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[*] posted on 17-5-2017 at 09:55 AM
Singapore Navy 2017 onwards


MINDEF Signs Contract to Acquire Two More Submarines

(Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence; issued May 16, 2017)

The Ministry of Defence has signed a contract with ThyssenKrupp Marine System GmBH to acquire two additional Type 218SG submarines. The contract includes a logistics package and a crew training arrangement in Germany.

The new submarines are part of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)'s approach to long-term capability development. Tailored to meet the RSN's unique operational requirements, the Type 218SG submarines incorporate design innovation and advanced maintenance and engineering concepts to optimise training, operation and maintenance costs. They will also be equipped with significantly improved capabilities like modern combat systems and Air Independent Propulsion systems.

The RSN is making good progress in the submarine programme. The first two Type 218SG submarines, which were acquired in 2013, have commenced construction following their steel-cutting in 2014. They are projected for delivery from 2021.

Together with the two additional Type 218SG submarines, they are part of the RSN’s submarine force renewal programme to meet operational requirements.
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[*] posted on 18-5-2017 at 12:53 PM


IMDEX Asia: ST Marine lifts veil on new platforms

17th May 2017 - 9:00

by Gordon Arthur in Singapore



ST Marine is highlighting its latest Endurance 170 design, a landing helicopter assault (LHA) ship that measures 170m long, at IMDEX Asia 2017. It is an evolution of the Endurance 160, of which a scale model was on display.

Far more capable than the four-ship Endurance class currently operated by the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN), ST Marine said it had a ‘potential customer’ for the Endurance 170. While the shipbuilder would not be drawn on who its client was, the RSN has talked since 2014 of acquiring a larger Joint Multi-Mission Ship.

There are five landing spots on the LHA’s full-length 4,200m² flight deck, plus a below-deck hangar deck can accommodate ten medium-sized helicopters.

Tan Ching Eng, senior vice president of ST Marine’s engineering design centre II, said, to save deployment time, helicopter rotor blades can be fully deployed before the aircraft ascend either of the LHA’s two elevators.

The Endurance 170 has a full load displacement of 19,000t, is 170m in length and 30.8m in width. Its ship crew numbers 140 plus 150 for the air crew. It can also carry up to 400 troops. Maximum speed is listed as 20kt, its range as 7,000nm and an endurance of 30 days.

The well deck can accommodate four landing craft plus up to 17 tanks on the vehicle deck. Another deck can fit 16 30t armoured vehicles. A 1,000m² medical facility, with three operating theatres, ten intensive care unit beds and 17 wards, is integral to the design.

Weaponry being promulgated, dependent on customer preference, includes a 76mm gun, 30mm remote-control weapon systems, close-in weapon systems and a vertical-launch missile system.

ST Marine is also promoting its Vanguard series encompassing an 80m patrol vessel, 95m naval research and support vessel, 105m OPV and 120m frigate. The company said the series of platforms ‘deliver multiple modular capabilities with one design’.

This commonality reduces design and engineering costs, allows a focus on mission systems development and reduces acquisition and life-cycle costs.

The newest design still being developed in-house is a 120m frigate with stealth characteristics, for which the Singapore shipbuilder is looking for a ‘launch customer’ and is fielding ‘ongoing enquiries’.

A feature offered on the Vanguard series is what ST Marine calls an Integrated Modular Mast (IMM) that optimises performance, minimises electromagnetic interference and enhances safety, according to Tan. This IMM can fit on any vessel of the class, reducing a ship’s radar cross-section in the process.

Also on offer for its family of naval vessels is ST Marine’s proprietary Nerva ship management system that employs open architecture and commercial off-the-shelf hardware and software. According to Sim Chee Chong, assistant director of EDC – automation at ST Marine, it ‘provides centralised control and monitoring of platform sensors and systems’.

Nerva manages all aspects of ship systems such as fire-fighting, propulsion and electrical system. As well as fixed consoles, a mobile tablet version is available to give the commander or other senior officers better situational awareness.

Another key aspect of Nerva is its sense-making system ‘able to perform equipment health monitoring and predictive diagnostics on platform machinery’. It converts data analysis into predictive advisory actions for the crew too by predicting component failure.

All kinds of data is sent ashore for monitoring and to allow fleet-wide analytics. In the event of a fire, for instance, an automatic SMS and email is sent to alert personnel ashore.

While Nerva can be retrofitted to vessels, it is particularly well suited to new-build ships.
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[*] posted on 18-5-2017 at 08:23 PM


IMDEX 2017: Singapore allocates SGD10 million towards upgrading of submarine rescue ship

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International

18 May 2017


MV Swift Rescue, the RSN's submarine intervention and rescue vessel. (Singapore Ministry of Defence)

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has set aside SGD10 million (USD7.1 million) towards upgrades of its submarine rescue ship and its related sub-systems.

The matter was revealed by the RSN chief, Rear Admiral Lai Chung Han during his presentation at the International Maritime Security Conference, which was held in conjunction with the IMDEX 2017 maritime defence exhibition at the Changi Exhibition Centre on 16 May.

The admiral has, however, not given further details on the planned upgrades, saying only that these will result in "better submarine rescue capabilities" for the RSN. The upgrades will take place over the next two years, he added.

The RSN has been operating a 4,300-tonne helicopter-capable ship, MV Swift Rescue, jointly with a commercial operator since April 2009. The 83 m vessel is equipped with a 9.6 m, 25-tonne submarine rescue vehicle (SRV) known as the Deep Search and Rescue-6 (DSAR-6), and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with manipulator arms.

Swift Rescue is currently the only ship in Southeast Asia that is capable of mating and conducting collective rescue and transfer of distressed submariners while under pressure. The platform is equipped with a recompression chamber that can rehabilitate up to 40 rescued submariners, in four separate compartments, at any one point of time.

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[*] posted on 18-5-2017 at 08:25 PM


IMDEX 2017: Singapore in talks to further expand bilateral submarine rescue arrangements

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International

18 May 2017

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) is currently in talks with a number of countries to further expand on the list of bilateral submarine rescue arrangements that the country currently has.

The matter was revealed by the RSN's chief, Rear Admiral Lai Chung Han, during his address at the International Maritime Security Conference, which was held as part of the IMDEX 2017 maritime defence exhibition at the Changi Exhibition Centre.

Among countries that the RSN is currently in talks with include Russia, India, and Thailand, the admiral revealed.

"For the past few years we have extended our bilateral submarine rescue arrangements, and we recently concluded new arrangements with other navies such as the [Republic of Korea] Navy," said Rear Adm Lai.

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[*] posted on 18-5-2017 at 08:49 PM


IMDEX Asia: Kairos assembles marine product potpourri

18th May 2017 - 8:00

by Gordon Arthur in Singapore



Kairos Singapore Holdings, a maritime equipment distributor within Southeast Asia, is promoting several products at IMDEX Asia 2017. One is the Splashdrone III, described by its maker as the world’s first waterproof and floatable UAV.

Eric Hu, CEO of Swellpro based in Shenzhen, China, said the Splashdrone III was introduced only last month. Fitted with a 4K camera, it is suitable for use on a range of platforms, from boats, for at-sea search and rescue, to flying in rainstorms and filming on and above water surfaces.

Of interest, Singapore’s Maritime and Port Authority purchased the Splashdrone earlier this year. It has a payload release mechanism that permits it to drop beacons that can be used to help track oil spills, and Singapore plans to trial this function.
A beacon that can be adapted for this purpose is produced by Germany-based Seareq. Called MOBOS (Man Overboard Operating System), it is an independent rescue alert system.

Christiane Linkenbach, deputy director of Seareq, said a tubular beacon (200x35mm in size and weighing 165g) is affixed to a lifejacket or body-worn pouch and, if a sailor falls overboard, the beacon is automatically or manually activated.

After a ten-second delay, a MOBOS receiver aboard the boat is activated to warn of a man overboard. GPS can determine the beacon’s position and direct the boat to the correct location to rescue the unfortunate person. It is suitable for kiteboarders and windsurfers too.

MOBOS is a development of ENOS, an electronic locating and rescue system developed to find missing divers, and which is heavily used by the tourism industry.

A military-grade version is also available with encrypted signals. It is being used in the Baltic region, for example, in anti-smuggling operations.

As well as assembling the above products, Roy Soeigiarto, managing director of Kairos, showed the Whaly 500 boat from the Netherlands. Fitted with a bow door, it is used by emergency rescue services at some Chinese airports bordering the sea.

Additionally, the Pioner Multi small landing craft on display is being used regionally, including by an NGO in Singapore to transport disabled people.

Kairos also exhibited a German-designed Roughneck OPH Troop Transporter M-10 boat. 
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[*] posted on 26-5-2017 at 04:58 PM


Singapore Army's commando VSV breaks cover

Kelvin Wong, Singapore - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

26 May 2017


The 16 m-long Very Slender Vessel provides the Singapore Army's commando units with an organic high-speed interdiction capability. (IHS Markit/Kelvin Wong)

Although its existence was officially announced as far back as 2009, the Singapore Army's Very Slender Vessel (VSV) finally made its debut public appearance as a static exhibit at its Army Open House 2017 event that is being held from 27 May to 28 May.

According to army specifications, the VSV is a wave piercing watercraft that measures 16 m long, 2.4 m wide, and 2.5 m tall.

The service also stated that the VSV operated by the Singapore commando forces for high speed interdiction missions at speeds in excess of 40 kt, although Jane's understands from manufacturer specifications that it is also designed to be deployed for covert insertion and exfiltration of personnel with maximum transit speeds in the region of 60 kt.

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[*] posted on 2-8-2017 at 06:40 PM


ST Marine cuts steel for Singapore’s final Littoral Mission Vessels

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Navy International

02 August 2017

Key Points
- ST Marine has cut steel for Singapore’s seventh and eighth Littoral Mission Vessels
- The Republic of Singapore Navy is on track to operate all eight vessels by 2020

Singapore Technologies (ST) Marine has held a steel-cutting ceremony for the final two Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN), the company confirmed with Jane’s on 2 August.

The ceremony, which was attended by RSN chief Rear Admiral Lew Chuen Hong, was held on 14 July at ST Marine’s computer numerical control cutting workshop in the western part of Singapore. As part of the ceremony, steel plates for parts of the hull and deck sections of LMVs seven and eight were forged into the required shapes by the plasma cutter, said ST Marine.

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[*] posted on 26-9-2017 at 12:52 PM


Singapore Navy Launches Fifth Littoral Mission Vessel

(Source: Singapore Government; issued Sept 23, 2017)


Singapore launched its fifth Littoral Mission Vessel, the future RSS Indomitable, on Saturday. ST Marine has launched the sixth LMV and is currently building the last two ships of this class. (SPore MoD photo)

Speaker of Parliament Mr Tan Chuan-Jin officiated at the launching ceremony of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)'s fifth Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV), Indomitable, at the Singapore Technologies Marine (ST Marine)'s Benoi shipyard today. The LMV was launched by Mrs Tan Lik Ling, wife of Mr Tan.

Speaking at the ceremony, Mr Tan highlighted how the RSN has progressed over the last 50 years. He said, "The LMV demonstrates how the RSN continues to strengthen its capabilities for the future and continues to safeguard our sea lines of communication. At 50 years, the RSN has come a long way since her humble beginnings, with just two wooden boats, to today's professional and well-respected maritime force."

He credited the RSN's achievements to the indomitable spirit of its people and entrusted the Commanding Officer and his crew the honourable duty of living up to the ship's name. "The journey to build a capable Navy was not easy. We stand on the shoulders of generations of sailors who have helped built our Navy and have kept our waters safe."

The launch of the LMVs is a significant milestone in the RSN's continued transformation to keep Singapore's seas safe. The LMVs are faster, more versatile, and equipped with sharper capabilities to further strengthen the RSN's effectiveness in seaward defence. The LMVs can be quickly configured with mission modules to take on a wide spectrum of operations, allowing the crew to deliver calibrated responses using lethal and non-lethal options to deal with a range of maritime threats.

The LMV programme is progressing well. The first LMV, RSS Independence, was commissioned during the RSN's Golden Jubilee on 5 May 2017 by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. RSS Independence was most recently involved in search and rescue efforts for the missing crew of the Dominican-registered dredger JBB De Rong 19 that collided with Indonesian-registered tanker Kartika Segara. The other three previously launched LMVs, Sovereignty, Unity and Justice are presently undergoing sea trials.

Also present at the ceremony were Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Lew Chuen Hong, and senior officers from the RSN and the Defence Science and Technology Agency.

-ends-

ST Marine Celebrates the Launch of the Fifth Littoral Mission Vessel – Indomitable

(Source: ST Engineering; issued Sept 23, 2017)

SINGAPORE --- Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd (ST Marine), the marine arm of Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd (ST Engineering), successfully launched the fifth Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV), Indomitable, designed and built for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN).

The ceremony was officiated by Mr Tan Chuan-Jin, Speaker of Parliament. Mrs Tan Lik Ling, spouse of Mr Tan Chuan-Jin, took on the role as the lady sponsor in accordance with naval traditions to name and launch the vessel at ST Marine’s Benoi Yard. The event was witnessed by many senior officials from the Ministry of Defence and the Singapore Armed Forces.

“2017 is an eventful year for the Littoral Mission Vessel programme. Early this year, we delivered the third LMV Unity; launched the fourth LMV Justice; keel-laid the sixth LMV and steel-cut the seventh & eighth LMVs. It is also the Republic of Singapore Navy’s Golden Jubilee Year. As part of the celebrations, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong officiated the commissioning of the first-of-class LMV, RSS Independence.

Today, the launch of the fifth LMV Indomitable marks yet another milestone in this significant journey. The LMVs are a new generation of smarter, faster and sharper ships designed and built in close collaboration with DSTA and the RSN. These ships strengthen the RSN's ability in the seaward defence of Singapore. We are proud and honoured to be able to play a part in the development of Singapore's maritime security roadmap.

I wish to record my appreciation to all the project teams from DSTA, the RSN and our many other industry partners whose dedication and professionalism have brought about the success of this programme to-date.” said Ng Sing Chan, President for ST Marine.

ST Marine was awarded the contract by MINDEF in 2013 to design and build eight LMVs for the RSN. The fleet of the eight LMVs will replace the Fearless-class Patrol Vessels designed and built by ST Marine in the 1990s.

ST Marine (Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd), the marine arm of ST Engineering, provides turnkey building, repair and conversion services for a wide spectrum of naval and commercial vessels. In shipbuilding, it has the proven capabilities to provide turnkey solutions from concept definition to detailed design, construction, on-board system installation and integration, testing, commissioning to through-life support.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 17-1-2018 at 09:23 PM


TKMS begins work on Singapore’s third and fourth Type 218SG submarines

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

16 January 2018


A computer-generated cross section image of the Type 218SG. Source: Ministry of Defence, Singapore

Key Points

Work on Singapore’s third and fourth Type 218SG submarines has commenced
The Republic of Singapore Navy is on track to receive the first boat in 2021

German shipbuilder ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) has begun work on the Republic of Singapore Navy’s (RSN’s) third and fourth Type 218SG air-independent propulsion (AIP)-equipped submarines.

A steel-cutting ceremony for the boats was held on 12 January in Germany, Singapore’s Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) announced three days after.

MINDEF first disclosed in May 2017 that it had acquired two more boats in addition to an earlier pair of Type 218SGs contracted with the same shipbuilder in 2013. The first two submarines underwent steel cutting in 2015, and are currently scheduled for delivery in 2021 and 2022 respectively. The third and fourth hulls are expected to be handed over from 2024 onwards.

“The Type 218SG submarines will have longer endurance, better sensors, and pack a greater punch as well as other state-of-the-art capabilities – all designed to achieve higher combat effectiveness in our unique operating environment,” said MINDEF in a statement issued on 15 January.

Neither the ministry nor the RSN has given further details of the platform beyond this description, but according to a model of the Type 218SG displayed by TKMS at the 2015 and 2017 iterations of the IMDEX naval exhibition, the boat will have a perpendicular length of about 70 m, a pressure hull diameter of about 6.3 m, and will displace approximately 2,000 tonnes when surfaced.

Deriving its design from the Type 214 while incorporating features from the Type 212A, the Type 218SG will feature an X-rudder stern configuration, which improves the platform’s manoeuvrability in shallow waters, as opposed to boats with cruciform tails.

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[*] posted on 9-3-2018 at 10:01 PM


Republic of Singapore Navy Unveils its Smart Defence Initiatives

Posted On Thursday, 08 March 2018 16:17

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) unveiled last week its "Smart Defence Initiatives" as it tries to harness the latest technological developments, such as robotics, artificial intelligence and data analytics, to enhance its capabilities and operational effectiveness.


RSS Sovereignty, the second LMV, during IMDEX 2017

According to the RSN, the security environment is becoming more complex and uncertain, and we now face a wider spectrum of threats. This is particularly true for Singapore, a maritime nation situated amongst many small islands, and having to deal with a porous maritime security environment. In addition, as a maritime trade hub, the waters that the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) protects are extremely congested with both large merchant vessels and small craft transiting through the narrow Singapore Strait.

https://youtu.be/Gw-2XdSxLpA
Our video coverage aboard RSS Independence, the first LMV

Revolutionary Ship Design -- Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV)

The RSN's newest class of ships, developed in partnership with the Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA) and Singapore Technologies Marine, features many innovative design concepts for both operations and engineering support.

The design process adopted a novel "design the support" approach, where key downstream engineering and logistics support considerations were factored upfront in the vessel's design. Its stacked mast maximises sensor coverage while allowing maintenance to be carried out more efficiently, and has led to the reduction of time spent at dock for mast-related defects. In addition, the LMVs are designed to be more capable than the Patrol Vessels (PVs) they replaced. Key features include (i) the co-location of the Bridge, Combat Information Centre and Machinery Control Room in the Integrated Command Centre for more effective and efficient maritime security operations; and (ii) automation, sense-making and decision support systems for both combat and platform systems. This has enabled the multi-mission capable LMVs to be operated with a leaner baseline crew of 23 personnel, as compared to the 30-man PVs, even though the LMVs are larger and more complex vessels. The innovative design solutions to our LMVs will save us at least $65 million across the 30-year life span of the platform, when compared to the PVs.


ST Marine's VENUS 16 MCM USV at IMDEX 2017

Unmanned Vessels to Enhance Maritime Security and Homeland Defence.

Currently, the RSN operates manned ships to patrol the Singapore Strait and scan the seabed for mines to keep our shipping lanes safe for navigation. The RSN is developing three types of Unmanned Surface Vessels (USVs), namely the Coastal Defence USV to conduct coastal patrols, the Mine Countermeasure USV with Towed Synthetic Aperture Sonar (TSAS) to conduct underwater scans of the seabed to detect mines, and the Mine Countermeasure USV with Expendable Mine Disposal System to conduct mine disposals (refer to Table 1 below for more details on their technical specifications). DSTA worked closely with the RSN to achieve semi-autonomous operation of the TSAS, through an automatic Launch and Recovery System that allows the operator to remotely launch the sonar as well as recover the sonar upon completion of survey operations. In addition, the fully automated detection and classification system on board the USV is able to rapidly detect and classify mines, reducing the time required by more than 50%.

https://youtu.be/Bb5dtRzcmzg?t=210
Video interview on ST Marine's USV projects at IMDEX 2017

Equipped with advanced sensors and software, all three types of USVs will provide comprehensive maritime security for Singapore. When operational, the USVs can perform their tasks at much lower cost and with less manpower than manned platforms. The Coastal Defence USVs will eventually take over the role of patrols in the Singapore Strait, which is currently undertaken by the PVs and LMVs. This will allow our manned warships, like the LMVs, to be deployed at further ranges from Singapore, and more strategically for complex missions. As overall programme manager for the USVs, DSTA ensures that the USVs meet design objectives through rigorous technical assessments and feasibility studies. The key features of the USVs include:

a. High Speed and Better Manoeuvrability. The USVs are designed for high speed and manoeuvrability for its operations. The USV’s hull also enables good sea-keeping, allowing the USVs to operate in the Singapore Strait even during monsoon seasons.

b. Autonomous Navigation with Collision Avoidance. The USVs can navigate safely and operate autonomously in proximity with other vessels with the in-built Collision Detection and Collision Avoidance system. The USVs are also able to manoeuvre autonomously by waypoint navigation and maintain its position relative to other vessels. This reduces the workload and frees up the capacity of the operator remotely controlling the USV in the Singapore Strait, which is the busiest shipping lane in the world, to have increased situational awareness and ability to detect suspicious activity.

c. Low Manning. With the high level of autonomy and integrated Command and Control systems aboard, the Operator Control Station located ashore or on board platforms at sea, can control the movement and payload of the USV with minimal manpower required.


The RSN's LMV class is already fitted with advanced data analytics systems.

Enhancing Operational Effectiveness

Leveraging Data Analytics for Predictive Maintenance. Equipment maintenance on board the ship is currently conducted according to pre-planned schedules. Defects are rectified as and when they occur, which impacts readiness and increases costs. The RSN is conducting trials to use data analytics on key equipment parameters such as engine health, vibration and temperature data on critical systems to predict when defects may occur. Ship crew will then be triggered to take pre-emptive steps to prevent defects and avoid costly repairs. Currently, trials for predictive maintenance of the frigate's diesel generators are being conducted and the resultant cost savings are projected to be $1 million per year, with the potential to adapt it for other systems.

Smart Base Access. Currently, the base security screening process is labour-intensive and time-consuming. The RSN has started a Smart Base Access project that utilises a combination of facial recognition and digital identification to simplify the process while maintaining high security standards. Without the need for laborious verification methods, the Smart Base Access project will reduce the number of security personnel required and could generate savings of $160,000 per year in Changi Naval Base alone. The trial for Smart Base Access will start at the end of February 2018.

Enhancing Maritime Security

Leveraging Data Analytics to Enhance Maritime Security. As the national lead for the Whole-of-Government (WoG) Maritime Security (MARSEC) efforts, the RSN is continually refining the system and leveraging data analytics improve detection of anomalies and its sense-making capabilities.

a. Improving Anomaly Detection with Video Analytics. The RSN has a comprehensive network of coastal surveillance sensors to detect any maritime threats in the Singapore Strait. The RSN is collaborating with DSTA and DSO National Laboratories to develop video analytics to automatically classify vessels and flag out anomalies, in order to increase situational awareness and reduce human error. This will increase the RSN’s operational efficiency and translate to manpower savings of about 30%, as personnel who were previously conducting manual scanning of video screens can now focus on higher-end tasks.
b. Improving Sense-making Capabilities. The RSN-led Singapore Maritime Crisis Centre (SMCC) is developing a sense-making system that collates and fuses information from Whole-of-Government agencies and open sources, and applies data analytics to uncover MARSEC threats and activate operational responses to deal with possible terrorist plots. For example, the National Maritime Sense-Making Group (NMSG) within the SMCC analyses data from a vessel's voyage and its crew's "pattern of life" to assess potential threats. This information has been used to cue other national agencies to check suspicious vessels and even deny specific crew members from entering Singapore. NSMG has also worked with the Police Coast Guard (PCG) to analyse parameters of previous smuggling incidents to obtain the vessel types that has a higher probability of being involved in smuggling activities. This has allowed the PCG to be more targeted in the vessels they inspect.


RSS Sovereignty, the second LMV, during IMDEX 2017

Q&A with Collin Koh, South East Asia Maritime Security expert

Navy Recognition (NR) - In your opinion, does the LMV really brings a plus to the RSN or was the program launched to benefit the local industry (ST Marine) first and foremost ?

Collin Koh (CK): It really brings a plus to the RSN from both technical and operational perspectives. The 8 LMVs were intended to replace the 11 patrol vessels, which thus represents a significant streamlining of manning and logistical requirements. At the same time, each LMV is vastly more capable of multiple functions than the older patrol vessel. However, there’s always an arms export dimension to it. ST Marine has been marketing its stable of warships for the export market, perhaps eyeing clients seeking cheaper alternatives to those products built by more established, Western shipbuilders. The LMV is no exception. However, the primary aim is foremost to equip the RSN, and use the successful employment of this vessel as the marketing point.

NR- Do you think the focus on USV / unmanned system is related to the RSN manning issues ?

CK: Very much linked to it. The RSN is known to be looking at unmanned systems for various aspects of operations for quite some time, including exploring the feasibility of a fully unmanned MCM force for example. And USVs have obvious MCM, maritime security and ASW applications. So besides the wider aim of service (or for that matter, the entire SAF) automation effort to reduce crewing requirements, the use of unmanned systems is also envisaged to add another new edge to the navy and on par with world class contemporaries.

NR- LMV, USV and now "Video Analytics" and "sense-making systems". Those are all very advanced if not "avant garde" projects or programs. Would you say that the RSN is the most technologically advanced navy in South East Asia, if not in the whole Pacific region (bar the US Navy) ?

CK: There are commentaries about RSN being the “best little navy in the world” and so on such accolades. But modestly speaking, while the RSN is one of the most advanced of its league worldwide, and in various measure could match major navies in certain tech and human capital aspects. However, within SE Asia, the RSN is probably the most balanced of all, having developed various air, surface, subsurface, and cyber beyond the traditional domains. In a way, the RSN is also blessed with the country’s geography - unlike its neighbours which often face persistent capacity shortfalls given the disproportionately large maritime zones, Singapore is able to devote resources not just to gain critical mass of assets but to focus on qualitative improvements by investing in both foreign and domestic R&D capabilities. Still, some of Singapore’s neighbours possess naval capabilities that the RSN doesn’t have - RMN with underwater launched SM-39 Exocet USGW for anti-ship, and VPN with the Klub-S SLCMs for both anti-ship and land attack roles.

Collin Koh is a research fellow at the Maritime Security Programme, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore.
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[*] posted on 26-3-2018 at 06:04 PM


Singapore launches sixth Littoral Mission Vessel

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

23 March 2018


The Republic of Singapore Navy’s second Littoral Mission Vessel, RSS Sovereignty . A sixth ship in the class, Fortitude , was launched on 24 March 2018. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- Singapore has launched its sixth Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel
- Republic is on track to operate the class of eight ships by 2020

ST Marine has launched the sixth Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN).

The warship, which will be known as RSS Fortitude with pennant number 20 once commissioned, was launched on 24 March at ST Marine’s facilities in Benoi. Fortitude is part of a contract for eight 80 m LMVs signed between ST Marine and the Singapore Ministry of Defence in 2013.

The programme’s first-of-class, RSS Independence (15), was commissioned in May 2017, while second and third ships in the class, RSS Sovereignty (16) and RSS Unity (17), were commissioned on the same day in November the same year.

All three ships are currently based at Tuas, and deployed with the RSN’s 182 Squadron as an operational component of the Singapore Armed Forces’ (SAF’s) Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF).

The LMV features a full-load displacement of 1,250 tonnes, can accommodate a baseline crew of 23 including five officers, and embark a medium-lift helicopter on its flight deck. The ship is powered by four MTU 20V 4000 M93 engines, and can attain top speeds in excess of 27 kt, and a standard range of 3,500 n miles at 15 kt.

Weapons on board the platform comprise one Oto Melara 76/62 Super Rapid naval gun, two Oto Melara Hitrole 12.7 mm remote-controlled weapon stations (one each on the port and starboard sides), and a Rafael 25 mm Typhoon gun system mounted at the aft section.

Defence against hostile aircraft and precision-guided munitions is provided by MBDA's VL Mica anti-air missile system deployed via a 12-cell vertical launching system (VLS) in the forward section.

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[*] posted on 16-4-2018 at 07:07 PM


ST Marine lays keel for Singapore’s eighth Littoral Mission Vessel

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

15 April 2018

Key Points

- Singapore has laid down the keel for its final Littoral Mission Vessel
- Republic is on track to progressively replace its Fearless-class patrol boats with eight LMVs by 2020

Shipbuilder ST Marine has laid down the eighth and final Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN).

Keel for the vessel, which will be known in service as RSS Fearless with pennant number 22 once commissioned, was laid down on 12 April at ST Marine’s shipyard in the western Singapore.

Fearless is part of a contract signed between Singapore’s Ministry of Defence and ST Marine in 2013.

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[*] posted on 19-4-2018 at 09:09 PM


Singapore provides information on commercial ship boarding operations amid heightened terrorism risks

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

18 April 2018


Personnel from the RSN's 180 Squadron demonstrate a ship boarding operation on a training simulator at Pulau Brani. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- The Republic of Singapore Navy has given insights into the operations of a maritime security unit known as 180 Squadron
- The unit, which is authorised to board and assume control of commercial vessels entering Singapore waters, is an instrumental component of the country’s maritime security efforts

Against the backdrop of heightened maritime terrorism risks, the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has given insights into the operations of a maritime security squadron, and the role that plays in ensuring the safety of commercial vessels in the region.

The insights were shared during a media event on 17 April at the former naval base on Pulau Brani. Besides showcasing the squadron’s capabilities, which have rarely been made public, the event was also held to highlight ongoing efforts that the country has taken to counter maritime terrorism threats that are specific to the region.

The unit highlighted is known as the 180 Squadron and consists of personnel who are trained and equipped specifically for commercial vessel boarding operations, including on chemical and oil tankers. The squadron does not operate naval vessels but performs more than 550 boarding operations annually from commercially chartered pilot boats.

180 Squadron is one of three operational squadrons of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF’s) Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF) formation. Two other squadrons under the MSTF are the 182 Squadron, which operates the RSN’s Fearless-class patrol boats and Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs), and the 194 Squadron, which wields the service’s fleet of four Bedok-class mine countermeasures vessels (MCMVs). The MSTF is tasked to ensure that Singapore’s sea lines of communication (SLOCs) remain safe and open at all times.

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[*] posted on 24-4-2018 at 01:27 PM


Indonesia, Singapore enhance bilateral naval drills amid increased terrorism threats

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

22 April 2018


RSN's Littoral Mission Vessel, Independence (foreground) with two GUSKAMLABAR fast boats intercepting a simulated terrorism threat Exercise 'Eagle Indopura' 2018. The TNI-AL's Sultan Iskandar Muda supports in the background. Source: Singapore MINDEF

Key Points

- The navies of Indonesia and Singapore have introduced counter-terrorism serials into an annual bilateral exercise between the two services
- Drills aim to enhance professionalism and interoperability of naval services in handling maritime security contingencies such as seaborne terrorist attacks

A long-standing annual bilateral exercise between the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) and the Indonesian Navy (Tentara Nasional Indonesia – Angkatan Laut, or TNI-AL) is, for the first time, featuring counter-terrorism serials amid heightened fears of seaborne terrorist attacks in the region.

The drills, known as Exercise ‘Eagle Indopura’, are being held from 19 to 27 April in Singapore and the port city of Surabaya in Indonesia. The RSN has deployed its first-of-class Formidable frigate (68), and its second Victory-class corvette, RSS Valour (89), for the drills. The service is also making a debut of its Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV), RSS Independence (15), in the exercise. Independence is the first of eight new LMVs acquired by the Singapore government in 2013. It was commissioned in May 2017.

Meanwhile, the TNI-AL is taking part with two of its Diponegoro (Sigma)-class frigates, KRI Diponegoro (365) and KRI Sultan Iskandar Muda (367), a Kondor II (Type 89)-class coastal minesweeper KRI Pulau Rusa (726), a CN-235 maritime patrol aircraft, and the sea security group from the service’s Western Fleet (Komandan Gugus Keamanan Laut Wilayah Barat, or GUSKAMLABAR). KRI Diponegoro is embarked with a BO 105 light helicopter.

‘Eagle Indopura’ is the Singapore Armed Forces’ (SAF’s) longest-running series of bilateral exercise with a foreign military, and it has been held since 1974. Previous iterations of the exercise feature largely conventional warfare scenarios including anti-air and anti-surface operations, in addition to maritime security scenarios.

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[*] posted on 27-4-2018 at 07:32 PM


Singapore receives fifth Littoral Mission Vessel

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

26 April 2018


RSS Sovereignty and RSS Unity at their commissioning ceremony in November 2017. Sister ship, Indomitable, was received by the RSN on 27 April 2018. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- The Republic of Singapore Navy has taken delivery of its fifth Littoral Mission Vessel
- Service will commission the vessel in 2018 and is on track to operate all eight ships in the class by 2020

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has taken delivery of its fifth Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV).

The ship, which will be in service as RSS Indomitable with pennant number 19 once commissioned, was handed over by ST Marine on 27 April. Indomitable is part of a contract for eight vessels signed between the shipbuilder and the Singaporean government in 2013.

Indomitable was laid down in November 2016 and subsequently launched in September the following year. The lead LMV, RSS Independence (15), was commissioned in May 201, followed by RSS Sovereignty (16) and RSS Unity (17) in November the same year.

Fourth-in-class, Justice , was handed over to the RSN in November 2017, while the sixth ship, Fortitude , was launched in March 2018. The seventh and eighth vessels were laid down in October 2017 and April 2018 respectively.

The Independence-class ships are progressively replacing the RSN's fleet of Fearless-class patrol vessels that have been in service since the mid-1990s. The LMV measures 80 m in length, 12 m in breadth, and has a hull draught of 3 m. Powered by four MTU 20V 4000 M93 engines in a combined diesel and diesel (CODAD) configuration, the 1,250-tonne warship has a top speed in excess of 27 kt and a standard range of 3,500 n miles (6,482 km) at 15 kt.

Each LMV has a baseline crew complement of 23 including five officers and has a mission endurance of 14 days.

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[*] posted on 17-5-2018 at 10:41 PM


Singapore Navy opts for partial helicopter capability across Independence class

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

17 May 2018


RSS Justice (foreground) and RSS Sovereignty, two of the four LMVs that will not be helicopter capable, despite having been built with a flight deck. Source: IHS Markit/Ridzwan Rahmat

Key Points

- Only four of the eight littoral mission vessels to be operated by the Republic of Singapore Navy are helicopter capable
- Service will likely validate the utility of helicopter operations on the vessel type before expanding on this capability across the class

A series of observations and verifications done by Jane’s over the last six months have confirmed that only four of the eight Independence-class littoral mission vessels (LMVs) to be operated by the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) are helicopter capable.

The LMV is an ST Marine-built 80 m vessel type that is progressively replacing the RSN’s fleet of Fearless-class patrol boats. The class’ armaments include an Oto Melara 76/62 Super Rapid naval gun, two Oto Melara Hitrole 12.7 mm remote-controlled weapon stations, a Rafael 25 mm Typhoon stabilised naval gun system, and a 12-cell vertical launching system (VLS) in the forward section that is capable of launching MBDA’s VL-MICA anti-air missiles.

While all vessels in the class have been designed with weight and strength considerations to accommodate one medium-life helicopter on the flight deck, four vessels in the class are currently being equipped to operate only rotor-wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

At the commissioning ceremony of RSS Sovereignty (16) and RSS Unity (17) in November 2017, Jane’s first observed that the flight deck surfaces of both ships have not been given markings, such as landing area periphery and landing line-up lines, associated with helicopter touch-down and lift-off (TLOF) operations. Also missing on both ships were vertical replenishment (VERTREP) limits demarcations.

The flight deck surfaces of both ships have also not been treated with anti-skid coatings typically found on helicopter-capable ships. What has been done on both flight decks instead is the painting of visual cues that are typically used to aid with UAV operations.

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[*] posted on 2-7-2018 at 09:24 PM


Singapore to replace Endurance class with Joint Multi Mission Ship after 2020

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

02 July 2018


A Republic of Singapore Navy Endurance-class ship, RSS Endurance. The class will be replaced by the JMMS after 2020. Source: Singapore Armed Forces

Key Points

- Singapore will retire its Endurance-class landing platform dock-like ships after 2020
- Vessels will make way for the Joint Multi Mission Ship vessel type, which features greater military lift, and humanitarian assistance capabilities

In a bid to enhance the service’s international humanitarian assistance capabilities, the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) will retire its Endurance-class landing platform dock (LPD)-like ships after 2020, and replace these with the Joint Multi Mission Ship (JMMS) platform.

The plan was revealed by Singapore’s Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen at a media conference held in conjunction with the country’s Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) day, which falls on 1 July.

The RSN operates a class of four 141 m Endurance-class LPDs, which it calls landing ship tanks (LSTs), with the service’s 191 Squadron. The vessels were commissioned between March 1998 and February 2000, and have been dispatched regularly in support for the RSN's midshipman sea training deployment (MSTD) programme.

The vessel type has also represented the SAF at several international humanitarian assistance operations including the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, and the search for downed AirAsia flight QZ 8501 in December 2014.

The Endurance class has a maximum speed of 15 kt, and a standard range of 10,400 n miles at 12 kt. It can accommodate two Super Puma helicopters on its flight deck. Each vessel is armed with one Otobreda 76 mm/62 Super Rapid naval gun in the primary position, and two 25 mm Bushmaster cannon turrets, one each on the port and starboard sides near the bridge wings.

Meanwhile, plans for its replacement platform, the JMMS, was first revealed by Ng in March 2014 during a parliamentary session. The new ship type would enhance Singapore’s ability to co-ordinate regional relief operations, and work with international partners in times of humanitarian crises.

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[*] posted on 2-7-2018 at 09:27 PM


Singapore develops trainer for Type 218SG submarines, first boat to launch in 2019

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

02 July 2018


A computer-generated cross section image of the Type 218SG submarine. Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence

Key Points

- The Republic of Singapore Navy is developing a trainer suite to prepare its crew for the Type 218SG submarines
- First-of-class on track for launch in 2019, with delivery scheduled for 2021

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) is developing a submarine trainer suite (STS) that will be used to instruct crew members of its new Type 218SG air-independent propulsion (AIP)-equipped submarines.

The STS will comprise a command team trainer, steering and diving trainer, virtual procedural trainer, and maintenance trainer that are specific to the Type 218SG. “These trainer systems will enable the RSN to train and qualify submariners in realistic, simulated operations at sea,” said the Singapore Ministry of Defence (MINDEF).

The RSN currently operates a fleet of four ex-Swedish Royal Navy Archer- and Challenger-class submarines that have been modernised to suit tropical operating conditions.

The service is anticipating delivery of four new Type 218SG submarines from German shipbuilder ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS).

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[*] posted on 3-7-2018 at 01:31 PM


Singapore to replace Victory-class missile corvettes with Multi-Role Combat Vessels

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

03 July 2018

Key Points

- Singapore has laid out plans to replace its Victory-class corvettes with a new type of multi-mission ship known as the Multi-Role Combat Vessel
- New ship type will further enhance the country’s ability to secure its sea lines of communication


Silhouette image of the Multi-Role Combat Vessel, based on a similar image released by the Singapore Ministry of Defence (IHS Markit)

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) will retire its class of six Victory-class corvettes, and replace these with a new type of platform known as the Multi-Role Combat Vessel (MRCV).

The matter was disclosed by Singapore’s Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen at a media conference held in conjunction with the country’s Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) day, which falls on 1 July.

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[*] posted on 27-9-2018 at 11:40 AM


Singapore unveils new Littoral Mission Vessel simulation centre

Kelvin Wong, Singapore - Jane's International Defence Review

26 September 2018


Bridge, combat, and engineering functions are fully replicated at the RSN's new LMV SIMCEN. Source: IHS Markit/Kelvin Wong

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has inaugurated a dedicated simulation centre designed to provide nearly the full spectrum of instruction, from operator component training to full-mission rehearsals, to crews assigned to its Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs).

The new LMV Simulation Centre (SIMCEN) is operated by 182 Squadron – an operational component of the Singapore Armed Forces’ Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF) – and has been christened RSS Daring, a name that had earlier been assigned to a Fearless-class patrol vessel that was decommissioned on 19 July after 21 years of service.

The LMV SIMCEN is located at the western Tuas Naval Base, where the LMVs are also homeported, and has been jointly developed by the RSN and the Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA). It features a tension fabric structure that measures 80 m long and 30 m wide, and houses an instructor operation centre, two full-scale LMV Integrated Command Centre- (ICC) simulation halls, and several briefing rooms.

The facility is the first of its kind to be developed for the RSN and is currently managed by a commanding officer and five instructors, who are augmented by artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted systems that enable a single instructor to manage an entire training session.

Each ICC simulator replicates the exact functions aboard an LMV’s ICC, which integrates a traditionally separated bridge, combat information centre (CIC), and machinery control room (MCR) functions into a single shared space for increased situational awareness and operating efficiencies in congested littoral environments.

Similar to the ICC aboard the LMVs, both simulators comprise seven crew stations – or ʻclusters’ – with engineering and navigation functions located towards the forward section of the ICC, followed by the command cluster where the commanding officer and principal warfare officer are positioned; the surveillance and weapons clusters are situated immediately to the rear of the command cluster.

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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 04:17 PM


Singapore Navy Launches Final Littoral Mission Vessel, ‘Fearless’

(Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence; issued Jan 26, 2019)


ST Engineering’s Marine Systems unit on Jan 26 launched ‘Fearless,’ the eighth and final Littoral Mission Vessel. Five LMVs have already been commissioned, two will be delivered this year and all eight will be operational by 2020. (S’Pore MoD photo)

Senior Minister of State for Defence Heng Chee How officiated at the launching ceremony of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)'s eighth and final Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV), Fearless, at ST Engineering's Benoi Shipyard today. The LMV was launched by Mrs Heng Soon Poh, wife of Mr Heng.

Speaking at the ceremony, Mr Heng highlighted the importance of a strong and capable RSN to safeguard Singapore's sovereignty. He said, “The navy is every maritime nation's first line of defence. A strong RSN is key to protecting our maritime sovereignty, and keeping our Sea Lines of Communication open. Singapore's maritime agencies work together 24/7 to monitor threats. The RSN augments this by conducting patrols around the clock – tirelessly – to keep our waters safe and secure. We do this to protect Singapore, Singaporeans, and our Singaporean way of life.”

On the launch of Fearless, Mr Heng encouraged the crew to "live up to the fearless spirit of our founding fathers and continue to live out its legacy. As you embark on your next journey to defend our sovereignty, our security, and our economic prosperity, I am confident that you will overcome all challenges fearlessly, never flagging in adversity."

The launch of Fearless is a significant milestone in the RSN's continued transformation to enable it to continue safeguarding the sovereignty and security of Singapore's waters.

The LMV programme is progressing well. Since 2017, five LMVs – RSS Independence, RSS Sovereignty, RSS Unity, RSS Justice and RSS Indomitable – have been commissioned.

They have rapidly assumed and effectively executed operational duties, including the DPRK-US Singapore Summit and daily maritime security patrols, and have participated in exercises such as the ASEAN Multilateral Naval Exercise and Singapore-India Maritime Bilateral Exercise.

LMVs Fortitude and Dauntless, launched in 2018, are undergoing sea trials and will be commissioned later this year. All eight LMVs will be fully operational by 2020.

Also present at the ceremony was Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Lew Chuen Hong, as well as senior officers from the RSN and the Defence Science and Technology Agency.

(ends)

ST Engineering Completes Eighth Warship Order for the Republic of Singapore Navy

(Source: ST Engineering; issued Jan 26, 2019)

SINGAPORE --- The Marine arm of ST Engineering has successfully launched the final of eight Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs), Fearless, that the Group has designed and built for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN).

The launching ceremony was officiated by Mr Heng Chee How, Senior Minister of State for Defence, at its Benoi shipyard, where all eight vessels were built. In accordance with naval tradition, the spouse of Mr Heng, Mrs Heng Soon Poh, was the lady sponsor to name and launch the final LMV. Senior officials from the Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) and the Singapore Armed Forces were in attendance to witness the ceremony.

“Today marks a major milestone in the shipbuilding history of ST Engineering. Six years ago, together with MINDEF, RSN, and Defence Science and Technology Agency, we embarked on this journey to design and build these eight state-of-the-art Independence-Class Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs). This is the last of the eight to be launched and named. For this project to come to this stage is yet another testament to our deep engineering capabilities in large-scale engineering projects,” said Ng Sing Chan, President, Marine, ST Engineering.

“I would also like to extend my congratulations and heartfelt appreciation to all in the defence eco-system who have put in years of hard work and dedication to make this project such a success. The deployment of the Independence-Class LMVs by the RSN will ensure that our sea lines of communications are kept open for international trade and put Singapore in a prime position in maritime security.”

To date, ST Engineering has delivered RSS Independence, RSS Sovereignty, RSS Unity, RSS Justice, RSS Indomitable and LMV Fortitude.

ST Engineering was awarded the contract by MINDEF in 2013 to design and build eight LMVs for the RSN. The fleet of eight LMVs will replace the Fearless-Class Patrol Vessels, also designed and built by the Group in the 1990s.

ST Engineering is a global technology, defence and engineering group specialising in the aerospace, electronics, land systems and marine sectors. The Group employs about 22,000 people across offices in Asia, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East. Headquartered in Singapore, ST Engineering reported revenue of S$6.62b in FY2017 and it ranks among the largest companies listed on the Singapore Exchange.

The Marine sector provides turnkey and sustainable solutions to a worldwide clientele in the marine, offshore and environmental engineering industries. In shipbuilding, it has proven capabilities from conception to detailed design, construction, on-board system installation and integration, commissioning to through-life support.

(ends)

Fact Sheet: Summary of the Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) Programme

(Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence; issued Jan 26, 2019)

As a maritime nation, the sea is Singapore's lifeblood and connects us to the world. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)'s Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF) is the first line of defence to safeguard Singapore's maritime security 24/7. The RSN's 182 Squadron, comprising Littoral Mission Vessels (LMVs) and Patrol Vessels (PVs), is at the forefront of this effort. Alongside other maritime security agencies, they conduct daily operational patrols and respond to maritime threats to Singapore.

The first-of-class, RSS Independence, was commissioned on 5 May 2017 by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong as part of the RSN’s Golden Jubilee. Since then, RSS Sovereignty, RSS Unity, RSS Justice, and RSS Indomitable have also entered operational service. The RSN launched its eighth and final LMV, Fearless, on 26 January 2019, marking a milestone in the LMV programme.

LMVs - by Singapore, for Singapore

The LMV project started nine years ago in 2010, and is jointly developed by the RSN and the Defence Science Technology Agency (DSTA). The Independence-class LMVs are constructed by Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd's subsidiary, ST Marine.

Designed and built locally, the LMVs pushed the boundaries of engineering and design to deliver a more capable, faster, and mission-flexible ship with better seakeeping and endurance. The LMVs are equipped with smarter technology and sharper capabilities to enable the RSN to operate more efficiently and effectively, while being manned by a leaner crew. This is made possible through the harnessing of technology, streamlining of work processes, and rethinking operating concepts.

An example is the co-location of the Bridge, Combat Information Centre and Machinery Control Room at the Integrated Command Centre (ICC). The ICC integrates and synergises the management of navigation, engineering, and combat functions to achieve greater operational effectiveness for maritime security operations.

Beyond the physical hardware, the effectiveness of a ship lies in the proficiency of its people. The LMV is manned by a crew of 23, all of whom undertake multiple roles on board the ship. To build proficient crews, training is tiered at the individual, team and ship level, supported by simulators and emulators. This approach delivers the highest outcomes for personal proficiency and team excellence, so as to be ready for the full spectrum of mission sets at sea.

High-fidelity training is conducted at RSS Daring – the LMV Simulation Centre (SIMCEN). The simulator employs technology, such as virtual reality goggles, to replicate the experience at sea and enable realistic training by putting the crew through a wide range of scenarios. Training is also more effective, using analytics to monitor individuals and allowing for prompt correction to enhance learning retention and speed.

Milestones in LMV Operations

Since achieving full operational capability, the five commissioned LMVs have been involved in the 24/7 patrolling of Singapore waters, search-and-rescue operations, maritime security operations such as the 2018 DPRK-US Singapore Summit, and exercises with other navies. A summary of major operations and exercises that the LMVs have been involved in is below:

Major Activities / Period

-- Singapore International Maritime Review / May 2017
-- Search & Rescue Operations for capsized dredger / Sep 2017
-- Exercise HIGHCREST / Oct 2017
-- ASEAN Multilateral Naval Exercise in Thailand / Nov 2017
-- Search & Rescue Operations for capsized sampan / Dec 2017
-- Exercise EAGLE INDOPURA with Indonesian Navy / Apr 2018
-- Exercise APEX / May 2018
-- Exercise SINGSIAM with Royal Thai Navy / Jun 2018
-- Security operations for DPRK-US Singapore Summit / Jun 2018
-- Security operations for National Day Parade 2018 / Aug 2018
-- Security operations for 33rd ASEAN Summit / Nov 2018
-- Singapore-India Maritime Bilateral Exercise with Indian Navy / Nov 2018

Conclusion

The LMVs have further strengthened the seaward defence of Singapore and the RSN's ability to protect our sea lines of communication and our way of life. All eight LMVs are expected to be fully operational by 2020.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 8-3-2019 at 10:27 PM


Singapore provides more details on its future Multi-Role Combat Vessels

MARCH 08, 2019


An graphic of what the Multi-Role Combat Vessel could look like. Photo c/o Singapore MINDEF.

Singapore’s Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) released information on its planned acquisition of new Multi-Role Combat Vessels (MRCV) designed to replace its ageing Victory-class missile corvettes by 2030.

The MRCV will be custom-made and will incorporate automation and high technology, and minimal requirement for manpower.

This includes the use of several unmanned platforms for aerial, surface, and sub-surface missions while also enhancing situational awareness , surveillance and detection range, and influence over a larger area.

It is also designed with modularity in mind, using various mission modules that can be quickly configured according to mission requirements. This could vary from high threat naval warfare, low threat law enforcement and security operations, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations.

The ships are also designed to allow future technology to be easily integrated into its system, allowing its relevance as new technology are introduced.

No mention was made on the weapon systems, but they are expected to be armed for surface, anti-submarine, and anti-aircraft warfare using different guns, missiles, and torpedoes.

Based on the graphics released by Singapore MINDEF, the MRCV could be similar in size to small frigates or corvettes.
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[*] posted on 8-3-2019 at 11:18 PM


That's looking really, really close to a second batch of Formidable class frigates.



Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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[*] posted on 3-10-2019 at 09:44 PM


Singapore, US navies sharpen combat interoperability at Pacific Griffin

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

02 October 2019


The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) frigate RSS Intrepid firing a Harpoon anti-ship missile in the waters off Guam during Exercise Pacific Griffin 2019. Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence

Key Points

- Navies of Singapore and the United States have begun a series of complex warfighting exercises off the coast of Guam
- The exercise provides Singapore with the opportunity to hone its capabilities at firing longer-range naval weapons

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) and the US Navy (USN) have begun a series of drills that included the first firing of a Naval Strike Missile (NSM) in the Asia Pacific.

The drills, which come under the scope of a biennial RSN-USN activity known as Exercise 'Pacific Griffin', began on 24 September in the waters off Guam. The exercise is designed to improve combat interoperability between the two services and was first held in 2017.

The NSM that was fired during the exercise was deployed from the USN's Independence-variant littoral combat ship, USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10). The missile struck an ex-USN frigate that was formerly in service as USS Ford , located about 170 n miles off the coast of Guam.

The decommissioned ship was also used as a target by the RSN's Formidable-class frigates, RSS Formidable and RSS Intrepid , both of which fired Harpoon anti-ship missiles at the vessel.

As part of the exercise, Formidable also intercepted a low-observable, high-speed aerial target with an Aster surface-to-air missile, while a Singapore-operated Sikorsky S-70B Seahawk naval helicopter fired a torpedo at a simulated underwater threat.

"The vast training space in the waters off Guam provides the RSN with the opportunity to conduct exercises of substantial scope and complexity, including the conduct of advanced naval warfare with the USN across the full-spectrum of anti-air, anti-surface, and anti-submarine warfare," said Singapore's Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) in a media statement on 2 October.

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[*] posted on 7-11-2019 at 09:16 AM


Singapores final Littoral Mission Vessel arrives at home port

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International

06 November 2019


Fearless, seen here at its launch ceremony in January 2019. Source: Singapore Ministry of Defence

Key Points

- The Republic of Singapore Navy has received its final Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel
- Progress of all eight vessels are on schedule, and the class is on track to be operationalised by 2020

The eighth and final Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has been moved to its home base, a representative from Singapore's Ministry of Defence told Jane's on 6 November.

The vessel, which will be in service as RSS Fearless once commissioned, arrived at its home port of Tuas Naval Base on 5 November. It will be inducted into service with the RSN's 182 Squadron as part of Singapore's Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF).

Fearless is part of a contract signed between ST Engineering's marine division and the Singapore Ministry of Defence in 2013, and the vessel was launched in January 2019. The warship is one of four LMVs that is capable of embarking a helicopter on its flight deck.

The Independence class has an overall length of 80 m, an overall beam of 12 m, and a hull draught of 3 m. The vessel displaces 1,250 tonnes at full load and can accommodate a baseline crew of 23, including five officers.

Powered by four MTU 20V 4000 M93 engines, the class can attain top speeds of more than 27 kt and a standard range of 3,500 n miles (6,482 km) at 15 kt.

Each LMV is equipped with one Oto Melara 76/62 Super Rapid naval gun in the primary position, two Oto Melara Hitrole 12.7 mm remote-controlled weapon stations (one each on the port and starboard sides), and one Rafael 25 mm Typhoon gun system mounted at the aft section.

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