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Author: Subject: Chinese Navy 2017 onwards
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[*] posted on 17-5-2017 at 09:58 AM
Chinese Navy 2017 onwards


New Guided-Missile Destroyers Being Outfitted in Dalian

(Source: Global Times; posted May 16, 2017)


The PLA Navy already operates five 052D-class missile destroyers, six more are being fitted out and several more are under construction; with phased-array radar and vertical launch systems, they are the most modern in the PLA fleet. (Jeffhead photo)

Outfitting work is being conducted on China's new 052D guided-missile destroyers in Dalian Shipyard, Northeast China's Liaoning Province.

The 052D destroyer, which is equipped with phased array radar and vertical launching system, is China's most advanced guided-missile destroyer. There are five 052D destroyers already in active service while another six are undergoing outfitting and several are under construction, read a Sina Weibo Post by the China National Radio (CNR) Military Program on Sunday.

"The 052D, a 7,000-ton-destroyer with 64 launch units, is designed for tasks including anti-aircraft, anti-submarine and anti-warship defense, while it does not and should not be required to have ground attack capability, which should be carried out by bigger destroyers, the coming 055," Song Zhongping, a military expert who used to serve in the PLA Rocket Force, told the Global Times on Monday.

Equipped with 112 launch units, the 055 destroyer will greatly enhance PLA Navy's combat capability in the open sea, and ground attack capability, as its higher tonnage will enable it to be more versatile, Song noted, adding that Chinese destroyers have seen a rapid development, but they still lack real combat experience.

China should not compare its destroyer development with that of Japan, as the latter does not have the ability to produce its Aegis class destroyers independently and they are purchased from the U.S., but China has domestic production capability.

While admitting that there is a gap in terms of basic industrial strength between China and the US, Song noted that the US destroyers are not perfect as many U.S. destroyers including the two sold to Japan are not equipped with active electronically scanned array (AESA).

Chinese destroyers are equipped with AESA, and the 052D and 055 destroyers are starting to include a variety of missiles serving different combat purposes in their vertical launching system, surpassing the U.S. system, Song said.

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[*] posted on 6-6-2017 at 01:40 PM


Images emerge of China's new Type 901 AOE conducting replenishment-at-sea trials

Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

05 June 2017


China's new Type 901 AOE (left) conducting replenishment-at-sea trials with a Type 071 LPD in the waters of the South China Sea on 24 May. Source: Via chinamil.com.cn

Photographs of the new Type 901 fast combat support ship (AOE) built for China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) have been published on the PLA Daily website showing the 40,000-tonne ship conducting replenishment-at-sea (RAS) trials with a Yuzhao-class (Type 071) landing platform dock (LPD) amphibious ship in waters of the South China Sea on 24 May.

The photographs show both alongside and astern refuelling activities.

The Type 901 was launched in December 2015 at the Guangzhou Shipbuilding International (GSI) yard at Longxue Island on the Pearl River, and the ship commenced sea trials in December 2016. It has not yet been commissioned but it is likely that this will take place in the near future.

A second ship of the class is under construction at the GSI Longxue yard and recent photographs showing the bridge superstructure in place suggest that a launch before the end of 2017 is likely.

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[*] posted on 6-6-2017 at 08:32 PM


Chinese navy claims lead in IEPS development

Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 June 2017

Of course it does! Everyone knows that...................:cool: :cool: :cool:

People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) Rear Admiral Ma Weiming, a leading authority on naval electrical systems engineering, has claimed in an interview with state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) that China now has a significant lead over US and Western navies in the development of integrated electrical power systems (IEPSs).

Although there has been some confusion over exactly what technology Rear Adm Ma was referring to, he appears to claim that China has more advanced IEPSs than those employed in either US Zumwalt- or UK Type 45-class destroyers.

He also remarked that an IEPS will be installed in the PLAN's next generation of nuclear-powered attack submarines (SSNs).

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[*] posted on 7-6-2017 at 11:42 AM


One wonders if the PLAN leadership actually believe their own propaganda?



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[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 07:40 PM


China launches fifth LPD for PLAN

Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

16 June 2017


China's fifth Type 071 LPD was launched on 15 June at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai. Source: Via Hobby Shanghai - HSH

China's fifth Yuzhao-class (Type 071) landing platform dock (LPD) vessel was launched on 15 June at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai. Fitting out and sea trials of the previous ship took 12 months: an indication that the newest vessel of the class is likely to enter service in about June 2018.

The Type 071 LPDs are 210 m long and displace more than 20,000 tonnes. Equipped with a hangar that can accommodate up to four medium-lift helicopters, such as the Harbin Z-8, they can also fit four Yuyi-class (Type 726) air-cushioned landing craft in the well deck. For amphibious operations the Type 071 LPDs are likely to embark between 600 and 800 troops.

The lead ship of the class was commissioned in 2007 and the first three ships all were allocated to the South Sea Fleet of the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN). After a four-year gap in production, the fourth ship of the class emerged and entered service with the PLAN's East Sea Fleet in February 2016. The latest ship to be launched is also expected to be allocated to this fleet.

All ships of the class have been built at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard and recent satellite imagery showed more LPD modules on the dockside, indicating that assembly of the hull of a sixth ship is likely to commence shortly.

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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 11:48 AM


China's Liaoning carrier departs Qingdao on training mission

Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

26 June 2017


PLAN aircraft carrier Liaoning set out from its base near Qingdao on 25 June on a training mission. Source: Xinhua

China's first in-service aircraft carrier, Liaoning , sailed from its naval base south of Qingdao on 25 June for a further round of training and exercises, according to the state-owned Xinhua news agency.

The Soviet-era Admiral Kuznetsov-class carrier was accompanied by Luyang III-class (Type 052D) destroyer Yinchuan (175), Luyang II-class (Type 052C) destroyer Jinan (154), and Jiangkai II-class (Type 054A) frigate Yantai (538).

The news report states that the training to be conducted by the Liaoning carrier group is expected to "strengthen co-ordination among the vessels and improve the skills of crew and pilots in different marine regions".

In early June, the 304 m-long Liaoning , which was declared ready for combat operations in November 2016, is thought to have been conducting pilot qualification training in the largely enclosed and protected area of the Bohai Gulf to the north of Qingdao.

Amongst the pilots who completed their qualification for carrier operations, including landing and take-offs from Liaoning , was Cao Xian Jian.

Chinese media reported that he should have completed his qualification in August 2016, but was injured when he had to eject from his J-15 aircraft during a training sortie from the Huangdicun training base.

The accident occurred in April 2016, three weeks before another J-15 was lost in an accident in which the pilot ejected at low-level but did not survive.

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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 11:51 AM


Another Jiangkai II-class frigate enters service with the Chinese navy

Andrew Tate, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

26 June 2017

The 24th Jiangkai II-class (Type 054A) frigate to be commissioned by China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) entered service with the South Sea Fleet on 23 June at a ceremony held at the Zhanjiang naval base.


The PLAN's 24th Jiangkai II-class frigate entered service with the South Sea Fleet on 23 June. (Via Dafeng Cao Twitter page)

Named Xuchang (pennant number 536), the 134 m-long ship was built at the Huangpu shipyard in Guangzhou and launched on 30 May 2016.

The Type 054A frigates have an overall beam of 16 m and a full-load displacement of about 4,000 tonnes. Fitted with a flight deck and hangar, each of the vessels is likely to operate a Z-9 helicopter.

The frigates are equipped with a vertical launch system comprising 32 cells that can fire HHQ-16 surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) as well as torpedo-carrying anti-submarine missiles. The armament also includes eight C-802 anti-ship missiles and a 76 mm gun.

The principal radar used by Xuchang is the H/LJQ 382 3-D search radar, which features the distinctive skewed back-to-back planar arrays derived from the Russian-designed Fregat-M2EM 'Top Plate' radar system.

Four Chinese versions of the Russian MR-90 Orekh 'Front Dome' radar are fitted to control the HHQ-16 SAMs. The ship is also equipped with an H/LJQ 366 fire-control radar for anti-ship missiles, which is a Chinese variant of the Russian Mineral ME 'Bandstand'.

Xuchang is thought to be equipped with a variable-depth sonar in addition to the towed-array sonar more widely fitted in the class.

The Jiangkai II-class frigates are powered by diesel engines in a CODAD configuration, with one or two engines powering each of the two shafts, depending upon the power required.

An updated version of the frigates, the Type 054B, is thought to be in the design phase and expected to adopt some form of diesel-electric propulsion.

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[*] posted on 30-6-2017 at 09:16 AM


China launches largest surface combatant to date

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International

29 June 2017


China's first Type 055 destroyer during its launch ceremony on 28 June 2017. Source: Chinese internet sources via cjdby.net

China has launched its first Type 055 guided-missile destroyer

The Vessel is expected to play an instrumental role in China's ambition to operate carrier strike groups

China's Jiangnan Shipyard has launched the country's first Type 055-class guided-missile destroyer on order for the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN).

The 180 m ship, which will be largest-ever surface combatant to date once inducted into service, was launched on 28 June at the company's facilities near Shanghai. Work on the platform, which is expected to play a major escort role in China's carrier and amphibious task groups, began in 2014.

According to information on Jane's Fighting Ships , the Type 055 platform features an overall beam of 19 m, and a hull draught of 6.6 m. The ship is estimated to feature a top speed of 30 kt, and a standard range of 5,000 n miles at 12 kt.

Details on the platform's weapons are speculative but citing a China Central Television (CCTV) interview with a military analyst, Jane's reported in February 2015 that the destroyer will be equipped with 128 vertical launching system (VLS) cells arranged in two grids of 64, one each in the forward and aft sections.

The platform is also believed to be capable of firing the YJ-100 long-range anti-ship cruise missile, as well as anti-submarine and air-defence missiles. Other weapons onboard the ship includes a 130 mm naval gun, and a Type 1130 30 mm close-in weapon system.

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[*] posted on 3-7-2017 at 12:42 PM


Artists's impressions have it looking vaguely European with that big black radar array on the aft superstructure, very Type 45 or De Zeven Provinciën.

Interesting that they've gone for significantly more VLS than a Burke, 128 vs. 96.




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[*] posted on 7-7-2017 at 03:34 PM


China Explores Electromagnetic Carrier Launch System

by Chen Chuanren - July 6, 2017, 3:51 AM


A J-15 lands on the Chinese aircraft carrier Liaoning, carrying a YJ-83K anti-ship missile. Inset: The J-15T prototype attached with holding rods similar to Western EMAL systems.

A recently released photo on the Chinese Internet has furthered speculation that the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) has begun trials of an electromagnetic (EM) catapult launch system, known as electromagnetic aircraft launching system (EMALS) in the West. It was previously rumored that China had successfully constructed its first EMALS in November 2016, but there were no official reports or pictures at the time.  

The photo shows a prototype Shenyang J-15T “Flying Shark” with nose gear designed for catapult-assisted takeoff but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) operations. The nose gear also features a front and rear holding rod that is similar to the American EMALS launch rail. The J-15 airframe is derived from Russia’s Sukhoi Su-33 carrier-borne fighter.

Rear Admiral Ma Weiming, the PLAN’s propulsion and power specialist, said in a university seminar that he is confident that the EMALS will be installed on the “No. 3 carrier.” A Chinese analyst noted that this could refer to the third domestically built carrier, not including the Liaoning. Ma also said that the plan to build the No 3 carrier is delayed, since the PLAN is still evaluating both steam and EM catapults. He said that the EMALS is more reliable, less complex and cheaper than the steam catapult and the decision will come in a matter of weeks. 

China has already built facilities to test both conventional steam CATOBAR and EM launch systems. Satellite photos of Huangdichun airbase show an EM launch rail parallel to the steam rail.

Professor Wang Qun, an analyst at the National Security and Military Strategy Research Center, noted that using EMALS on a conventionally powered carrier will consume additional fuel and energy and hence compromise the ship’s combat effectiveness. 
 
Concurrently, Chinese state media has released footage of J-15s conducting numerous sorties on the Liaoning, some of them carrying the YJ-83K anti-ship missile. The carrier group turns towards the South China Sea, where China is asserting its claim of control. According to the Pentagon’s latest report on Chinese military power, the Liaoning task group conducted a second round of integration training there last December.

Additional reporting by Chris Pocock
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[*] posted on 11-7-2017 at 01:58 PM


Chinese Navy Establishes "Mobile Supply Point" In Indian Ocean

(Source: China Military; posted July 10, 2017)

GULF OF ADEN --- The destroyer Hefei and frigate Yuncheng of the Chinese PLA Navy received replenishment of fuel and fresh water from the supply ship Gaoyouhu of the 26th Chinese naval escort taskforce in the Gulf of Aden days ago.

The two Chinese warships, together with the supply ship Luomahu, are on their route to Russia to participate in the "Joint Sea 2017" Sino-Russian military exercise in St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad in late July.

One military expert who requested to be anonymous said that the Chinese naval task group to participates in the joint drill in Russia has a long voyage and will soon pass through the Suez Canal to enter the Mediterranean Sea, and then sail northward in the Atlantic Ocean and eventually reach the Baltic Sea.

Although the task group has the supply ship Luomahu with a full displacement of over 20, 000 tons, the amount of supplies it carries is limited and not capable of meeting the needs of the other two warships for fuel, fresh water and other supplies during the nine-month-long voyage, he said.

The replenishment given by the Gaoyouhu of the 26th Chinese naval escort fleet helped improve the follow-up support capability and enhance the consecutive mobile capability of the task group, the expert said.

Thanks to the success of this "replenishment relay", the task group has reduced the cost of conducting replenishment in foreign countries’ ports, and also the duration of voyage will be shortened.

This new logistic support mode indicates that the supply ship of the Chinese naval escort taskforce will act as a mobile supply point of the Chinese navy in the Indian Ocean. "It is a useful exploration for the Chinese navy to take advantage of its escort taskforce in the Gulf of Aden to conduct front-end replenishment for Chinese warships passing by this water, which will be of great help for Chinese navy's similar ocean-going operations in the future," said the expert.

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[*] posted on 13-7-2017 at 12:45 PM


And this piece of 'news' is news exactly how?

So they conducted a consol unrep, hardly rocket science. The RAN regularly undertook that using Success and Sirius.




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[*] posted on 13-7-2017 at 11:53 PM


Analysis: PLA Navy edges toward owning Asia-Pacific

13th July 2017 - 10:13

by Wendell Minnick in Taipei



China is producing naval vessels at a rate that will soon see the People’s Liberation Army navy (PLAN) eclipse the US Navy (USN) in force structure and capabilities in the Asia-Pacific region. Sources indicate that China is intent on replacing the US as security guarantor for the region, and could use its position to force regional neighbours to serve as tributary states.

China’s naval modernisation efforts are based entirely on modelling their navy after the US naval combatant structure, said Chris Cavas, a Washington-based naval analyst. They are emulating the USN’s ‘balanced fleet concept’, he said, with destroyers, frigates, logistics, support mission craft and, now, aircraft carriers.

China is mass-producing new classes of fighting vessels nonstop, such as the Type 052D destroyer, Type 054A frigate and Type 056A corvette. ‘They are cranking those babies out,’ Cavas said. 

They have also begun building four cruisers, the Type 055, of 10,000t displacement. The Type 055 is capable of air defence, anti-cruise missile, anti-submarine and anti-ship missions. ‘China’s navy is becoming a force to reckon with,’ he said. 



The Type 055 has a vertical launch system capable of firing 120 YJ-18 land attack/anti-ship cruise missiles and this is a ‘problem for the US Navy,’ Cavas said. ‘It is not clear whether our countermeasures for Chinese anti-ship missiles work.’ 

China’s navy is also constructing its first flat-top amphibious assault ship, the 40,000t Type 075 (also referred to as the Type 081) with a complement of 30 helicopters. 

China’s shipbuilding philosophy is consistent with the ideological dialectics theory known as change in quantity to change in quality, said Ching Chang, a research fellow of the Taipei-based Society for Strategic Studies, and a former Taiwan naval officer. 

‘By accumulating evolutionary efforts to a yield point, then a revolutionary new type will be produced,’ Chang said. ‘There is a cyclic pattern in Chinese naval shipbuilding activities:
revolutionary-evolutionary-revolutionary-evolutionary.’ This is the general modus operandi of Chinese mainland naval shipbuilding, he pointed out. 

As an example, the Type 052C ‘Aegis’ destroyer was revolutionary, and follow-on minor modification types were evolutionary until the revolutionary phase began again with the Type 055. ‘One big step forward, then follows a series of smaller improvements,’ Chang related.



Cavas said China is using fewer foreign dual-use systems for its ships. ‘Things used to be French, Dutch, Russian, but now systems appear to be indigenously produced.’ 

One area of weakness used to be propulsion, said Roger Cliff, a China military analyst at the Atlantic Council, but they seem to have solved that one with the QC-280 gas turbine, an evolution of the Ukrainian GT-25000 design.

There are still questions on when surface ships will transition to nuclear power. Rick Dorn, senior analyst at AMI International, suggested that since they have developed nuclear-powered Type 095 attack submarines and Type 094 ballistic missile submarines, ‘what would stop them from putting those plants on a surface ship, possibly an aircraft carrier?’ 

Chang said whether they go nuclear on propulsion is a matter of time and a few key factors will affect the decision: marine nuclear fuel rod production technology, final disposal technology, marine nuclear reactor control and steam turbine control technology. China will not go forward on nuclear-powered surface ships until these necessary technologies are mature, Chang said.



One area of difficulty China has to overcome is building large aircraft carriers. Currently, the 55,000t Liaoning, a former Soviet aircraft carrier, is a training platform using a ski-jump launch system. 

The second carrier, likely named Shandong and based on the Liaoning, will be commissioned in 2020. The third aircraft carrier, now under construction, could be a standard flat-top carrier in the 100,000t range with a catapult system. 

The real challenge will be whether they can build a catapult that can stand up to the sea environment and thousands of firings, said Cliff. ‘It is a non-trivial challenge. There was speculation that they might skip steam catapults and go directly to an electromagnetic catapult system, but those turn out to be harder than was anticipated, so I expect China’s first carriers to have steam catapults.’

Sarah Kirchberger, head of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Strategy and Security at Kiel University, Germany, said that China is experimenting with steam catapults and the electromagnetic aircraft launch system, and the challenge will be to develop sufficient competency in either of these fields, and to integrate the chosen technology successfully into a brand new ship design. 

‘We can expect to see the usual issues that commonly afflict prototypes, and it will take some time, likely a few years, to overcome them,’ she assessed. 

Another technological challenge to tackle will be the third carrier’s propulsion plant, Kirchberger said. Nuclear propulsion would of course be the obvious choice for a flat-top carrier, but developing it could be a time-consuming challenge despite the fact that China already operates nuclear propulsion plants, albeit of a different type, aboard submarines.

The remarkable progress China has made in its naval modernisation and shipbuilding efforts over the past 20 years must be considered in light of the difficult conditions China has faced under the 1989 Western arms embargo, Kirchberger said.

Except for dual-use technologies, China has been limited to cooperating with Russia and Ukraine, and yet has made ‘remarkable progress in naval shipbuilding.’ 

For one, China has made the transition from an experimental approach of warship design, ‘building various prototypes simultaneously while importing foreign models to study, and successfully settled on one indigenous design for the serial production of every major surface combatant type’. 

This has enabled China to take advantage of ‘economy of scale effects’, which also increases operational readiness, whereas the earlier approach resulted in a ‘heterogeneous fleet facing multiple logistics and training challenges’, Kirchberger said. 



Second, the quality of construction itself has improved markedly when comparing modern vessels with earlier Chinese warships. China is now successfully using modern build methods, and the quality of the welding now appears to be high.

Kirchberger argued that while the new ship designs look good from the outside, it must be noted that hull design is only a small part of the challenges associated with building a naval force capable of network-centric operations. Major challenges faced by China now pertain to systems integration and jointness. 

Modern ‘informationised’ warships are ‘systems of systems rather than just systems’, and they require a much more sophisticated level of systems integration than was necessary in the past, a factor largely invisible from the outside. 

‘One can assume that China has to face similar challenges as other leading navies when it comes to integrating a lot of power-hungry and sensitive sensor equipment aboard a relatively small hull.’ Moreover, these capabilities require enormous computing power and highly specialised software.

 

The problem is therefore not just to develop each of these systems and components separately, but to integrate them all into an organic whole, and this requires secure data links and specialist and intense crew training for sailors, naval aviators and shore-based personnel. 

Since transparency is lacking and failures will likely remain unacknowledged, it will be difficult for outside analysts to assess the actual status of China’s systems integration efforts from open sources. 

Craig Beitinger, an AMI International analyst, said that while Chinese naval operations are largely focused regionally, the fleet is stretching its legs into the Indian Ocean and participating in counter-piracy as well as showing-the-flag operations in the Mediterranean. The 2015 Joint Sea 2015 naval exercise with Russia highlighted Chinese naval activity/development and the promotion of interoperability with Russia and other navies. 

Cavas agreed, ‘Part of the maturity is anti-piracy missions begun in 2008, and they have learned a lot from the US Navy during those missions.’ 

This has given the PLAN more confidence in interacting with other navies beyond their near shores.
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[*] posted on 2-8-2017 at 07:44 PM


Published: Wednesday, 02 August 2017 10:28

New 6000 Tons Ocean Going Tug Boat Commissioned with PLAN North Sea Fleet
 
The People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN or Chinese Navy) commissioned the first vessel of a new class of ocean going tug boat. The Bei Tuo (hull number 739) vessel displacing 6,000 tons was commissioned on July 20th with the PLAN North Sea Fleet during a ceremony held at the Qingdao naval base, in north China’s Shandong province.
 

PLAN's new ocean going tug boat Bei Tuo.
  
The ocean going tug boat was launched in July 2016 at the Huangpu shipyard in Guangzhou. It measures over 110 meters in length, 16 meters in width and is fitted with an helicopter deck forward.

According to a PLAN North Sea Fleet press release, the vessel's main missions will be the towing and assistance of medium to large displacement vessels.

Secondary mission includes at sea repairs of damaged ships and submarine rescue. The vessel can accommodate a number of mission modules (in containers).

Two more vessels of the class are currently being built at the same shipyard. The Bei Tuo class is the largest and most powerfull (14 000 kW) tug boat ever built forthe PLAN.

With information and pictures from our colleagues at Eastpendulum
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[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 12:33 PM


China’s First Homemade Aircraft Carrier to Enter Mooring Trials Next Month

(Source: People's Daily Online; published August 04, 2017)
By Zhang Huan

China’s first homemade aircraft carrier will likely enter mooring trials next month ahead of schedule, said Hu Wenming, general director of construction of the aircraft carrier, CCTV.com reported on Aug. 3.

Hu introduced that construction of China’s second aircraft carrier, also the country’s first homemade one, is going well after it hit the water in Dalian on April 26 this year. Hu added that the carrier will likely start mooring trials next month ahead of schedule to test if its equipment is able to meet the requirements for further sea trial.

China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, has been delivered to the Chinese Navy for training and research. China’s second carrier will be based on the Liaoning and will be among the world’s most advanced, further improving China’s research and development of aircraft carriers, according to the director.

Hu also disclosed that a total of 412 state-owned enterprises, private enterprises, and scientific research institutions in China have contributed to its development, occupying 77.4 percent of the total, which indicates that its construction is the result of national collective efforts.

In addition, through construction of the carrier, China has possessed a talent team at an average age of 36 and gained the ability to independently research and develop, design, and manage an aircraft carrier project, which has laid a foundation for the country to build better ones in the future, the director noted.

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[*] posted on 10-8-2017 at 01:14 PM


I'm sorry guys, but I look at those photo's of Liaoning and all is see is a statement made by the US submarine community back in the 1980s about first the Kiev and Minsk then later about the Kuznetsov.

"A Navy Cross waiting to be earned."




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[*] posted on 5-9-2017 at 02:30 PM


PLA Navy Commissions New Supply Ship

(Source: China Military Online; issued Sept 01, 2017)


The Hulun Nur 965, commissioned last week, is the lead ship in a new class of logistical ship developed for the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy. (PLA-N photo)

GUANGZHOU --- An advanced comprehensive supply ship Hulun Nur (Hull 965) joined the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy in southern China's Guangzhou city on Sept.1, 2017.

Hulun Nur 965 is a new type of comprehensive supply ship independently developed by China using globally advanced technologies.

It is capable of conducting replenishment-at-sea with the aircraft carrier battle group or other ocean-going naval fleet.

Vice admiral Shen Jinlong, commander of the PLA Navy, conferred the military flag and presented a certificate to the new ship.

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[*] posted on 12-9-2017 at 09:07 AM


China’s land-based carrier mock-up undergoing further modifications

Andrew Tate - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

11 September 2017

A recently published image of modifications made to China’s land-based aircraft carrier development facility at Wuhan reflects the ongoing work supporting the development of the country’s third aircraft carrier, commonly known as the Type 002.

Published in Chinese online forums in early September, the image shows that the height of the island's forward upper superstructure on the carrier mock-up has been increased to facilitate faring in the array panels of the phased array radar.



A recently published image of China’s land-based aircraft carrier development facility at Wuhan shows that the height of the island's forward upper superstructure has been increased to facilitate faring in the array panels of the phased array radar. (Via CJDBY website)

In addition, the smaller square apertures above those for the main array panels suggest that the Type 002 may be equipped with a dual-band, phased-array radar: a configuration that appears to be similar to that on China’s Type 055 destroyers, the first of which was launched in June.

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[*] posted on 12-9-2017 at 06:32 PM


China launches seventh Type 815A AGI

Andrew Tate - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

12 September 2017


The seventh Type 815A intelligence collection ship on order for the PLAN was launched on 8 September in Shanghai. Source: Via HSH (Hobby Shanghai) website

The seventh improved Dongdiao-class (Type 815A) intelligence collection ship (AGI) on order for China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) was launched on 8 September at the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard in Shanghai.

The ship is the sixth of the class to be launched since March 2014, with the previous hull entering the water in February 2017. All the ships of the improved Dongdiao class – as well as the original Type 815 – have been built at Hudong-Zhonghua, and it is anticipated that more will be constructed.

The 6,000 tonne (6,614 ton) ships are 130 m (426.5 ft) long with a beam of 16 m and are fitted with three or four very large and highly distinctive radomes that enclose the antennas.

The appearance of the fifth Type 815A hull differs from that of the previous ships of the class due to the installation of a cylindrical ‘Top Hat’ radome on the bridge roof.

Satellite imagery suggests that hull six is configured similarly. No antenna or radome has yet been installed on top of the bridge of the most recently launched ship.

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[*] posted on 19-9-2017 at 01:43 PM


China’s CASC unveils D3000 unmanned oceanic combat vessel concept

Kelvin Wong - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

18 September 2017

China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) has revealed plans for an autonomous multirole surface vessel designed specifically for high-end naval operations at the 2017 International Ocean Science and Technology (OST) Exhibition in Qingdao.

Under development by the Beijing-based 13th Research Institute of CASC’s Ninth Academy – the latter also known as China Aerospace Times Electronics Corporation (CATEC) – the D3000 unmanned oceanic combat vessel is presently envisioned to be a 30 m-class unmanned surface vessel (USV) that is capable of operating out to a range of 540 n miles for up to 90 days, although its size can be further scaled up for greater range or payload capacity should there be a customer requirement.

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[*] posted on 19-9-2017 at 07:11 PM


PLAN’s new training ship embarks on maiden voyage

Ridzwan Rahmat - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

19 September 2017

A new training ship that was commissioned in February 2017 for the People’s Liberation Army Navy’s (PLAN’s) Dalian Naval Academy has set sail for its maiden oceangoing voyage, the PLA-linked China Military Online website reported on 18 September.

The vessel, Qi Jiguang (pennant number 83) began the voyage with a total complement of 549 including midshipmen and crew.

The midshipmen include trainees from the Naval University of Engineering, Dalian Naval Academy, Naval Submarine Academy, Naval Aeronautical University, Naval Medical University, and Naval School for non-commissioned Officers.

According to a Jane’s report from February 2017, Qi Jiguang is said to feature an overall length of 163 m, an overall beam of 22 m, and a displacement of 9,000 tonnes.

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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 02:53 PM


PLA Navy Gets New Nuclear Submarine

(Source: Global Times; issued Sept 21, 2017)

A new nuclear submarine has been turned over to the People's Liberation Army Navy, one of the largest State-owned naval shipbuilding enterprises revealed on Tuesday, but experts believe that this submarine is not the most advanced Type 096, which is China's next generation strategic nuclear submarine.

China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC), which also manufactures China's aircraft carrier, posted the information on its WeChat account Tuesday in an article reviewing its achievements since the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) in 2012.

"The past five years since the 18th National Congress of the CPC has been an extraordinary period for the CSIC, with the handover of China's first aircraft carrier Liaoning to the PLA Navy, the launch of the first homegrown aircraft carrier, the completion of the new nuclear submarine and the deep-sea-exploration submersible Jiaolong…"the article said.

However, the article did not reveal the submarine's name and type. But some Net users and military enthusiasts speculated the submarine is Type 096, China's most advanced nuclear submarine, and the successor of the current Type 094, which first appeared on China Central Television in 2013.

The submarine the CSIC mentioned could be Type 094 or Type 093, but not the next generation nuclear-powered ballistic submarine Type 096, since Type 096 is too advanced and not to be completed soon, Song Zhongping, a military expert who served in the PLA Rocket Force, told the Global Times.

The strategic nuclear submarine, also called a nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, is capable of launching nuclear warheads from the sea, and can provide "a second strike" to a country in nuclear warfare.

That means when the enemy has completely destroyed land-based launch positions, the submarines take over.

The 2017 Annual Report to the U.S. Congress on China's military power by the U.S. Defense Department claims that China's next-generation nuclear submarine, Type 096, will likely begin construction in the early 2020s, and will reportedly be armed with the JL-3, a submarine-based ballistic missile.

"Pentagon's prediction about Type 096 could be correct to some extent, but the submarine could be completed ahead of schedule. The submarine is a key weapon to the country's nuclear warfare capability. Only the US and Russia have the real 'nuclear triad' (consisting of ballistic missiles, strategic nuclear submarines and strategic bombers), but sooner or later, China will have it as well," said Li Jie, a Beijing-based naval expert.

The U.S. report also predicts that in the next decade, China will probably develop a new variant of the SHANG class (NATO code) Type 093B, which would not only improve the PLA's anti-surface warfare capability but also provide it with a more clandestine land-attack option.

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[*] posted on 27-9-2017 at 04:27 PM


Faster-Than-Imagined Aircraft Carrier Construction Sparks Speculation of An Earlier Sea Test

(Source: People's Daily Online; published Sept 26, 2017)


A photo taken on Sept. 20 shows the new look of the Type 001A aircraft carried being built in China to a Chinese design. (Photo by cjdby.net)

It will not be long before China’s first homegrown aircraft carrier, the Type 001A, starts its sea test, at least according to online speculation, judging from the latest advancements in its construction, but experts argue that according to the rules, an official sea trial will not come soon.

Recently, photos of a radar mast being constructed on the carrier were posted online. Li Jie, an aircraft carrier expert, said the ship will be ready for a sea trial at or around the beginning of 2018, because usually it will be one year between the launch of a medium-and large-sized carrier and a sea trial. The Type 001A was launched in April.

Radar devices are important for a carrier’s ability to find its target, Li told the Global Times on Sept. 24. Therefore, the installation of radar systems is a key part in the building of an aircraft carrier.

“It is very efficient that the construction has moved forward to radar installation five months after the ship was launch. Once the radar systems are installed, which takes the longest period of time, the rest will be finished quickly,” Li noted.

The accelerated speed will enable the trial to take place ahead of schedule, Li said, adding that other systems are possibly being installed simultaneously, including navigation, communication, and power systems.

Li said the possibility of starting an earlier sea trial should not be counted out if the outfitting work and system debugging are completed ahead of schedule, but he also pointed out that an unofficial sea test could be carried out before an official one.

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[*] posted on 27-10-2017 at 07:42 PM


Chinese Propulsion System Advances Submarine Capability

(Source: Global Times; issued Oct 25, 2017)

China has conducted a trial run on the country's first permanent magnet propulsion motor for naval vessels, with experts saying that it marks a significant breakthrough in the country's naval vessel building industry, especially for the nuclear submarines.

The State-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC), which is known for its aircraft carriers and the Jiaolong submersible vessel, made a statement on its official WeChat public account on Monday that the permanent magnet motor with a Chinese patent has been used on naval vessels docked at Sanya, South China's Hainan Province, the base of China's conventional and nuclear submarine fleet.

The statement said the vessel's propeller began to turn at 11 am on October 18, then reached the designated speed, which signified the success of the permanent magnet propulsion.

Although the statement did not disclose the type of vessels the motor was tested on, Chinese military experts say they believe the motor is specially designed for China's submarines and can substantially improve their performance in many aspects, especially by significantly reducing their running sound to the lowest possible level.

The new high-performance permanent magnet motors made from rare-earth materials avoid the flaws of traditional motors that work under the excitation principle, and can provide much greater power density, and can significantly reduce its working noise," Song Zhongping, a military analyst who previously served with the PLA Rocket Force, told the Global Times on Tuesday.

Back in May, Rear Admiral Ma Weiming, China's top naval engineer, in an interview with China Central Television, said that the navy was supplying its newest nuclear attack submarines with a "shaftless," rim-driven pump-jet, which was considered a revolutionary, low-noise propulsion system.

Ma said that the technology was ahead of the US and more efficient and suitable for high-speed nuclear submarines.

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[*] posted on 3-11-2017 at 10:00 PM


China claims to have developed conventionally powered electromagnetic catapult

Reuben F Johnson - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

02 November 2017

Key Points
- China has developed its own version of the US EMALS system, according to Chinese media reports
- US sources remain sceptical about whether the Chinese system could generate enough power to operate effectively on an aircraft carrier

People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and Chinese defence industry officials are claiming that the second of China’s indigenously built aircraft carriers, the Type 002, will be equipped with an electromagnetic catapult, according to a report in the South China Morning Post .

The system is allegedly similar to the General Atomics Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) being fitted to the US Navy’s (USN’s) latest Gerald R Ford-class carriers.

However, in a change from how the USN has approached the development of EMALS, sources within the PLAN are also claiming Chinese industry has developed a new integrated propulsion system (IPS) that would permit operation of the Chinese catapult without equipping the PLAN’s carriers with a nuclear powerplant. All US carriers are nuclear powered, which has been seen as a necessary power source to support the energy requirements of an electromagnetic catapult.

The Type 002 carrier will differ substantially from the design of China’s Type 001 carrier Liaoning (originally Varyag ), which was purchased from Ukraine, and the Chinese-built 001A, which is a stretched version of that Soviet-era design. Both carriers are built with a ski ramp to get their aircraft airborne, whereas the Type 002 will be a traditional ‘flattop’ design equipped with a catapult.

The news of the PLAN’s electromagnetic catapult development is consistent with statements made this past summer by PLAN Rear Admiral Yin Zhao and others indicating that the Type 002 carrier would have such a system on board. The launch of the Type 002 has reportedly been delayed in order for the new catapult system to be included in its configuration.

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