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Author: Subject: Chinese Navy 2017 onwards
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[*] posted on 9-5-2019 at 12:02 PM


Love all those flood holes on the side of the hull, that won't contribute to flow noise...much!



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[*] posted on 9-5-2019 at 12:35 PM


Well, nobody has any problem tracking them, or so I've been told............
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[*] posted on 14-5-2019 at 09:27 AM


Chinese Guided Missile Destroyer Suitable for Mass Production: Experts

(Source: Global Times; published May 12, 2019)


China launched two Type 052D guided missile destroyers simultaneously on Friday at the Dalian Shipyard in Northeast China's Liaoning Province. The warships, seen here decorated with Chinese national flags, are the 19th and 20th ships of their class. (IC photo)

China is expected to build even more guided missile destroyers, Chinese military analysts said on Sunday as China launched two Type 052D guided missile destroyers on Friday in Dalian, a coastal city in Northeast China's Liaoning Province.

Decked with Chinese national flags, the two Type 052D destroyers were launched in the Dalian Shipyard on Friday with the assistance of tug boats, marking the 19th and 20th of launches of their kind, news website wenweipo.com reported on Friday.

China now has 20 Type 052Ds either in active service or being fitted out for service soon, the report said.

Wei Dongxu, a Beijing-based military analyst, told the Global Times on Sunday that 20 would not be the end for the ship's development, and China might have more than 30 in the future.

"The platform [of the Type 052D] is pretty reliable and it uses very mature technologies. These make it suitable for mass production," Wei said, noting that the destroyers will play crucial roles in China's fleet air defense system.

The domestically developed Type 052D destroyer saw significant upgrades on its predecessor, the Type 052C.

It is equipped with weapons and equipment including advanced active electronically scanned array radar systems and 64 vertical launch missile cells.

The ship is capable of undertaking missions including escort and air defense, experts said.

Dalian Shipyard's double launch of the Type 052Ds on Friday came after another double launch in July 2018.

The vessels launched back then were two Type 055s, China's more advanced destroyer featuring a displacement of more than 10,000 tons and 112 vertical launch missile cells.

China has planned eight Type 055s for the first batch, Upolitics, a WeChat account run by Beijing Youth Daily, reported.

The Type 055 made its parade debut on April 23, when the People's Liberation Army Navy celebrated its 70th anniversary.

Though the Type 055 seems superior to the Type 052D in all ways, Chinese analysts said the former would not replace the latter anytime soon.

The Type 055 destroyer can provide stronger air defense umbrellas to, for example, an aircraft carrier combat group, but it is not necessary to dispatch a ship with its caliber for every single mission, because for many the smaller and less expensive Type 052D would suffice, Wei said.

The US Navy currently operates more than 60 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and more than 20 Ticonderoga-class cruisers.

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[*] posted on 15-5-2019 at 09:21 PM


China’s eighth Type 071 in advanced stage of construction

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

14 May 2019


Images show that the hull of an eighth Type 071 LPD for the Chinese navy is at an advanced stage of construction at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai. Source: Via haohanfw.com

Images have emerged on Chinese online forums showing that the hull of an eighth Type 071 (Yuzhao)-class landing platform dock (LPD) vessel for the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) is at an advanced stage of construction at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai.

The ship is being built in the same dry dock used for construction of the seventh Type 071. A considerable number of modules for the latest ship were evident on the dockside before the seventh vessel was launched on 28 December 2018, which has enabled the hull of the latest LPD to be assembled in less than six months.

In a 2 May report to Congress about military and security developments involving China, the US Department of Defense (DoD) said that China will probably continue constructing Type 071s even as the PLAN pursues a follow-on class of amphibious assault ships that are not only larger but also incorporate a full flight deck for helicopters.

That new ship class, known as the Type 075, may be already being built in the same dock at Hudong-Zhonghua. Satellite images reveal that alongside the eighth Type 071 a second and larger ship is also being built. Construction of the Type 075 class has been anticipated for some time and there have been persistent rumours for several months that construction is under way.

The evidence available so far is insufficient to state conclusively that this is the first Type 075 and the particular dry dock has previously been used for naval and commercial ships.

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[*] posted on 15-5-2019 at 09:26 PM


The Chinese are managing to put out a huge number of ships as of late. I have to wonder how much of this is a quantity vs quality thing. Given the speed of the fleet growth, and Chinese manufacturing being what it is, how many will still be viable in another ten years time?



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[*] posted on 15-5-2019 at 09:40 PM


Trained personnel for all this shit, is another "puzzle", as well as the resources to support all of this naval force..........
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[*] posted on 15-5-2019 at 09:52 PM


And just to complicate the burden further...........

China to Soon Commission 1st Homemade Aircraft Carrier: Reports

(Source: Global Times; issued May 15, 2019)


As China nears the commissioning of its Type 001A carrier (photo), construction of its second locally-built carrier has begun at the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai; this one will be bigger and have a flat deck with “cat-and-traps” for aircraft handling. (PLA file photo)

A full year has passed since China's second aircraft carrier, or the first domestically made, the Type 001A, conducted its first sea trial, leading analysts to suggest the ship might soon officially join the country's naval service.

Their prediction is based on the experience of the country's first carrier, the Liaoning, which took a little more than a year from its maiden voyage to enlist in the PLA Navy.

As of Monday, lane markings have been painted on the Type 001A's flight deck. It also conducted a replenishment drill within the shipyard with the supply ship Hulunhu in late April, news website wenweipo reported on Monday.

The first domestically developed carrier undertook its first sea trial on May 13, 2018. Four others have been conducted over the past year.

The sea trials successfully tested the warship's propulsion system, combat and supply capabilities, China Central Television reported in April.

Chinese military enthusiasts had hoped the second carrier would make it to a maritime parade on April 23 to celebrate the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy's 70th anniversary in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province. However, it remained in its shipyard in Dalian, Northeast China's Liaoning Province where it continued to be painted.

The interval between the Liaoning's first sea trial and its commissioning to the PLA Navy was a little more than a year, so analysts believe the domestically made carrier will very likely be commissioned within two months, the wenweipo report said.

As the commissioning of the Type 001A appears to be on track, military observers are beginning to shift their focus to China's third carrier.

The construction of the second domestically developed aircraft carrier has begun, the PLA Daily reported on April 21. The Xinhua News Agency also reported construction was underway in November 2018.

Reuters reported on May 7 that the third carrier is being constructed at the Jiangnan Shipyard in Shanghai, citing recent satellite images.

Chinese military experts told the Global Times previously that the third carrier will likely be bigger than the previous two and feature a flat deck instead of jump-rack deck. It might also use new technologies including an electromagnetic catapult to launch its aircraft, they said.

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[*] posted on 18-5-2019 at 10:53 AM


PLAN decommissions four Type 051 destroyers

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

17 May 2019


The Chinese navy decommissioned four Type 051-class destroyers in a ceremony held at the North Sea Fleet base in Lushun on 16 May. Source: military.cnr.cn

China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) decommissioned four Type 051 (Luda)-class destroyers in a ceremony held at the North Sea Fleet base in Lushun, formerly known as Port Arthur, on 16 May.

Named Kaifeng (with pennant number 109), Dalian (110), Zunyi (134), and Guilin (164), the ships had been assigned to the 10th destroyer flotilla, and been in service for more than 30 years.

The Type 051 destroyers were built in China but the class was heavily influenced by Russian designs, particularly the Kotlin-class destroyers. Seventeen ships were built between 1970 and 1990, although only two - Zhanjiang (165) and Zhuhai (166) - remain in service after the recent decommissioning.

The 3,250-ton displacement of the Type 051 class is only about half that of the Type 052D (Luyang III) class, of which the 19th and 20th were launched in Dalian on 10 May. Although the weapon systems on the Type 051 class had been updated, particularly on Kaifeng and Dalian, which were equipped with 16 YJ-83 anti-ship missiles, the class had very limited capabilities compared with the destroyers that are currently entering service with the PLAN.

The Type 051 ships are unlikely to be sold to another navy as their steam propulsion plant is manpower intensive, both to operate and to maintain. Several of the previously decommissioned ships have become floating museum exhibits.

The PLAN still operates a surprising number of steam-powered destroyers in addition to the two remaining Type 051s. Shenzhen (167) - which is the only Type 051B (Luhai)-class destroyer ever constructed - and the two Type 051C (Luzhou)-class destroyers - the second of which was commissioned as recently as 2007 - are steam powered, as are the four Sovremenny-class destroyers imported from Russia between 2000 and 2006.

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[*] posted on 22-5-2019 at 08:09 PM


More hints about Beijing's aircraft carrier ambitions

21 MAY, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM BY: GREG WALDRON SINGAPORE

Beijing’s ambitions for a large aircraft carrier have gained more clarity, with the emergence of detailed artist impressions of the Xian KJ-600 airborne early warning & control (AEW&C) aircraft, as well as satellite imagery of a Chinese shipyard.

Recent artists impressions posted on social media offer more details about the Xian KJ-600, which is expected to be a key part of future People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) carrier air wings.

While the provenance of the impressions are not clear, they are consistent with previous images of the aircraft, which resembles the Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye in service aboard US and French carriers.


The Xian Y-7 based JZY-01 test bed (top) with the KJ-600 (bottom)

The impressions suggest that the twin-turboprop KJ-600 will also have a carrier on-board delivery (COD) variant similar to the C-2 Greyhound, and an anti-submarine warfare variant.

The main AEW&C variant is notable in that it includes an air-to-air refueling probe. The text suggests that this can increase its endurance from 4-5hrs to 7-8hrs.

The KJ-600 is shown with the larger JZY-01 testbed, which has been used to test what is apparently the aircraft’s CETC KLC-7 radar. A CETC promotional video at Air Show China in November 2018 depicted KLC-7 equipped KJ-600 vectoring fighters against enemy aircraft.


The carrier onboard delivery (top) and anti-submarine warfare (bottom) versions of the KJ-600.

Like the C-2, the KJ-600’s COD variant is equipped with a ramp for loading personnel and equipment. The ASW version features a surface search radar under the chin, torpedoes in a semi-recessed mounting in the aircraft’s belly, synthetic aperture radar, and a magnetic anomaly detector (MAD) boom.

The aircraft are planned for use aboard China’s developmental Type 002 carrier. In April, the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) posted satellite images of Jiangnan shipyard, where it contends a large aircraft carrier is under construction.

Its estimated displacement will be 80,000-85,000t. By using catapults, as opposed to the ski-jump found on Beijing’s existing pair of carriers, it will be able to launch a broader range of aircraft, including AEW&C types. CSIS projects that it will enter service in 2022.
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[*] posted on 4-6-2019 at 10:46 PM


Images show likely configuration of sensor suite for PLAN’s next carrier

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

04 June 2019

Photographs published on Chinese internet forums show that further developments and modifications have been made to the superstructure of the land-based aircraft carrier development facility in the central Chinese city of Wuhan. These likely reflect the changes that will be implemented in building the third carrier for China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN).


An image of China's land-based aircraft carrier development facility in Wuhan showing what is likely to be the future configuration of the sensor suite on the island of China's third aircraft carrier. (Via CJDBY.net)

The most significant feature is the installation of an integrated mast on top of the island superstructure, replacing the mast that in the first two carriers supports the mechanically rotated Type 382 (H/LJQ 382) 3D radar with its distinctive back-to-back skewed arrays. Multiple arrays appear to be fitted to the new mast, which has a housing with eight faces halfway up that seem to be designed to accommodate two differing sets of four arrays.

The mast design appears to reflect that fixed planar arrays will be adopted for most radio frequency sensors, comparable to the widespread use of such technology in the Type 055 destroyer, although the carrier systems are likely to be more focused on situational awareness and data communications rather than the functions of target illumination and weapon control that will be crucial in the destroyer.

As previously reported, the carrier mock-up retains the four square panels for the Type 346A ‘Dragon Eye’ surveillance radar, in the same configuration as in the second carrier, above which there are smaller square apertures that may be for a higher frequency radar or other sensors.

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[*] posted on 6-6-2019 at 09:44 PM


China's New Type 055 Destroyer Among Best in the World: Experts

(Source: Global Times; issued June 05, 2019)

Accompanied by marching music and tearing waves, a huge warship with the hull number 101 sailed into view out of heavy fog during the maritime parade on April 23 in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province to celebrate the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy's 70th anniversary.

Those not lucky enough to experience this at the scene and were eagerly waiting to see it on television were disappointed when state broadcaster China Central Television was unable to provide a live feed of the parade, possibly due to the bad weather and sea conditions. But that did not stop them from enjoying picture reports that arrived a few minutes later, when they saw their long-anticipated expectation become a reality.

Chinese military enthusiasts have been dreaming for decades to see China have a 10,000-ton-class destroyer. Finally, the first domestically developed Type 055 Nanchang made its parade debut as a special birthday present to the PLA Navy, as the warship will reportedly join its North China Sea Fleet.

Between 1840 and 1949, China suffered more than 470 invasions by foreign powers from the sea. With the help of the Type 055 destroyer, a warship described by Chinese military experts as world class, fewer foreign hostile forces will have the ability to repeat such attacks.

Strong firepower

With a displacement of more than 10,000 tons, the Type 055 can carry more weapons and equipment than any other Chinese destroyer.

The warship has eight eight-unit vertical launch systems (VLS) in the front deck and six eight-unit VLS in the middle, a total of 112 VLS units, the most among Chinese destroyers, reported Ordnance Industry Science Technology, a Xi'an-based periodical on the national defense industry.

By comparison, China's Type 052D destroyer has only 64, the US' Arleigh Burke-class destroyer has 96, and the US' Ticonderoga-class cruiser has 122, according to media reports.

These VLS units use the latest standard design of the PLA Navy, giving them both hot launch and cold launch abilities, the Ordnance Industry Science Technology report said. A hot launch means a missile ignites in its cell, and a cold launch means a missile is ejected from the launch cell before it ignites.

Missiles armed within the VLS units include air defense missiles, anti-ship missiles and anti-submarine missiles, according to the report. Some say that the ship may also have land-attack missiles.

In the air defense department, the ship is expected to be installed with missiles including HHQ-9B long-range air defense missiles and HQ-16B mid-range air defense missiles, Ordnance Industry Science Technology reported, noting that it could also be equipped with a type of mid-close-range surface-to-air missile developed from the DK-10 missile. With regards to warship-to-warship combat, the Type 055 could be equipped with YJ-18 anti-ship missiles, the report said.

This type of missile can fly at high subsonic speed upon launch, but accelerate to between Mach 2.5 and Mach 3 when approaching its target. This design keeps the missile light and far-reaching, while also giving the enemy as little reaction time as possible, the report said, noting that the YJ-18 carries a heavy explosive warhead, which, combined with the enormous kinetic energy from the fast speed, can severely damage a warship with tens of thousands of tons of displacement with only one strike.

Although anti-submarine assault is not the Type 055's main mission objective, it is likely equipped with Y-8 anti-submarine missiles and torpedoes. The warship is also equipped with an advanced sonar system and can carry medium-to large-sized anti-submarine helicopters on board, according to the report, which pointed out that the helicopters, missiles and torpedoes could form a three-layer defense web against even advanced nuclear-powered submarines.

The main gun of the warship seems to be an improved version of the 130 millimeter single-barreled H/PJ45A-130-1, which could be found on the Type 052D, Ordnance Industry Science Technology said. The gun can shoot 40 shells a minute, and a normal shell can travel 30 kilometers, while a rocket-propelled guided shell could hit targets even farther and more accurately, the report said.

The ship is also equipped with a Type 1130 close-in weapon system that can shoot tens of thousands of bullets per minute to neutralize incoming missiles. It also has a 24-unit HHQ-10 close-range anti-missile system that can effectively intercept supersonic anti-ship missiles, according to the report.

With such strong firepower, the Type 055 can either serve as a powerful escort to an aircraft carrier, or lead a flotilla sailing across the globe, as it also has very long operational range, Xu Guangyu, a senior consultant at the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, told the Global Times.

"It is no inferior to Aegis ships like [the US'] Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and Ticonderoga-class cruisers. By comparison, the Nanchang is the best in Asia, and can be considered world class," Xu noted.

A Chinese military expert who asked not to be named told the Global Times that the Type 055 is also equipped with very advanced radar and electronic control systems, which allow it to make the best of these weapons.

Future potential

With the Nanchang joining the PLA naval service, more Type 055s are being manufactured. A second one was launched in April 2018 in Shanghai, while the third and fourth ones were launched in July 2018 in Dalian, Northeast China's Liaoning Province, and more are expected to come, media reported.

Military observers say that the Type 055 might see variants in the future that could carry China's futuristic electromagnetic railgun, which can shoot hypersonic projectiles at Mach 7.

It might also upgrade its arsenal to serve as an antiballistic missile platform, the anonymous expert said.

"The Type 055 has huge room for upgrades, so I expect it to bring more surprises in the future," he said.

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[*] posted on 7-6-2019 at 12:47 PM


"China's New Type 055 Destroyer Among Best in the World: Experts"

...say Chinese Navy experts.

"With the help of the Type 055 destroyer, a warship described by Chinese military experts as world class..."

Reports the Chinese owned Global Times...

:crazy:;) We need a proper eyeroll emoji




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[*] posted on 7-6-2019 at 01:20 PM


I want to completely overhaul the site and the software hosting the forum in the next few months. Really not happy with the state of the emojis given some of the content that appears here...



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[*] posted on 8-6-2019 at 10:08 PM


Chinese navySecond carrier

June 5, 2019


Type 001A, China’s second aircraft carrier, is docked alongside Hulun Lake, a combat support vessel, at Dalian Shipyard. Photo: Weibo

- Fuel constraints will limit PLA’s 2nd carrier
- Vessel can only last six days at sea without resupply but a new base is being built on Fiery Cross Reef

By Asia Times staff

Replenishment issues may emerge as a big drag on the combat capabilities of China’s second aircraft carrier, known only as “Type 001A”, which is now in its final stage of trials and tweaks before going into service, likely by the end of this year.

The homemade carrier, which runs on marine fuel, is modeled on its predecessor, the Soviet-built Liaoning, and it has the same basic propulsion and powertrain systems as her sister ship.

As with the Liaoning and other Kuznetsov–class vessels from the Soviet era, the new carrier will need to store around 13,000 metric tons of marine fuel for its operations, plus the six to eight guided missile destroyers and corvettes that form a larger combat group.

A mission to replenish the carrier’s tanks will be required whenever a third of the total fuel consignment is consumed, as seen in the People’s Liberation Army’s logistics arrangement for its anti-pirate deployment in the Gulf of Aden, where it escorts Chinese merchant ships, according to the Kanwa Defense Review.

The second carrier will consume 1,100 tons of fuel per day when cruising at 20 knots (37 kilometers an hour), and about 400 tons more during active combat. The J-15 fighter squadron aboard the carrier will also need adequate aerial fuel supply, as well as other lubricating oils.

When the new carrier is in the high seas, the 23,000-ton Type 903 oiler, ammunition and supply ship will be the main source of its fuel, food and other supplies. Yet this capacity constraint means the navy would be hard put to replenish the entire carrier group for more than two rounds.

Observers say that like the Liaoning, the Type 001A group can only last at sea for six days between each refill, a fraction of the time of the US Navy’s nuclear-powered flattops, which do not need fuel for propulsion.


A satellite image shows the 50,000-ton Hulun Lake supply ship and the Liaoning carrier. Photo: Weibo


The Hulun Lake supply ship. Photo: Xinhua

As a stop-gap measure before China can launch its own nuclear carriers in the distant future, the Guangzhou Shipyard under China State Shipbuilding Corp has already been revving up the construction of the 50,000-ton Type 901 fast combat support ships, with the first two of the class already entered into service.

South China Sea bases

It has also been revealed that Type 001A will primarily be assigned to patrol the South China Sea from its homeport of Yulin, in Sanya, on the strategically-located Hainan Island, where berths for the two carriers are nearing completion.

Another carrier base is also taking shape offshore in the heart of the hotly-contested waters, on Fiery Cross Reef, aka Northwest Investigator Reef and Yongshu Reef, just west of the Spratly Islands, where China’s frenetic reclamation has seen huge chunks of land being made from the sea over recent years.

China’s militarization of the atolls there aims to create a “Great wall of Sand”, with replenishment bases for its warships, as the PLA seeks to boost its patrols and territorial claims.


A photo of Fiery Cross Reef, or Yongshu Reef, released by the Chinese military. It will have a berth to service Chinese carriers. Image: PLA Daily

It should take a little over a day for Type 001A to sail there from Sanya at a speed of 20 knots.

The PLA’s first overseas base in Djibouti, on the Horn of Africa, as well as a civil port in Sri Lanka leased by the force, will also be vital supply bases for the Chinese carriers.
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[*] posted on 11-6-2019 at 09:22 AM


China increases construction rate of amphibious assault ships

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

10 June 2019


The eighth Type 071-class amphibious assault ship on order for the PLAN was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai on 6 June. Source: Via Weixin website

The eighth Type 071 (Yuzhao)-class amphibious assault ship on order for China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard in Shanghai on 6 June, making it the fourth of these 20,000 tonne landing platform dock (LPD) vessels to have entered the water since June 2017.

Construction of the seventh LPD began in April 2018, with the ship entering the water on 28 December 2018: a period of eight months to assemble the complete hull and launch the ship. Assembly of Hull 8 was carried out in the same part of the dock vacated following the launch of Hull 7, meaning that Hull 8 was completed in just six months. Fitting out and trials are likely to take a further 12 months before the ship is ready for commissioning.

As previously reported by Jane's, another hull is being constructed in the same dock as the LPDs, and it seems certain that this will be the PLAN's first Type 075 helicopter assault ship. Progress on this ship has also been rapid, as assembly must have commenced after the dock was drained following the launch of the seventh Type 071 in December 2018 and a large part of the Type 075 was sufficiently complete to be watertight and float when the dock was flooded again for the most recent LPD launch.

Although assembly of the Type 075 may take longer than the repeat builds of the Type 071, given that it is both larger and a new design, it looks likely that it will be launched before the end of 2019.

The most recent satellite imagery shows that the hull of the Type 075 in its current state has a beam of about 32 m. As the bow and stern sections have yet to be added, its length cannot yet be established but it seems likely that the displacement will be about 35,000-40,000 tonnes.

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[*] posted on 23-8-2019 at 08:20 PM


China launches world-leading 'JARI' unmanned warship USV

Posted On Friday, 23 August 2019 09:38

China on Wednesday, August 21, 2019, launched a world-leading unmanned warship, with its developer claiming the vessel is combat-ready. The unmanned surface vessel called 'JARI'. CSOC is the export arm of Chinese shipbuilding group China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC).


The unmanned surface combat unveiled by CSOC during AAD 2018 (Picture source: Army Recognition)

Jointly developed by No. 716 and No. 702 research institutes under the state-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC), the JARI multi-purpose unmanned combat vessel held its launch ceremony on Wednesday at an undisclosed location, according to a statement the No. 716 Research Institute of CSIC released on its WeChat account on Wednesday.

The launch indicates the world-leading combat drone ship has gained initial combat capability, the statement said. Announcing JARI's combat-readiness immediately after its launch is also an indication of how mature the technologies used on the ship are.

Normally a warship needs multiple sea trials before it becomes operational, the expert noted. It will still need further tests to unlock its full potential of being a fully autonomous combat drone ship, according to the statement.

The ship has a length of about only 15 meters and a displacement of 20 tons, but is capable of conducting air defense, anti-ship and anti-submarine missions thanks to a phased array radar system, vertical-launched missiles and torpedoes, China Central Television (CCTV) reported in February, when a model of the JARI was exhibited at the 14th International Defense Exhibition and Conference (IDEX) in Abu Dhabi. Some military observers called the ship an unmanned "mini Aegis-class destroyer" because of its radar and missiles.

The JARI can be remotely controlled, but also uses artificial intelligence to autonomously navigate and undertake combat activities once it receives commands, the CCTV report said. The drone ship could either work stealthily alone or form a swarm with others to become a formidable power, analysts said.

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[*] posted on 24-8-2019 at 12:22 PM


Photos reveal progress on China’s largest amphibious assault ship

By: Mike Yeo   9 hours ago



MELBOURNE, Australia — Recent photos reveal the construction of China’s largest amphibious assault ship is progressing at a shipyard in the metropolis of Shanghai, as the country strives to plug gaps in its military’s amphibious capabilities.

One photo, taken from a boat sailing on the Huangpu River, which runs through Shanghai, eastern China, shows the main bridge structure has recently been joined to the hull of the first Type 075 amphibious assault ship.

Other photos taken from surrounding buildings and within China State Shipbuilding Corporation’s Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard have also been posted online, with one taken from the rear showing the configuration of the stern elevator and part of the well dock.

The Type 075 is roughly analogous to the U.S. Navy’s Wasp-class landing helicopter dock. The Chinese ship will feature a large flight deck capable of handling five to six large transport helicopters taking off and preparing for flight simultaneously. It will also have parking and hangar space for more helos.
Its well dock is expected to be able to accommodate multiple conventionally powered and/or air-cushioned Type 726 landing craft.

Given the pace of construction, the ship is expected to launch this year. The shipyard at Hudong-Zhonghua is also responsible for building the 25,000-ton Type 071, or Yuzhao landing platform dock, which is the currently the most capable amphibious ship in service with the People’s Liberation Army Navy. Six of these ships are active, and two more are undergoing final work at the shipyard.

It’s unknown how many Type 075s China plans to eventually operate, although some reports suggested at least three such ships will be built.

Once in service with the People’s Liberation Army Navy, or PLAN, the Type 075 — which is expected to displace between 35,000 and 40,000 tons — will represent a significant boost to the service’s amphibious capabilities. The PLAN is mostly outfitted with smaller, less capable landing ships alongside the Type 071s.

The U.S. Defense Department’s 2019 China Military Power Report suggests the PLAN has a near-term focus on building up an amphibious force geared toward smaller-scale expeditionary missions as opposed to the capability necessary for a large-scale, direct beach assault, i.e., a full-scale Taiwan invasion. The report suggests this effort would require a significant expansion of China’s landing ship force.

China has also reorganized the PLAN Marine Corps, with plans for the force to grow from two brigades with 10,000 troops to seven with more than 30,000 personnel, according to the report.. The force’s mission is also to expand to “include expeditionary operations beyond China’s borders” by 2020 as part of planned reforms to China’s military, the report says.

However, many of the six marine brigades now in existence are not fully prepared for operations. The new brigades were formerly coastal defense or infantry units, and have been re-designated as Marine Corps units, although the process of reequipping and retraining them is ongoing. The Pentagon report concludes that “China lacks a sufficient inventory of wheeled armored vehicles” to adequately support “multiple expeditionary deployments.”

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[*] posted on 24-8-2019 at 02:31 PM


Shit, the PLAN aren't mucking about.

The US industrial base to support shipbuilding seems to be slowly dieing while China is full steam ahead.

I saw a statement that suggested that the Chinese were bringing into service the equivalent of the entire Royal Navy every two or so years.




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[*] posted on 24-8-2019 at 02:56 PM


And here we are, dicking about for the next 10 years waiting for only the FIRST of the new Hunter class to get built and commissioned. I don't think people are taking the China threat seriously at all. They wouldn't be building at such a rapid pace if they weren't seriously considering using all this naval power.
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[*] posted on 24-8-2019 at 04:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by CaptainCleanoff  
And here we are, dicking about for the next 10 years waiting for only the FIRST of the new Hunter class to get built and commissioned. I don't think people are taking the China threat seriously at all. They wouldn't be building at such a rapid pace if they weren't seriously considering using all this naval power.


I couldn't agree more...…..by the time we get ready to start building our Hunter class, the Royal Navy will be moving on to the next iteration of the Type 26 to replace the Type 45...……….
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[*] posted on 27-8-2019 at 09:14 AM


Three types of 927 surveillance ships entered China navy in 2018 and 2019

Posted On Monday, 26 August 2019 16:22

Photographs have circulated over the past week showing what appears to be a new Chinese ocean surveillance vessel being completed in southern China, possibly giving China a new long-range capability to detect submarines.


The type 927 (number 782) closely resembles U.S. ocean surveillance ships (Picture source: Chinese internet)

Photographs circulating on Chinese social media sites show a Type 927 twin-hulled acoustic surveillance ship berthed at the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) main South Sea Fleet base at Zhanjiang. The vessel bears the pennant number 780 and appears to be flying a naval ensign, indicating that the ship has most probably entered service. Three are known to have been built, two at the Huangpu shipyard in Guangzhou and one at the Shuangliu shipyard in Wuhan.

Type 927 vessels are twin-hulled, with a displacement of approximately 5,000 tonnes. The ships are 90 meters long and have a beam of 30 meters being completed at a shipyard in Huangpu near Hong Kong that has built SWATH designs for the Chinese navy before. SWATH vessels are both extremely stable and extremely quiet, especially when outfitted with electric motors for propulsion. Their stability and quiet make them especially useful for hydrographic surveying and research utilizing sonar and other sensitive acoustic equipment, and for locating submarines.

While the photographs do not yet show any obvious equipment such as reels for towed sonar arrays, the vessel is almost certainly intended to support Chinese anti-submarine warfare operations to detect and track submarines. The Chinese vessel bears an unmistakable resemblance to U.S. Navy Ocean Surveillance Ships, which are equipped with advanced sonar arrays to detect and track submarines at great ranges. These ships trail sensitive listening equipment on long cables that can pick up the sound of submarines travelling underwater and track their movement. Some can augment their passive listening arrays with low-frequency active arrays that send sound waves into the water to bounce off submerged submarine hulls to reveal their location.
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[*] posted on 28-8-2019 at 04:00 PM


China’s navy ‘set to pick J-20 stealth jets for its next generation carriers’

Military insiders say the aircraft appears to have beaten the FC-31 in the race to become the PLA Navy’s fighter of the future

Minnie Chan

Published: 11:00pm, 27 Aug, 2019
Updated: 11:49pm, 27 Aug, 2019



China’s military is likely to pick the country’s first active stealth fighter, the J-20, for its next generation aircraft carriers, according to military sources and a recent report on state media.

The J-20, made by the Chengdu Aerospace Corporation (CAC), appears to have a won a head-to-head contest with the FC-31, a fighter made by another company which is still undergoing testing.

A military insider told the South China Morning Post that the Central Military Commission, the People’s Liberation Army’s top decision-making body, now favoured adapting the J-20 for its new carriers.

“The Chengdu Aerospace Corporation will announce some new products, which will include a new version of their J-20. You can guess what type it will be,” the military insider, who requested anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject, said.

The FC-31 was independently developed by CAC’s sister company Shenyang Aircraft Corporation (SAC), which also produced the J-15 – the jets currently in use on the country’s only active aircraft carrier, the Liaoning.

Both aerospace firms are subsidiaries of the state-owned giant Aviation Industry Corporation of China, which specialises in designing and developing military aircraft, and were set up to ensure benign competition between manufacturers.

However, the SAC has faced criticism from some military leaders and experts for being too conservative and failing to innovate because of its bureaucratic structure.

A recent programme aired by the state broadcaster China Central Television also suggests the J-20 will be chosen.

An episode of Military Documentary shown on August 16 reported how the PLA Navy was selecting candidates for pilot training and illustrated the feature with a mock-up of jets that looked like J-20s taking off from a carrier.

Ground-based J-20s – also known as Powerful Dragons – entered service with the PLA Air Force in 2017. Mass production of the stealth fighters began late last year as China stepped up its efforts to counter the deployment of American F-22s and F-35s in the Asia-Pacific region.

If the selection of the J-20 is confirmed it will mark the end of a lengthy debate between its supporters and advocates of the FC-31 as to which would make a better carrier-based fighter.

Those who favoured the J-20 said it was more advanced and reliable than the FC-31, but its supporters said it was more light and nimble.

“Both the J-20 and FC-31 have their advantages. The size of the J-20 is similar to the J-15 since both are powerful heavy fighters,” Song Zhongping, a military commentator for Hong Kong-based Phoenix Television, said.

Song said the lighter FC-31 could be developed into a medium-sized carrier fighter that would complement the J-20 in future.

But another military source close to the PLA Navy said it would be almost impossible to develop both aircraft over the next few years given the risk of an economic downturn as the trade war with the US continues to escalate.

The source said China’s next generation aircraft carriers would be with equipped electromagnetic catapults similar to those used on the US Navy’s Ford-class supercarriers.

These enable the use of heavier fighters because they are more powerful than the older diesel systems used on older carriers.

“The key problem of the J-20 is not weight, but length. If it wants to be a carrier-based fighter jet, it needs to be made shorter.”

Military insiders have previously said that CAC engineers are working to produce a shorter version of the J-20 that will work with the new launch system.

At present both the J-20 and F-31 still rely on Russian engines.

The WS-15 engine that has been purpose built for the J-20 has undergone hundreds of hours of testing but has yet to meet reliability targets while the F-31 prototype does not have a purpose-built engine.

China’s navy plans to build at least four carrier battle groups by 2030, three of which will be active at any given time.

Miliary analysts say China will need at least a decade to develop its new generation carrier-based fighters, so the J-15 will remain in service for at least a decade, if not two.

The J-15 made its maiden flight in 2009 and has been in service since 2012. They are the only fighters based on the Liaoning and will be used by its sister ship the Type 001A when it enters service, probably later this year.
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[*] posted on 20-9-2019 at 06:09 PM


Photos: China’s Sharp Sword Carrier-Based Stealth Drone to Enter Service by End of Year

(Source: Sputnik News; posted Sept. 17, 2019)



China’s new carrier-based drone, dubbed the Sharp Sword, will appear in the October 1 National Day parade in Beijing and is expected to enter service before the end of the year.

Unnamed sources in the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy told the South China Morning Post recently that final preparations were being made for the Sharp Sword drone to be commissioned before the end of the year.

“The use of drones for aircraft carriers and warships is the trend [for navies] around the world,” a source from the PLAN said. “China is no exception.”

The Sharp Sword is one of two drones to grow out of Shenyang Aircraft Design Institute’s AVIC 601-S stealth UAV testbed. Built in conjunction with the Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) and Shenyang Aerospace University, the program produced a slew of drone designs, one of which was the Sharp Sword. The other, the Dark Sword, was touted as the world’s first sixth generation aircraft at its unveiling last year, Sputnik reported.

“China has learned the technology from the US and France,” the PLAN insider told SCMP. The US is developing a similar drone, the Boeing MQ-25 Stingray, and France has the experimental Dassault nEUROn carrier-based UAV. The Stingray is expected to serve a variety of functions for the US Navy, from communications relay to aerial refueling.

“The Sharp Sword does not have this capability,” the naval insider said of refueling, “so it will focus on reconnaissance missions for [China’s] missile systems.”

“In order to reduce its weight, the reconnaissance version of the Sharp Sword would not carry weapons despite having two internal bomb bays, because it needs to fit the ski-jump take-off ramp on the Type 001A,” the source told SCMP. “The Sharp Sword reconnaissance drone’s key mission will be gathering intelligence for ship-borne missile systems, enabling the missiles to accurately hit targets that are 300 km to 400 km away.”

The PLA Rocket Force has placed particular emphasis on developing dangerous long-range anti-ship missiles that can keep the US Navy at a safe distance, so the Sharp Sword’s ability to further extend that range only places enemy ships in all the more peril.

The drone made an unexpected appearance in recent photos of the PLA’s parade rehearsals in Beijing. In just two weeks, the People’s Republic of China will celebrate the 70th anniversary of its foundation, when Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong declared victory in the civil war and the foundation of the new socialist country in 1949.

The celebrations are expected to be marvelous, but also militant, with a military parade showing off the country’s incredible technical advancements as indicative of its status as a rising global power. Chinese President Xi Jinping has set a goal for China of achieving a “moderately prosperous society” by 2020 and making China a “fully developed nation” and “a global leader in terms of comprehensive national power and international influence” by 2049, the PRC’s centenary.

China’s advancements in drone development reflect its heavy investment in emerging technological fields. Aside from dominating the worldwide market for drones both civilian and military, Beijing has developed a bevy of UAVs for military purposes, many of which rely on stealth technology, including the Sharp Sword.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 23-9-2019 at 09:38 PM


China launches fifth Type 055 destroyer for PLAN

Andrew Tate, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

23 September 2019



The fifth Type 055 (Renhai-class) destroyer on order for the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) has been launched at the Jiangnan Changxingdao shipyard near Shanghai.

Work is now continuing in the fitting-out basin, as shown in commercial satellite imagery captured on 18 September.

The launch was not covered by official Chinese media but the satellite imagery shows that it occurred between 7 and 18 September, with some Chinese social media sites claiming that it took place on 12 September.

Displacing more than 10,000 tonnes, the Type 055 is the largest destroyer built for the PLAN. Its vertical launch system (VLS) comprises 112 cells from which surface-to-air, anti-ship, anti-submarine, and land-attack missiles can be launched.

(114 of 503 words)
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[*] posted on 25-9-2019 at 01:34 PM


FORBES

Sep 24, 2019, 07:50am

Intelligence Suggests Imminent Launch Of China’s New Amphibious Assault Carrier

H I Sutton
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Aerospace & Defense
I cover the changing world of underwater warfare.

While recent events have focused military thinking on the Persian Gulf, a small corner of the defense community have been looking in an entirely different direction: towards China. The country’s first amphibious assault carrier, a 35,000-ton behemoth, is about to be launched from an innocuous-looking shipyard in Shanghai. When the new warship enters the water it will, in a near-instant, transform the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN).


The new Type-075 Amphibious Assault Carrier is nearly as large as the US Navy's America Class vesselH I Sutton

Termed a Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD), this type off ship allows marines to capture beaches and land supplies on enemy territory. Possessing this type of warship represents yet another step change in China’s rapidly expanding maritime capability, joining aircraft carriers, air defense destroyers and underwater drones in an impressive new lineup.

Amphibious ships are particularly relevant because of China’s vast territorial claims in the South China Sea, border disputes further north with Japan, and the long-standing threat to the last holdout from the communists: Taiwan. For many years a potential Chinese assault on Taiwan was mocked as the “million-man swim” because the navy did not have anything approaching the amphibious capability needed to land enough troops on the island. Today these derogatory jokes are fading into memory as defense watchers count the new warship in China’s naval modernization.

Rumors and reports of the ‘Type-075’ Amphibious Assault Carrier have been doing the rounds since even before the entry into service of China’s first large amphibious warfare ship, the Type-071, a landing platform-dock. The first construction images began leaking out via the Chinese Internet in March this year. Since then a trickle has become a flood and, combined with commercial satellite imagery, paints a decent picture of the new ship. She has a large flat deck for helicopters, several lifts for aircraft and equipment, and a long narrow island like you would imagine for an aircraft carrier. Chinese warships are built at incredible speed – just six months after the first construction photos the ship appears ready for launch. Monday morning, observers spotted a red lantern hanging from the ship’s bow, a sign of an impending launch ceremony.

This rate of warship construction is itself impressive. It is only 12 years since China commissioned the Type-071 class. That was the first of at least seven landing platform-docks (LPDs) which each carry four large helicopters and have a well-deck for transport hovercraft. These were already a massive leap in Chinese amphibious capabilities, but the new Type-075 will be in the next league. In terms of size it is likely to be larger than the Australian or French equivalents and second only to the U.S. Navy’s Wasp Class and America Class on the world stage.

The new assault carriers will also have a part to play in power projection. Chinese amphibious forces have already venturing to the Indian Ocean and Middle East and China now has a base at Doraleh in Djibouti on the Horn of Africa, conveniently near to the Persian Gulf and Red Sea.

So there appears no letup in the Chinese Navy’s growing capabilities and incredible modernization journey. Based on analysis of satellite images from last month it appears that a second Type-075 is already under construction even before the first one has hit the water.
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