The Fifth Column Forum
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3
Author: Subject: Unmanned Underwater Vehicles
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 28-5-2019 at 09:50 PM


Aquabotix SwarmDivers USVs purchased by US Navy

POSTED ON TUESDAY, 28 MAY 2019 11:50

Underwater robotics company Aquabotix has won a contract from the U.S. Army worth an estimated $150,000 for the purchase of its SwarmDiver unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) system along with training and test support.


Aquabotix's SwarmDivers at NAVDEX 2019, UAE (Picture source: Navy Recognition)

Presented for the first time during Navdex 2019, these micro-sized, unmanned surface vessels (USVs) are capable of diving and swarming. Such vehicles are designed to support various missions and can be operated in shallow water.

These ultra-portable vehicles are deployable either from the shoreline, or from any platform (mobile or not). In addition to that, they can be launched and operated by a single person. No need of lots of personnel to launch, maneuver and recover the USVs. The inherent redundancy in the mission created by the system's swarm functionality makes SwarmDivers an ideal tool for hydrographic surveys, mine countermeasures, escape and evasion tactics, above and below water communications, harbor management/port security, as well as many reconnaissance missions.

A single SwarnDiver has a length of 0,75m and a weight of 1,7kg (without any extra payload). The system is capable to reach depths down to 50m with speeds going up to 4,3 knots (2,2 m/s). It has an autonomy that can go up to 2,5 hours and up to 100 vehicles can be operated at the same time as a swarm!

These USVs have 3 main missions which are the reconnaissance, the use as mine countermeasures and the creation of a security perimeter.

More information and video at this link

http://navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/naval-exhibitions/...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 30-5-2019 at 07:47 PM


Carderock's McAllister Talks Future of Unmanned Vehicles

(Source: US Navy; issued May 28, 2019)

WEST BETHESDA, Md. --- Before the turn of the century, futurists imagined today looking something like an episode of “The Jetsons,” with robots doing the dull and dirty work in every home, and pilotless flying cars providing seamless transportation. While that is certainly not the case yet, futuristic concepts are being developed and tested at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division.

Reid McAllister is the director of Carderock’s Integrated Unmanned Maritime Mobility Systems, which is responsible for the research, development, test and evaluation of unmanned maritime systems and enabling technologies. McAllister said he knew years ago that unmanned systems would be a big part of future warfare, and he began coordination efforts to establish an unmanned systems community of interest across the Navy's Warfare Centers, laboratories, System Commands, academia and industry.

In 2015, Carderock Division and Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Newport Division started the Unmanned Vehicles and Autonomous Systems (UVAS) Working Group, co-led by McAllister and Newport’s Chris Egan, with the idea to create a thriving, high-velocity learning enterprise to collaboratively exploit the Warfare Centers’ collective technical capabilities and ensure the Navy has the most reliable and cost-effective unmanned systems.

“The focus of the UVAS Working Group is not just about developing unmanned systems technology alone,” said McAllister. “It’s also about integrating unmanned systems and related technologies into the naval force to achieve force-multiplying capability through dynamic man-machine teaming.”

According to McAllister, the future of unmanned systems success hinges on the ability to rapidly advance autonomy development and the speed at which the Navy can safely transition those advancements to the fleet.

Unmanned systems that are 100 percent autonomous need to have the ability to function on their own when communications with the remote operator are lost. Different types of maritime platforms have distinct communication limitations and those variables have to be accounted for. Undersea systems cannot use radio frequencies for routine communications when submerged, while surface platforms can communicate as long as over-the-horizon links are maintained. When unmanned systems go into hostile environments, they must have the ability to continue with the mission.

Reliance on autonomy becomes critical to system adaptability and mission success. If a system’s autonomy/sensor fusion is smart enough to be able to perceive the dynamic world it is operating in and react accordingly, the need to place warfighters’ lives on the line to complete a mission is greatly reduced, if not eliminated.

Unmanned systems could play a role in peacetime scenarios, as well. A ship with a Sailor or Marine overboard could launch an autonomous boat with a recovery crew aboard. The smart boat could have advanced infrared perception as part of its autonomy sensor suite, which would allow it to see the human as a hot spot against the backdrop of the cold sea. The Sailors aboard the rescue craft would not have to focus their attention on the safe navigation of the boat, but on the safe and quick return of the Sailor or Marine to the ship.

“That is a good example of man-machine teaming,” McAllister said.

The UVAS Working Group meets every week, where representatives from across the Naval Research and Development Establishment map out how to best apply their collective energies to advance unmanned systems and warfighter capability.

Capt. Pete Small, head of the Unmanned Maritime Systems Program Office (PMS 406) at Naval Sea Systems Command, is stewarding a multi-billion budget to acquire significant numbers of unmanned maritime systems (UMS) and related core technologies over the next five years. Small approached the UVAS Working Group to help him understand how the Warfare Centers, Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, and Naval Meteorological and Oceanographic Command could come together to assist in the development, testing, fielding and sustainment of the PMS 406 unmanned systems portfolio. There is urgency in Small's request since many of these capabilities will be coming into Navy possession within the current Future Years Defense Program (FYDP).

To accelerate understanding and collaboration, the UVAS Working Group facilitated a workshop on March 22 at Carderock to discuss the development, testing, fielding and sustainment of the PMS 406 portfolio. During breakout sessions, teams brainstormed their ideas to explore the gaps and opportunities for unmanned systems in the areas of core technologies; business and acquisition; integrated logistics support; test and evaluation; ashore and afloat facilities; and sustainment.

Small said he intends to use the results of the workshop as a foundation for a series of ongoing collaborative efforts that will expand outward to other organizations, ensuring the success of PMS 406's portfolio across the life cycle.

“How do we develop unmanned systems far cheaper than we currently are producing them today, and how can we affordably assemble, field and operate multi-domain systems in large numbers?” McAllister said. “When you deploy low-cost capability en masse at an adversary, the cost imposition shifts against the adversary, and our superiority in every encounter is the most likely outcome. Expendability should be a key driver where it makes sense.”

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-6-2019 at 12:29 PM


BAE Systems aims to boost Riptide UUV capabilities

Gerrard Cowan, Belfast - Jane's International Defence Review

26 June 2019


BAE Systems will apply its technologies to its newly acquired Riptide unmanned underwater vehicle family. (Riptide Autonomous Systems)

BAE Systems aims to leverage its own sensing technologies to capitalise on the recent acquisition of Riptide Autonomous Solutions "to address the future needs of US and allied navies", Geoff Edelson, technical director at BAE Systems FAST Labs, told Jane's .

The acquisition, which was announced in early June, offers a range of technological opportunities to the defence prime, which plans to demonstrate the combination of Riptide's unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) technology with its own mission-level autonomy, undersea navigation, and communications technologies in the coming weeks.

Edelson explained that there is a natural synergy between Riptide's host platform UUV and BAE Systems' sensor, processing, communications, and autonomy payloads and software, both in terms of existing technologies and those under development.

"Riptide is a natural fit for coupling our payload capabilities to their platform to offer our customers longer duration, more affordable mission solutions," Edelson said.

He noted that the two companies will begin demonstrating their combined offerings in the third quarter of 2019, adding that BAE Systems' interest in Riptide stemmed from several factors.
"Their vehicles' endurance, power efficiency, and depth flexibility are of particular interest to us from a mission perspective," he said. "The ease of using their open-architecture approach to add mission capabilities makes the Riptide line of vehicles particularly attractive from a cost and schedule perspective."

Riptide had sold just over 100 platforms before the acquisition, Edelson noted, adding that the company had "rapidly developed new technical solutions across a range of vehicle sizes and depth ratings, and they had a significant number of development opportunities".

The deployment of BAE Systems' resources will also enable Riptide's products to advance farther and faster in the market.

(302 of 426 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2019 at 07:40 PM


Saab completes production version of Sea Wasp ROV

Dr. Lee Willett, London - Jane's International Defence Review

02 August 2019


The Sea Wasp ROV, pictured operating in Huntington Beach port, California, during the ‘Coastal Trident’ exercise in 2016. Source: Saab Seaeye

Sweden's Saab has finalised the production version of its Sea Wasp remotely operated vehicle (ROV).

Sea Wasp offers a waterborne ROV-based capability for tackling improvised explosive devices (IEDs). The vehicle has been in development since about 2014, following Saab's receipt of a contract from the US cross-government Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office (CTTSO).

The company is now readying its "productionised Sea Wasp Mk 1 version", Chris Lade, Sea Wasp sales manager in Saab's underwater systems business unit, told Jane's .

Saab plans to formally reveal the production version later in 2019. Any prospective customer proceeding with a purchase would receive this version, Lade added. Development of the production-ready version was funded by the company.

Sea Wasp is launched and recovered by a two-person team, with a variety of fittings optional to aid deployment. Remote control is carried out from a host platform or ashore. Sea Wasp can operate in currents of up to 2.5 kt.

The 1.7 m, 90 kg vehicle is controlled via a fibre-optic tether of variable length.

It observes its operating environment and potential targets using a Norbit wideband multibeam forward-looking sonar and a pair of colour cameras (one on the front of the vehicle and one atop an electrical manipulator arm), and manoeuvres using six thrusters positioned around the vehicle.

Ordnance disposal is achieved using controlled explosive/non-explosive effects delivered using proprietary disruptor systems, including a small charge or water jet deployed from the manipulator arm and enabled by Sea Wasp's firing circuit through the tether.

The operating package includes the vehicle, tether, a control console, a 180-260 V AC power supply unit (PSU), and access to power.

The production-ready version has brought several modifications to the package.

(305 of 792 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 05:55 PM


Self-propelled underwater [DSEI19D1]

10 September 2019



Teledyne Marine (Stand S6-260), through its Teledyne Instruments business, has been awarded an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract by the US Naval Undersea Warfare Center to supply autonomous underwater vehicles and related monitoring and communications acoustic systems. The initial 2019 value of the contract is approximately $5.4 million; the value could reach $22.2 million if all contract options are exercised.

''For more than a decade, Teledyne has been the leading provider of autonomous underwater gliding vehicles to the US government,'' said Al Pichelli, president and CEO.

''We are exceptionally pleased now to have received our first significant order from the US Navy for Teledyne's self-propelled autonomous underwater vehicles.''

(107 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 09:53 AM


First Sub to Carry Poseidon Underwater Nuke Drone to Begin Sea Trials in 2020

(Source: TASS; published Sept. 09, 2019)


In line with the schedule, the acceptance act of the new submarine to operate the Poseidon nuclear-powered underwater drone is to be signed by the Russian Navy in September 2020. (RUS MoD image)

SEVERODVINSK, Russia --- Russia’s special-purpose nuclear sub, the Belgorod, which will be the first basic carrier of Poseidon nuclear-capable underwater drones, will enter sea trials in June 2020 and will be commissioned in September, Sevmash shipyard Director General Mikhail Budnichenko told reporters on Monday.

"The vessel has already begun trials," he said. "Besides, we have a schedule approved by the Defense Ministry, and the work is being carried out in strict compliance with this schedule."

The Sevmash director general said the Belgorod is to take to the sea on June 15, 2020.

"In line with the schedule, the acceptance act is to be signed in September of the same year," Budnichenko added.

In December 2012, the Sevmash shipyard began the construction of a special purpose submarine, designated Project 09852. It was based on the incomplete Project 949A (Oscar II class) submarine, the Belgorod. There is no data on the submarine’s current technical characteristics as of today.

In his state-of-the-nation address to both houses of Russia’s parliament on March 1 last year, Russian President Vladimir Putin mentioned for the first time the country’s efforts to develop a nuclear-powered unmanned underwater vehicle that can carry both conventional and nuclear warheads and is capable of destroying enemy infrastructural facilities, aircraft carrier groups and other targets.

Poseidon drones together with their carriers - nuclear-powered submarines - make part of the so-called oceanic multipurpose system. The drone got its name following the results of open voting on the website of Russia’s Defense Ministry.

A source in the defense industry earlier told TASS that the Poseidon drone would be capable of carrying a nuclear warhead with a yield of up to 2 megatonnes to destroy enemy naval bases.

According to reported data, the Poseidon will feature an intercontinental range capability and an operational depth of over 1 km.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-9-2019 at 02:41 PM


General Dynamics Mission Systems Introduces New Autonomous Unmanned Underwater Vehicle

(Source: General Dynamics; issued Sept 11, 2019)

LONDON, England -- General Dynamics Mission Systems today released the new Bluefin-12 autonomous unmanned underwater vehicle at Defense and Security Equipment International (DSEI) 2019.

This new vehicle builds upon the proven Bluefin autonomy and uses shared Bluefin Robotics’ core capabilities, increased mission modularity and embedded intelligence to complete users’ long endurance, high-consequence and changing missions.

The base Bluefin-12’s extended modularity supports the integration of user-designated sensors and payloads to deliver new mission-critical capabilities. The Bluefin Robotics core autonomy with Standard Payload Interfaces (SPI), open-architecture compatibility and greater than 4,000 cubic centimeter-payload section supports the rapid integration of sensors and payload needed for the successful completion of new missions. The Bluefin-12 may be configured with an optional turnkey survey package delivering integrated survey capabilities including high-resolution sonar, environmental sensing, powerful on-board data processing and highly accurate navigation.

“The General Dynamics’ team has invested in a completely new generation of vehicles,” said Andy Rogers, vice president of undersea systems at General Dynamics Mission Systems. “The new Bluefin-12 provides superior design, high quality, excellent modularity and best-in-class reliability to deliver exceptional mission capability and range.”

“We are proud to add the Bluefin-12 to our UUV family of products and to deliver both the Bluefin-12 and Bluefin-9 UUVs to Thales in support of the Royal Australian Navy’s SEA 1778 program,” Rogers said.

General Dynamics Mission Systems is a business unit of General Dynamics Headquartered in Reston, Virginia, General Dynamics is a global aerospace and defense company that offers a broad portfolio of products and services in business aviation; combat vehicles, weapons systems and munitions; IT services; C4ISR solutions; and shipbuilding and ship repair. General Dynamics employs more than 100,000 people worldwide and generated $36.2 billion in revenue in 2018.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-9-2019 at 12:17 PM


DSEI 2019: General Dynamics launches new Bluefin-12 UUV

Kate Tringham, London - Jane's Navy International

13 September 2019

General Dynamics Mission Systems displayed its Bluefin-12 lightweight medium-class unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) for the first time at the 2019 Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) exhibition in London.

Bluefin-12 forms part of a product refresh of the Bluefin family of UUVs, which is currently under way and follows on from the launch of the Bluefin-9 in 2018, Erik Schmidt, mechanical engineer II for Bluefin Robotics, a General Dynamics subsidiary, told Jane's at the DSEI.


The General Dynamics Mission Systems Bluefin-12 lightweight medium-class UUV on display at DSEI in London. (IHS Markit/Kate Tringham)

"General Dynamics [GD] took over Bluefin Robotics three years ago, and at Bluefin we had a lot of legacy and obsolete components that we'd been dealing with for a long time," he explained. "So, GD gave us the opportunity to really redesign these vehicles from the ground up and improve all the lessons learned over the years and really try to get it right."

According to the company, the system has been built with robust core capabilities and features increased modularity, embedded intelligence, data processing, and an extended operational range.

The Bluefin-12 is 4.83 m long and 32 cm in diameter, with a dry weight of 250 kg.

Both the Bluefin-9 and Bluefin-12 share the same sensor and survey packages, including a Sonardyne Solstice 3000 multi-aperture sidescan sonar, a turbidity and fluorometer sensor, and a sound velocity sensor for temperature and pressure. The depth rating of both UUVs is also the same at 200 m. "The reason for that is that we try to keep as much in common between the two vehicles as we can, so that if you do own a system of vehicles you can interchange the batteries and so on," Schmidt said.

(295 of 437 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-9-2019 at 10:18 PM


NEWS FROM DSEI: Vendors Unveil New Versions of Robotic Subs, Boats at London Show

9/13/2019

By Stew Magnuson


Wave Glider
Photo: Liquid Robotics

LONDON — Makers of unmanned underwater and surface vehicles took the opportunity to reveal new versions of their robots this week at the world’s largest defense trade show.

General Dynamics Mission Systems unveiled its Bluefin-12 on the first day of the Defence and Security Equipment International conference in London Sept. 10. Company officials said it was the start of a new generation of the UUV series. GD acquired Bluefin in 2016.

“We have been on a journey to develop the highest quality, highest maintainability, highest reliability and low logistics family of UUVs that we can bring to bear,” said Andy Rogers, vice president of undersea systems at the company.

The autonomous Bluefin-12, larger than previous iterations of the UUV, features an open architecture so customers can place sensor packages in its 4,000-square-centimeter bay. It also comes with a turnkey survey package with a high-resolution sonar, environmental sensing, navigation and onboard data processing.

The onboard processing allows for quick turnaround for crews. They can unload the data and send the Bluefin-12 back to sea in about 30 minutes. The modular payload bay “allows users to pick the mission they want,” Taylor said at the sub’s unveiling.

The 12-model has already found one customer. Prime contractor Thales selected it as part of its contract to provide the Royal Australian Navy counter-mine capabilities for its SEA 1778 program.

Raytheon was promoting its AQS-20 sonar and Barracuda mine neutralizer for a U.K. Royal Navy program.

The market for unmanned surface vessels "continues to grow at a rapid rate, for USVs in a range of sizes,” Andy Wilde, director of strategy and business development for undersea warfare systems at Raytheon, said in an email. "USVs provide solutions that are much less expensive than traditional manned ships, and for missions such as mine counter-measures, where an unmanned system keeps sailors away from the hazard out of mined waters.”

Raytheon is pursuing the U.K. Royal Navy’s “MCM in a Box” program, which is a rapid acquisition, unmanned expeditionary mine hunting and disposal system. The package will include towed sonars, unmanned surface vessels and mine neutralization systems. The program is projected for fielding in early 2022, Wilde said.

The company recently showed the system this summer at the U.S. Navy’s ANTX technology demonstration event.

“Raytheon’s AQS-20C and Barracuda, operated from a USV, could provide the ability to significantly shorten the mine clearance process by rapidly finding, classifying, identifying and neutralizing mines as they are found, in stride. In an in-stride MCM mission, the USV serves as the tow platform for the mine hunting sonar, and would also carry the Barracuda neutralizer,” Wilde said.

“The ... AQS-20C provides complete simultaneous coverage of the water volume and sea bottom, and is the only mine hunting sonar in the world with this combined capability. Its sidescan synthetic aperture sonar provides exceptionally clear images of contacts on the sea floor, with high-resolution SAS capability for acoustic identification,” he added.

Also on display at the show was Liquid Robotics' newest Wave Glider, a tethered surface-subsurface system. Liquid Robotics is owned by Boeing.

The Wave Glider is known for its endurance, using the ocean and sun to harvest energy. It can sail autonomously for up to one year and carry a variety of payloads in five different bays, according to a fact sheet. Company representatives at the conference were not authorized to speak to the media.

The new SV3 v300 model improves a couple of key performance parameters, including a six-fold increase in computing power, better ruggedization, easier launch procedures and more efficient solar panels, according to a Sept. 10 press release.

“The new Wave Gliders are designed to help customers streamline their operations, decreasing the amount of time spent on assembly and pre-launch checkouts,” Jeff Fiedoroweicz, the company’s chief technology officer, said in the statement.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-9-2019 at 06:29 PM


DSEI 2019: SEA, iXblue launch SeaDrix anti-submarine surveillance solution

Kate Tringham, London - Jane's Navy International

13 September 2019


The SeaDrix autonous ASW surveillance system combines SEA’s KraitArray acoustic sensor with iXblue’s DriX USV. Source: SEA

UK defence and security specialist SEA and French navigation provider iXblue unveiled a new autonomous submarine hunting system at the 2019 Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition (DSEI 2019) in London.

The 7.7×3 m system, called SeaDrix, combines SEA's low-profile acoustic sensor KraitArray with iXblue's unmanned surface vessel (USV) DriX to offer a solution that provides persistent autonomous long-endurance anti-submarine surveillance. According to SEA it can be deployed as a stand-alone asset or as part of a wider anti-submarine warfare (ASW) surveillance system.

Both KraitArray and DriX are proven in operation. DriX was launched in 2017 onto the civilian market and has already conducted successful operations ranging from subsea positioning to bathymetry missions. The USV features a hydrodynamic hull that enables stable seakeeping in up to Sea State 5 and high-speed transit capabilities up to 14 kt. It is equipped with a gondola attached with embedded-sensors that sits two metres below the surface of the vessel for data gathering in a calm environment.

SEA's KraitArray thin-line passive towed array sonar is a small size, low-weight, thin-line (20 mm diameter) passive array that, due to its size, has proven popular particularly in the unmanned systems market. It consists of up to 150 m sections that can be tailored to meet mission requirements.

According to SEA, the integration of the two technologies will enable naval forces to complete surveillance missions without having to rely on military vessels and support teams being in the immediate area. This is of particular value in the current climate in which navies are facing a reduction in the number of specialised frigates and destroyers in their fleets.

(294 of 672 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-9-2019 at 07:04 PM


NATO allies unleash their drones in the waters off Portugal

By: David B. Larter   15 hours ago


The NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation tests acoustic networks during last year's Exercise REP. (NATO)

WASHINGTON — Off the Atlantic coast of Portugal’s Sesimbra and Troia peninsulas, NATO is hosting a gathering of its robot ships and aircraft that the partner nations hope will soon pepper the ocean with sensors for hunting submarines, mines and ships, fused together in a surveillance network unrivaled in maritime history.

Several nations along with the NATO Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation have gathered “dozens of unmanned underwater, surface and air vehicles” for Exercise REP (MUS) 19, held Sept. 11-19, according to a NATO news release.

About 800 service members and civilians from the Portuguese Navy, as well as Belgium, Italy, Turkey, Poland, the United Kingdom and the United States, are participating in the exercise.

The exercise follows up on a July 2018 agreement between the allies to work together to develop unmanned maritime systems, a goal that experts say is primarily aimed at increasing pressure on Russian submarines operating in the region.

“NATO members are alarmed by the growing threat from Russian submarines, and are investing more resources to deal with it,” Jorge Benitez, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, said during an interview. “Under [President Vladimir] Putin, Russia has deployed new, stealthier submarines in the north Atlantic that are much harder for NATO navies to track."

Benitez previously served as the lead on NATO issues for the Office of the Secretary of Defense.


The Office of Naval Research launches a REMUS 600 autonomous underwater vehicle for mine search and identification operations off the coast of Bornholm Island during BALTOPS 2018. The U.S. Navy is among the nations participating in a drone exercise off the coast of Portugal this September. (MCC America Henry/(U.S. Navy)

“This new multinational cooperation in undersea drones is the most recent example that NATO is taking the Russian threat in the north Atlantic much more seriously than it has in the past quarter century,” he added.

A release announcing the exercise acknowledged as much, saying that submarines armed with more powerful weapons, such as Russia’s Kalibr cruise missile, pose a significant threat.

“New maritime unmanned systems technologies can be a game-changer in countering multiple threats in the maritime domain,” the release said. “Using Maritime Unmanned Vehicles can help effectively counter new submarines armed with more powerful weapons. They can also prevent military personnel from moving into risky situations in countering threats like sea mines.”

The U.S. military believes that since surface combatants and submarines armed with expensive sonar arrays are too few and far between to monitor all the world’s chokepoints, it is developing cheaper systems it can deploy to increase numbers and cast a wider net.

That’s the idea behind Sea Hunter. Developed by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, or ACTUV, was designed to track enemy subs while avoiding collisions and abiding by the rules of the road. The first Sea Hunter was christened in 2016, and in January the project transitioned to the Office of Naval Research for further development.

“ACTUV represents a new vision of naval surface warfare that trades small numbers of very capable, high-value assets for large numbers of commoditized, simpler platforms that are more capable in the aggregate,” Fred Kennedy, head of DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office, said in a January news release.
“The U.S. military has talked about the strategic importance of replacing ‘king’ and ‘queen’ pieces on the maritime chessboard with lots of ‘pawns,’ and ACTUV is a first step toward doing exactly that.”
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Mupp
Member





Posts: 127
Registered: 28-4-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Benighly aggressive.

[*] posted on 28-9-2019 at 06:43 AM


EDA expands work on autonomous underwater vehicles
Brussels - 27 September, 2019

EDA’s Steering Board has just approved the launch of a 4-year CAT B project aimed at developing a swarm of biomimetic underwater vehicles for underwater intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (SABUVIS II). It builds upon previous collaboration carried out under the SABUVIS I project which was completed in 2019. So far, two Member States (Poland, Germany) are contributing to this new project for which a project arrangement is expected to be signed later next year.

The new project is important for defence as Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) are being increasingly utilised for a variety of differing tasks in the maritime environment. They represent a viable alternative to the operation of manned platforms and are particularly well suited to the rigours of an inhospitable domain that places a premium on technical advancements.

Taking the natural world as its template, this collaborative project seeks to replicate some of the key features of marine life, principally those of propulsion and behaviour, so as to ensure the successful completion of underwater operations. A key feature of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance missions (ISR) for example, is the necessity to undertake these missions covertly, and those systems that are difficult to detect, both visually and audibly, provide the optimum solution.


Building on the findings of SABUVIS I

This project is a continuation of the successful collaboration enjoyed between Poland, Germany and Portugal in the first SABUVIS project. In this first iteration, three different Biomimetic Underwater Vehicles (BUVs) were constructed with the resulting conclusion that BUVs can be designed with varying degrees of similarity with living organisms. Some of the identified benefits are that undulating propulsion consumes less electrical energy than conventional propulsion systems utilising screw based propellers, and different hydroacoustic signatures are produced with a corresponding lower noise level.

This second phase will now expand upon, and investigate further, the swarm aspects with more tightly cooperating vehicles, moving in formations and consisting of vehicles having specific functions or tasks to perform. The project in particular will focus on the lead vehicles, who are responsible for the navigation function.

The expected advantages of utilising vehicles in a swarm are reliability and efficiency. Firstly, the swarm system can incorporate redundant elements, essentially extra vehicles, which increases reliability in performing a task – the loss of one element does not result in the mission being abandoned. Secondly, the distribution of sensors and devices necessary to perform the mission across a number of vehicles makes it possible to reduce the size and complexity of vehicles and thus ensures simpler construction. Technological areas that the project will also focus on are in the area of navigation and principally in GPS denied areas, optical surface coastal navigation systems and new biomimetic drives.

The principle organisations planned to undertake this project are the Polish Naval Academy and also the Wehrtechnische Dienststelle für Schiffe und Marinewaffen der Bundeswehr, Maritime Technologie und Forschung (WTD 71) in Germany. The project is as a result of the successful cooperation in EDA’s Maritime Capability Technology Group.
https://www.eda.europa.eu/info-hub/press-centre/latest-news/...





Paddywhackery not included.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-10-2019 at 09:55 AM


EDA Expands Work on Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

(Source: European Defence Agency; issued Sept 27, 2019)

BRUSSELS --- EDA’s Steering Board has just approved the launch of a 4-year CAT B project aimed at developing a swarm of biomimetic underwater vehicles for underwater intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (SABUVIS II). It builds upon previous collaboration carried out under the SABUVIS I project which was completed in 2019. So far, two Member States (Poland, Germany) are contributing to this new project for which a project arrangement is expected to be signed later next year.

The new project is important for defence as Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) are being increasingly utilised for a variety of differing tasks in the maritime environment. They represent a viable alternative to the operation of manned platforms and are particularly well suited to the rigours of an inhospitable domain that places a premium on technical advancements.

Taking the natural world as its template, this collaborative project seeks to replicate some of the key features of marine life, principally those of propulsion and behaviour, so as to ensure the successful completion of underwater operations. A key feature of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance missions (ISR) for example, is the necessity to undertake these missions covertly, and those systems that are difficult to detect, both visually and audibly, provide the optimum solution.

Building on the findings of SABUVIS I

This project is a continuation of the successful collaboration enjoyed between Poland, Germany and Portugal in the first SABUVIS project. In this first iteration, three different Biomimetic Underwater Vehicles (BUVs) were constructed with the resulting conclusion that BUVs can be designed with varying degrees of similarity with living organisms. Some of the identified benefits are that undulating propulsion consumes less electrical energy than conventional propulsion systems utilising screw-based propellers, and different hydroacoustic signatures are produced with a corresponding lower noise level.

This second phase will now expand upon, and investigate further, the swarm aspects with more tightly cooperating vehicles, moving in formations and consisting of vehicles having specific functions or tasks to perform. The project in particular will focus on the lead vehicles, who are responsible for the navigation function.

The expected advantages of utilising vehicles in a swarm are reliability and efficiency. Firstly, the swarm system can incorporate redundant elements, essentially extra vehicles, which increases reliability in performing a task – the loss of one element does not result in the mission being abandoned. Secondly, the distribution of sensors and devices necessary to perform the mission across a number of vehicles makes it possible to reduce the size and complexity of vehicles and thus ensures simpler construction. Technological areas that the project will also focus on are in the area of navigation and principally in GPS denied areas, optical surface coastal navigation systems and new biomimetic drives.

The principle organisations planned to undertake this project are the Polish Naval Academy and also the Wehrtechnische Dienststelle für Schiffe und Marinewaffen der Bundeswehr, Maritime Technologie und Forschung (WTD 71) in Germany. The project is as a result of the successful cooperation in EDA’s Maritime Capability Technology Group.

-ends-
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 11:35 PM


Electric Observation Class ROV XLe Spirit passes trials

Posted On Thursday, 10 October 2019 16:02

Working with its Norwegian partner, Innova AS, Forum recently tested the XLe Spirit at a fjord with a 500m water depth. The compact remotely operated underwater vehicle represents the first of a new generation of electric observation class ROVs.


The Forum XLe Spirit (Picture source: Forum)

The Forum XLe Spirit is the smallest in a new range, and powerful enough to perform subsea maintenance and repair work. Forum says it is ideally suited to the aquaculture market and capable of tasks such as net and tank inspection.

Working with its Norwegian partner, Innova AS, Forum recently tested the XLe Spirit at a fjord with a 500m water depth. The standard equipment function testing was confirmed utilising all ancillary equipment, including cameras, lights, altimeters and sonars.

The XLe Spirit benefits from an optional electric or hydraulic five function manipulator arm. The self-regulating power feature compensates for tether losses ensuring a constant and stable power delivery to the vehicle, regardless of tether length. The trials follow a twelve-week assessment, which took place at Forum’s test tank in Kirbymoorside, Yorkshire, UK.

XLe Spirit vehicle is the first observation class ROV to utilise Forum’s Integrated Control Engine to bring greater functionality commonly only found in larger work-class vehicles. The advanced control electronics pod fitted to all Forum XLe observation class vehicles enables superior connectivity and expansion capabilities compared to other ROVs on the market.

Ethernet interfacing allows for seamless integration with other industry sensors.

The XLe Spirit incorporates a number of features to maximise its stability for use as a sensor platform, including regulated propulsion power and a wide range of auto-functions for positioning and flying.

The vehicle embraces the latest advances in ROV technology that the industry has come to demand and expect from modern ROV design. XLe Spirit is compact in design and is primarily suited to observation and inspection tasks. The vehicle is powerful enough to perform maintenance and repair duties with use of the optional electric or hydraulic five function manipulator arm.

Kevin Taylor, Vice President of Forum Subsea Technologies, commented: “The XLe Spirit’s successful sea trials mark a significant milestone as we continue to bring the latest technology to the industry. The vehicle’s capabilities make it ideally suited to a wide range of operations in the oil and gas and aquaculture markets.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bug2
Member





Posts: 17781
Registered: 13-8-2017
Location: Perth
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 29-10-2019 at 09:11 AM


MADEX 2019: Hanwha Defense showcases new UUV for ASW operations

Manash Pratim Boruah, Busan - Jane's International Defence Review

28 October 2019


Hanwha’s ASWUUV development was revealed at MADEX 2019 in Busan. Source: Manash Pratim Boruah

South Korean company Hanwha Defense has unveiled a new unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) that is designed specifically for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations.

The unmanned platform, named ASWUUV, was shown in public for the first time during MADEX 2019 exhibition held at Busan in late October.

The ASWUUV has been under development by the Korean Ministry of National Defense (MND)'s Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) since 2017. Work is expected to be completed by 2022, with trials scheduled in 2021.

(103 of 339 words)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1    3

  Go To Top

Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 16] [PHP: 33.0% - SQL: 67.0%]