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Author: Subject: The UK and EU agree terms for Brexit transition period
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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 12:45 AM
The UK and EU agree terms for Brexit transition period


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-43456502

Quote:
The UK and EU have agreed on a "large part" of the agreement that will lead to the "orderly withdrawal" of the UK.

Brexit negotiators Michel Barnier and David Davis said the deal on what the UK calls the implementation period was a "decisive step".

But issues still to be resolved include the Northern Ireland border.

The transitional period is set to last from 29 March, 2019 to December 2020, and is intended to smooth the path to a future permanent relationship.

Mr Barnier said there was also an agreement on the rights of 4.5m EU citizens in the UK and the 1.2m UK citizens in the EU after Brexit, including giving EU citizens arriving in the UK during the transition the same rights and guarantees as those who arrive before Brexit.




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[*] posted on 25-5-2018 at 12:46 PM


Unresolved Brexit negotiations threaten continentwide security, EU lawmaker warns

By: Martin Banks   5 hours ago


British Prime Minister Theresa May, right, speaks to a group of soldiers of the NATO Battle Group at the Tapa military base in Estonia on Sept. 29, 2017. She was guaranteeing Britain's security commitment to the other 27 European Union leaders. (Marko Mumm/AP)

BRUSSELS ― Britain’s security and defense relationship with the European Union faces “a cliff edge” because of the country’s stalled exit from the organization, according to a senior British member of the European Parliament.

Charles Tannock said Thursday that not enough is known in how the U.K. will engage in European security and defense matters post Brexit.

He warned of Britain “falling off a cliff edge” if defense and security issues are unresolved by the time the U.K. leaves the EU at the end of March 2019.

“Time is fast running out. My fear is that vitally important security issues could all fall by the wayside if they are left to the very end of the current Brexit negotiations,” the center-right deputy cautioned.

The EU and U.K. are still thrashing out agreements over a range of matters, including the future trading relationship between the two sides and Ireland’s border, with security and defense being moved to the sidelines.

Tannock, who serves as the foreign affairs spokesman for his Conservative group in the European Parliament, raised his concerns at a meeting of the Constitutional Affairs Committee on “future EU-U.K. cooperation in security and defense” after Britain exits the 27-strong bloc.

“No one in the EU referendum campaign said that the lives of U.K. citizens could be in danger as a result of Brexit, and security and defense were rarely featured in the debate. But as it stands, I certainly fear a security cliff edge,” Tannock added.

He said his fears were exacerbated given the U.K.’s red lines, particularly opposition to the continued jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice, and the “paucity of time” left for Brexit negotiators to reach a deal. “If agreement is not found on these issues there is a real danger of a cliff edge, particularly on domestic security,” he said.

Disagreement in space

His concerns were echoed by another speaker, Mark Leonard, of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a U.K.-based pan-European think tank, who agreed there was a “real danger of a security cliff edge.”

“The issue of security and defense has simply not entered the public consciousness on either the EU or U.K. side in these Brexit negotiations. The debate has been entirely about other issues,” Leonard said. “While there is a basket of incredibly complex matters to negotiate this one, the issue of security and defense, is quite different from other areas.”

“Post-Brexit security arrangements will be extraordinarily difficult to resolve, including U.K. participation in Galileo,” he continued, referring to the EU’s flagship satellite navigation program. “But at a time when we are seeing all sorts of challenges everywhere from Russia and China to Donald Trump, we have to be aware that if EU side falls apart, it will be difficult to preserve the current world order.”

There is uncertainty over the U.K.’s involvement in Galileo.

Germany and France are reportedly split on whether to allow the U.K. access to Galileo after Brexit. Germany supports the European Commission in seeking to deny Britain access to Galileo’s encrypted system for government and security use.

However, France has joined Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands and the Baltic states in objecting to the U.K.’s exclusion.

One European diplomat said Germany was using security as a lesson in the benefits of EU membership and the cost of leaving.

This comes after Martin Selmayr, the German secretary-general of the European Commission, wrote to the U.K.’s ambassador to the EU, Tim Barrow, about the end of Britain’s participation in Galileo without proper consultation with member states.

“There is sympathy for Britain at being treated in this peremptory way,” another official noted.

Britain has spent about £1.2 billion (U.S. $1.6 billion) as its contribution to building the nearly £9 billion satellite system. But as things stand, only EU members would have access to the crucial military-grade data from Galileo. The U.K. has subsequently threatened to build its own system.

A U.K. government spokesman told Defense News: “The U.K. wants to continue participating in Galileo. This is in the mutual interests of the U.K. and EU, benefiting European competitiveness, security, capability development and interoperability.

“Future U.K. participation in Galileo should be agreed as part of the future security partnership between the UK and the EU.

“If agreement cannot be reached on the future balance of rights and obligations, and U.K. security and industrial requirements consequently cannot be met, the U.K. could not justify future participation in Galileo. In parallel, the U.K. is therefore exploring alternatives to fulfill its needs for secure and resilient position, navigation and timing information, including the option for a domestic satellite system.”

Tannock says the U.K. government should also ensure continued participation in other judicial and security-related program, such as the European Arrest Warrant and EU police agency Europol.

Another speaker at the hearing, Wolfgang Ischinger, a former German ambassador to the U.K., suggested that a “firewall” be created separating security and defense issues from other aspects of Brexit talks, such as trade.

“The U.K., even before the EU was founded, has always had a substantial strategic interest in ensuring that countries on the European continent would not go to war with each other,” he said. “For the 27 member states that remain after Brexit, it will be in their natural interests to still have the U.K. associated with defense and security interests as closely as possible, with or without the EU.”
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[*] posted on 25-5-2018 at 10:04 PM


No one has given much thought to post-Brexit security ties between the UK and the EU because the UK and NATO will continue to operate the way it has for decades.

After all the US isn't part of the EU and seems to succeed very well, in part due to NATO ties.

The UK wants out of the EU and its works, but it's not leaving Europe and will continue to be a part of the European security landscape, through NATO.

Sometimes these EU parliamentary and bureaucratic types can't see the forest in front of them for the trees.




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[*] posted on 26-5-2018 at 10:08 AM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
No one has given much thought to post-Brexit security ties between the UK and the EU because the UK and NATO will continue to operate the way it has for decades.

After all the US isn't part of the EU and seems to succeed very well, in part due to NATO ties.

The UK wants out of the EU and its works, but it's not leaving Europe and will continue to be a part of the European security landscape, through NATO.

Sometimes these EU parliamentary and bureaucratic types can't see the forest in front of them for the trees.
It's been the UKgov side who have linked their Brexit deal to wider European security issues...

It's ironic the UKgov is concerned about Galileo's PRS signal now, since the were the ones who pushed for the 3rd country rule... the same rule that will see them lose access to it...all to keep the Chinese from using it.




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[*] posted on 12-7-2018 at 06:45 PM


So given the current state of the UK's Brexit preparations, is anyone taking bets on the chances of a revote to remain in the EU?



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[*] posted on 12-7-2018 at 07:02 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ARH  
So given the current state of the UK's Brexit preparations, is anyone taking bets on the chances of a revote to remain in the EU?


A recent poll would tend to indicate that the Pro-Brexiteers remain the dominant force.........................see here:

https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/986461/brexit-news-l...
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[*] posted on 31-7-2018 at 06:04 PM


https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/fears-of-no-deal-prompt-...

Quote:
A Brexit backlash is stirring just eight months before the UK is due to leave the European Union, as headlines warn of stalled negotiations, hospitals stockpiling medicines and supermarkets stockpiling food.

For the first time since the 2016 referendum, a major poll has shown the public breaking sharply against Brexit.

About half the population want another referendum to give them a choice between the government’s proposed Brexit model, a ‘no deal’ Brexit, or deciding instead to stay in the EU, the Sky Data poll published on Monday revealed.

If there were such a vote 58 per cent would choose to "remain" in the EU, 32 per cent would vote for 'no deal' with Brussels, and only 10 per cent for the Brexit plan that Theresa May thrashed out with her cabinet a fortnight ago – prompting several high profile ministerial resignations.

Just one in 10 voters think the government is doing a good job negotiating Brexit, the poll found. Two-thirds expect Britain will get a bad deal once negotiations are finished, including a majority of Leave voters.


Quote:
Until now most polls have showed few signs of 'Bregret', staying within a few percentage points of the referendum result. Most polls showed a slight advantage to Remain, but were balanced by the fact that many Remainers are young people less likely to vote.

Unless the new poll is a statistical anomaly, a lot of former pro-Brexit voters are now starting to change their minds.

“The lack of faith in the [government’s] handling of Brexit is affecting perceptions of Brexit itself,” Sky’s political editor Faisal Islam said.

“The Brexit middle ground is disappearing from underneath the Prime Minister’s feet.”


Quote:
Another poll by YouGov released on Friday found that 83 per cent of Leave voters stuck by their decision, but 7 per cent had changed their minds and another 10 per cent didn’t know whether they had been right in hindsight.

An earlier YouGov poll saw Prime Minister Theresa May’s personal favourability at an all-time low.

When voters were asked who would make the best prime minister, the winner was "don’t know" at 39 per cent, followed by May on 32 per cent and Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn on 26 per cent.

Another poll released on Monday found that 56 per cent of small companies would vote to stay in the EU if there was a re-run of the Brexit referendum – and only 32 per cent wished to leave.

The survey showed a 7 per cent swing towards remaining since April 2017.




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[*] posted on 31-7-2018 at 09:55 PM


There are several efforts to undermine or reverse the decision of the Referendum all driven by the narrow clique at the top of society. People who were happy to ignore the plight of millions in the UK.
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[*] posted on 1-8-2018 at 06:43 AM


Just wait for the last quarter of this year, when people grasp the repercussions, should this continue to evolve towards a no-Brexit deal! Apart from the medium term economic impact, the UK imports up to 50% of its food from continental Europe. So in the worst case add two factors:
1) a no-Brexit deal means from one day to another, no free trade and all harbors are shut or due to a lack of sufficiently (trained) inspectors, goods pass in slow motion compared to one day earlier
2) Europe currently suffers from an unprecedented drought, with early newspaper articles already hinting at widespread devastated harvests with price hikes expected next year.

That alone would be ... a very fast, very hard hitting short term impact when people wake up Monday, April 1st 2019, and the supermarkets turn empty. Not a fools day joke, and hopefully something that we are spared from.
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[*] posted on 1-8-2018 at 09:56 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Zen9  
There are several efforts to undermine or reverse the decision of the Referendum all driven by the narrow clique at the top of society. People who were happy to ignore the plight of millions in the UK.

I'm Irish, we voted to alter our Constitution and signed the GFA etc in good faith that the UK would honour their side....and all we see now is people trying to backslide on it, saying it's no big deal.
Hell there are opinion polls asking which is more important for leave voters in the UK, leaving the EU or peace in NI and they are coming down on the leave EU side...

Look I don't care if the British attach rockets under the home counties and launch themselves off to the belt and become Galactic Britain, but we'll hold the UKgov to the deal they made over NI.....or they can just show themselves to be untrustworthy, up to them.




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[*] posted on 23-11-2018 at 07:01 PM


EU sets out its vision for future relationship with UK, including defence and security

Brooks Tigner, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

23 November 2018

The EU released its draft framework for a future relationship with the United Kingdom on 22 November. It embraces all envisioned aspects between the two sides after Brexit and will be endorsed by EU leaders and UK Prime Minister Theresa May at an extraordinary summit in Brussels on 25 November.

The 36-page political declaration strives for “an ambitious, broad, deep, and flexible partnership” in defence, security, trade and economic co-operation, law enforcement, criminal justice, foreign policy, and other sectors.

For defence, it says the future relationship should benefit from research and industrial co-operation in European collaborative projects to “promote interoperability and joint effectiveness of their armed forces”.

(107 of 422 words)
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[*] posted on 29-11-2018 at 08:49 PM


Brexit causes Airbus to move 80 Galileo jobs to Europe

Charles Forrester, London - Jane's Defence Industry

29 November 2018


SSTL workers test a payload for the Galileo satellite. Airbus UK has had to relocate 80 jobs to France as part of its work on the Galileo programme. Source: SSTL/Philip Davies

Airbus has been forced to move 80 jobs from the UK to France as a result of the UK's withdrawal from the European Union (EU) and the company's departure from the Galileo satellite navigation programme.

In comments to the UK's Parliament's Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee on 28 November, Airbus UK Senior Vice President Katherine Bennett said the company had to move the positions to France to undertake older work on the programme.

"We understand the rules, you need to be an EU national to work on these projects as they are obviously linked to national security. It's a shame, because we have real, specialist skills."

The company is currently bidding for work on the Copernicus programme, which Bennett said would bring in an estimated EUR1 billion (USD1.13 billion) benefit to the UK.

"We are already delivering on these projects, it's just the next phase of bidding. So, we are in active discussions with government here and in Brussels," Bennett added.

Royal Aeronautical Society President Simon Henley added that the industry was starting to see companies being stopped from bidding on the Galileo programme, and European companies winning contracts that would have previously been awarded to UK firms.

"There is evidence now that we have lost work that we would have otherwise expected to win," Henley said, adding that "Galileo for Europe without the UK involved will be slower and more expensive for Europe."

Bennett went on to say that Airbus had so far spent about EUR50 million preparing for a no-deal Brexit, with the company putting investments in the UK "on hold" because of the current uncertainty.

"If the withdrawal agreement is successful, then we will consider investing in the UK," Bennett said.

When pressed for values on investments in the UK by the committee if the Brexit vote had not happened, Bennett said the company had been spending about GBP500 million (USD638 million) in research and development in the UK.

(347 of 458 words)
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 11:44 PM
Majority believe Brexit wrong call: poll


https://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/latest-news/majority-b...

Quote:
Fewer than four in 10 Britons (38 per cent) now think the UK was right to vote for Brexit, while almost half (49 per cent) believe it was the wrong decision.

The 11 per cent gap is the widest recorded by pollsters YouGov in a regular series of monthly surveys for the Times, while the number believing Brexit was right is at its lowest and those seeing it as wrong at its highest.

Virtually every poll in the sequence since the summer of 2017 has found a majority believing that the wrong decision was made in the EU referendum of 2016.

The results came as MPs were embroiled in five days of debate over the EU withdrawal deal reached by Prime Minister Thjeresa May in Brussels last month.

The poll found just 23 per cent of those questioned support May's Brexit deal, against 46 per cent who oppose it.

But the Conservatives remain ahead in terms of voting intention, on 40 per cent, compared with Labour's 38 per cent and 9 per cent for the Liberal Democrats.

Some 35 per cent said May was best choice for prime minister, against 24 per cent for Labour's Jeremy Corbyn and 37 per cent opting for neither.

YouGov interviewed 1624 British adults on December 3-4.




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[*] posted on 6-12-2018 at 05:24 AM


It's a curious thing to hear such complete lack of comprehension from a country and people who of all should have the sharpest understanding of how the Empire treats it's subjects.

Speaking as an Englishman who has had no body represent my country and people distinct from 'Great Britain' or any referendum on how we are governed.

The Empire began here and must end here. And end it must.
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[*] posted on 10-12-2018 at 11:47 PM
European Union court rules UK can change its mind and pull out of Brexit


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-10/brexit-eu-court-rules...

Quote:
The European Union's top court has ruled Britain can change its mind over Brexit, boosting the hopes of people who want to stay in the EU that the process can be reversed.

In an emergency judgement delivered just a day before British Parliament is due to vote on the Brexit deal agreed with the EU, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that when an EU member country has notified its intent to leave, "that member state is free to revoke unilaterally that notification" without consulting other member states.

The ECJ said in its statement that Britain should suffer no penalties if it halted the Article 50 process.




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[*] posted on 10-12-2018 at 11:55 PM


I'm rapidly coming of the opinion that a second vote is necessary.......if that cancels BREXIT, so be it.

The sheer shyte that is currently going on, is generally ignoring the people whilst various fuck-wit politicians grandstand from BOTH sides...................
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[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 05:30 AM


Oh Dagda give me strength!....



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[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 11:31 AM


Given how close the Brexit vote was, and the fact it came about on the back of a public relations campaign fuelled by rampant misinformation, and the fact there was no Brexit strategy proposed at the time, and the fact that there still is no viable Brexit strategy in place, which is running the risk of a minority government losing a no confidence vote, a second referendum would seem to be the most appropriate move at this point.



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[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 08:19 PM


Here is nice rundown of possible and immediate issues, taking effect on April fools day 2019:

http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Short_sharp_shock_if_no-deal...

Quote:

But here are some things London is telling Britons to brace for in the first days of a worst-case scenario pullout.

- Rip-off roaming -

It is on their mobile phones where people could first notice things.

Free roaming would no longer apply and UK mobile phone operators can start charging extra for subscribers who pop off to "the Continent".

London is also urging people in Northern Ireland to watch out for "inadvertent roaming" when straying too close to the EU border with Ireland.

- Grounded at Heathrow -

Heathrow and other big airports can be a nightmare at the best of times.

But planes getting grounded when Brexit strikes at 2300 GMT on March 29 because airlines have lost their licences would create chaos that ripples across the world.

London says it would "envisage" granting European carriers special permission to keep flying -- and that it would "expect" the 27 EU countries to do the same.

- Forms, forms, forms -

Prepare to start signing your name. A lot.

Thousands of companies in Britain that do business with Europe would have to fill out reams of customs and duties declarations.

British tourists to the EU who want to rent a car may need to get international driving permits because their UK licences become invalid.

And even pets might need to jump through new administrative hoops that require them to have new passports.

People might want to check theirs as well. Those that expire within six months of travel might need to be renewed in advance.

- Drug dilemma -

Things turn more serious for those who rely on medication.

Officials are talking to drug companies about creating a six-week "buffer stock" on top of the three months they already have in place.

This should help cover any short-term disruptions at the border. Britain will also waive the need for EU firms to re-test their drugs under new rules.

- Shoppers beware -

That one-click purchase at your favourite online store might start looking slightly less tempting.

The British government says "increased costs and slower processing times" for payments made in euros are a possibility.

Parcel deliveries could also get more expensive because waivers for certain import and sales taxes would expire.

- Flicks and tunes -

Catching up on the latest Netflix releases while coasting on a high-speed Eurostar train may suddenly become a whole lot harder.

Britons could theoretically lose access to streaming services while abroad -- everything from Spotify to Amazon Prime -- because the UK would no longer be in Europe's "digital single market".

And the Eurostar service itself might be in trouble because old licenses of UK train operators in Europe will be invalid.

- Pork pies -

Britons are proud of their Stilton cheese and Scotch whisky.

But the status of everything from Cornish pasties to Melton Mowbray pork pies will be up in the air because they will lose their "geographical indication" status in Europe.

Britain's 86 GI-protected products make up a quarter of all its food and drink exports.

- Surprises -

A host of other industries and products could also be affected.

Britain will have to come up with its own warning stickers for packs of cigarettes because the current ones are protected by the EU image library.

Imported sperm donations could face delays or stoppages.

Caviar supplies might start running out because Britain will not be able to trade in goods covered by European endangered species rules.

Also facing possible disruption: breeders of pedigree British horses and sheep.
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[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 11:43 PM


Just remember, the people voted for this, it is what they wanted.



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[*] posted on 12-12-2018 at 12:35 AM


You know I get it that the UK will be leaving, but has no one realised yet that the same politicians that have been the cause of most of the shite during these times are also the exact same politicians who'll be the ones guiding the UK post Brexit?

If I were a Brit I'd be terrified.....




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[*] posted on 16-1-2019 at 12:24 PM


Brexit deal: Theresa May suffers historic defeat in vote as Tories turn against her

PM faces vote of confidence after MPs reject her Brexit plan by majority of 230

- How did your MP vote?
- How does a no-confidence motion work, and what’s next?

Heather Stewart and Daniel Boffey

Wed 16 Jan 2019 12.45 AEDT First published on Wed 16 Jan 2019 09.28 AEDT

Theresa May has pledged to face down a vote of no confidence in her government, after her Brexit deal was shot down by MPs in the heaviest parliamentary defeat of the democratic era.

On a day of extraordinary drama at Westminster, the House of Commons delivered a devastating verdict on the prime minister’s deal, voting against it by 432 to 202.

The scale of defeat, by a majority of 230, was greater than any seen in the past century, with ardent Brexiters such as Jacob Rees-Mogg and Boris Johnson walking through a packed division lobby cheek-by-jowl alongside passionate remainers.

As noisy protesters from both sides of the Brexit divide massed outside in Parliament Square, the prime minister immediately rose to accept the verdict of MPs – saying she would welcome a vote of no confidence in the government.

“The house has spoken and the government will listen,” she said. “It is clear that the house does not support this deal, but tonight’s vote tells us nothing about what it does support.”

In a raucous Commons, the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, confirmed he had tabled a formal motion of confidence in the government, backed by other opposition leaders, which MPs would vote on on Wednesday.

Corbyn told MPs: “This is a catastrophic defeat. The house has delivered its verdict on her deal. Delay and denial has reached the end of the line.”

The Brexit-backing European Research Group (ERG) and the Democratic Unionist party (DUP) later announced that they would support the prime minister, making it unlikely Labour could succeed in triggering a general election.

May said that if she survived the vote on Wednesday, she would hold meetings with senior parliamentarians from all parties to “identify what would be required to secure the backing of the house”.

The prime minister’s spokesman later said May would be contacting Conservative and DUP MPs among others , but declined to say whether or not she would meet with Corbyn or the SNP leader, Ian Blackford.

He cited the example of May’s meetings with Labour MPs such as Caroline Flint and Gareth Snell about an amendment on workers’ rights, although both of those MPs eventually voted against the government. “We will approach it in a constructive spirit,” the spokesman said.

May had no plans to head to Brussels immediately, No 10 said, implying that the prime minister first needed to test what would be acceptable to MPs.

Downing Street said May would approach the talks wanting to find a solution to deliver a Brexit deal that would honour the result of the referendum – suggesting she would not countenance talks with those pushing for a second referendum, or even a full customs union, which Labour has backed.

She would then make a statement on Monday, setting out how she intended to proceed. MPs would get the chance to amend the statement, and were likely to take the opportunity to try to demonstrate support for their own favoured alternatives – including a Norway-style soft Brexit, and a second referendum.

Several cabinet ministers, including Amber Rudd, Philip Hammond and Greg Clark, had pressed the prime minister at Tuesday’s cabinet meeting to pursue a cross-party solution if her deal was defeated. But Brexit-backing ministers, including Andrea Leadsom and Penny Mordaunt, urged her instead to seek revisions to the Irish backstop – and failing that, to pursue a “managed no deal”.

The former foreign secretary Boris Johnson said the crushing defeat gave the prime minister a “massive mandate” to return to Brussels and seek a better deal.

“We should not only be keeping the good bits of the deal, getting rid of the backstop, but we should also be actively preparing for no deal with ever more enthusiasm,” he said.

On Tuesday night Johnson was joined by other prominent Brexiter MPs, including John Redwood and Bill Cash, at a champagne celebration party at Rees-Mogg’s house.

Hammond moved quickly after the vote to quell business anger over the failure of May to get her deal ratified. The chancellor expressed his “disappointment” at the result in a conference call at 9pm with main business groups, including the CBI and the British Chambers of Commerce, as well as dozens of chief executives.

One source on the call said it was constructive and that Hammond’s tone was “realistic” about the damage prolonged uncertainty around Brexit was inflicting on the economy. However, Hammond was hammered by business leaders over parliament’s refusal to take a no-deal Brexit off the table. “This was the single biggest question he was asked,” said the source.

May said any plan that emergeed from the talks would have to be “negotiable” with the EU27. She earlier rejected an amendment from the Tory backbencher Edward Leigh calling for the Irish backstop to be temporary, saying it was not compatible with the UK’s legal obligations.

In Brussels, Donald Tusk, the European council president, appeared to back a second referendum soon after the crushing result for the prime minister was announced, and urged her to offer a way forward.

May was expected to return to Brussels within days to consult with Tusk and the European commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker. Officials said the EU was now in listening mode.

In a statement, Juncker urged the British government to “clarify its intentions as soon as possible”, and warned that “time is almost up”.

“I take note with regret the outcome of the vote in the House of Commons this evening”, he said. “On the EU side, the process of ratification of the withdrawal agreement continues”.

In a defence of Brussels’ role in the negotiations, Juncker said that the EU and the bloc’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, had shown “creativity and flexibility throughout” and “demonstrated goodwill again by offering additional clarifications and reassurances” in recent days.

He said: “The risk of a disorderly withdrawal of the United Kingdom has increased with this evening’s vote. While we do not want this to happen, the European commission will continue its contingency work to help ensure the EU is fully prepared.”

May, in Westminster earlier knowing that she faced a heavy defeat, made a heartfelt plea to MPs to support her, calling it “the most significant vote that any of us will ever be part of in our political careers”.

“Together we can show the people we serve that their voices have been heard, that their trust was not misplaced,” she said.

Earlier in the day, as one Conservative backbencher after another stood up to attack her painstakingly negotiated withdrawal agreement in the House of Commons, it became clear that few had changed their mind.

May had embarked on a last-ditch charm offensive on Tuesday, holding meetings with MPs including the ERG’s Steve Baker, who said the pair had held a “constructive and substantial conversation about the future”.

Corbyn, speaking just before the vote , saidMay had “treated Brexit as a matter for the Conservative party, rather than the good of the whole country”.

He called the government’s efforts to steer Brexit through parliament “one of the most chaotic and extraordinary parliamentary processes” he had experienced in 35 years as an MP. The attorney general, Geoffrey Cox, told his colleagues that if they did not accept the prime minister’s deal, they risked condemning the UK to the chaos of a no-deal Brexit.

“It would be the height of irresponsibility for any legislator to contemplate with equanimity such a situation,” he said.

Corbyn would come under intense pressure to throw his weight behind a second Brexit referendum if May wins on Wednesday; but his spokesman said Labour did not rule out tabling another no-confidence motion at a later stage.

Labour MPs were joined by 118 Conservative rebels in voting down the prime minister’s deal, including erstwhile loyalists such as the chair of the backbench 1922 committee, Graham Brady. That was one more than the number who had backed a no-confidence vote in May’s leadership of the Conservatives in December. Under party rules, the prime minister’s victory in that vote means she cannot be challenged for party leadership again within the next 12 months.
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[*] posted on 16-1-2019 at 01:21 PM


May should have seen this from a mile off. The UK would be far better off remaining in the EU than taking up the proposed plan.

IMO the fallout from a hard Brexit has been vastly overstated for the purposes of pushing through a shitty plan. The EU's main negotiating advantage is the fact that the UK has been running on a timetable to conclude negotiations. The UK should simply accept a hard Brexit, then once out of the EU, renegotiate an actually viable and equitable plan with the EU.




Repent!

The darkest hour of Humanity is upon us. The world
shall meet it's end and we shall be submerged into a
new dark age. Repent your sins, for the apocalypse,
and the end, is extremely f@#king nigh!
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[*] posted on 16-1-2019 at 03:36 PM


Deal-day: Brexit Divorce Deal Hammered in Parliament

Wednesday, 16 January 2019 — Albert Park, Melbourne

We’ve said it many times before, here at The Australian Tribune we don’t believe that Brexit will eventuate.

Since the 2016 referendum that saw Brits vote to leave the EU, the ‘stayers’ have done everything they can to go against the democratic vote to leave. And now it looks like the UK will head to their leave date without a deal…

Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit divorce deal did not survive the Commons vote, with British MPs voting against the deal by a significant margin.

Now, the UK has no idea what the next move is.

One of the worst losses in British history

The deal resulted in an overwhelming political upset, losing in a staggering 432–202 voting margin. That’s a two-year strategy to leave the EU amicably gone right out the window.

And it’s the first British parliamentary defeat of a treaty since 1864.

But we shouldn’t be surprised. After all, this very vote was postponed four weeks because May knew she’d have no hope if the vote had gone ahead in December.

With just over two months until the 29 March due date for the UK to leave the EU — which they’ve been a part of since 1973 — this loss is looking to shape one of the deepest political crises in the past 50 years, according to RAW.

Following the upset Jeremy Corbyn, the opposition Labour leader, called a no confidence vote in May’s government to be held in the next 24 hours. The last of this kind saw May secure a much smaller victory than this ‘no deal on the deal’ consensus.

But it seems as though even May herself isn’t confident in the next move forward. As she told parliament just moments after the deal was voted down:

‘It is clear that the House does not support this deal, but tonight's vote tells us nothing about what it does support.

‘... nothing about how - or even if - it intends to honour the decision the British people took in a referendum parliament decided to hold.’

May has a very valid point. Over 100 of May’s own Conservative team — both EU supporters and Brexiteers alike — put a down vote on the deal. So even the downvoters aren’t united in how to proceed.

And so, the debate continues.

May struggles to find a clear road forward

May’s spokesman has said that the rejected divorce deal could still be used as the basis of a different EU withdrawal plan.

But it seems MPs are hell-bent on finding a better option.

Conservative pro-Brexit former minister, David Jones said:

‘The EU will see that it must now offer better terms to the UK. If it does not, we must leave to trade on WTO terms.’

Other pro-Brexit conservatives, as well as the Northern Irish DUP party, were adamant in their refusal of May’s Brexit deal. However, both have ensured they will back May in the upcoming no-confidence vote.

This is a rather conflicting means of sentiment. Having faith in May’s abilities to resolve this ongoing issue, but refusing to support her one and only solution.

Adding to this wave of disappointment is the EU’s comment that May’s deal was the best and only way to ensure a clean and orderly exit. So brace yourselves for the zero-tolerance negotiation from the Union in the upcoming weeks.

In fact, Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said as much, with EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker saying serious preparations for a no-deal Brexit would soon commence.

RAW also reports Donald Tusk, the chairman of EU leaders, suggested that Britain should now consider reversing Brexit, tweeting:

‘If a deal is impossible, and no one wants no deal, then who will finally have the courage to say what the only positive solution is?’

Such a troubling, yet accurate summation of reality.

And while there isn’t a clear next step right now, whatever path they do take is sure to shake the future of the world’s fifth largest economy.

Stay tuned to see whether 29 March 2019 will in fact be recorded as a life-changing date for the UK.
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[*] posted on 18-1-2019 at 06:31 PM


UK Remain Solution-Less Over Brexit

Friday, 18 January 2019 — Albert Park, Melbourne

In our last Brexit update, The Australian Tribune outlined how May’s close scrape of a win has done little to remove the unease as to choosing the best way forward for the UK.

Moments after the victory, Theresa May called upon her fellow party leaders to put self-interest aside for the sake of finding a suitable solution for Brexit.

With her proposed divorce deal heavily voted down by parliament, and hesitancy from the EU to come to any other arrangement, a no-deal Brexit has had to remain a potential pathway for the UK.

But May’s direct opposition, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, refuses to even remotely entertain this possibility.

So, with both parties collectively holding 88% of the 650 seats in British parliament, failure for May and Corbyn to reach a compromise is sure to weigh heavily on the UK’s progress in leaving the EU.

Corbyn will not move forward with ‘no-deal’ Brexit in play

As PAA reports, May’s spokeswoman said the prime minister had held ‘constructive’ talks on Thursday with MPs, including some from the opposition party, to explore ways of winning support for her deal.

Unsurprisingly, Corbyn was not part of these discussions.

Corbyn relayed in a speech in Hastings that May’s government had confirmed ‘she would not take “no-deal” off the table’.

‘So I say to the prime minister again: I am quite happy to talk, but the starting point for any talks about Brexit must be that the threat of a disastrous no-deal outcome is ruled out.’

Indeed, within the first few minutes of today, an extract of an open letter from Corbyn to May was released, which clearly outlined his conditions for potential compromise:

‘After the unprecedented and unnecessary delay to the meaningful vote last month, entering into talks while the clock continues to run down, and the threat of a chaotic “no deal” increases, would be a reckless leap in the dark.

‘Therefore, on behalf of the Labour party, I ask you to rule out “no deal” and to immediately end the waste of hundreds of millions of pounds of public money preparing for a ‘no deal’ outcome.’

And yet, likely unintentionally, Corbyn also pointed out the precise reason as to why a ‘no-deal’ Brexit must be kept in play.

‘Labour is open to meaningful discussions. But following the decisive rejection of the government’s deal by MPs on Tuesday, those cannot be on the basis of your existing red lines. It is clear that no tweaks or further assurances are going to win support for the government’s Brexit deal in parliament.’

If no revised exit plan will win support, what’s the only option, other than cancelling the Brexit all together?

Well, Corbyn has an answer for it, though it’s hard to call it a good one.

Corbyn wants yet another vote

One option which Corbyn has suggested is holding another referendum.

But this would unavoidably add the delay on Brexit that financial markets are terrified of. According to May’s office, official government guidance shown to MPs earlier this week revealed that the process could take an entire year.

As such, other members of the EU are offering their time to discuss a potential way forward for May and the UK.

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told Berlin’s lower house of parliament, ‘we will do everything we can so that Britain exits with, and not without, an agreement’.

And Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, said there was room for a ‘more ambitious’ deal to be organised than that which May brought to parliament on Tuesday. He also said that rejected agreement could not be improved on. Scrap it and start fresh, he insists.

Over the next week MPs have the opportunity to propose alternatives. On Monday, May will face parliament and deliver what she believes are the ideal next steps.

On 29 January they will debate whatever plans parliament have come up with.

Once again, a vote will determine whether any of these ideas are worthy of support.
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