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buglerbilly
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[*] posted on 11-5-2017 at 06:06 PM
Surface-to-Air systems


Pantsir-SA firing tests to start in June

Nikolai Novichkov, Moscow - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

10 May 2017



Russia's new Arctic Pantsir-SA surface-to-air missile (SAM) system photographed at the Victory Day 9 May parade in Moscow. Source: Russian MoD

Firing trials of Russia's new Arctic Pantsir-SA surface-to-air missile (SAM) system will begin in June, a source in the Russian defence industry has told Jane's.

"Two [Pantsir-SA] systems will be deployed at a test range for firing trials after their demonstration at the Victory Day 9 May parade in Moscow," the source said.

The newest Pantsir-SA SAM system is designed to be used in the Arctic region. It is based on the chassis of the DT-30PM Vityaz (Noble Knight) upgraded twin-unit all-terrain tracked carrier (ATTC) that, with an average ground pressure of 0.27 kg/cm 2 , offers a high degree of mobility in harsh climatic conditions.

The DT-30PM has a basic (empty) weight of 29 tonnes, a useful payload of 30 tonnes, a road speed of 37 km/h, a swimming speed of 4-5 km/h, and a cruising range of 500 km. The ATTC is powered by a diesel engine with a power output of 710 hp (522 kW).

While the energy supply system and auxiliary equipment are integrated within the DT-30PM's front unit, the Pantsir-SA combat module is mounted on the rear unit and features an armament suite that is different to that of the basic Pantsir-S.

The original system's two side-mounted 2A38 anti-aircraft cannons have been replaced by three additional containerised SAMs on each side of the target tracking radar. Thus, the system's ready-to-launch ammunition load has been increased from 12 to 18 missiles (nine missiles on each side). The location of the target detection station has remained the same, behind the missiles and the target tracking radar.

The Russian armed forces will receive the Pantsir-SA SAM systems "at an early date", according to Lieutenant General Viktor Gumenniy, who as deputy commander of the Russian Aerospace Forces (VKS) is also commander of Russia's Air-Defence and Missile Defense Troops.

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[*] posted on 12-5-2017 at 11:20 AM


Diehl advances fire on-the-move capability for IRIS-T-SLS

Robin Hughes, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

11 May 2017

Diehl Defence is evolving a fire on-the-move capability for the IRIS-T-SLS (Surface Launched Short Range) mobile air-defence interceptor system.


An IRIS-T-SLS Launcher on a Hagglunds Bv 410 platform (Swedish configuration). (Diehl Defence)

IRIS-T-SLS uses an unaltered IRIS-T (Infra Red Imaging System - Tail/Thrust vector-controlled) air-to-air missile. The interceptor is fired vertically from a launcher mounted on an all-terrain vehicle - for a 360° short-range air defence (SHORAD) application - where the missile's infrared seeker will be able to lock-on-before as well as lock-on-after launch following target designation by the ground station´s battle management system.

In the air-defence role, the IRIS-T-SLS system is currently designed to be fired from a static deployed all-terrain vehicle.

Diehl cites the Unimog 5000 4x4 multi-purpose all-wheel drive medium truck in its marketing literature as its default IRIS-T-SLS launch platform, although the system is essentially platform 'agnostic', and can be adapted to country-specific transport and launcher vehicles with a variable frame system.

Speaking at the IQPC Integrated Air and Missile Defence 2017 conference in London in late March Michael Masur, GBADS Head of Marketing, Diehl Defence told Jane's that the a new fire-on-the-move concept has already been finalised and that the company is now in the "realisation phase for this development."

Masur said that the fire-on-the move concept envisages a single platform - manned by a crew of three: driver, gunner and commander - with an integrated sensor, and a four-missile load out mounted on a bespoke launcher which has been "specifically designed and engineered to enable release of the missile while the platform is one the move."

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[*] posted on 12-5-2017 at 11:25 AM


IDEF 2017: Aselsan reveals 35 mm ABM

Christopher F Foss, Istanbul - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

11 May 2017



Aselsan has completed development and qualification of a new 35 mm air burst munition (ABM) called the Atom.

Atom has been designed to be fired from the Aselsan Korkut twin 35 mm self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) for which the first production contract was announced earlier this year for the Turkish Land Forces Command (TLFC).

Korkut, which has a linkless ammunition feed, consists of the FNSS Savunma Sistemleri Armoured Combat Vehicle 30 (ACV-30) tracked platform, which is fitted with a remote turret armed with a twin 35 mm (90 calibre) cannon developed by Aselsan.

The 35 x 228 mm ammunition weighs 1,750 g, is 387 mm long, and is fitted with a time-programmable base fuze with an electronic self-destruct function.

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[*] posted on 19-5-2017 at 07:57 PM


US Army eyes lasers for IFPC next-generation air defence system

Daniel Wasserbly, Washington, DC - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

19 May 2017

The US Army hopes to add a laser to its next-generation air defence system known as the Indirect Fire Protection Capability (IFPC).

Accordingly, US Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command (USASMDC/ARSTRAT) has evolved the High Energy Laser Tactical Vehicle Demonstrator (HEL TVD) as 'a pre-prototype system' that could potentially address objective requirements for the IFPC Increment 2 - Intercept Block I (IFPC Inc 2-I), an official from the command told Jane's on 18 May at the Pentagon.

The IFPC system overall is meant to address incoming rocket, artillery, and mortar (RAM) and unmanned aerial system (UAS) threats at fixed or semi-fixed locations.

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[*] posted on 6-6-2017 at 11:05 PM


Indian DRDO-designed QRSAM successfully tested

Rahul Bedi, New Delhi - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 June 2017

India's state-owned Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) tested the indigenously designed quick-reaction surface-to-air missile (QRSAM) system on 4 June from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) in Chandipur on the country's east coast.

Official sources said that the system, which is being developed for the Indian Army (IA) in tandem with public sector companies Bharat Dynamics Limited and Bharat Electronics Limited, successfully engaged an aerial target during the developmental trials.

They said the missile fired by the QRSAM system, which uses a solid-fuel propellant and has a stated strike range of 25-30 km, was launched from a truck-mounted canister.

The range to which the missile was tested was unclear, however, as the DRDO spokesman declined to comment on the test-firing.

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[*] posted on 29-6-2017 at 04:55 PM


Published: Wednesday, 28 June 2017 19:01

New PASARS short-range air defense system with 40mm Bofors cannon and RLN-1C missiles.

Something slightly quaint and old-fashioned about this design...............

The PASARS, new short-range air defense systems unveiled by the Serbian State Company Yugoimport at Partner 2017, the International fair of armament and defense equipment in Belgrade, Serbia.
 

New short-range missile/cannon air defense system PASARS at Partner 2017, the International Fair of Armaments and Defense Equipment in Belgrade, Serbia.
 
The PASARS is based on 6x6 military truck chassis FAP 2026 with an armoured cabin with two seats which is protected against firing of heavy machine gun 12.7mm caliber and shell splinters. The rear of the vehicle is fitted with a turret armed with one L/70 Bofors 40mm automatic cannon and two surface-to-air missile RLN-1C.
 
The RLN-1C is a short-range air defense missile system based on the Russian-made air-to-air missile R-13M which is normally used on fighter aircraft Mig-21. This is an upgrade of the R-13M with an new infrared homing head, a new warhead with laser proximity fuse and rocket motor.

The Bofors L70 40 mm auto-cannon has a cyclic rate of 320 rounds per minute and an effective range of 4,000 meters against both air and ground targets.

The PASARS has a crew of four with driver and commander in the crew cab. The weapon station accommodates two operators to control the cannon and the launch of the missiles. The turret has a traverse of 360° with elevation from -3° to 90°.

The RLN-1C missile has a maximum firing of 12,000 m. It has a weight of 125 kg and a warhead of 11 kg. The operator lock the air target and launch the missile which is guided by the infrared homing head using the heat produced by the aerial target.  

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[*] posted on 5-7-2017 at 12:01 PM


Successful Flight Test of QRSAM

(Source: India Ministry of Defence; issued July 03, 2017)


The Quick-Reaction Surface-to-Air Missile was developed by India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation to meet a requirement for a mobile medium-range air-defense missile. (DRDO photo)

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO)-developed Quick Reaction Surface to Air Missile (QRSAM) was successfully flight tested from ITR Chandipur, off the Odisha Coast at 11.30 AM today.

All the technologies and subsystems incorporated in the missile have performed well, meeting all the mission requirements. All the radars, electro optical systems, telemetry systems and other stations have tracked the missile and monitored all the parameters. The missile test met all the objectives.

Director DRDL, Shri MSR Prasad, Director RCI, Shri BHVS N Murthy and Director ITR, Dr BK Das monitored the launch operation in the presence of, Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri & DG (MSS) Dr G Satheesh Reddy.

Secretary, Department of Defence R&D Dr S Christopher congratulated scientists on the successful test fire.

The Defence Minister Shri Arun Jaitley congratulated DRDO on the successful trial of QRSAM and said it is an important milestone in the indigenous Surface to Air Missiles (SAM) development.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 8-7-2017 at 03:35 PM


More on this.................

Serbia's MTI develops hybrid air-defence system

Christopher F Foss, Belgrade - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

06 July 2017


Pasars utilises a 6x6 cross-country base vehicle for enhanced mobility. Source: Christopher F Foss

Serbia's Military Technical Institute (MTI) has unveiled a self-propelled (SP) hybrid air-defence system that has been designated Pasars.

The platform has been under development since 2016, and consists of a locally developed FAP 2026 (6x6) all-terrain chassis fitted with an armour-protected engine compartment and a fully enclosed and protected two-door crew compartment.

The base vehicle features power steering, and all six wheels are provided with a central tyre inflation system, which enables the driver to adjust the tyre pressure to suit the ground being traversed.

To the immediate rear of the cab is a flatbed on which has been fitted the upper section of a Bofors 40 mm L/70 towed anti-aircraft gun.

The 40 mm L/70 weapon system has unlimited traverse through 360° at a maximum rate of 85°/sec, while elevation is from -4 to 90° at a maximum rate of 45°/sec.

The 40 mm L/70 gun has a maximum effective range of 4,000 m and a cyclic rate of fire up to 300 rds/min. This version of the gun is already fitted with a laser rangefinder and day/night sighting system on the left side. Ammunition is fed in clips from the top, with the empty cartridge cases being ejected forwards of the mount.

An auxiliary power unit (APU) is mounted at the rear of the platform, which powers the weapon mount when the main engine is switched off.

To provide a more stable firing platform four hydraulically operated stabilisers are lowered to the ground, with this function being carried out by the commander seated in the protected cab to the right of the driver.

Video footage released by MTI shows the Pasars operating in the ground-to-ground role: this would always be a secondary mission, but could be highly effective.


The system features an anti-aircraft gun and SAMs. (IHS Markit/Christopher F Foss)

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[*] posted on 11-7-2017 at 03:22 PM


First Turkey decided for the chinese HonqQi HQ-9 and NATO was furious.
Now Turkey decided for the russian S-400 and the silence by NATO is deafening.




Quote:

Russia-Turkey S-400 Deal to Take on Western Policy of 'Chaos' in Middle East

The contract on the delivery of Russian-made S-400 air defense systems to Turkey has been agreed, but there is still no decision on a loan Moscow can provide to Ankara for the purchase, said Vladimir Kozhin, Russian presidential adviser on military and technical cooperation.

https://sputniknews.com/politics/201707021055158352-russia-t...


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[*] posted on 11-7-2017 at 10:16 PM


I think no one gives a damn what the Turkish government does, as they give all the appearance of being diametrically opposed to everything else NATO wants to do, at least that is the noise coming out of Istanbul......................the S400 has still to happen, and if it does, expect some of the "secrets" of aforesaid Russian system to wander elsewhere...............
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[*] posted on 13-7-2017 at 12:54 PM


And Ankara needs a Russian loan to buy Russian systems...



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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[*] posted on 13-7-2017 at 03:27 PM


Ozelot Missile Platforms In Lithuania: Protection from Aerial Attacks

(Source: German Armed Forces; issued July 06, 2017)


Ozelot air-defense vehicles, which fire Stinger short-range infra-red guided missiles, are notably used to protect German troops from short-range threats, such as low-flying helicopters and helicopters. (Bundeswehr photo)

RUKLA, Lithuania --- Around 6,000 servicemen and -women from nine different NATO nations, including around 1,300 from the enhanced Forward Presence battlegroup, have spent almost two weeks training with armoured vehicles and heavy equipment.

Ozelot air-defence missile platforms fire Stinger surface-to-air missiles at enemy aircraft identified by [surveillance radars. While the troops practise high-intensity combat, air-defence units from the air force protect the army soldiers from enemy attack from the air.

Thrillingly realistic

For the purposes of these manoeuvres, it is assumed that the fictional enemy has already destroyed a good deal of infrastructure in the course of the Iron Wolf exercise. Most bridges have been booby-trapped or otherwise rendered impassable. As intended, the German-led eFP battlegroup avoids them. The plan is to obstruct the enemy forces from certain defensive positions and destroy them in a localised counterattack.

In the course of this operation, the soldiers encounter an obstacle. Where there was once a bridge, there is now a treacherous torrent blocking the way ahead for 200‑odd armoured vehicles, trucks, troop carriers and combat vehicles. This is a job for 901 Heavy Engineer Battalion from Minden, North Rhine-Westphalia. They are able to build a temporary bridge using their M3 amphibious vehicles. image2

All-round protection for the battalion

At this crucial stage of the mission, the soldiers are sitting ducks for enemy air strikes.

Cover is therefore provided by 3 Squadron, 61 Surface-to-Air Missile Group from Todendorf in Schleswig-Holstein. From their small, tracked vehicles – their Ozelot platforms – Squadron Leader Milo D.’s men can spot and identify enemy aircraft at distances of up to 20 kilometres.

If an attack is imminent, they can engage the target when it is still six kilometres away and up to 3,000 metres up. “We are always among the first troops in place when it comes to waterway crossings,” Squadron Leader D. reports. “Before the amphibious craft get to work, we secure the intended location of the new bridge against aerial attack.”

“Engineers, forward!”

And now it’s time for Lieutenant Vladimir A.’s team. The 26‑year-old platoon leader from the 4th Company of the engineer battalion outlines the plan with precision: “My men and women investigate the waterway and the banks. Depending on how wide the river is, we use up to 12 amphibians that can be coupled to one another. In this exercise, we have a distance of 88 metres to deal with.”

Waterway crossing

The bridge is assembled in two parts from bridgeheads on either bank. “One is built pointing upstream, the other downstream,” explains the lieutenant in charge of bridge construction. “Then, on command, the two parts scissor together to complete the bridge. After a brief test to made sure the bridge can take the strain, the battlegroup can cross the river.”

But there’s no time to have a breather while the vehicles get under way. Full concentration is required, particularly from Squadron Leader D.’s soldiers. “In this scenario, we are expecting an enemy air strike from the north-west,” he announces. The air space is monitored from the reconnaissance, command and fire control vehicle.

Ultra-modern and unique

The light air-defence system consists of the Ozelot missile platform in combination with the two Wiesel delivery vehicles. These armoured vehicles are operated by two soldiers each. Each of the delivery vehicles has a multiple launching system at the back equipped with two Stinger guided missiles on either side.

Junior Technician Marcel M. drives one of the delivery vehicles. The 21‑year-old is his commander’s right-hand man. During the waterway crossing operation, he is deployed as a MANPADS operator, firing shoulder-launched missiles. “You have to stay completely focused at all times. In the worst case, a moment of inattention on my part could put my comrades’ lives at risk,” the junior technician says.

The Ozelot system is considered one of the most up-to-date short-range air-defence systems available. During Iron Wolf, it is providing all the ground forces with comprehensive air defence.

The light air-defence system

The purpose of the light air-defence system includes protecting ground troops, airbases, communications facilities and port infrastructure from airstrikes. It is chiefly directed against attacks from low-flying aircraft, helicopters and unmanned airborne targets. Its weaponry consists of four Stinger man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS) combined in a removable multi-launcher system. Four Stinger missiles are carried at the rear of the Ozelot platform for reloading.

The multi-launcher system also includes a sensor block with a high-luminosity video camera, a thermal imaging system and a laser rangefinder. The Ozelot system is deployed in combination with a reconnaissance, command and fire control vehicle, which provides it with targeting instructions, using a 3‑D radar system to independently monitor the airspace in a radius of up to 20 kilometres.

Supplementary reconnaissance data from other sensors can also be integrated into the air situation display via radio data transmission. One reconnaissance, command and control vehicle has the capacity to coordinate the firing of up to eight Ozelots. For situations when it is deployed independently of such a control vehicle, the Ozelot has a passive infrared sensor with which to identify airborne targets.

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[*] posted on 21-7-2017 at 11:21 AM


Rheinmetall Air Defence preps GDF-009 AAG for production

Christopher F Foss - IHS Jane's International Defence Review

20 July 2017


Oerlikon GDF-009 EO towed anti-aircraft gun deployed in the firing position, showing the electro-optical device mounted on top and the integrated battery-based power unit on the right. Source: Rheinmetall Air Defence

Rheinmetall Air Defence has released details of its latest Oerlikon GDF-009 twin 35 mm towed anti-aircraft gun (AAG).

The GDF-009 model is based on a four-wheeled carriage, and is raised off the ground by three stabilisers when deployed in the firing position. It also features an automatic levelling system that can compensate for a maximum tilt angle of up to 7°.

Mounted on the forward part of the carriage is the integrated battery, which functions as the gun's power supply unit and can be recharged from an external source if required.

Earlier GDF models relied on an external power source, or a diesel or petrol-powered power supply unit.

Target information is fed to the weapon by an associated fire-control unit (FCU) such as the Oerlikon Skyguard, with a Skyguard FCU typically managing two GDF-009 AAGs.

The Oerlikon Skyguard 3 is the latest build currently offered by the company; however, earlier Skyguard 1 and 2 FCUs can also be updated to this standard.

The GDF-series AAGs are armed with two 35 mm Oerlikon KDC dual-feed cannons, which have a cyclic rate of fire of up to 550 rds/min per cannon.

The cannons normally fire in bursts, and have an effective range of 4,000 m in the air defence role. The guns fire 35 x 228 mm ammunition with a total of 280 rounds on the weapon, of which 112 rounds – 56 rounds for each cannon – are ready-use.

The 35 mm ammunition is manufactured by Rheinmetall Weapons and Munitions (RWM) Schweiz, based in Zurich.

The standard natures of 35 x 228 mm ammunition are the PMD402 high-explosive incendiary (HEI), PMD-040 high-explosive incendiary-tracer (HEI-T), and their associated training natures, which have a typical muzzle velocity of 1,175 m/s.

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[*] posted on 26-7-2017 at 04:34 PM


Rheinmetall Wins Major New Air Defence Orders Worth a Total of €220 Million

(Source: Rheinmetall; issued July 25, 2017)


Over 40 years after it was first developed by the Swiss Oerlikon-Contraves group, which has since been bought by Germany’s Rheinmetall, the Skyguard point-defense system is still going strong. This is the latest Skyguard 3 version just sold to two customers. (Rheinmetall photo)

Rheinmetall has recently booked two important air defence orders, winning a new customer country in the process. Two foreign governments have ordered air defence hardware and related services for their air forces. Total value of the two orders comes to around €220 million.

In both cases, Rheinmetall had to overcome stiff international competition. The orders were booked in June this year. Delivery will take place through to 2021.

The new customer country has ordered two Skyguard 3 air defence systems. This is a third-generation system optimized for protecting critical facilities and infrastructure from current and future threats at very short ranges. Each system consists of a Skyguard 3 fire control unit as well as two 35mm Oerlikon Twin Gun GDF009 automatic cannons. The same country is expected to place additional orders in the medium term.

Another nation – already a longstanding customer – has now opted to add 35mm Skyguard 1 fire units to its inventory. The order also encompasses 35mm ammunition, simulators, related test equipment as well as training on location. Here too, follow-on orders are expected to come within the next five years.

Rheinmetall is one of the world's foremost makers of sophisticated air defence systems for short-range applications. The company is the market leader in gun-based air defence, and the sole single source supplier of fire control technology, guns, integrated guided missile launchers and special Ahead airburst ammunition.

The Group's tried-and-tested 35mm Skyshield technology sets the unsurpassed global standard, particularly when it comes to protecting sensitive civilian sites and critical infrastructure from terrorist threats.

Developed by Rheinmetall on behalf of the German Bundeswehr, the Mantis air defence system is the most advanced system of its kind anywhere. First deployed in 2014, it is able to protect military installations and forward operating bases from incoming rocket, artillery and mortar fire.

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[*] posted on 1-8-2017 at 01:42 PM


India's Anti-China Missile Can't Be Trusted In Fights, Says CAG In 8 Damning Points

(Source: Economic Times; published Jul 29, 2017

As many as a third of the home-made Akash surface-to-air missiles are unreliable, unusable and untested, posing an operational risk during hostilities, the country's national auditor said in a damning report.

This revelation comes at a time when a stand-off between Indian and Chinese troops continues along the border in Sikkim sector.

Akash, to be positioned in the vulnerable Siliguri corridor (also referred to as the Chicken's neck), was India's counter to any strike by Chinese Air Force fighters. But the CAG report puts a big question mark on its utility and also on the Make in India initiative that seeks to trim the country's dependence on imported arms.

Here's what CAG had to say:

1) The missiles fell short of the target, had lower than the required velocity, and there was malfunctioning of critical units

2) The missile systems were to be installed at six designated sites (in northeast), between 2013 and 2015. But till date, none of the missile systems have been installed

3) Out of 80 missiles received up to November 2014, 20 missiles were test fired during April-November 2014. Six of these missiles, which is 30%, failed the test

4) Two of the missiles failed to even take off. These deficiencies pose an operational risk during hostilities

5) The lifespan of some missiles had expired by March 2017

6) The missiles were bought at a high cost but would stay usable for a less period than their stipulated life.

7) Delay in civil works at the sites pushed the installation of the missile systems behind schedule.

8) The CAG was also not ready to accept Indian Air Force’s argument that the delay in commissioning of missile system was not attributable to non-availability of infrastructure

The report is a body blow to the missile system and comes after the Army earlier this year showed interest in going for the Israeli quick-reaction surface-to-air missiles (QR-SAMs) to take on enemy fighters, helicopters and drones instead of Akash.

Defence ministry sources said the Army has made it clear that it does not want any more Akash regiments after it gets the first two ordered earlier for Rs 14,180 crore, with six firing batteries and hundreds of missiles each.

According to a Times of India report, the Army holds Akash area defence missile systems do not meet its operational requirements for defending its strike corps against enemy air attacks in forward areas.

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[*] posted on 3-8-2017 at 03:27 PM


Laser In Front, Grunts In Back: Boeing Offers Anti-Aircraft Vehicles

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

on August 02, 2017 at 1:35 PM


Stryker vehicle armed with anti-aircraft missiles.

ARLINGTON: Need to shoot down Daesh drones or Russian gunships? Boeing is offering the Army an array of ways to do it, from laser-armed 8×8 Strykers to missile-launching MATV trucks and tracked Bradleys.

This September, the Army plans a “shoot off” of competing anti-aircraft systems as it tries to rebuild battlefield air defenses it largely disbanded since 9/11. Boeing’s not the only contender, but it’s been the most aggressive in showing its wares. A new anti-aircraft Stryker will debut at next week’s Space & Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Ala., but that’s just one of several designs they’re prototyping. The aerospace giant has worked with makers of military vehicles – Oshkosh for the MATV, General Dynamics for Stryker, BAE for Bradley — to integrate its weapons systems on their war machines in ways that give the Army multiple options.

M-ATV with anti-aircraft missiles.

What the Army wants is Maneuver SHORAD: Short-Range Air Defense systems that can keep up with frontline combat units and survive in combat, unlike Patriot and THAAD batteries, which have longer range but are heavier and are not armored.

It particularly wants Maneuver SHORAD it can afford, so installing existing weapons on existing vehicles is a lot more attractive than developing silver bullets from scratch. And, finally, the Army would love vehicles that can both carry SHORAD systems and still fulfill other roles, like troop transport.

Happily for the Army, Boeing and other companies have made laser weapons much more compact. You still need a dedicated vehicle for a 50- to 300-kilowatt weapon suitable for downing helicopters, airplanes, or (at the high end) cruise missiles, but 2- to 5-kW weapons with proven drone-killing capability can fit in existing combat vehicles. The 2 kW laser Stryker that starred in a recent Army exercise has room for several infantryman in back, but that’s a test configuration not optimized to be compact, Leary said: A properly integrated production model could fit a full nine-man squad, same as a regular Stryker.

The whole system – laser, beam director, power and cooling – is so compact you could install it on a wide range of vehicles without crowding out their other missions, Boeing executive Jim Leary told reporters this morning. Most of the time, these laser-accessorized vehicles would just go about their normal roles.

But whenever an enemy tried to spy on US units with the kind of low-cost, low-altitude drones that are proliferating rapidly worldwide, there’d be someone around who could laser them out of the sky. That would stop Daesh-style drone attacks in low-tech wars and make it harder for a high-end enemy like Russia to spot targets for airstrikes and artillery.


Army laser-armed Stryker at Fort Sill.

Actually shooting down incoming artillery rockets, helicopter gunships, and strike aircraft, however, would require more powerful weapons. For now, that means missiles – although work is progressing rapidly on lasers. The Army’s current air defense vehicle is the Avenger, basically an unarmored Humvee with Stinger missiles mounted in pods, but that vehicle isn’t tough enough and that missile isn’t potent enough for a war with, say, Russia.

So Boeing, which built the original Avenger, is repurposing its turret and fire control to fire other missiles from other vehicles. As we’ve reported, the upgraded system can fire variants of both the Hellfire – made famous by Predator strikes – and the AIM-9X – used on jet fighters. What we haven’t reported in detail before is how it fits on different vehicles. There are tradeoffs.

Bradley vehicle with anti-aircraft missiles.

Boeing has worked with Oshkosh to install the upgraded Avenger turret on an MATV armored truck – the older brother of the new JLTV – and with General Dynamics to install it on a Stryker. In each case, Leary said, the missiles take up the whole back of the vehicle, replacing the passenger compartment. These would be dedicated anti-aircraft vehicles.

The M2 Bradley is a little different. There the anti-aircraft missiles would replace the TOW anti-tank missiles carried on the side of the turret (and use the same room for reloads), similar to the old M6 Linebacker. The fire control systems would be integrated into those already on the Bradley, Leary said. The anti-aircraft Bradley would retain its 25 mm chaingun, its machineguns, and its capacity to carry infantry, so it could still do all its regular missions except for killing tanks and busting bunkers.

Leary didn’t say this, but it strikes me the Army today has far more ways to kill tanks than to kill aircraft. Converting one Bradley in every four-vehicle platoon would trade a tolerable 25 percent decrease in anti-tank missiles for a new and much needed capacity for air defense – without affecting the number of infantry or scouts. Stryker units and light infantry would still need to spring for dedicated air defense vehicles, but the heavy brigades crucial to any major war would not. US armor bristling with air defense might just make the Kremlin reconsider in a crisis.
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[*] posted on 10-8-2017 at 11:11 AM


Boeing, GDLS team up on mobile SHORAD system for September Shoot-Off

By: Jen Judson   12 hours ago


The Boeing, General Dynamics Land Systems Maneuver SHORAD Launcher (MSL) Stryker. (Photo Courtesy of Boeing and GDLS)

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Boeing and General Dynamics Land Systems have teamed up to build a short-range air defense system on a Stryker combat vehicle and plan to demonstrate the capability at a SHORAD shoot-off hosted by the Army next month.

The team brought its Manuever SHORAD Launcher (MSL) Stryker to the Space and Missile Defense Symposium on August 8 before it heads to White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, where the Army will host the shoot-out designed to inform the service’s way ahead for an interim SHORAD solution.

The Army identified a SHORAD capability gap in Europe last year and has been moving quickly to fill it by developing a system that will give maneuver forces the capability to defend against air threats from peer adversaries on the forward edge of the battlefield.

The MSL Stryker is essentially made up of a modernized Avenger air defense system on the back of a Stryker reconfigured to accommodate the system on a turret.

The new Avenger is designed to shoot a multitude of different missiles, can be equipped with a 30mm gun and potentially even directed energy weapons down the road.

With none of the maneuver formations having a SHORAD capability, GDLS leaned forward and invested its own money to configure Strykers to be able to integrate a SHORAD capability “and that capability that the Army wanted to integrate was an Avenger,” Kendall Linson, a business development manager at GDLS, told Defense News.

The Avenger is a SHORAD system that is now only resident in the Army National Guard and is used to defend the National Capitol Region from possible air threats. The Army will deploy an Avenger unit to Europe in February 2018 to join the nine-month rotation of an armored brigade combat team.

The team will shoot Longbow missiles at White Sands, but have designed the system to host any missile in a certain range and various guns along with a laser-range finder because it anticipates the Army wanted flexibility to incorporate a variety of ways to handle air threats depending on what maneuver formation is using the system.

“When you start talking about SHORAD there is no one solution set,” Linson said. “You have to look at dedicated or non-dedicated and that will factor what goes on the vehicle.”

The Army has requirements out there for SHORAD solutions, but it “doesn’t have to fall on one platform to provide that capability,” he noted.

For instance if a powerful laser weapon was incorporated, then it might make more sense to make that a dedicated platform designed to handle that specific weapon system because of the size, weight and power considerations.

However, some units like the Infantry Brigade Combat Team may prefer to have a non-dedicated system that is equipped to take down drones.

The weapons interface is designed to incorporate multiple effectors on it, Jim Leary, the global sales and marketing lead at Boeing, said. So while the Avenger on the back of the Stryker looks like an Avenger because it uses the same casing, the interface inside of it makes it far more advanced.

With the interface, the company could add a new missile onto the platform through just two months of software integration, Leary said.

The Army is looking for an interim SHORAD solution to field in roughly 2019 and while that may seem fast for a system acquisition, it recently developed an up-gunned Stryker with a 30mm cannon to meet an urgent request from the European theater in roughly two years with plans to field the system to a unit in 2018.

A Stryker can be configured to accept and integrate an Avenger onto the vehicle in roughly 10 months, according to Linson.
“This is ready,” Leary added.

The two companies are also considering other ways to configure the Stryker with SHORAD capability including ideas to take the interface completely out of the Avenger casing and integrating it into a Stryker without having to cut the back of it to accommodate the Avenger system.

“With a little creativity, you could put this on the back of a regular Stryker in a different formation on a different turret or how do we put this on the existing turret,” Leary said.
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[*] posted on 10-8-2017 at 04:23 PM


Goodbye, MiG: Boeing, General Dynamics Debut Anti-Aircraft Stryker

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

on August 09, 2017 at 11:21 AM


The anti-aircraft MSL Stryker on display in Huntsville.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA.: If you fly Russian MiG fighters, Sukhoi attack jets, or Hind helicopters, your life just got a little harder — and in the event of war, potentially much shorter. At the Space & Missile Defense conference here, General Dynamics rolled out the latest variant of their eight-wheel-drive Stryker armored vehicle, with the troop compartment that’s normally in the back replaced with a Boeing-built anti-aircraft turret. Scroll down for our photos of the vehicle, dubbed the Maneuver SHORAD (Short-Range Air Defense) Launcher, or MSL Stryker.

Evolved from the Cold War era Avenger, which mounted Stinger missiles on Humvee, the new turret can mount a wider array of more powerful weapons:

- AI-3s, a ground-launched version of the AIM-9 missiles used by US fighters, with significantly better range and maximum altitude than the old Stinger.
- Longbow Hellfires, originally an anti-tank missile, made famous -the favored weapon of the Predator drone, and suitable for both ground targets and low-flying aircraft like helicopter gunships.
- Hydra 2.75 inch guided rockets;
- 0.50 caliber machineguns;
- and even low-powered lasers capable of burning out quadcopters and other small drones.

The vehicle on display at Huntsville’s Werner von Braun Center mounts Hellfires on one side and AI-3s on the other, as well as a specialized electro-optical sensor on top. But the GD Stryker is just one of a family of anti-aircraft vehicles that Boeing is developing with various partners, as heavy as BAE’s tracked Bradleys and as light as Oshkosh’s Joint Light Tactical Vehicles.

A JLTV with anti-aircraft missiles and a machinegun will debut at the enormous Association of the US Army annual conference in Washington, DC this October.


The MSL Stryker’s turret, with two AI-3s (modified AIM-9s) on one side, four Hellfires on the other, and a sensor on top.

The mission for all these vehicles: highly mobile air defense that can keep pace with frontline units and survive in combat zones– what the Army calls Maneuver SHORAD. There’s been no successful airstrike on US Army forces since 1953, when a North Korean biplane flying low and slow slipped through US defenses, Since 1991, the Army has focused on missile defense and disbanded anti-aircraft units, assuming Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps pilots will rule the air and keep enemy aircraft off their backs.

That assumption no longer holds. On the low end, proliferating drones present targets too low and slow for jet fighters to intercept. On the high end, advanced adversaries like Russia and China have developed anti-aircraft missiles that can keep US planes at bay and sophisticated fighters that can challenge US pilots for control of the air. The new threats are driving all of the services to seek countermeasures, especially a new concept for all-service operations known as Multi-Domain Battle.

But we can’t carry out any kind of operations if our forces are bombed and strafed every time they try to move, like the German reinforcements struggling to reach the D-Day beaches in 1944. That’s what Maneuver SHORAD — and the new Stryker vehicle — are all about. If friendly fighters can’t keep enemy aircraft at bay, the ground troops will shoot them down themselves.


The anti-aircraft turret replaces the passenger/cargo compartment normally found on Strykers.


Rear view of the MSL Stryker.


Side view of the MSL Stryker.

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[*] posted on 11-8-2017 at 12:47 PM


Army: 50 kW Laser Stryker By 2021, 100 kW FMTV Truck By 2022

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

on August 10, 2017 at 4:22 PM


Laser-armed Stryker vehicle

HUNTSVILLE, ALA.: The Army keeps putting more powerful lasers on smaller vehicles. Battlefield lasers in testing today can shoot down snooping quadcopters and other small drones. By the early 2020s, however vehicles mobile enough to keep up with combat brigades – Strykers and FMTV trucks – will have power in the 50 to 100 kilowatt range. That’s enough not only to kill drones in less time and at longer ranges than today, but also to stop incoming rockets, artillery shells, and mortar rounds.

Army lasers are advancing on two fronts, said Adam Aberle, who heads high energy laser development and demonstration at the Space & Missile Defense Command. Lower-powered lasers go on eight-wheel drive armored vehicles called Strykers. Higher-powered ones go on converted cargo trucks, which have no armor and worse off-road performance than Strykers, but a lot more room.

In 2021, the service will test a 50 kilowatt weapon, the Multi-Mission High Energy Laser, on a Stryker. That’s five times the power of the 10 kW laser being installed on a Stryker for testing this November – which is itself double the 5 kW laser tested on a Stryker this March and five times the 2 kW tested last year.

All these lasers are compact enough that the Strykers can still carry gear and troops for other battlefield tasks (hence “multi-mission”), a big plus for combat units. The 50 kW laser is a potential candidate for the Army’s Maneuver Short-Range Air Defense (MSHORAD), effort, which needs vehicles that can move and fight alongside frontline forces.



The Army is putting heavier lasers on cargo trucks. Eventually, such vehicles might be part of the Indirect Fire Protection Capability (IFPC), a truck-mounted system designed to set up behind the front line and defend large areas against incoming fire. In 2022, the Army will test a 100 kW laser on a truck, the High-Energy Laser Tactical Vehicle, based on three-axle, 10-ton FMTV. The FMTV is an unarmored support vehicle, but it’s much smaller and nimbler than the current laser truck, a four-axle, 20-ton HEMTT now being fitted for a 50-kW laser. (IFPC uses the FMTV truck as well).

For comparison, the original HEMTT-mounted laser installed in 2012 was just 10 kW. That’s same firepower that fits on the much smaller Stryker today. The power-to-weight ratio is ramping up radically.


Laser output required for different targets and ranges. (Courtesy Center for Strategic & Budgetary Assessments)
Power and Precision

Power matters because every time you double a laser’s output in kilowatts, you halve the time it takes to burn through a specific target at a specific distance, letting you quickly wipe out waves of incoming threats. Or you can double the power, keep the target and time to kill the same, but shoot it down 40 percent farther away. Or you can keep the time and distance the same, but burn through harder targets.

It’s not all about power, however, Aberle emphasized in a roundtable with reporters at the Space & Missile Defense Symposium here. The 100 kW laser on a truck will take a year longer than the 50 kW laser on a Stryker, he said, in large part because its beam control system is more ambitious.


A quadcopter mini-drone downed by an Army laser in a recent test.

Beam control is about focusing a laser’s power on the target and on a specific spot on the target: A well-built laser can pinpoint a specific weak point, allowing it to have far greater effects than its power alone might indicate. Engineers also need to optimize beam quality so the laser can penetrate the atmosphere without losing power. All lasers also require sophisticated software and powerful optics, which incidentally make great telescopes for surveillance when the laser isn’t firing.

The beam control and quality equations look very different when firing from a ground level in relatively dry air, a naval craft in humid sea air, or an aircraft surrounded by turbulence in the thin upper atmosphere. That is part of the reason the services all have their own programs, though they compare notes all the time, said Aberle.

In the near term, all the services are looking at relatively low-powered defensive laser. Aircraft already use lasers to confuse the sensors of incoming surface to air missiles, while the Navy’s 30 kW laser tested in the Persian Gulf was designed to deal with drones and approaching Iranian attack boats. The near-term lasers in development can burn down dangerous but relatively fragile targets ranging from ISIL drones, to Taliban mortar rounds, to Syrian barrel bombs, to Russian artillery rockets. But in the not too distant future, increasing power and precision could take out incoming cruise missiles, helicopter gunships, and strike aircraft. At that point, modern warfare starts to change dramatically.
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[*] posted on 16-8-2017 at 03:32 PM


Algeria confirms Buk delivery

Jeremy Binnie - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

15 August 2017

Algeria's acquisition of Buk-M2E surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems has effectively been confirmed by the August issue of the People's National Army's (ANP) El-Djeich magazine.


A collage published in the August 2017 issue of <I>El-Djeich</I> included an image of a Buk-M2 TELAR on a MZKT 6922 6x6 wheeled vehicle. (El-Djeich)

The publication included an article covering the 'Majd 2017' exercise held in July, which was supported by a collage of Algerian military equipment – including a transporter erector launcher and radar (TELAR) vehicle from a Buk-M2 system, seen launching a 9M317-series missile.

The story did not mention the SAM system, which was mounted on a Belarusian-made MZKT 6922 6x6 wheeled vehicle instead of the tracked carriers used by most other Buk operators, including Egypt and Syria.

(100 of 274 words)
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[*] posted on 23-8-2017 at 09:11 PM


Posted On Tuesday, 22 August 2017 19:52

Podolsky Plant Samum Sandstorm 4x4 23mm cannons short-range air defense system at Army-2017.

At Army-2017, the International Military Technical Forum, the Russian defense Company Podolsky Electrical and Mechanical Plant Special mechanical engineering present a new project of light wheeled short-range air defense vehicle under the name of Samum, in English "Sandstorm".

  
Samum 4x4 armoured 23mm short-range air defense system at Army-2017 International Military Technical Forum near Moscow, Russia.
 
The Samum is based on a new 4x4 tactical vehicle fully designed and developed by the Company Podolsky Electrical and Mechanical Plant Special mechanical engineering with a two man crew cab at the front and a cargo area at the rear with a ZU-23/30M1-4 23mm automatic cannons.

The vehicle is protected against firing of small arms and shell splinters. The ZU-23/30M1-4 is armed with a 23 mm twin cannon which is operated by one gunner. The 23 cannons are mounted on a single platform which has a traverse of 360° and elevation from -10° to +90°.

The Samum can be used against land targets with a maximum range of 2,500m and 1,500 m against aerial targets. A total of 1,000 ammunitions are carried in the vehicle in a storage box located at the rear of the chassis.

The Samum has a crew of three, including driver , commander and gunner. It has a total weight of 6,500 kg.
 
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[*] posted on 24-8-2017 at 03:18 PM


Taiwan exhibits point air defence system

24th August 2017 - 4:54

by Charles Au in Taipei



At TADTE 2017 in Taipei, the National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology (NCSIST) exhibited a new hard-kill weapon system designed to eliminate UAVs, fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, cruise missiles and anti-radiation missiles. 

Inspired by the Skyguard area defence system, the truck-mounted 40mm antiaircraft system was developed for a Ministry of Defense requirement..................EDITED
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[*] posted on 24-8-2017 at 04:15 PM


Latvia to Buy Stinger Air-Defence Systems

(Source: Latvia Ministry of Defence; issued Aug 22, 2017)

Latvian Ministry of Defence and Danish Ministry of Defence have signed an agreement for purchase of air defence systems, currently held by Danish Armed Forces, by the Latvian side.

“I am extremely proud and pleased about the acquisition of Stinger air-defence systems, as these missiles will significantly boost our military capability. Moreover, air defence is currently one of our top priorities. In so doing, we are significantly upgrading our strength. Every unit, which will receive these systems, including National Guard, will significantly benefit from this purchase,” underlined Defence Minister Raimonds Bergmanis.

According to the deal for acquisition of Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia will receive missiles together with launch systems. The planned deal is expected to be completed in the first half of 2018 when systems will arrive in Latvia.

In terms of production volumes, Stinger air-defence system is the most popular of its kind. Having excellent combat track record and considered to be one of the most efficient man-portable air-defence systems, it is used by many of Latvia’s allies, such as the USA, the UK, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Finland, Norway and Lithuania.

Along with purchase of the Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia is also working on acquisition of the necessary, support, maintenance and training equipment. Armed forces of NATO countries and other allies are helping Latvia with experience and personnel training required to operate the systems.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 25-8-2017 at 04:29 PM


Posted On Thursday, 24 August 2017 18:40

Arctic variant of the Tor-M2 Surface-to-air missile system is shown at the Army 2017 exhibition

At Army 2017, JSC Kupol Izhevsk Electromechanical Plant (IEMZ Kupol) has presented a prototype of the Tor-M2DT SAM system developed to operate in Arctic conditions, Zvezda TV channel writes.
 

Tor-M2DT
 
"This is an Arctic version (Tor-M2DT) of the SAM system intended for service in the Arctic," Igor Ivanov, Kupol’s director for military-technical cooperation, said. "Its combat assets are mounted on a two-unit cross-country tracked chassis, so that the SAM system can operate in off-road conditions, rugged, snow- and ice-covered terrain. It is mounted on the DT-30PV Vityaz all-terrain two-unit articulated tracked vehicle: the first section carries a crew life support module and the Tor control systems, while the second one accommodates an antenna/launcher. The DT-30PV has the specific ground pressure of just 0.3 kg/cm2, i.e. less than for the man. In other words, the vehicle can easily navigate both deep snow and ice ridges. At the same time, its speed is up to 37 km/h, and the maximum climbing angle is 30 degrees."

The capabilities of the all-terrain vehicle as a platform were clearly demonstrated in March 2017 during a 2,400-kilometer run along the route Tiksi-Kotelny Island-Cape Holy Nose-Strait of Laptev-Strait of Sannikov-Tiksi. All the necessary conditions were created for the Arctic Tor’s crew to effectively operate the SAM system in the Arctic winter conditions. The SAM system’s combat assets were also tailored for operation at low temperatures: the SAM system is able to operate at extremely low temperatures (up to minus 60 degrees), in a snowstorm with a wind force exceeding 35 m/s.

 
Tor-M2DT
  
Kupol has supplied the target amount of modern equipment in recent years. So, the four battalion sets of the Tor-M2U and Tor-M2 SAM systems were shipped to the customer last year.

Moreover, the manufacturer managed to radically improve the performance of its products. In particular, short-range weapons gained a capability to fire on the move. During tests, the Tor-M2U engaged targets while moving at 25 km/h, and quite recently, firings were also carried out when the vehicle moved at 45 km/h. In fact, according to experts, the Tors are capable of providing continuous cover for troops on the march and during a maneuver in combat.

The modified Tor-M2 systems were fielded in 2016. This system is an advanced version of the Tor-family SAM systems.

Compared to the previous version, it features twice the number of missiles having improved operational characteristics. The target kill probability with such ammunition is estimated as close to 100 percent. This made it possible to abandon the practice of simultaneously firing two missiles against one target. "Today, the Tors operate on the "one target - one missile" principle," emphasizes Igor Ivanov.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2017 at 02:23 PM


MSPO: Raytheon in talks with E. European nations over potential missile deals

By: Jaroslaw Adamowski   7 hours ago


The Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System was jointly developed by Norway’s Kongsberg and Raytheon based on the latter company’s Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile. (Kongsberg)

KIELCE, Poland — Poland’s potential acquisition of Patriot missiles is valued at nearly U.S. $5 billion, making it the region’s largest defense acquisition in the pipeline, but Raytheon is making headway with negotiations that could secure other customers for its systems in Eastern Europe.

In Lithuania, the government aims to purchase the Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System, or NASAMS, under a deal worth about €100 million (U.S. $119 million). The acquisition would allow Vilnius to become the system’s fifth operator in Europe. Lithuania would also be the first country to obtain the missiles among Eastern European allies. NASAMS was jointly developed by Norway’s Kongsberg and Raytheon based on the latter company’s Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile.

Mike Tronolone, director of international business development for Europe and NATO at Raytheon, told Defense News the Patriot systems and NASAMS are perfectly interoperable, but they constitute separate air defense tiers.

“Lithuania is interested in NASAMS; there are ongoing discussions with the Lithuanian government,” Tronolone said at the MSPO defense industry show in Kielce. “The threats in Europe have changed, as demonstrated by Russia’s actions in Ukraine, and the threat is real and imminent. This is why there is a drive for proven systems that could protect Europe.”

Tronolone said that Patriot missiles have been deployed to Europe since 1985, and Raytheon aims to increase the number of their users in cooperation with local industry players.

“We have partnerships with PGZ in Poland, Rheinmetall in Germany and many other companies,” Tronolone said.

Raytheon says it is also negotiating a potential Patriot missile procurement for the Romanian Armed Forces. Last July, the State Department cleared the sale of seven systems to Romania. The potential deal comprises seven Patriot Configuration 3+ units, complete with radars, control stations, antenna, launching stations and power plants, as well as 56 Patriot MIM-104E Guidance Enhanced Missile-TBM missiles and 168 Patriot Advanced Capability-3 Missile Segment Enhancement missiles.
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