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[*] posted on 11-5-2017 at 05:59 PM
Land-based anti-ship missile systems


Serbia unveils ALAS-C missile system during 'Celik 2017' manoeuvres

Igor Bozinovski, Skopje - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

10 May 2017

An ALAS-C coastal defence missile, launched at Nikinci testing ground near Belgrade during preparations for the Serbian Armed Forces' 'Celik 2017' manoeuvres on 9 May. Source: Serbian MoD

On 9 May Serbia celebrated its Armed Forces Day, Victory Day, and Europe Day during the 'Celik 2017' ('Steel 2017') military exercise, held at the Serbian Armed Forces' Nikinci testing ground 45 km west of the capital Belgrade.

The exercise involved the participation of 560 Serbian military and police personnel and also served to demonstrate the latest developments within Serbia's defence industry, among which the most notable was the unveiling of the ALAS-C coastal defence missile developed by Belgrade-based company EDePro.

During 'Celik 2017' a TV-guided ALAS-C was demonstrated destroying a moving target at a range of around 12.5 km: about half the weapon's current effective range of 25 km (although Serbian media have stated that this will be increased to 50 or even 60 km in future).

Developed to meet the requirements of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) armed forces, the ALAS-C is primarily designed to destroy hostile patrol boats. The system shown at Nikinci was mounted on a UAE-produced Nimr Automotive Haffet-class 6x6 light armoured vehicle that carried six missile canisters arranged in a rectangular shape (two rows of three canisters) that can be elevated and turned away from the unprotected cab.

The original TV-guided ALAS (Advanced Light Attack System), designed to destroy tanks and other AFVs as well as command posts, fortifications, and infrastructure, is being developed in two ground-to-ground variants: the ALAS-A, with a range of 25 km; and the ALAS-B, with a range of 60 km.

The coastal-defence ALAS-C, meanwhile, is the focus of a 2013 joint-venture agreement between Serbian state-owned defence import/export intermediary Yugoimport SDPR and Abu Dhabi-based Emirates Advanced Research and Technology Holding.

Earlier this year Serbian assistant defence minister Nenad Miloradovic said the UAE remains a key market for Serbia's defence industry, where it has "active contracts" worth around USD220 million.

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[*] posted on 19-2-2018 at 07:26 PM


Russian Navy’s Coastal Defense Forces Almost Fully Equipped with Bal & Bastion Systems

Posted On Monday, 19 February 2018 08:57

The proportion of advanced military hardware operational with the Russian Navy’s coastal-based forces makes up 96 percent, Navy Commander-in-Chief Vladimir Korolyov said in an interview with the Krasnaya Zvezda newspaper. This figure was achieved after the coastal-based forces were rearmed with Bal (NATO reporting name: SSC-6 Sennight) and Bastion (SSC-5 Stooge) coastal-based missile systems, he added.


File Picture: 3K60 BAL (NATO reporting name: SS-C-6 Sennight) Coastal Missile System of the Russian Navy Pacific Fleet Coastal Troops seen during its first test launch in Primorye territory.

"In the past several years, the rearmament of the Navy’s coastal-based forces with Bal and Bastion systems has allowed us to bring the proportion of advanced military hardware to 96 percent," Korolyov said.

In the past five years, the share of state-of-the-art rescue equipment has grown by 5.3 times from 13 percent to 70 percent, the commander said.

In the same period, the proportion of advanced aircraft in service with the Navy’s air arm has increased by more than 1.5 times.


3K55 Bastion coastal defense mobile anti-ship missile systems (NATO reporting name: SSC-5 Stooge) of the Russian Pacific Fleet’s missile and artillery brigade. File Picture: Russian Pacific Fleet press service

The Bastion coastal-based system with the standardized Yakhont (Onyx) (SS-N-26 Strobile) supersonic anti-ship homing cruise missile is designed to eliminate surface ships of various types and classes operated by naval assault forces, convoys, ship- and carrier-borne task forces, as well as individual vessels and land-based radio-contrast targets in intense firing and electronic countermeasures environment.

The Bal coastal-based missile system with the Kh-35 (AS-20 Kayak) anti-ship missile is designed to protect and defend territorial waters, straits, naval bases and other coastal-based infrastructural facilities. It can also provide protection against the enemy’s amphibious assault forces.

The system can operate in all weather conditions both in the daytime and at night in firing and radio-electronic countermeasures environment.

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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 07:22 PM


Japan: Okinawa to be defended by Type 12 anti-ship missiles

Posted On Wednesday, 28 February 2018 10:02

Because of the constantly increasing activity of the Chinese navy in the disputed waters of the China Sea, the Japanese government intends to deploy Type 12 anti-ship missile batteries on Okinawa.


Type 12 anti-ship missile (Picture source: Wikipedia)

Japan already plans to send missiles to Okinawa Prefecture's Miyako Island. Now, lawmakers believe the main island should also have a missile battery. Miyako Island is located about 290 km southwest of the main island of Okinawa.

The Type 12 surface-to-ship missile (12式地対艦誘導弾) is a truck-mounted anti-ship missile developed by Japan's Mitsubishi’ Heavy Industries in 2012. It is an upgrade of the Type 88 Surface-to-Ship missile. The Type 12 features INS with mid-course GPS guidance and better precision due to enhanced Terrain Countour Matching and target discrimination capabilities. The weapon is networked, where initial and mid-course targeting can be provided by other platforms, and also boasts shorter reload times, reduced lifecycle costs, and a range of 108 nautical miles (200 km).
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[*] posted on 2-3-2018 at 12:09 AM


Poor old China eh? Everyone is out to get them. They deploy thousands of ASM’s? It’s cool.

Japan deploys one solitary battery of missiles and it is ‘destablising the region...’




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 10-3-2018 at 07:05 PM


MBDA studies Sea Venom for surface-launched coastal defence role

Robin Hughes, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

08 March 2018


MBDA is evaluating the application of the Sea Venom/ANL drop-launched anti-ship missile in a surface-launched coastal defence role. Source: MBDA

MBDA has launched an internal study to evaluate the application of its Sea Venom/Anti-Navire Léger (ANL) lightweight medium-range anti-ship missile in a surface-launched role, as part of a networked multilayered coastal defence solution.

Co-funded by the governments of France and the United Kingdom, Sea Venom/ANL is a 100 kg drop-launch high-subsonic sea-skimming effector developed by MBDA to meet the joint requirements of the UK Royal Navy (RN) and French Navy for a future shipborne helicopter-launched anti-ship missile. In RN service, Sea Venom is mandated under the Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon (Heavy) requirement to equip the Wildcat HMA2 helicopter, and will replace the capability previously delivered by Sea Skua anti-ship missile; in French Navy service the missile will equip the Hélicoptère Interarmées Léger (HIL – Joint Light Helicopter) rotary-wing platform.

Sea Venom/ANL incorporates an imaging infrared (IIR) seeker (with space and weight provisions for an additional semi-active laser [SAL] guidance channel), advanced inertial navigation guidance, a high-speed two-way datalink for operator-in-the-loop control, and a 30 kg-class semi-armour-piercing blast/fragmentation warhead. SAL guidance, if enabled, would allow for the engagement of targets outside the line of sight in concert with third-party laser designation. “The system is based on an innovative ‘fly-above-the-loop’ concept: using its advanced artificial intelligence capability the missile is able to fly a fully autonomous 'fire and forget' profile, while enabling operator interface for actions such [as] in-flight re-targeting, aimpoint correction and refinement, and safe abort,” an MBDA spokesperson told Jane’s. Powered by a boost/sustain propulsion package - a fixed boost motor aft (derived from the Brimstone motor) and a mid-body rocket sustainer, Sea Venom/ANL has a given maximum range of "over 20 km."

“Sea Venom has been designed primarily to be drop-launched from air platforms,” Christophe Leduc, product executive, Naval Defence Systems, MBDA told Jane’s .

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[*] posted on 18-4-2018 at 09:52 PM


DSA 2018: China's NORINCO Showcasing TL-7B Anti-ship Missile

Posted On Tuesday, 17 April 2018 17:21

At DSA 2018, the tri-service defence exhibition currently held in Kuala Lumpur - Malaysia, Chinese company NORINCO (China North Industries Corp.) is showcasing its TL-7B land based anti-ship cruise missile.


TL-7B anti-ship missile (left)

TL-7B is a medium / long range anti-ship cruise missile developped by NORINCO with mature technology. It is designed to be launched from the AR3 platform.

According to NORINCO, the missile is designed to strike medium to large surface vessel (destroyers, frigates, supply ships, landing ships etc...). TL-7B missile uses ING / GPS and Radio Frequency (RF) seeker, digital control system, advanced composite material structure and armor-piercing anti-ship warhead. A single missile can disable (critically damage) or sink the targeted vessel. TL-7B has the ability to conduct sea skimming flights.

A NORINCO representative told Navy Recognition that the TL-7B missile was unveiled for the first time in 2017.


AR3 scale model at DSA 2018

The AR3 is an MRLS Multiple rocket launcher system presented for the first time during the International Defence Exhibition IDEX 2011. The AR3 370mm Multiple Launcher Rocket System (MLRS) is a long range suppressing weapon system developed and manufactured by NORINCO.

AR3 adopts a universal launching platform to fire 750mm tactical missiles, 380mm anti-ship missiles, 370/300mm guided rockets...

AR3 comes with a complete C4ISR command / fire control and unmanned reconnaissance means.

TL-7B specifications:

Typical target: Large and medium warship
Diameter: 380 mm
Wingspan:1.3 m
Cruise speed: 0.8 Mach
Cruise height: 10 m (above sea surface)
Firing range: 180 km
Guidance mode: INS + GPS + RF seeker
Hit probabilit: 90%
Missile length: < 6000 mm
Missile weight: < 850 kg
Warhead weight: > 320 kg
Operating temperature: -40° to +55° C
Shelf life: 10 years
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[*] posted on 25-4-2018 at 10:04 PM


Pakistan Navy releases images of Zarb coastal defence system

Gabriel Dominguez, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

24 April 2018


Pakistan’s Zarb ASCM is seen here being test-launched from a TEL vehicle during exercise ‘Sealion III’. Source: Pakistan Navy

The Pakistan Navy (PN) has released one of the first images of its Zarb land-based anti-ship cruise missile (ASCM) system (also known as the Zarb Weapon System) being test-launched.

In the April issue of its Navy News magazine, the PN published a photograph of the Zarb ASCM being fired from an 8×8 transport-erector-launcher (TEL) vehicle at the Jinnah Naval Base in Ormara, Balochistan Province, as part of the recently conducted naval exercise ‘Sealion III’.

The missile, which was fired by the PN’s Naval Missile Regiment under the Naval Strategic Force Command, successfully hit its intended target, said the publication without providing further details about the test or the system.

Other than the colour scheme, the missile shown in the images appears to be a Chinese C-602, which is the export variant of the domestic YJ-62. The C-602 is a medium-range anti-ship/land-attack missile, which has a stated maximum range of 280 km and is armed with a 300 kg high-explosive semi-armour-piercing (SAP) warhead.

The TEL vehicle used to fire the Zarb ASCM features three container launch units (CLUs) and is also almost identical to that used by the YJ-62 mobile coastal defence system operated by China’s People’s Liberation Army.

The TEL vehicle has a main front cab, a separate rear command cab, a power-generation system, and an elevating launch platform holding the three CLUs.

Although arranged differently and of a different coloration, the CLUs also appear to be exactly the same as those used by the Chinese Navy’s Luyang II (Type 052C)-class destroyers.

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[*] posted on 28-8-2018 at 01:27 PM


Romania to cut $159M deal for anti-ship missiles to protect Black Sea coast

By: Jaroslaw Adamowski   8 hours ago


A seaman inspects a cannon on the Romanian frigate Regina Maria during a military drill on the Black Sea on March 16, 2015. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images)

WARSAW, Poland — The Romanian government has approved a decision to spend at least €137 million (U.S. $159 million), excluding the value-added tax, on the purchase of anti-ship missiles that are to be deployed to the country’s Black Sea coast.

The Cabinet approved the planned acquisition along with other programs of strategic importance developed by the Defence Ministry, the government said in a statement.

Romanian Defence Minister Mihai Fifor has said he planned to award the contract by the end of the year.

Local news site Hotnews.ro reported that the potential bidders for the contract, which is scheduled to be financed in the years 2018-2023, could comprise one American and three European manufacturers. These include Boeing, offering its Harpoon missiles; MBDA, with the Exocet MM40 Block 3 systems; Kongsberg, offering its Naval Strike Missile; and Saab, with the RBS-15 Mk3 systems, produced in cooperation with Diehl BGT Defence.

Last February, Bucharest inked a letter of agreement with the U.S. government to purchase the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System and Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems. The Romanian Cabinet is also pursuing plans to acquire Patriot air and missile defense systems after it signed an agreement last November.
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[*] posted on 28-8-2018 at 10:44 PM


Romania is building quite a handy little force...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 14-10-2018 at 05:35 PM


Russian Navy Artillery Units to Get Uragan-1M MLRS for Coastal Defence

POSTED ON SATURDAY, 13 OCTOBER 2018 09:44

The Russian Navy began to rearm its artillery units in Crimea and Kaliningrad region. They will get long-range multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS) Uragan and upgraded Uragan-1M, the Izvestia daily writes.


Russian Navy Artillery Units to Get Uragan 1M MLRS for Coastal Defence The Russian Navy artillery units in Crimea and Kaliningrad region will get long-range multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS) Uragan and upgraded Uragan-1M (pictured here). Russian MoD picture.

The Defense Ministry told the newspaper it decided to reinforce the artillery might of the Navy. The artillery regiment of the Black Sea fleet and artillery brigade of the Baltic fleet are rearmed with 200mm Uragan 9K57 MLRS. Baltic artillerymen have already received the first weapons. In September the brigade for the first time trained fire from them. In future upgraded Uragan-1M will replace the Uragan.

The range will increase to 70 km. Tornado-G and Grad MLRS currently operated by coastal artillerymen have a smaller range of 40 and 20 km respectively.

Little is known about Uragan-1M. It is distinguished by packet loading of the launchers with transport-launch containers which increase the rate of fire. New artillery munitions have been designed - cluster and air-fuel explosive with a bigger range. Uragan-1M will have guided missiles. The MLRS can fire 122mm projectiles of Grad. The automatic control systems and onboard computer allow MLRS to destroy targets in real time without the control of the operator.

The deployment of new MLRS will increase the capabilities of the Black Sea and Baltic fleets, expert Dmitry Boltenkov said. It is important as there are no major distances in the regions. "Uragan will make coastal troops long-range. It will be possible to destroy warships and armor at distant approaches. Thus, the coastal troops are reinforced in areas with complicated military international situation. The rearmament has matured long ago," he said.

The Black Sea fleet artillery regiment and the Baltic fleet artillery brigade are a part of the coastal forces. They have to destroy light warships, protect the coast from landing operations, and support friendly forces and formations.

The 244th separate Neman artillery brigade of the Red Banner Orders of Suvorov II degree and Kutuzov III degree is deployed in Kaliningrad. It is a permanent readiness unit to defend Kaliningrad region. It comprises two cannon and one missile artillery battalions. The brigade is armed with 152mm self-propelled Msta-S howitzers and Grad 9K51 BM-21 MLRS. The eighth separate artillery regiment is deployed in Simferopol. It is also a permanent readiness unit to defend Crimea and its coast. The regiment is armed with 152mm self-propelled Msta-S with an automatic aiming system, Tornado-G 9K51M MLRS, self-propelled antitank missile complexes Khrisantema 9P157, the Izvestia said.

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[*] posted on 18-10-2018 at 09:41 AM


Saab Unveils Surface Launch RBS15 Gungnir at Euronaval

(Source: Saab; issued Oct 16, 2018)


The RBS 15 anti-ship missile already has a ground-launched variant for coastal defense, so the emergence of a ground-launched variant of the Mk 4 missile was only a question of time. (Saab photo)

Saab will unveil the surface launch version of RBS15 Gungnir, the next generation anti-ship missile system at Euronaval, stand G18-H23, 23-26 October in Paris. A press briefing on the new system will be held at 14:00 on Wednesday 24 October, at the Saab stand.

The surface launch version of RBS15 Gungnir uses the all new RBS15 Mk4 Surface missile. This provides greater range, enhanced defence penetration and electronic protection as well as a more advanced target seeker, allowing it to engage any target, in all conditions.

The RBS15 Mk4 Surface missile is used in both the sea system and the land system of RBS15 Gungnir. It is designed to provide commonality through easy integration on both land- and sea-based platforms of almost any size. The system is fully backwards compatible, so an investment in Mk3 today opens a smooth path to transition into Gungnir tomorrow.

“With the RBS15 Gungnir we continue to build on the success and knowledge we have gained from the previous generations of RBS15. The surface launch version is a highly flexible missile system that can be integrated with existing command networks and on a wide range of the ships available on the market today”, says Görgen Johansson, Senior Vice President and head of Saab business area Dynamics.

The development and production programme, valued at 3.7 BSEK, was contracted in March 2017 with the Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV). This next generation of the RBS15 system is named RBS15 Gungnir by Saab and is now being offered to the market as a complete missile system solution for air, sea and land based platforms.

The RBS15 missile family is jointly produced by Saab and Diehl Defence GmbH & Co. KG and serves with various navies, coastal batteries and air forces from Sweden, Finland, Germany, Poland, Croatia, Thailand and an undisclosed country.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 18-10-2018 at 11:02 AM


Seems like it has the same problems as Harpoon to me...

Old design, slow, non-LO airframe... A warm over and calling it the Mk4 doesn’t seem to be enough to justify investment in it, apart perhaps as an upgrade for existing users.





In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 18-10-2018 at 11:05 AM


Personally, I'd go for NSM every time..........
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[*] posted on 7-11-2018 at 06:53 PM


AirShow China 2018: CASIC unveils new CM-401 anti-ship missile

POSTED ON MONDAY, 05 NOVEMBER 2018 13:33

The CM-401 anti-ship missile is now ready for the export market, it was confirmed at this year's edition of AirShow China, being held from 6-11 November in Zhuhai. The CM-401 missile system is being produced by China Aerospace Science & Industry Corporation Limited (CASIC).


CASIC CM-401 anti-ship missile system (Picture source Army Recognition)

The CM-401 missile is a new type of supersonic anti-ship missile, using near space trajectory, and capable of all-course high supersonic maneuverable flight, terminal diving and high velocity top-attacking, as well as various platform launch firing.

It has the characteristics of multi-ballistic coordinated capability, strong penetration ability and system combat. It features an operational range of 15-290km and reaches a Mach 4 cruise and Mach 6 terminal speed, as well as evasive capability such as the M20/Iskander missile system. It is assumed that the missile would have a maximum diameter of 850 mm

The CM-401 can also fire multiple missiles in different ballistic arches, to deceive anti-air/ballistic countermeasures especally from ships. It use ARH to seek surface ships, as well as SAR to target land facilities like ports.
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[*] posted on 7-11-2018 at 09:51 PM


It seems to be a common theme among Russian and Chinese anti-ship missiles that they are catching on to the fact that the chances of a supersonic sea skimming missile getting through current missile defences isn't too great, but a high altitude ballistic shot that flies vertically down onto the target will get through most defences that aren't covered by SM3 tier defences.



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[*] posted on 8-11-2018 at 09:28 AM


Image shows ground-launched variant of China’s YJ-12 anti-ship missile

Gabriel Dominguez, London and Neil Gibson, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

07 November 2018


An image has emerged on online forums confirming that a ground-launched variant of China’s YJ-12 radar-guided anti-ship missile is in service with the PLA. Source: Via Weibo

An image has emerged on online forums confirming that a ground-launched variant of China’s YJ-12 ramjet-powered, radar-guided anti-ship missile is in service with the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) as part of a coastal defence system.

The missile is shown in the picture being launched from a five-axle transporter-erector-launcher (TEL) at an undisclosed location. The TEL and launch containers are similar to those used with the CJ-10 cruise missile.

It is likely that the photographed system is the same one as that referred to by US network CNBC as the YJ-12B. Citing sources with direct knowledge of US intelligence reports, the media outlet reported on 2 May that Beijing had installed YJ-12B systems along with and HQ-9B self-propelled surface-to-air missile systems on Fiery Cross Reef, Subi Reef, and Mischief Reef in the disputed South China Sea.

A few weeks later, on 23 May, the United States disinvited China from participating in this year’s multinational ‘Rim of the Pacific’ (‘RIMPAC’) maritime exercise due to what Washington described as Beijing’s “continued militarisation of disputed features in the South China Sea”, which “only serves to raise tensions and destabilise the region”.

“While China has maintained that the construction of the islands is to ensure safety at sea, navigation assistance, search and rescue, fisheries protection, and other non-military functions, the placement of these weapon systems is only for military use,” stressed US Department of Defense (DoD)

spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Logan at the time, calling on Beijing to “immediately” remove the military systems and “reverse course on the militarisation of disputed South China Sea features”.

The YJ-12 missile, which has an estimated maximum range of 500 km, has a long ogival nose and a roughly constant-diameter cylindrical body, to which four rectangular-section fairings are attached.

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[*] posted on 10-1-2019 at 08:05 PM


China’s Ship-Killer Missiles Mobilized to Northwest China Plateau

(Source: Global Times; published Jan 09, 2019)


A Chinese DF-26 long-range anti-ship ballistic missile. Deploying it far from the seaboard ensures that it is out of reach during the early stages of its trajectory, when it is slow and thus more vulnerable to enemy countermeasures or weapons. (China MoD file photo)

China's far-reaching, anti-ship ballistic missile the DF-26 has been mobilized to Northwest China's plateau and desert areas, reported China's national broadcaster on Tuesday after a US warship trespassed into China's territorial waters off the Xisha Islands in the South China Sea on Monday.

The DF-26 is China's new generation of intermediate-range ballistic missile capable of targeting medium and large ships at sea. It can carry both conventional and nuclear warheads.

The DF-26 is attached to a brigade under the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Rocket Force that operates in Northwest China's plateau and desert areas, China Central Television (CCTV) reported.

The report said the missiles are now capable of mobile operations across the country. It was unclear from the CCTV report when the missiles were mobilized.

A mobile missile launch from deep in the country's interior is more difficult to intercept, a Beijing-based military expert, who asked not to be named, told the Global Times on Wednesday.

During the initial phase of a ballistic missile launch, the missile is relatively slow and not difficult to detect, making it an easier target for enemy anti-missile installations, the expert noted.

After the missile enters a later stage, its speed is so high that chances for interception are significantly lower, the expert said.

This is also the first time the missile has made a close-up public appearance since it came into service with the PLA, cctv.com reported.

The timing of the report sparked discussions among Chinese military observers online, as it came after the USS McCambell, a US guided missile destroyer, trespassed into China's territorial waters off the Xisha Islands on Monday without permission from the Chinese government.

China dispatched aircraft and warships to warn the US vessel and has lodged a solemn representation with the US, Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Lu Kang said at a daily briefing on Monday.

The report is a good reminder that China is capable of safeguarding its territory, the anonymous expert said. "Even when launched from deeper inland areas of China, the DF-26 has a range far-reaching enough to cover the South China Sea."

It can hit targets 4,500 kilometers away, china.com reported, making it capable of striking targets including US naval bases in Guam in the western Pacific.

In April 2018, Ministry of National Defense announced that the missile has officially joined the PLA Rocket Force.

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[*] posted on 11-7-2019 at 08:50 PM


IMDS 2019: First public appearance of the Rubezh-ME coastal defence system

Posted On Thursday, 11 July 2019 11:40

At IMDS 2019, a new version of the Russian Bal-E coastal defence system is presented for the 1st time. The Rubezh-ME, dedicated to the export market, is based on a Kamaz 63501 8x8 chassis which is more compact than the MZKT-7930 of the original Bal-E.


The Rubezh-ME coastal defence system at IMDS 2019

The Rubezh-ME still uses the same familly of KH-35 anti-ship missile. The system is paired with its Monolith-B self-propelled commmand vehicle with control and communication unit. The Rubez-ME can be deployed in less than 15 min, be positioned up to 1km above sea level and 10km from the coast line.

The Monolith-B radar allows the Rubezh-ME to engage targets up to 250km in active mode and up to 450km in passive mode, the systems also allows to track 30 targets in active mode, 50 in passive detection mode and 10 in targeting mode. The KH-35E missile has a range of 5 to 130km and the KH-35UE allows the Rubezh-ME to engage from 7 to 260km.
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[*] posted on 13-8-2019 at 10:52 PM


Indian MoD approves procurement of coastal batteries armed with BrahMos missiles

Rahul Bedi, New Delhi - Jane's Defence Weekly

12 August 2019

India's Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved the procurement of locally developed Next Generation Maritime Mobile Coastal Batteries (NGMMCBs) and software-defined radios (SDRs) for the Indian Navy (IN).


India's Ministry of Defence (MoD) has approved the procurement of locally developed Next Generation Maritime Mobile Coastal Batteries fitted with the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile (seen here). (IHS Markit/Patrick Allen)

The MoD's Defence Acquisition Council (DAC), which is headed by Defence Minister Rajnath Singh, announced on 8 August that an undisclosed number of NGMMCBs fitted with the BrahMos surface-to-surface supersonic cruise missile, would be deployed along India's coastline, but did not elaborate on the precise location.

However, IN sources told Jane's on 12 August that two NGMMCBs worth an estimated total of INR10 billion (USD140.37 million) would be based at INS Trata, the navy's missile battery base in Mumbai responsible for defending a large swathe of India's western coast.

(117 of 322 words)

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[*] posted on 2-9-2019 at 10:58 AM



U.S. Marines with Fox Battery, 2nd Battalion, 14th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, launch rockets from a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System during live-fire training at Adazi Training Area, Latvia. Land-based fires will help the Navy control a littoral sea such as the Baltic in a time of conflict.
U.S. Marine Corps (Andy O. Martinez)

Give Marines and Soldiers Better Anti-ship Fires

Land-based weapon systems hold tremendous promise in helping the Navy control the littorals.

By First Lieutenant Walker D. Mills, U.S. Marine Corps

September 2019 Proceedings Vol. 145/9/1,399

In his book Fleet Tactics and Coastal Combat, retired Navy Captain Wayne Hughes points out that almost all naval combat since 1945 has been fought in the littorals.1 Littoral warfare expert Milan Vego of the Naval War College argues that this trend only will increase because some 60 percent of the worlds politically significant urban areas are located within sixty miles of the coast, and 70 percent within three hundred miles.2

Yet, the U.S. Navys control of the sea is being increasingly contested in global littorals and narrow seas. As pressure grows on the Navy to meet this challenge without significant increases to the size of the fleet, the Marine Corps can help fill a widening gap between capability and requirements by providing land-based antiship weapon systems to support sea-control and sea-denial missions. To do so, the Corps needs to invest in long-range precision fires and supporting sensors.

In the December 2018 Marine Corps Gazette, a dozen articles discussed fires and artillery.3 Authors covered the capabilities and tactics of a wide range of nonlethal and lethal fires. Many ideas were superb, but the key innovation the service needs nowland-based antiship fires that can support naval operationswas absent. More recently, in the July 2019 Gazette, a group of Marines wrote that in simulating war in the western Pacific they found mobile, conventional land-based, long-range missiles incredibly valuable, [but] multiple variables involved in their employment were also fairy-dusted and need[ed] to be addressed before this became a real capability.4

It is a sign of progress that professional discussion has begun to include antiship fires, but this debate still addresses only the general conceptnot how these fires should be employed or what the specific capability will require. And yet senior leaders up to and including the Commandant himself have emphasized land-based antiship fires as a priority for the Marine Corps.5

Two years ago, 5th Battalion, 11th Marines successfully fired the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) from the deck of a ship at a target ashore.6 This is the emerging capability on which the artillery community needs to focusnot tactics and techniques for firepower in limited war.7 Both the Marine Corps and the Army need to rapidly develop and deploy redundant land-based capabilities to strike ships in the littoral, as well as concepts for their employment.

Army and Marine Corps Lag Adversaries

At the 2018 Rim of the Pacific exercise, an Army unit fired the Naval Strike Missile from the back of a Palletized Load System, hitting a target at sea.8 In addition, the Army has designated long-range precision fires as its top modernization priority.9 Even though the Marine Corps has made clear it was watching the results closely, it has not maintained pace with the Army in experimenting with this type of fires.

In fact, both services are far behind U.S. adversaries as well as allies in land-based antiship fires. Russia, China, Iran, Pakistan, Japan, and Poland, to name a few countries, all have deployed land-based antiship missiles capabilities in the past decade.

China tested antiship missiles on aircraft carriershaped targets in the Gobi Desert, and Iran test-fired several new antiship missiles in response to the United States pulling out of the nuclear agreement last year.10 Even Pakistan and Ukraine have tested land-based antiship cruise missiles.11

Land-based antiship warfighting capability is not foreign to the U.S. military. Its use stretches back to before the nations founding, although it has not been a priority since shortly after World War II ended. Before then, both the Army and Marine Corps maintained coastal defense units, but in 1950 the Army abolished the Coastal Artillery Corps and deactivated almost all of the nearly 200 coastal defense sites it had manned in the US.12 Similarly, the Marine Corps reorganized, converted, or abolished all 19 Marine Defense Battalions in 1944. Initially organized with 5-inch naval guns, these battalions saw action almost everywhere in the Pacific but proved most critical in early defensive actions, such as the Battle of Wake Island. In that instance, Marine gunners sank a Japanese destroyerthe first Japanese ship sunk by U.S. forces during the warand managed to hold off an invasion for 15 days. As the war progressed, however, the battalions increasingly shifted toward an antiaircraft role.13


U.S. Navy (Jasen Morenogarcia)
The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) transits the South China Sea, a littoral region where the Marine Corps and the Army could be important contributors to gaining and maintaining sea control.

The Two Services Must Work Together

The U.S. military needs a 21st-century version of the capability formerly provided by Marine Defense Battalions and the Army Coastal Defense Artillery Corps, but the two services need not have identical capabilities to contribute to this important mission. The Marines require a more mobile, expeditionary capability, whereas the Army can support a larger force structure and does not need to be as strategically mobile.

The rapid growth of the Peoples Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) already has started to put the U.S. Navy at a disadvantage in the western Pacific. The PLAN fleet is now larger in number of hulls than the entire U.S. fleet and still growing in size and capability.14 If the U.S. Navy can hand off missions in the littorals to the Marine Corps or Army, more Navy ships and submarines can focus on blue-water operations and fleet maneuver.

Naval leaders have said they need more lethality and greater range and distribution of forces. Unless the Marine Corps can fill roles previously handled by ships, it is difficult to imagine a way to increase the distribution and lethality of the fleet without either investing in more ships or adding more capability to existing ships.

Prepare for War in the Littorals

Marine officers writing recently in War on the Rocks imagined a future in which small, lethal teams of Marines set conditions in the littorals for operations such as seizing key maritime terrain.15 This is an example of traditional expeditionary warfare and power projection. We need to take this vision further, imagining those same Marines bringing with them HIMARS or a similar capability to control chokepoints or other key terrain without naval support. Better yet, Marines with long-range fires could project power from current bases in the Pacific as a deterrent in a concept that has been called Archipelagic Defense.16

In his seminal work, Naval Strategy and Operations in Narrow Seas, Vego argued that coastal defense forces can be used to obtain absolute local, though often temporary, control of straits and river estuaries. He emphasized the current and future value of mobile land-based systems: Strikes have already replaced naval battles as the main method of employment of coastal navies.17 In 2018, Marines at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, conducted a HIMARS raid against land targets with an Air Force C-130 aircraft.18 Could HIMARS or a similar system be used to strike a fleet at anchor? Could it be used to raid a fleet as it traveled through a chokepoint such as the Strait of Malacca?

The need for littoral fires is not unique to the western Pacific. Poland has acquired antiship missiles, and the Baltic and Scandinavian countries have operated them for decades. They also are increasingly prevalent in the Black Sea region. Marines armed with potent antiship missiles would be an asset in the Baltic, Bering, Barents, or Black Sea regionsand many other areas around the world.

The recent announcement of the U.S. withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty provides a further imperative for the Army and Marine Corps to aggressively expand the range of land-based fires. Admiral Philip Davidson, commander of Indo-Pacific Command, wrote in testimony to the Senate that fielding land-based systems previously banned under the INF would provide additional options to counter Chinas existing missile capabilities, complicate adversary decision making, and impose costs by forcing adversaries to spend money on expensive missile defense systems.19 Past analysis called mostly for modifying HIMARS and the M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System to fire at maritime targets, but withdrawal from the INF Treaty opens the door to developing new systems or adapting air and naval weapons such as the Tomahawk cruise missile for land-based employment against maritime targets.

In the near term, the Marine Corps needs to convert more artillery battalions to HIMARS and work closely with the Army in rapidly developing and fielding a joint system for mobile long-range antiship fires. In May, the Marine Corps awarded a $47 million contract for antiship missiles, but it is unclear how they will be integrated into the existing force structure. They may be intended for jets and not ground-based systems.20 Even if the missiles are intended for integration with HIMARS, the contract is a token investment compared with legacy acquisition programs such as the new heavy-lift helicopters and amphibious combat vehicles, both of dubious survivability in a littoral fight.

Land-based fires are a cheap alternative to buying more frigates, destroyers, and aircraft. They can be more easily hidden and distributed than sea-based fires but pack the same punch. They also are more survivableyou cannot sink the parking lot or the motor pool. Furthermore, as the Marines have demonstrated, the sensors can be disaggregated from the shooter. For example, an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, or the still-under-development MUX drone, can relay targets to ground-based launchers.21 The NavyMarine Corps team needs to rethink how it defines and evaluates fleet capability to conduct operations in the littorals. In 2000, Hughes wrote: For littoral operations, it is no longer possible to define a fleet merely as a set of warships, because land-based systems play a prominent part.22

Land-based antiship missile systems are an effective tool in countering maritime aggression, and this is being increasingly recognized inside and outside the force. In his planning guidance, Marine Corps Commandant General David Berger wrote, One possible future [of the Unit Deployment Program] would be the forward deployment of multiple High-Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) batteries armed with long-range anti-ship missiles.23 Employing these systems in the littorals of the western Pacific would disrupt current adversary investments and strategy.

The Army and Marine Corps must continue to invest in and prioritize long-range antiship fires for littoral operations so they can support the Navy in sea-control and sea-denial missions.

The services need to work togetherthe Marine Corps has extensive experience in naval operations, but the Army has a much larger and more robust fires complex, as well as more resources for acquisition and development. Concurrently, Marines and soldiers need to drive forward the discussion on how these new systems should be employed. Land-based antiship fires are exactly the type of cross-domain capability the joint force needs to fight and win a high-end conflict in a littoral environment.

References

1. Wayne Hughes, Fleet Tactics and Coastal Combat (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2000), 151.
2. Milan Vego, On Littoral Warfare, Naval War College Review 68, no. 2 (Spring 2015): 31.
3. Marine Corps Gazette 102, no. 12 (December 2018).
4. TECOM Warfighting Club, National Security: Tackling Our Nations Most Pressing Challenges, Marine Corps Gazette 103, no. 7 (July 2019), 82.
5. Sydney J. Freedberg, Marine Missile Strategy: Buy Some ASAP, Then Develop with the Army, Breaking Defense, 4 June 2018; Megan Eckstein, Marines Want to Field a Long-Range Anti-Ship Missile As Fast As Possible, USNI News, 19 February 2019.
6. Gidget Fuentes, Marines Fire HIMARS from Ship in Sea Control Experiment with Navy, USNI News, 24 October 2017.
7. Robert H. Scales, Firepower in Limited War (New York: Presidio Press, 1997).
8. Rachael Jeffcoat, U.S. Army Conducts First RIMPAC Joint Live-Fire Sinking Exercise as Multi-Domain Task Force, Navy News Service, 23 July 2018.
9. David Vergun, Long-Range, Precision Fires Modernization a Joint Effort, Army Tech Leader Says, Army News Service, 22 August 2018.
10. Daniel DeFraia, China Tests DF-21D Missile on Mock U.S. Aircraft Carrier in Gobi Desert, Agence France-Presse, 30 January 2013; Phil Stewart, Iran Test-Fired Anti-Ship Missile During Drills Last Week: U.S. Source, Reuters, 10 August 2018.
11. Ukraine Reveals Details of Newest Cruise Missile, Defence Blog, 27 August 2018; Pakistan Successfully Test-Fires Land-Based Antiship Missile, Economic Times, 14 July 2018.
12. Joel Eastman, Bolling Smith, and Mark Berhow, U.S. Coastal Defense Sites after 1950, Coastal Defense Study Group.
13. Charles D. Melson, Condition Red: Marine Defense Battalions in World War II, Marine Corps Commemorative Series, 23.
14. Stan Lee Myers, With Ships and Missiles, China Is Ready to Challenge U.S. Navy in Pacific, New York Times, 29 August 2018.
15. Scott Cuomo, Olivia Garard, Noah Spataro, and Jeff Cummings, Not Yet Openly at War, But Still Mostly at Peace: The Marine Corps Roles and Missions around Key Maritime Terrain, War on the Rocks, 23 October 2018.
16. Andrew Krepinevich, How to Deter China: The Case for the Archipelagic Defense, Foreign Affairs 94, no. 2 (March/April 2015).
17. Milan Vego, Naval Strategy and Operations in Narrow Seas (London: Frank Cass Publishers, 2003), 239.
18. Niles Lee, Marines with 2/14 Conduct HIMARS Raid, Marine Corps Forces Reserve, 5 April 2018.
19. ADM Philip Davidson, USN, Advance Policy Questions for Admiral Philip Davidson, USN: Expected Nominee for Commander, U.S. Pacific Command, Senate Armed Services Committee.
20. Sam LaGrone, Raytheon to Arm Marine Corps with Anti-Ship Missiles in $47M Deal, USNI News, 8 May 2019.
21. Shawn Snow, Marines Connect F-35 to HIMARS Rocket Shot for the First Time, Marine Corps Times, 5 October 2018.
22. Hughes, Fleet Tactics and Coastal Combat, 169.
23. U.S. Marine Corps, Commandants Planning Guidance: 38th Commandant of the Marine Corps, July 2019, 3.
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[*] posted on 6-11-2019 at 08:13 PM


Pakistan Navy successfully launched land-to-sea anti-ship missile

Posted On Wednesday, 06 November 2019 10:29

Pakistan Navy test-fired land-based anti-ship missile Zarb as part of a training exercise from the coastal region. The missile successfully followed its preplanned trajectory and accurately engaged the target at sea. Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Zafar Mahmood Abbasi witnessed the exercise as Chief Guest.


Zarb Anti-Ship Missile (Picture source: Pakistan Navy)

While speaking at the occasion, Admiral expressed his utmost satisfaction on the operational readiness of the Pakistan Navy.

The Admiral further said that Pakistans pursuit for peace and stability has to be taken in the context of our quest for maintaining a peaceful coexistence in the region and not to be construed as our weakness. Pakistan Navy, being a professionally competent and potent force, is fully capable of thwarting any aggression with an iron fist. He further said that operationalization of Zarb Weapon System is depictive of Pakistans strong resolve and high level of preparedness. He reaffirmed the resolve that Pakistan Navys personnel remain vigilant and combat-ready to guard the sea frontiers and maritime interests of our motherland.

Chief of the Naval Staff also underscored the importance of Pakistan Navys own initiatives of Regional Maritime Security Patrols (RMSP) in Gulf of Aden/North Arabian Sea, Pakistan Navys participation in multinational Combined Maritime Force (CMF) and recent joining of Trans-Regional Maritime Network with participants from 32 navies which will greatly contribute in improving maritime security.

Chief of the Naval Staff lauded the efforts, dedication and professional conduct displayed by all participants especially the crew of missile unit, scientists and engineers for making the event a complete success.
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[*] posted on 31-1-2020 at 03:29 PM


First Bal Coastal Defense Missile System Arrives for Russias Caspian Flotilla

(Source: TASS; published Jan 30, 2020)

MOSCOW --- An official ceremony took place in the Republic of Dagestan to hand over the first Bal coastal defense missile system to the Caspian Flotilla, the press office of Russias Southern Military District reported on Thursday.

"The first Bal coastal defense missile system has entered service with the Caspian Flotilla. Its official handover has taken place in the Republic of Dagestan," the press office said in a statement.

As the press office specified, the Bal is designated for the coastal defense of the permanent bases of ships that provide security in the Caspian Sea and Caspian Flotilla land troops. The systems teams can fire missiles in salvoes or make sole launches at the designated time.

"Most of its flight time, a missile flies over the sea surface, which makes it possible to save munitions and complicates its interception and destruction by anti-missile defense capabilities. One Bal launcher is capable of firing a salvo of over 50 missiles in no time," the press office said.

The Bal coastal defense missile system is mounted on the high cross-country capability chassis of the MZKT-7930 special truck, which makes it possible to assume fire positions on rough terrain. The system is armed with cruise anti-ship missiles with a flight range of several hundred kilometers.

The Bal coastal defense system with the Kh-35 anti-ship missile is designated to control territorial waters and straits, defend naval bases, other coastal facilities and infrastructure and areas vulnerable to amphibious assaults. The coastal defense missile system is capable of operating in any weather conditions, day and night, with its full autonomous guidance after launches, under an enemys intensive fire and jamming.

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