German SOF adoption is of a newer edition of the HK416 than that which in use with US and UK SOF. It will be very interesting to see which lasers and optics will be chosen for the new Sturmgewehr Spezialkräfte.

According to further news reports, the A7 model is the first variant of the HK416 with a 45 Deg throw lever safety. Interestingly, this is also featured on the HK433.
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[*] posted on 14-10-2017 at 01:35 PM


HK416 A7 to be called G95 by the German Special Forces

Posted 20 hours ago in NFA / Suppressors / Class III by Eric B



There are a lot of news about Heckler & Koch right now.

It’s now official, the Special Forces of the German Army (Bundeswehr) will receive the Heckler & Koch HK416 as a new standard firearm.

The model is the HK 416 A7 and it will be called the G95. This designation is a bit surprising as the HK 416 A5 is called G38.

To be honest these names are a lot easier to understand and remember than some of the other in the Heckler & Koch Nomenclature.

The Press Release from the Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology and In-Service Support (BAAINBw) states that the HK416A7 has a 14.5″ barrel in 5,56 mm x 45 NATO with a weight of 3 690 gram.

The contract is not huge, some 1 745 pieces of HK 416 A7 rifles and accessories are to be delivered under the contract. There are a lot of discussions and rumors about what the Army is paying for this contract, but very few known facts.



The G95 is to be delivered “only” to the German Special Commando Forces (KSK) and the German Naval Special Commando Forces, and will reach the soldiers in January 2019 and onwards. Already in November 2017 there will be more technical testing of the firearm.

A few rifles, but for the best and most active soldiers.

During my research I found this interesting rumor from the HK Pro forums: “Was chatting with a buddy in Delta…. told me they were field testing an A7 variant.” So we can assume than some testing of the A7 has already begun in various parts of the world.

There are no details what the new model “A7” incorporates in comparison with other models like the A5.

According to Larry Vickers the HK416A7 features a 45 degree safety – “The first time that I am aware of on an HK416.”

Below is a detailed picture of the HK416 A5. Notice the selector is different. Also it seems that HK’s press image of the A7 is using a Magpul PMAG Window. Normally they use steel or translucent magazines in their press pictures, so I’m sure there’s a hint.



To get a little longer back-up sight, it seems the A7 is getting a quick-release iron sight and folding front sight mounted on the barrel.

And the 416 A7 below, sorry for the poor resolution but you take what you get.



And I wonder who will be getting the HK416 A6, if anyone?



Above: A copy of the German Press Release from the Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology and In-Service Support (BAAINBw), which even incorporates a picture of the rifle.
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[*] posted on 14-10-2017 at 01:57 PM


SIG 516PDWs in service with Pakistani Naval Commandos

Posted 1 min ago in AR-15, Companies, Daily News, Defense, News, Rifles by Miles with No Comments



Recent images have emerged of the Pakistani Special Service Group (SSG), the countries Naval Special Operations component, with New Hampshire based Sig Sauer, Inc. 5.56x45mm NATO SIG 516PDW carbines with 7.5 inch barrels, along with Steiner DBAL I2 ATPIALs mounted on the handrails.

SSG operators have been seen with both Magpul and STANAG magazines inserted. The images appeared on two recent threads in Pakistan Defense, from July of this year, and from early October as well.





Pakistani Special Operations have been working with 14.5 inch M4 carbines for some time now, but this appears to be the first glimpse of short barreled M4s among Pakistani operators, especially piston operated ones as opposed to direct gas impingement versions that are provided through foreign military sales programs.
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[*] posted on 14-10-2017 at 09:20 PM


Quote:
The weapon has a weight of 3,690kg


Bloody hell! Now that is what I call ‘heavily armed’...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 15-10-2017 at 10:25 PM


Hahahahaha you tit, the Germans, and a lot of other Euro's, don't use a full stop to differentiate between a whole number and a decimal but use a comma instead.................makes for you taking great extra care when ordering bulk materials, as our Engineers found out more than once...........................
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[*] posted on 17-10-2017 at 06:35 PM


Army Eyeing 6.5mm for Its Future Battle Rifle


Textron Systems maintains that its Intermediate Case-Telescoped Carbine, chambered for 6.5mm, delivers 30 percent more lethality than 7.62mm x 51mm brass ammunition. Photo: Textron Systems.

Posted By: Matthew Cox October 13, 2017

The U.S. Army’s chief of staff recently made a bold promise that future soldiers will be armed with weapons capable of delivering far greater lethality than any existing small arms.

“Our next individual and squad combat weapon will come in with a 10X improvement over any existing current system in the world, and that will be critical,” Gen. Mark Milley told an audience at AUSA 2017 on Oct. 10.

Milley’s pledge to “significantly increase investments” in a leap-ahead small arms technology appeared low in the story I wrote for Military.com since soldier lethality was the lowest of the Army’s top six modernization priorities.

As Milley was speaking, Textron Systems officials were showing off their new Intermediate Case-Telescoped Carbine, chambered for 6.5mm on the AUSA exhibition floor.



The working prototype has evolved out Textron’s light and medium machine guns that fire 5.56mm and 7.62mm case-telescoped ammunition developed under the Lightweight Small Arms Technology program.

Over the last decade, the Army has invested millions in the development of the program, which has now been rebranded to Textron’s Case-Telescoped Weapons and Ammunition.

Textron’s cased-telescoped ammunition relies on a plastic case rather than a brass one to hold the propellant and the projectile, like a conventional shotgun shell.

The ICTC is a closed bolt, forward feed, gas piston operated weapon, weighing 8.3 pounds. The 6.5mm case-telescoped ammunition weighs 35 percent less and offers 30 percent more lethality than 7.62mm x 51mm brass ammunition, Textron officials maintain.

“I think the most important thing is what we have been able to do with the intermediate caliber, the 6.5mm in this case,” Wayne Prender, vice president of Textron’s Control & Surface Systems Unmanned Systems told Military.com. “We are able to not only provide a weight reduction … and all the things that come with it – we are also able to provide increased lethality because of the ability to use a more appropriate round.”

Textron officials maintain they are using a low-drag “representative” 6.5mm bullet while U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC, is developing the actual projectile.



“We actually used three different bullet shapes and we scaled it,” said Paul Shipley, program manager for of Unmanned Systems. “We scaled 5.56mm up, we scaled 7.62mm down and took a low-drag shape and ran that between the two” to create the 125 grain 6.5mm bullet that’s slightly longer than the Army’s new 130 grain M80A1 Enhanced Performance Round.

Textron officials maintain that the new round retains more energy at 1,200 meters than the M80A1. At that distance, the 6.5mm has an impact-energy of 300 foot pounds compared to the M80A1 which comes in at about 230 foot pounds of energy, Textron officials maintain.

“The increased lethality we are referring to has to do with the energy down range,” Shipley said. “You can take whatever kind of bullet you want, compare them and it’s going to have increased energy down range.”

Lethality has always been a vague concept. Is it the amount of foot pounds of energy at the target? Or is it the terminal performance, or the size of the wound channel, it creates after it penetrates an enemy soldier?

It’s hard to predict how much performance will change if and when ARDEC creates a 6.5mm projectile that meets the Army’s needs.

A lot can be done to predict performance with computer modeling, but ultimately there is no way of knowing how a conceptual bullet will perform until it is live-fire tested thousands of times under multiple conditions, according to a source with intimate knowledge of military ballistics testing.

The Army has also spent years developing its current M855A1 5.56mm and M80A1 7.62mm Enhanced Performance Rounds.  After many failures, the service came up with a copper-jacketed round composed of a solid copper slug that sits behind a steel penetrator tip designed to defeat battlefield barriers and remain effective enough to kill or incapacitate.



Is the Army going to throw all of that away, invest millions of dollars to redesign its ammunition-making infrastructure to switch to case-telescoped ammunition?

“What they’ve got in stockpile does what it does, and they know that is not good enough anymore, so they are faced with that choice,” Shipley said.

The Army has not come to a definitive conclusion on a future caliber, but it has been very open about its waning trust in the 5.56mm round.

In late May, Milley revealed to Congress that the M4 Carbine’s M855A1 Enhanced Performance Round cannot penetrate modern enemy body armor plates similar to the U.S. military-issue rifle plates such as the Enhanced Small Arms Protective Insert, or ESAPI.

In August, the service launched a competition to find an Intermediate Service Combat Rifle chambered 7.62mm NATO. The Army intended to purchase up to 50,000 new 7.62mm rifles to meet the requirement, according to the solicitation, but sources say that the service has already backed away from that endeavor.

Textron’s 6.5mm case-telescoped carbine certainly looks like the leap-ahead, small-arms tech that the Army is searching for to arm its future soldiers.

Then again, the Army’s imagination was also captured in the late 1990s by the Objective Individual Combat Weapon, or XM29.

Remember that? It featured a 20mm airburst weapon mounted on top of a 5.56mm carbine. XM29 had an advanced fire-control system that could program 20mm shells to burst at specific distances. At 18 pounds, it proved to be too heavy and bulky for the battlefield.

Textron officials maintain that case-telescoped carbine can be customized to whatever the Army wants.

“It’s configurable,” Shipley said. “The technology that is inside is what counts.”
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[*] posted on 18-10-2017 at 03:16 PM


Russia’s State Arms Seller Quits India’s Tenders for Over 20,000 Automatic Rifles — Source

(Source: TASS; published Oct 16, 2017)

The Russian wording on this decline, reads as "we no longer sell museum pieces" to me..................

MOSCOW --- Russia’s state arms seller Rosoboronexport has decided against participating in the tenders of India’s Interior Ministry for the purchase of over 20,000 7.62x39 mm automatic rifles, a source in the system of military and technical cooperation told TASS on Monday.

"The tender documentation is 99% specified by specialists of India’s Interior Ministry for the outdated Kalashnikov automatic rifles produced in Bulgaria under the expired Soviet license. The requirements of India’s Interior Ministry for the purchase of over 20,000 automatic rifles for the reserve of the national police and the border guard service do not allow Russian companies from the very outset to submit their commercial bids," the source said.

According to the source, the Indian side has specified among the tender’s essential terms the availability of a metal magazine whereas Russia has long given up this option in favor of more reliable plastic items; appliances for the assembly and disassembly of the trigger and firing mechanism, although this mechanism’s design in new Russian assault rifles of the hundredth series has been improved and no longer requires such an accessory and also steel folding butts whereas modern butt-stocks are made of composite materials.

A source in Rosoboronexport confirmed the state arms exporter’s withdrawal from the Indian Interior Ministry’s tenders for the purchase of automatic rifles, saying that Russia’s AK-103 submachine guns did not comply with the terms of the tenders. However, the source declined to comment on the Indian Interior Ministry’s current procurement policy, saying such statements would be incorrect.

In turn, the Kalashnikov Group said it was greatly surprised that old metal magazines were important for the purchasers from the Indian Interior Ministry.

"They are less reliable and subject to rust in a hot climate. The entire world has long been switching over to plastic magazines," the Kalashnikov Group press office reported, noting that the company planned to invite Indian journalists and experts in the arms sphere to Russia so that they could see with their own eyes modern and qualitative arms, which the Indian police and border guards could get, if the current tender terms "would be more beneficial for the producer of genuine Kalashnikov automatic rifles."

"No doubt, the Indian side has the right to choose any arms for its law-enforcement, defense and security agencies. In turn, the Russian side has the full right not to act in the role of the tender’s marginal participant and so the refusal by Rosoboronexport to give up the tenders is a logical decision. But if the terms of the tenders are altered, we are ready to take part in them," the Kalashnikov Group press office said.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 19-10-2017 at 11:17 AM


ADEX 2017: S&T motivated to grow its small arms

18th October 2017 - 11:10 GMT | by Gordon Arthur in Seoul



S&T Motiv displayed several new small arms that it is currently developing – including a 5.56mm assault rifle, 7.62mm machine gun and 12.7mm anti-materiel rifle – at the Seoul ADEX 2017 exhibition from 17-22 October.

Shaun An, manager of public relations at S&T Motiv, said production of the K2C1 5.56mm assault rifle (pictured above) commenced last year for South Korea’s military. An evolution of the in-service K2C rifle, S&T Motiv will produce 60,000 of these 3.68kg rifles this year to fulfil a one-off order. A 3.3kg short-barrel version is also available.

Coming later on will be the K2C2 rifle, a more radical evolution of the basic design. This weapon is now in development and it will be produced from 2021 onwards as a replacement rifle for the whole of the Republic of Korea Army (ROKA).

The K2C2 has an extendable and folding buttstock, flip-up front sight, integrated Picatinny rail and a selector switch on both sides to aid ambidextrous use. Development of this rifle is expected to be completed next year. Its range is listed as 500m.

Weapons for the ROKA will have a 16-inch barrel, but a carbine variant with a 12-inch barrel will be available for the export market.

In terms of machine guns, An continued, the 7.62mm K-12C2 will replace the M60 in ROKA infantry service beginning next year. This 1.23m-long weapon has a four-position adjustable buttstock, an angled carry handle, foldable front sight, ergonomic trigger handle and a lighter weight of 10.5kg.

No weapon sight has been selected for the K-12C2 yet, so competition is intensifying amongst local sight manufacturers.

As an adjunct to the K3 5.56mm light machine gun, the LMG II is also being developed with series production to start in 2019.

S&T Motiv is developing a 12.7mm anti-materiel rifle too after a requirement was issued by the government this year. The company showed a conceptual solution at Seoul ADEX and production will not start until 2022 so it is still early days.

An said the 400 employees at S&T Motiv’s weapons division were extremely busy given the large number of projects on the go.

As well as being supplier to the ROK military, exports make up an important part of S&T Motiv’s trade. An said his company had a turnover of KRW15 billion ($13.3 million) from 2008-14 from exports alone. This included major orders from countries such as Iraq, Pakistan and the Middle East.

S&T Motiv, which was once a government arsenal until being privatised in 1981, has enjoyed a privileged position as small arms supplier to the South Korean armed forces. However, the government is trying to introduce more competition, so S&T Motiv will have to compete with Dasan, another local company, in the future.

S&T Motiv also makes the innovative K11 dual-barrel airburst weapon that combines a 5.56mm rifle with 20mm grenade launcher. The K11 has experienced problems because recoil forces damage the computerised fire control system. An said a more robust computer is being tested, and that a lighter and slimmer version of the K11 will appear next year.
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[*] posted on 19-10-2017 at 02:43 PM


You know things are screwed up when even Russia is pulling out of an arms acquisition process...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 19-10-2017 at 09:53 PM


Indian Army Brass Call for Small Arms Program Reform (Again)

Posted 1 min ago



The scale of what they require is mind-boggling..............

In an ongoing national conference where the top Indian Army generals are convening to discuss issues and ways to improve the military, one of the top issues is small arms program reform, especially in regards to the 5.56x45mm INSAS infantry rifle currently in use by most Indian Infantrymen. Secondarily, leaders are looking towards ways to improve or adopt better machine guns and light support weapons for the troops. One news report stated that the service is in dire need of at least 200,000 replacement rifles for the INSAS, which was adopted in 1988.

From the Times Of India–
Though plans are now on track to plug major operational gaps in artillery guns, air defence missiles and helicopters, “small arms” remain a big worry. As per overall plans, the 12-lakh strong Army needs 8,18,500 new-generation assault rifles, 4,18,300 close-quarter battle (CQB) carbines, 43,700 light machine guns and 5,679 sniper rifles. All these figures also include some weapons for the much-smaller IAF and Navy, say sources.

But all these induction plans, which are supposed to include direct purchase of an initial number of weapons from a foreign vendor followed by large-scale indigenous production with technology transfer, have failed to materialize so far.

In September 2016, for instance, the Army was forced to re-launch its global hunt for new-generation 7.62 x 51mm assault rifles to replace the old glitch-prone 5.56mm INSAS (Indian small arms system) rifles after similar bids over the last decade were scrapped due to corruption scandals, unrealistic technical requirements and change in caliber of the desired guns, as was first reported by TOI.

The predicament of the Indian Army service rifles is no stranger to TFB. Not only has the MoD realized the extent of this problem before, but its own Ordnance Board has completely failed to come up with a reliable alternative that could pass any test. So far what we have seen from the Indian Army is this cycle of realizing that the current service rifle is far from acceptable (to the point that troops in India’s most actively engaged combat zone, the Kashmir are very often seen with AKMs), deciding that something needs to be done, attempting an initiative that involves designing and producing an alternative in India as apart of the ‘Buy & Make’ Indian drive, failing, then going right back to where the command structure is right now.

Case in point, Indian soldiers in Kashmir with AKMS’.

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[*] posted on 21-10-2017 at 10:33 AM


Kalashnikov Group upgrades AK-103 assault rifle

Nikolai Novichkov - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

20 October 2017

The Kalashnikov Group, a subsidiary of the Rostec state corporation, has modernised the AK-103 assault rifle chambered for the 7.62×39/M43 round.


Kalashnikov has modernised the AK-103, with the upgraded assault rifle designated the AK-103M. (Kalashnikov Group)

The updated firearm, designated AK-103M, has a reinforced upper receiver, the entire length of which is fitted with a MIL-STD-1913 rail for modern sighting systems. In addition, the handguard carries 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o'clock Picatinny rails for tactical grips, laser pointers, and weapon flashlights. The rail interface is complemented by iron sights, while the side-mounted ('dovetail') attaching lug for sights has been removed.

The AK-103M is fitted with a 415 mm barrel, weighs 4.1 kg with an empty magazine, and has a combat length variable between 880 mm and 940 mm. The weapon can fire in semi-automatic and automatic modes and its cyclic rate of fire is 600 rounds per minute.

The assault rifle has a folding polymer buttstock with adjustable length and height, and an ergonomic pistol grip with an internal container for batteries. The AK-74 type muzzle brake present on the AK-103 has been replaced with a slotted (cage-type) flash suppressor on the modernised weapon. The cleaning rod that is stored under the barrel on the AK-103 has been removed.

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[*] posted on 21-10-2017 at 10:38 AM


The AK-103M is the rifle the Russians wanted to propose to the Indians, but seeing as some prick in the Indian MoD scripted a specification based on the LEGACY AK-47's, the Russian's latest and greatest AK cannot comply. What a nonsense!
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[*] posted on 21-10-2017 at 02:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  




What is this voodoo? A rifle that works? The Indian Army Ordnance Board won’t be happy to hear about this!

Lithgow should definitely get onto this. Once the Indians hear of the infallible magnificence of the EF-88 enhanced battle rifle, they just like us, won’t even bother competing it against anything else...

This could make history as the fastest Indian arms procurement of all time!




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 22-10-2017 at 12:49 PM


Nah, they gotta cancel this competition first................give it a week or three!
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[*] posted on 22-10-2017 at 11:28 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bug2  
Nah, they gotta cancel this competition first................give it a week or three!


Yup, cancel the competition and have at least 3 project members arrested for official corruption...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 31-10-2017 at 10:00 PM


IWI launches Tavor AR assault rifle

Andrew White - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

30 October 2017


The Tavor AR assault rifle is expected to be available in the first quarter of 2018. Source: IWI

Israel Weapon Industries (IWI) is set to unveil an upgraded variant of its Tavor assault rifle as well as a new family of handguns at the Defense and Security Thailand 2017 exhibition in Bangkok on 6 November.

IWI has responded to emerging demands for increased lethality and range with the design of a 7.62x51 mm calibre Tavor AR assault rifle. To date, the company has only manufactured the bullpup assault rifle in NATO standard 9x19 mm; 5.56x45 mm; and 7.62x35 mm (300BLK) calibres.

Shlomi Saba, CEO at IWI, explained how the Tavor 7 AR would enable customers to operate in a “wide variety of scenarios at short and medium range with enhanced firepower efficiently, safely, and easily with only minimal maintenance”.


The latest 7.62x51 mm calibre Tavor AR assault rifle features increased lethality and range. (IWI)

Featuring ambidextrous controls and features similar to IWI’s X95 model, including fire selector switch; cocking lever; magazine release catch; and ejection port; the Tavor 7 AR features a rail adaptor system in the 3-; 6-; 9-; and 12- o’clock positions for the integration of weapon accessories including laser designators, torchlights, and optical weapon sights.

Manufactured from impact-modified polymer, the weapon has been hammer-forged and chrome-lined and also features a free-floating barrel for enhanced accuracy and lethality, IWI stated.

The Tavor 7 AR features a short-stroke gas piston operating system with four-position variable gas regulator, which includes an ‘Off’ position designed for special operation forces.

The operating system also includes a rotating bolt for increased safety and a modular pistol grip.

The weapon is available in grey, olive drab green, and flat dark earth colours with options for multiple replaceable barrel lengths (17 and 20 inches) to suit mission requirements. Tavor 7 measures a total weight of 4.1 kg unloaded and has a claimed maximum effective range of 600 m.

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[*] posted on 1-11-2017 at 12:46 AM


S&T Motiv Unveil K2C-2

Posted 1 day ago in Daily News, Defense, News, Rifles by Matthew Moss


New S&T Motiv K2C-2 (milidom.net)

South Korea’s S&T Motiv (formerly Daewoo) have unveiled the next generation of their K2 rifle. Displayed for the first time at the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition (ADEX 2017) the K2C-2 is expected to enter production in the 2020s.

The K2C-2 is one of a number of updates to S&T Motiv’s catalogue, others include upgrades to the K3 light machine gun and the K12 GPMG as well as the K11 Dual-barrel air burst weapon (which combines a 5.56 rifle with a 20mm bolt action launcher).

The weapon is still very much under development and from the photo available looks to have changed very little externally. With the K2C-2 S&T Motiv have the future of the Republic of Korea’s Army in mind. The K2C-2 is said to offer greater modularity than the older K2 and K2C-1s currently in service.

Little information on the new rifle is available but like the current K2C-1 the new rifle has a Picatinny top rail but retains a fixed rear and a folding integrated front sight. K2C-2 has an extendable and folding buttstock, and ambidextrous controls.

The gas operated K2C-2 will have a 16 inch barrel as standard with a 12-inch carbine version also planned to replace the 5.56x45mm K1A. You can check out S&T Motiv’s full small arms catalogue here, the K2C-2 is not yet listed. S&T Motiv believe that following successful testing the production of the new weapon could begin in 2021.
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[*] posted on 2-11-2017 at 10:08 PM


D&S 2017: Emtan unveils trio of new rifles

2nd November 2017 - 11:11 GMT | by Andrew White in London

Sorry I cannot attach an image file as the local server in the Philippines will not allow it.............I've written to them, but who knows IF they'll unblock it?

The MZ-47, launched mext week in Bangkok, Thailand, is a 7.62x39mm automatic weapon compatible with the AK47 standard magazine and ammunition, available in two barrel lengths – 11.5in and 14.5 inches. (Photo: Emtan)

Israeli small arms specialist Emtan Karmiel will introduce a series of assault rifles to the market at the D&S conference in Bangkok, Thailand next week.

According to company officials, the latest weapon systems include variants of its MZ-4 assault rifle, based on conventional operating systems associated with the M4 and M16 family of rifles.

These include the MZ-47, MZ-4P, and MZ-300 automatic/semi-automatic firearms.

The MZ-47 is available in 7.62x39mm calibre, featuring standard AK-47 ammunition and magazine housings.

The rifle is available with options for two barrel lengths, both chrome-lined and measuring 11.5 and 14.5" respectively, providing operators with flexibility to satisfy different operational requirements.

The automatic and ambidextrous rifle is manufactured from aluminium and can fire between 650 and 850 rounds per minute. It features front and rear flip-up sights for close quarter battle.

The MZ-4P - which has options for 11.5 and 14.5" barrel lengths - has a piston operating system, available in NATO standard 5.56x45mm calibre. 

It has been designed to deliver a ‘consistent rate of fire while eliminating gas exiting at the rear of the rifle, even when using a suppressor,’ a company spokesperson explained to Shephard.

Finally, the MZ-300 is available in 7.62x35mm Blackout (300BLK) calibre, with options for 9, 11.5 and 14.5" barrel lengths with a company spokesperson describing how the weapon utilises 5.56mm x 45mm standard bolts and magazines, providing an ‘ideal solution for automatic and semi-automatic firing with short barrels and suppressors’.

‘The MZ-300 delivers greater terminal ballistics effects such as stopping power and reduced penetration, with an option of automatic firing with suppressors,’ officials explained.

Defence sources highlighted to Shephard how the global special operations community continues to witness the proliferation of 300BLK calibre, particularly suitable for CQB operations in urban environments.

‘We chose to launch these three weapons in Thailand since we are aware of the need of the local and regional markets for the type of solutions we offer,' said Ron Pollak, VP sales and marketing at Emtan.

'We have longstanding ties with Thai forces, which have adopted quite a few of our products and are very satisfied with them. We highly appreciate this cooperation, and are working towards its continuation.’
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[*] posted on 2-11-2017 at 11:16 PM


What? Use a VPN. Screw Filipino regs!

Private Internet Access I understand to be quite affordable and useful...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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