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[*] posted on 17-2-2018 at 02:13 PM


Russia set to finalise TOR-M2DT SHORAD testing

Igor Bozinovski, Skopje - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

16 February 2018



Russia is set to begin final qualification of the TOR-M2DT (9K331MDT) Arctic short-range air defence (SHORAD) system.

Initial test firings of the TOR-M2DT were planned for 15 February at Kapustin Yar test site in Astrakhan Oblast, with the system scheduled to enter serial production and Russian service later this year.

Developed by Russia’s JSC Izhevsk Electromechanical Plant Kupol (a subsidiary of the Almaz-Antey Concern), the amphibious Tor-M2DT system is mounted on a DT-30PM-T1 articulated all-terrain tracked carrier and armed with 16 vertical-launched 9M331 and 9M332 SAMs with a maximum range of 12 km at altitudes of up to 10 km.

(124 words)
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[*] posted on 25-2-2018 at 02:48 PM


IMI Systems Will Upgrade the Royal Thai Army M-163 VADS

(Source: IMI Systems; issued Feb 15, 2018)

RAMAT HASHARON, Israel --- IMI Systems will upgrade the venerable M-163 Vulcan Air Defense System (VADS) of the Royal Thai Army.

According to the Thai Military and Asian Region magazine, the upgrade will consist of laser rangefinder to replace AN/VPS-2, video feed, thermal imaging sight (uncooled) and some new functions including remote-controlled operation, all-weather operation capabilities as well as automatic target tracking.

Using link-less feed system, the M168 20mm autocannon rotary gun can fires at 3,000 rounds per minute in short bursts of 10, 30, 60, or 100 rounds or in a continuous fire mode at a rate of 1,000 rounds per minute.

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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 11:31 PM


Northrop Grumman-built G/ATOR radar approved for early fielding

Posted On Thursday, 01 March 2018 08:26

Completion of Lots 1 and 2 deliveries will enable the US Marine Corps to achieve G/ATOR (Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar) Initial Operational Capability in 2018.


AN/TPS-80 G/ATOR (Picture source: Northrop Grumman)

The Northrop Grumman Corporation AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar (G/ATOR) has been approved for early fielding by the United States Marine Corps. This milestone follows the delivery of the final Lot 1 and Lot 2 Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) G/ATOR system to the Marines. The USMC will field their first two systems by delivering them to Marine Air Control Squadrons 1 and 2 for operational use.

Early fielding, also known as Initial Operational Capability (IOC), is a significant milestone that indicates that a system is ready for operational deployment. It is achieved when production systems, spares, logistic support items and documentation have been tested and validated through a rigorous process. As the developer and system integrator, Northrop Grumman has taken G/ATOR from concept through to production.

Northrop Grumman has delivered six G/ATOR systems with Gallium Arsenide technology to the Marine Corps in Lots 1 and 2. Beginning with Lot 3 deliveries and including all Full Rate Production systems, G/ATOR will incorporate high power, high efficiency Gallium Nitride (GaN) antenna technology that can further enhance operational capabilities.

"Through our close partnership with the Marine Corps, we have been able to achieve this important early fielding milestone," said Roshan Roeder, vice president, land & avionics C4ISR division, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems. "We are looking ahead to full rate production and getting G/ATOR's unprecedented capabilities to the Marines in the field."
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[*] posted on 21-3-2018 at 09:18 AM


The Answer Is the Laser Dune Buggy: Agile, mobile and effective, this invention will protect troops from new threats

(Source: Raytheon Co.; issued March 19, 2018)


Raytheon's sophisticated MTS sensor package, combined with a high-energy laser and mounted on the MRZR vehicle, could offer an effective defense against UAVs. Earlier this year, it targeted and disabled a small UAV during tests in New Mexico. (Raytheon photo)

Raytheon's sophisticated MTS sensor package, combined with a high-energy laser and mounted on the MRZR vehicle, could offer an effective defense against UAVs.

In a windowless room on Raytheon’s campus in McKinney, Texas, a small team of blue jean-clad engineers and physicists is doing something that’s never been done before. They move back and forth between computer screens and a vehicle that looks like it’s straight out of Mad Max.

“Basically, we’re putting a laser on a dune buggy to knock drones out of the sky,” said Dr. Ben Allison, director of Raytheon’s high energy laser product line.

It’s actually a little more complicated than that, Allison added. The team is combining a high energy laser with an advanced variant of Raytheon’s Multi-spectral Targeting System – a sophisticated package of electro-optical and infrared sensors – and installing it on a Polaris MRZR, a small, all-terrain vehicle.

In an homage to Austin Powers, Art Morrish, vice president of Advanced Concepts and Technology at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, said, “It’s not sharks with laser beams on them, but it’s pretty close.”

A defense against drones

According to Allison, the idea grew out of a meeting with Raytheon’s CEO and Chairman Tom Kennedy earlier this year. Kennedy told Allison and Morrish that an allied nation had recently used a Patriot missile to shoot down a cheap, store-bought UAS that was outfitted with a grenade-like munition.

“That cost-to-kill ratio is high,” explained Allison, “but the threat is clear. So, the question became, ‘What can we do for a counter-UAS system using a high-energy laser, and do it quickly. We didn’t want to go out and do a bunch of research and development. We wanted to take the assets and capabilities Raytheon has today and use them to really affect this asymmetrical threat. We settled on a small system that’s hugely capable.”

Good Things Come in Small Packages

The team first looked at putting its laser on a standard-size military container, but soon realized it only took up a quarter of the available space. At the same time, an undisclosed customer was exploring ways to put a laser weapon system on vehicles small enough to fit in an airplane’s cargo bay or inside a helicopter.

“When we saw how small we could make it and we saw a clear customer need, we immediately wanted to find a very tactically relevant vehicle that could get out to forward operating bases and do its mission,” said Allison.

The system is standalone, with a footprint of roughly 30 square feet. On a single charge from a standard 220v outlet, the same kind you plug your washing machine into at home, the HEL system onboard the MRZR delivers four hours of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability and 20 to 30 laser shots. The system can also be coupled with a generator to provide virtually infinite magazine depth.

While the laser and the vehicle are sure to draw all the attention, it’s the weaponized MTS sensor package that is the core of the system. In this configuration, the MTS provides its standard setting ISR and tracking capabilities while also serving as a beam director.

That’s something Allison says sets this combo apart from bigger, more power-hungry systems. “If you have a good beam director, then you can use a smaller, more efficient laser. You can make your system smaller and more flexible,” said Allison.

Hitting the Road

Morrish believes the solution is particularly suited for expeditionary missions. “Right now, it’s a shoot-on-the-halt capability,” said Morrish. “You drive the vehicle wherever you’re going to drive it. You stop and then you fire up the laser. That makes it great for protecting forward-operating bases and places where convoys have to stop. The next step is to set it up so you can actually shoot on the move.”

Raytheon began field testing the HELWS MRZR last week, and is slated to demonstrate it at the U.S. Army’s Maneuver Fires Experiment at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in December.

“The idea is to quickly take this solution out of the lab and put it in the hands of the operators,” said Morrish. “The folks in uniform are going to find ways to use it that those of us in lab coats never have.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 24-3-2018 at 05:18 PM


Rheinmetall Presents Its Future-Oriented Concept for Ground-Based Air Defence – In Close Cooperation with Raytheon

(Source: Rheinmetall AG; issued March 23, 2018)


Germany’s Rheinmetall has teamed with US-based Raytheon to develop a new generation of ground-based air-defense systems integrating networked sensors, weapons, platforms and C4I assets into a single system. (Rheinmetall image)

Successful air defence demands a holistic approach. This is why Rheinmetall – Europe's foremost maker of military systems and equipment – wants to supply the German armed forces with a path-breaking solution encompassing the whole complexity of ground-based air defence. Here the Düsseldorf-based high-tech group is cooperating closely with America's Raytheon.

Rheinmetall's plan calls for networking all relevant sensors, effectors, platforms and C4I assets into a single, scalable, system of systems. This will create a highly effective, modularly scalable and flexible air defence system covering the Bundeswehr's full mission spectrum.

Short- and very short-range air defence

The phasing out of the Roland and Gepard mobile air defence systems leaves the Bundeswehr with very limited capabilities in the area of short- and very-short range air defence, or SHORAD. Rheinmetall's lightweight air defence system ensures that this capability is maintained through to 2025.

Effective SHORAD – NNbS in German military parlance – requires a total system concept, one which is capable of neutralizing incoming rockets, artillery and mortar rounds – the so-called RAM threat – as well as bringing down unmanned aerial systems, especially in the low, slow, small (LSS) subset, e.g. quadrocopter drones. Finally, the system has to be able to deal effectively with conventional aircraft flying at close range. As an experienced SHORAD supplier, Rheinmetall's proposal calls for a mix of automatic cannon and guided missiles, and in the nearby future augmented with high-energy laser weapons.

Tactical air defence systems

Over the next few years, the Bundeswehr will be utilizing the Patriot integrated air and missile defense for defence e.g. against tactical ballistic missiles. Rheinmetall is Raytheon's national partner for evolving Patriot in Germany.

A phased upgrade from the current Patriot Config 3+ system to next-generation (NextGen) status will meet the future requirements for a long-range ground-based air defence system.

Even in the concept phase, the systemic approach embodied by Rheinmetall SHORAD and the Patriot NextGen meets the requirements for comprehensive, adaptable, modular air defence, enabling a single-source approach covering all aspects of air and missile defence.

Patriot is in the backbone of integrated air and missile defense for six NATO nations and eight other partner countries, making it globally interoperable. A multinational solution, it significantly lowers lifecycle costs thanks to a common threat database and modernization costs shared across the 14-nation partnership.

Scalable tactical C2 design

Rheinmetall envisages a flexible, role-based command and control architecture for its ground-based air defence system. The scalable tactical operation centre concept with flexible C2 architecture enables optimized force composition in line with the given specific operational task.

"VSHORAD" army programme

Complementing the German Air Force capabilities of ground-based air defence, the German Army has articulated the demand for an organic air defence capability against microdrones, to be available for NATO-VJTF 2023. The operational demand envisages a wheel-mounted air defence vehicle protecting units in the very short range from aerial threats during deployed operations. Here, Rheinmetall can offer a market-ready system. Future utilization and integration of those VJTF 2023 components into the SHORAD system is assured, thus representing sustained investment.

Headquartered in Düsseldorf, Rheinmetall AG is a publicly traded, globally operating high-tech enterprise. Founded in 1889, Rheinmetall AG's 21,600 employees generated sales of around €5.9 billion last year. Today Rheinmetall numbers among the world's top makers of cannon-based air defence systems and is pioneering the use of high-energy laser effectors.

Raytheon Company, with 2017 sales of $25 billion and 64,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Mass.

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[*] posted on 29-3-2018 at 05:10 PM


Army details timeline for Short Range Air Defense system contract and prototype

By: Jen Judson   8 hours ago

There a couple of videos worth watching at the original article, link below:
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/global-forc...

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — The U.S. Army plans to be fully under contract for mission equipment packages to transform its Stryker combat vehicles into maneuverable Short Range Air Defense, or SHORAD, systems by August with prototypes expected the following spring.

The timeline was detailed during an interview with Col. Chuck Worshim, project manager for cruise missile defense systems with the Army’s Program Executive Office Missiles and Space, who spoke to Defense News at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Global Force Symposium.

The service will issue a solicitation to industry called a request for ordnance technology initiatives. The ROTI will call for mission equipment packages for SHORAD on March 30, and then the service will make a selection among vendor offerings in June, Worshim said.

The Army has moved rapidly to bring SHORAD capability back into the maneuver force since then-U.S. Army Europe commander Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges about a year and a half ago recognized a capability gap in SHORAD that needed filled for possible operations against near-peer threats such as Russia.

Brig. Gen. Randy McIntire, who is in charge of the Army’s air and missile defense modernization effort via the new Futures Command, told Defense News in a previous interview that there are “two very viable candidates” with offerings today.

Worshim provided more granularity, stating that there are two viable candidates for an interim SHORAD solution from whom the Army has seen capability demonstrations. But he added that anyone can submit to the ROTI, and so other candidates may emerge through that process.

It’s no mystery who one of the “viable candidates” is. Boeing first brought an Avenger launcher loaded with a variety of missiles to AUSA Global Force last year. Then Boeing and General Dynamics Land Systems showed up at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in August with an Avenger on a Stryker — the first SHORAD solution to integrate onto a Stryker platform before the Army even stated it would be the base vehicle for the system.

Boeing and GDLS brought their Avenger/Stryker solution again to Global Force loaded with Longbow Hellfire missiles as well as Stinger missiles. Then the next day, the companies swapped them out with AIM-9X Sidewinder missiles to show the versatility of the launcher platform. The system also has an on-board radar, which is a must-have requirement for the SHORAD system.

“We’ve already done some company investment to make sure we’re leaning forward to get all the components ready for production,” Jim Leary, director of Boeing global sales and marketing for weapons, told Defense News at Global Force. “That’s happening now. We aren’t assuming that there’s been an award, but we just know the right thing to do.”

The system also has room for a directed-energy weapon. Boeing is working on such a weapon for integration on the Stryker, which is under evaluation in Germany in a separate program.

The Army wants to integrate a directed-energy capability into SHORAD as an objective requirement, possibly within the next five years.

But there’s a dark horse emerging that went undetected despite several companies coming forward with SHORAD solutions last fall, including Iron Dome, Flying Tiger and others. While Boeing/GDLS, Israel’s Rafael and South Korea’s Hanwha as well as Raytheon and Lockheed Martin all participated in a SHORAD demonstration in the fall, there’s one solution that did not.

Leonardo DRS has a SHORAD system that is fully integrated onto the Stryker. The centerpiece is its “reconfigurable integration weapons platform,” made by its partner Moog, according to Ed House, DRS Land Systems’ business development manager, who spoke to Defense News at Global Force.

The company had an unassuming small-scale mock-up of its concept at its booth on the showroom floor.

The platform provides a choice of sites, directed-fire weapons and missiles, House said. The system is able to integrate both Stinger and Longbow Hellfire missiles, which is a requirement for the service’s maneuver SHORAD solution. It also comes equipped with a compliment of direct-fire weapons and sites to include the M230 chain gun and the 7.62mm coaxial machine gun.

The reason DRS didn’t show up to the demonstration in September at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, with the rest of the SHORAD candidates is because it was working on a very similar system for a counter-unmanned aircraft systems capability at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, in response to an urgent operational need.

That system was on display at AUSA Global Force.

But since the system couldn’t make it to White Sands, the Army is taking information from the C-UAS demonstration and will measure the performance against SHORAD requirements.

“We hope the Army considers our solution a viable candidate because we’ve done it, we’ve done it under live-fire conditions,” House said. “We don’t take anything for granted; though we’re very comfortable with the Stryker platform, we know how to integrate the capabilities being directed in the M-SHORAD offering, we’ve done it for a different customer right now.”

DRS’ C-UAS capability is already fielded and performing missions downrange.


Leonardo DRS emerged as a dark horse in the SHORAD competition at AUSA Global Force. The system is based closely on its counter-UAS solution already fielded downrange, pictured here. (Jeff Martin/Staff)

Without naming names, Worshim confirmed that one viable candidate was present at the M-SHORAD demonstration in September while another one was doing counter-UAS work at Yuma at the request of the Army because of the urgent operational need to field C-UAS capability.

“Somebody could come out of the blue,” Worshim said. “And we would evaluate the proposal on its technical approach, cost, all the things, the performance that we are looking for, and they could be a viable candidate moving forward.”

The Army will be assessing a variety of aspects when considering which vendor or vendors to choose from ― yes, there could be more than one vendor, Worshim said. While technical approach is one, the ease of integration is another because it’s all about schedule and time, he added.

Cost is also important, but so is the potential for future growth.

While the initial SHORAD will be on a Stryker, it’s possible the Army would consider other platforms down the road. And as the Army qualified, for instance, new interceptors for its Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 system, those could also be integrated onto SHORAD, Worshim said. And a future platform and solution should be able to integrate directed-energy capability onto the system.

At some point, the interceptors will need to have longer ranges.

Improved sensor coverage and survivability are also among other possible future enhancements, Worshim noted.

Jeff Martin of Defense News Weekly contributed to this report.
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[*] posted on 3-4-2018 at 08:06 PM


New mobile SHORAD air defense system a priority for US Army

Posted On Monday, 02 April 2018 10:25

Air and Missile Defense is one of the top modernization priorities of United States Army including the acquisition of a new SHORAD (Short Range Air Defense) mobile system. Air and Missile Defense systems will include the ability to defeat missile threats against the U.S., the deployed forces and the allies and partners.


General Dynamics Stryker MSL at AUSA Association of the United States defense exhibition in Washington D.C., September 2017. (Picture source Army Recognition)

According to an article published on March 22, 2018 on the official website of the US Army, a maneuver system for short-range air defense (SHORAD) may be fielded five years faster than normal as the U.S. Army tests a new modernization process.

The first battery will be fielded in fiscal year 2020 with a dozen systems. A full battalion will be fielded the following year with another soon afterward. Under the legacy process, McIntire said that first battery wouldn't even have been fielded until at least 2025.

The recently signed requirements document for Maneuver SHORAD calls for a vehicle such as a Stryker A-1 variant with a 50-caliber automatic weapon or 30mm cannon on top, along with a pod of missiles, and eventually a 50kw laser.

In September 2017, during AUSA, the Association of the United States defense exhibition which takes place every year in Washington D.C., many U.S and foreign companies have presented different solutions of mobile SHORAD systems. In October 2017, a live demonstration was performed at White Sands Missile Range by the Maneuver Short Range Air Defense program allowed U.S. program officers to look at existing technology to help form the requirements for an interim solution to Army short range air defense while the Army develops a permanent system.

At AUSA 2017, General Dynamics Land Systems has presented its Stryker 8x8 armoured vehicle under the name of Stryker MSL fitted with a Boeing turret armed with Hellfire missiles. The Stryker MSL (Maneuver Short-range air defense Launcher) is a short-range Air Defense (SHORAD) solution that meets the U.S. Army's emerging operational need to counter Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Rotary Wing (RW) and Cruise Missile (CM) threats.

The Stryker MSL is fitted with a Boeing unmanned turret mounted at the rear of the chassis, the original infantrymen compartment is replaced by a cargo area. The turret is armed with four AGM-114 Longbow Hellfire located on the right side and another pod with four launchers for Raytheon Stinger short range air defense missile.


Hanwha Defense Systems Hybrid BiHo at AUSA Association of the United States defense exhibition in Washington D.C., September 2017. (Picture source Army Recognition)

The South Korean Company Hanwha Defense Systems has showed its new M-SHORAD tracked armoured vehicle called Hybrid Biho, an upgraded version of the K30 Biho twin 30 mm self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon was developed to meet the operational requirements of the Republic of Korea Armed Forces for a highly mobile short range air defense system.

The Hybrid Biho keeps the original 30mm twin-gun turret of original version of the Biho but fitted with four additional LIG MANPADS (MAN-Portable Air-Defense Systems), two launchers mounted on each side of the turret, armed with Chiron guided missiles.

The Chiron missile features an integral Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system, full night and adverse weather capabilities, and a two-color infrared seeker to aid in negating countermeasures. It has a 7 km maximum target range and flies at a maximum altitude of 3.5 km and maximum speed of Mach 2.1.


Oshkosh Defense JLTV fitted with Boeing air defense turret at AUSA Association of the United States defense exhibition in Washington D.C., September 2017. (Picture source Army Recognition)

American Company Oshkosh defense has used a modified version of its JLTV to offer a mobile SHORAD solution, fitted with a new short-range air defense weapon station manufactured by the Company Boeing. The the Boeing Maneuver Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) Launcher is armed a M3P .50 cal machine gun, M299 launcher with four Longbow Hellfire missiles, sensor suite, and fitted with a communications suite including a Thales VRC-111.

The AGM-114 Hellfire is a family of 100 lbs class laser guided missiles for use against fixed and moving targets by both rotary and fixed-wing aircraft including UAVs.

The LONGBOW system employs fire-and-forget LONGBOW HELLFIRE AGM-114L missiles that can be launched from defilade, increasing battlefield survivability. The LONGBOW HELLFIRE missile locks on targets before or after launch and has been used in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. It has an operational range from 500 m to 8 km.


BAE Systems Bradley M-SHORAD at AUSA Association of the United States defense exhibition in Washington D.C., September 2017. (Picture source Army Recognition)

BAE Systems showcased new M-SHORAD (Mobile Short-Range Air Defence) solution mounted on Bradley M2A3 tracked armoured IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) at AUSA 2017, the Association of United States Army Exhibition and Conference in Washington D.C.

The turret is equipped with three type of weapons which can be used against drones, and different aerial threats as helicopters and low-flying aircraft. To fight the drones, the Bradley M-SHORAD is fitted with radio interference systems mounted on the top of the turret.

the M-SHORAD Bradley was equipped with a pod including four launchers for Stinger missiles as the Avenger AN/TWQ-1, an air defense vehicle using an HUMVEE chassis. The current production Stinger missiles are the RMP (reprogrammable microprocessor) FIM-92D and the Block I FIM-92E.

Second armament of the Bradley M-SHORAD includes one 30 mm caliber lightweight XM914 Bushmaster Chain Guns which can be used against aerial targets flying at very low altitude.

The XM914 is an upgraded and modified version of the M230 30mm automatic chain gun mounted on Apache helicopter.
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[*] posted on 16-4-2018 at 07:18 PM


Trials of the new Derivatsia-PVO anti-air system to begin in 2018

Posted On Friday, 13 April 2018 11:44

Government acceptance trials of a new antiaircraft artillery module of 57mm caliber designed by Burevestnik Company for Derivatsia-PVO artillery complex are scheduled to begin in 2018, T-digest online portal quoted Uralvagonzavod CEO Alexander Potapov as saying.


The Derivatsia-PVO is based on the combat-proven BMP-3 chassis (source: UVZ )

"It has been a classified project until recently. Derivatsia-PVO existed only as a mockup. Now the concept of the artillery gun has been declassified. Its solo photo shows the vehicle on BMP-3 chassis protected by reactive armor. It has an unmanned automatic combat module," it said. The weapon has to destroy air, light armor and ground and surface targets, as well as troops in buildings and light erections.

The weapon comprises a combat vehicle with high ballistic and precision rapid-fire cannon, a transloader, evacuation vehicle and a set of rounds. Derivatsia-PVO fires standard 57mm shells to the automatic antiaircraft S-60 gun (fragmentation tracers OR-281U and armor-piercing BR-291U), as well as new multirole remotely detonated and guided artillery projectile. The complex can operate in any time of the day and weather. The vehicle obtains targeting information both from the central command post and independently. It will select the best munition for each specific target.

© Copyright 2018 TASS. All rights reserved.
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[*] posted on 19-4-2018 at 07:36 PM


One Step Closer to New Combat Support Vehicle

(Source: Norwegian Ministry of Defence; issued March 23, 2018)

(Issued in Norwegian; unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


Norway has signed a contract with FFG to design and develop prototypes of the army's new mobile air defence platform, comprising an M-113 armored personnel carrier modified to carry a four-cell vertical launcher for IRIS-T air-to-air missiles. (DLO image)

The Norwegian Army will have new armored combat support platforms to carry, among other things, their new combat air defense system. Today, Forsvarsmateriell (Defense Matériel agency) signed a prototype contract.

On Friday, March 23, 2018, a contract was signed between the Flensburg, Germany-based Flensburger Fahrzeugbau GmbH (FFG) and the Defense Land Capacity office. The contract initially includes the prototype of an Armored Combat Support Vehicle and a number of upgrade kits for existing M113 vehicles to M577A2 configuration. Options for additional acquisitions are included in the contract.

The Armored Combat Support Vehicle will, after future qualification of the prototype, be put into series production. The vehicle will be used as a support platform for the future combat air defense system, the artillery locating radar, electronic countermeasures and tanker transport.

The contract’s signature is the result of long-term work by Defense Materials, well supported by the Armed Forces Logistics Organization (FLO) and the Norwegian Army.

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[*] posted on 23-4-2018 at 04:31 PM


Medium Range Radar a Portable, Powerful Addition Canadian Army Toolbox

(Source: Canadian Army; issued April 19, 2018)

OTTAWA, Ontario --- Recent military operations in places like Iraq and Afghanistan have shown that smaller – even improvised – weapons are both difficult to detect and deadly.

The Canadian Army (CA) is adopting a high-tech solution to those low-tech problems: Medium Range Radar (MRR).

MRR is a transportable but powerful system built by Israeli manufacturer Elta and purchased from Rheinmetall Canada, which is the prime contractor. It can quickly detect and locate sources of indirect fire, which include rocket propelled grenades, mortars, rockets and other munitions fired without a direct sightline to the target. Recent lessons learned in Latvia reminded NATO that there is still a significant threat from artillery, mortars and rockets whether from Russia or rogue forces.

MRR may not be as simple in its construction as those weapons systems it is built to counter, but it can still be set up and torn down in just 20 minutes.

“You always want to set up and tear down as quickly as possible so that if there’s a threat we can move out of that location and move on to another one,” said Major Raymond Dupuis, part of the MRR project team. “That’s why we’ll use these in pairs so that as one’s transmitting, the other’s ready to move.”

And the human operators can control the MRR system remotely, from up to 100 metres away.

“Obviously radar is always a high-value target to the enemy,” Maj Dupuis explained.

“Therefore, you want standoff distance between the radar and where your personnel are operating. There is an operator work station and a command post, whether that’s a vehicle or a static location.”

The system also tracks airborne threats and creates a tactical display which can be shared with other Canadian units and Allied forces. Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) radar is also part of the package. IFF, which was developed during the Second World War to prevent friendly fire incidents, detects radio signals from aircraft to distinguish between hostile and friendly ones.

“We’re going to have the ability to give early warning to our troops of air threats,” Maj Dupuis added. “We don’t have the ability to fire on aircraft right now but we do have a project and will eventually purchase an air defence weapon.”

A total of 10 MRR systems are being purchased. Most will be housed in New Brunswick with 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), Royal Canadian Artillery where a successful round of field tests was held earlier this year. Initial cadre training has started and the unit is excited and ready to field this new capability which will not only be a key asset for the Canadian Armed Forces but a sought-after asset for Coalition Operations.

The MRR project is an offshoot of a larger one: Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR). First announced in 2003, ISTAR is an ongoing effort to deliver sensors and intelligence tools that can be used to gather information on the battlefield.

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[*] posted on 23-4-2018 at 08:39 PM


Rheinmetall lands a €100 million order for Skyshield air defence system

Posted On Monday, 23 April 2018 08:39

An Asian nation has contracted with Rheinmetall to supply it with advanced air defence technology. In a competitive bidding process, Rheinmetall Air Defence won the order to supply the customer with the latest generation of its Skyshield systems.


The Oerlikon Revolver Gun Mk3 35mm cannon is part of the Skyshield air defence system

The contract, booked in April of this year, is worth over €100 million. Production of the systems is already under way.

Shipment will take place over the course of the next three years.

Besides reconnaissance sensors, 35mm fire units and the accompanying command and control equipment, the contract includes a comprehensive logistics and service package.

Rheinmetall will be providing complete training for operators and maintenance personnel as well as technical assistance and live fire exercise support in the customer country. Moreover, local companies will take part in the project, including construction of buildings and vehicle procurement.

Rheinmetall attaches great commercial importance to this contract, with follow-up orders already on the horizon. The current project underscores once again Rheinmetall’s globally leading role in the field of state-of-the-art short-range air defence systems.
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[*] posted on 27-4-2018 at 08:40 PM


Iran unveils Kamin-2 air defense missile system on National Day parade

Posted On Thursday, 26 April 2018 13:37

Iran’s Air Defense unveiled a new indigenous air defense missile system on Wednesday in a military parade marking the National Army Day on 18 April.


"Kamin-2", the new Iranian air defense missile system, an upgrade from the "Marsad" (Picture source: IRNA)

One of the major attractions spotted during the parade in Tehran was the new air defense missile system, dubbed “Kamin-2”. It is a short-range air defense system designed to take out reconnaissance and strike unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as well as manned airplanes and helicopters flying at low altitudes. This latest military system is an upgraded version of the Mersad missile system.

The move flouts international restrictions on such weapons and will be seen by many as a direct challenge to President Donald Trump's attempt to “strangle” the Iranian missile programme, as well as to scrap the current agreement on the country's civilian nuclear programme and force Iran to accept to renegotiate a new one, which Teheran and Moscow have already firmly refused (the European Union has declared its will to keep on implementing the current agreement, even if French President Emmanuel Macron declared on 25 April in Washington that a new agreement should be envisaged).

Iran is expected to deploy these missiles to war zones in the Middle East such as Syria to combat what Iranian officials call "regional threats". Earlier this week Iranian army airborne commander Yousef Qorbani announced the missile unveiling to state media: "The range of the missile has doubled to fly 8 to 12km further compared with the previous version," he said.

Given the regional threats that we are facing, they can be highly effective in combats in short-range combat zones."

In addition to the new missiles, Iran unveiled helicopters armed with rockets and machine guns. Iran has said that these would be deployed "for combat in proxy and guerilla wars". Qorbani added: "Our dear experts in the air industry have had a highly successful performance and have equipped our helicopters with night-vision systems. "We have also become fully indigenised in the field of long-range missile systems." Iran has among the highest stockpile of ballistic missiles in the region.
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[*] posted on 27-4-2018 at 08:50 PM


ILA 2018: Just Listening …


TwInvis has already shown what it can do in several demonstrations to military customers, air traffic control organisations and other interested parties. Two TwInvis demonstrators have already been delivered to potential customers in Europe. (Photo: DPM)

Hensoldt unveils its TwInvis passive radar system (twin + invisible, as neither TwInvis itself nor the targets to be detected emit any signals on their own, which means that they are invisible) in live operation during this year’s ILA. The TwInvis system, which can be integrated into an all-terrain vehicle or a van, does not emit its own signals to monitor air traffic, but simply passively analyses the echoes of signals from radio or TV stations. To this end, it detects electromagnetic disturbances in the FM (Frequency Modulation) radio broadcast band of 87.5MHz to 108MHz, the Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) frequency band of 174.92MHz to 239.2MHz and the Digital Video Broadcasting Terrestrial (DVT-B) waveband also located in the 300MHz to three gigahertz ultra high frequency waveband.

“Our newly developed, highly sensitive digital receivers now make it possible for a single TwInvis system to monitor up to 200 aircraft in 3D within a radius of 250 kilometres. This was unthinkable even just a few years ago,” said Hensoldt CEO Thomas Müller. “This will open up completely new options for application in such fields as air defence, the protection of large events or air traffic control.”

Working as mere receivers, passive radar systems detect aircraft by analysing the signals that they reflect from existing third-party emissions. “TwInvis excels with a very precise picture of the airspace covered, which is obtained by simultaneously analysing a large number of frequency bands.

For example, up to 16 FM transmitters (analogue radio) plus five frequencies used by several DAB and DAB+ transmitters (digital radio) as well as DVB-T and DVB-T2 (digital, terrestrial television) can be simultaneously analysed for the first time,” the company states. Furthermore, Hensoldt’s new generation of software will provide great performance in terms of range and precision of detection.

In civil applications, passive radar systems can act as a cost-effective supplement to conventional radar-based air traffic but without any additional emissions. In military applications, the system enables wide-area surveillance using networked receivers, while offering the advantage that passive radar systems cannot be located by the enemy and are very hard to jam, although they do of course depend on the availability of local FM, DAB and/or DVTB emissions being present. Moreover, no agreement is required with any other public authority, as there is no radiation, which allows the system to be quickly ready for deployment in new locations and to also be used in urban areas. This results in another advantage of the new technology: the system can be used in places where coverage was previously inadequate, in particular for example, in mountainous regions. HENSOLDT officials told MONch that the system has completed tests and that the firm is now awaiting customers, witnessing significant interest to this end.

TwInvis has already shown what it can do in several demonstrations to military customers, air traffic control organisations and other interested parties. Two TwInvis demonstrators have already been delivered to potential customers in Europe. (Photo: DPM)
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[*] posted on 27-4-2018 at 08:52 PM


ILA 2018: SHORAD Gap Filler


Four IRIS-T SLS air defence missiles can be fired vertically from a launcher packed onto a Hågglunds Bv410 all-terrain vehicle on show in Berlin in a Swedish configuration (Photo: DPM)

Modernising existing ground-based air defence assets is a European, if not a global trend. For protecting mobile ground forces, Diehl Defence promotes its system solution for the SHORAD domain consisting of the IRIS-T SLS (Surface Launched Short Range) guided missile system shown in Berlin packed onto a BAE Systems Hågglunds Bv410 all-terrain vehicle.

As a ‘gap filler,' this solution is about to attract the interest of an increasing number of potential users. The company was successful in offering this configuration for an immediate Swedish Army requirement. Designed as a new-generation SHORAD missile, it offers a combat range of greater than 25 kilometres, able to defend against a wide spectrum of sophisticated airborne threats. Diehl Defence proposes this solution as a real fire-on-the-move asset, enabling ground troops a “ready-to-use” capability to defeat a broad range of attacking weapons, including air-to-ground missiles, cruise missiles, anti-radar missiles, and rockets. Other manoeuvring threats on the target list include low-flying drones and helicopters.

According to the manufacturer, IRIS-T SLS offers a high probability of kill against any of these threats to a maximum altitude of 6,000 metres. The carrier platform on show in Berlin also carries the GIRAFFE 1X radar from Saab, a multifunctional 3D radar based on advanced gallium nitride (GaN) technology.

One key advantage of the radar is that it can be easily integrated in almost any type of mobile platform, fixed structure or C2 system.

Visit Diehl Defence’s static display S2-001

Stefan Nitschke
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[*] posted on 9-5-2018 at 11:23 AM


Swiss eye stealth-nixing radar to protect Alpine valleys

By: Sebastian Sprenger   7 hours ago


Swiss forces position air-surveillance equipment in the Alps near Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 23, 2011, to protect the World Economic Forum. (Kecko)

COLOGNE, Germany ― Swiss defense officials say they are monitoring progress in the field of passive radar, a technology with the potential to track stealthy aircraft, as the country plans a multibillion-dollar upgrade of its air defenses.

Some European vendors are looking to the Alpine nation, hoping its “Air 2030” program, which is slated to include a combination of new aircraft and ground-based sensors, could finally offer a breakthrough for the still-dormant radar technique.

Unlike traditional radar sets, which emit radar waves and then track their path, passive radar equipment computes an aerial picture by reading how civilian communications signals bounce off of airborne objects. The technique works with any type of signal that’s already present in a given airspace, including radio or television broadcasts as well as emissions from mobile phone stations.

Passive radar technology promises the advantage that it cannot be detected, meaning pilots entering a monitored area may be unaware they are being tracked. That could even be the case for pilots flying stealthy aircraft like the F-35, experts say, though there appears to be no publicly available data pitting passive radar against low-observable aircraft designs and their radiation-absorbing coatings.

Finally, because there are no emitters in passive radar, enemies seeking to overwhelm ground-based air defenses at the outset of an invasion would have no targets for their anti-radiation missiles.

Renato Kalbermatten, a spokesman for Switzerland’s defense department, told Defense News the technology is of interest for Air 2030 planners because of the “high density” of signal emitters throughout the country.

Last year, a group of experts advising the Swiss government on its new air-defense plans mentioned passive radar as a possible element of the new strategy, especially in combination with other types of sensors.

“Stationary military radar stations are exposed and therefore vulnerable, especially through standoff weapons and sabotage,” the report states. Protecting these sites is costly and promises only limited success.

“Air-based, mobile ground-based and especially passive sensors offer much greater survivability,” the experts concluded.

In a footnote, the experts said of “anti-stealth” properties offered by passive radar that such thinking is still largely in the beginning stages.

Swiss experiments with the technology go back to 2010, according to Kalbermatten. In 2015 and 2016, officials field-tested several demo systems from industry, academia and Armasuisse, the defense department’s acquisition arm, at two locations, he said.

While Switzerland has reached out to potential vendors for the purpose of “research coordination” in preparation for the Air 2030 program, the spokesman warned against too much enthusiasm. Officials consider the dependency on civilian radio waves to be a “disadvantage,” and additional development is necessary to make the technology ready for real-world use, he wrote in an email.

While, passive radar technology has been around for decades, computers previously were unable to process the vast amount of data collected by sensors. That has changed with recent advances in computing technology.

Many defense companies are believed to have passive radar developments in the works, either openly or as under-the-radar research projects.

For example, Leonardo markets a product called “AULOS Passive Covert Radar,” advertising it as an “eco-friendly system” because it produces no “electromagnetic pollution.”

At the Berlin Air Show last month, Germany’s Hensoldt unveiled what company officials claimed was the first market-ready, deployable system, dubbed TwInvis. It comes in four variants, ranging from a fixed-site option to packages small enough for a delivery truck or Humvee-sized vehicle.

Company officials noted the system’s utility in airspace surveillance, including as an inconspicuous way of tracking aerial movements across borders for up to 250 kilometers.

During a reporter’s visit to Hensoldt’s demo system at the air show, company engineers excitedly convened around a large TwInvis screen showing the track of a Eurofighter performing a thundering aerial show nearby. The aircraft’s track, including sharp turns and steep dives, appeared with an update rate of less then half a second, plus processing time under 1.5 seconds, according to the company.

Asked what the screen might show if a stealthy F-35 had been flying there, officials just shrugged and said they wouldn’t care to guess.

The Swiss will get a chance to vote on the envisioned Air 2030 program in a referendum scheduled for 2020.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2018 at 04:13 PM


Taiwan’s Army looking for new short-range air defense system

The Republic of China Army plans to embark on an upgrade exercise to replace weapon systems that are more than 25 years-old.

One of the items on its shopping list is a new short-range air defense system to replace the current AN/TWQ-1 Avenger.

The news report by Liberty Times says the service could either upgrade the current Avenger or buy an indigenous system developed by the National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology.

The system comprised of Sky Sword II (TC-2) missiles, a 40mm cannon and a mobile phase array radar. It was demonstrated to Army chief Gen. Wang Shin-lung during his recent visit to the institute.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2018 at 07:54 PM


US Army speeds up deployment of SHORAD Strykers in Europe

Posted On Wednesday, 09 May 2018 08:48

Stryker MSLs (8x8 armored vehicles armed with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles) are headed to Europe sooner than expected to bolster the short-range air defense (SHORAD) systems that the U.S Army is deploying in the region to counter Russia.


Stryker MSL (Maneuver Short-range air defense Launcher) at White Sands Missile Range for a SHORAD demonstration (picture source: General Dynamics)

The U.S. Army is speeding up the development of new SHORAD capabilities for the first time since the Cold War. It would likely encompass the Stryker MSL with a 2020 IOC date. These Strykers will likely be assigned to the permanently forward-stationed 2nd Cavalry Regiment, which is already the first in U.S. Army Europe to have received 80 new Stryker ICVs armed with the 30mm cannon, and additional 87 Strykers with the CROWS-J Javelin system, both of which were engineered to help fill that SHORAD gap. Let us mention that the 2nd Cavalry Regiment is undergoing new training to field-test Stryker vehicles armed with a 5kw Mobile Experimental High Energy Laser for SHORAD purposes.

The Stryker MSL is a short-range Air Defense (SHORAD) solution that meets the U.S. Army's emerging operational need to counter Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Rotary Wing (RW) and Cruise Missile (CM) threats. The vehicle is fitted with a Boeing unmanned turret mounted at the rear of the chassis, the original infantrymen compartment is replaced by a cargo area.

The turret is armed with four Longbow Hellfires located on the right side and anotherpod with four launchers for Raytheon Stinger short range air defense missile.

Boeing and General Dynamics Land Systems have teamed up to build the new short-range air defense system mounted on a Stryker combat vehicle. The MSL Stryker is essentially made up of a modernized Avenger air defense system on the back of a Stryker reconfigured to accommodate the system on a turret.

The Boeing turret is fitted with an organic sensor suite including electro-optical (EO) and infrared sensors with laser range finder and laser designator.
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[*] posted on 10-5-2018 at 12:25 AM


Not sure how high they will fly, nor how fast a target they will be able to engage, but there sure won’t be much left of the aircraft that cops a Hellfire...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 10-5-2018 at 08:56 AM


Combat Helicopters and UAV's for this wee beastie................and make a right mess of either!
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[*] posted on 10-5-2018 at 09:44 PM


It doesn't matter how well armoured your Hind might be, one hit from a Hellfire will turn it into crumpled, fire-blackened tinfoil.



It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of sapho that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains,
the stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion
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[*] posted on 15-5-2018 at 06:31 PM


Derivatsiya-PVO SPAAG to enter state trials in 2018

Dmitry Fediushko, Moscow - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

14 May 2018


The Derivatsiya-PVO SPAAG will begin state trials later this year. Source: UVZ

The Derivatsiya-PVO self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) will enter state trials later this year, a Russian defence industry source has told Jane’s.

He added that a prototype of the newest 57 mm SPAAG developed by the Nizhny Novgorod-based Burevestnik institute, a subsidiary of Rostec’s Uralvagonzavod (UVZ), had already been manufactured and sent for preliminary trials.

The Derivatsiya-PVO is based on the BMP-3 infantry fighting vehicle, the protection of which is reinforced by explosive reactive armour skirts. The source said the SPAAG is designed to engage unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), cruise missiles, surface-to-air munitions, tactical aircraft, combat helicopters, and single rockets fired by multiple rocket systems, as well as lightly armoured ground and surface targets. The vehicle can destroy an aerial target flying at a speed of up to 500 m/s at an altitude of up to 4.5 km and at a slant range of up to 6 km. The system’s remote-controlled 57 mm gun has a rate of fire of 120 m/s.

Its ammunition load comprises 148 armour piercing, high explosive fragmentation tracer rounds, multipurpose airburst munition, as well as guided artillery projectiles. The secondary armament suite comprises a 7.62 mm medium machine gun and nine Tucha-family smoke dischargers. The Derivatsiya-PVO is supported by a Ural-4320-based transporter and a mobile maintenance vehicle, the source added. The system has a crew of three.

The SPAAG is reported to be fitted with the OES OP electro-optical passive targeting station developed by Minsk-based JSC Peleng. It can detect a small aerial target 10 km away and identify it with a thermal imager at 4 km.

(285 of 354 words)
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[*] posted on 23-5-2018 at 02:28 PM


SOFIC 18 – X-MADIS

May 22nd, 2018

The eXpeditionary Mobile Air Defense Integrated System by Ascent Vision Technologies is being displayed in the Darley Defense Booth.



About a year ago, the Marines identified six critical technologies for Counter UAS.

Hardware

- RADAR – detection, tracking and location by RADA Technologies
- Optic – Tracking and positive ID by Ascent Vision Technologies
- Mitigation – EW jammer by Sierra Nevada Corp (Skycap)

Software

- CUAS suite integration software
- Graphic User Interface
- Operator Assist – video content analytics, detects change, alerts user



Together, these technologies accomplish the following functions : Detect-locate-track-identify-mitigate-analyse.

The system works on the move. This pickup is the technical demonstrator. Operational variants are integrated into MRAZRs.
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[*] posted on 25-5-2018 at 12:15 PM


Even as low bidder, Russia’s Rosoboronexport may still loose air defense program in India

By: Vivek Raghuvanshi   11 hours ago


Venezuelan Defense Minister Padrino Lopez mans a Russian-made 9K338 "Igla-S" (SA-18) man-portable air-defence (MANPAD) surface-to-air missile launcher during a military training in Caracas. Rosoboronexport emerged as lowest bidder in the Indian army’s $1.5 billion very short range air defense program, pitching the Igla-S, but the Russian company may still loose the contract. (Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW DELHI – Even though Rosoboronexport has emerged as lowest bidder in the Indian army’s $1.5 billion very short range air defense or VSHORAD program, the Russian company may loose the contract following serious complaints from the other competitors in the fray.

The Indian Ministry of Defence last week opened the commercial bids of the long pending VSHORAD program, in which Rosoboronexport was declared lowest bidder against Saab of Sweden and MBDA of France, a senior MoD official said.

“But the Russian defense company is not going to get [VSHORAD] contract any time soon and the program may face cancellation following complaints from one of the competitor,” he noted.

The Indian Army floated a restricted global tender for purchase of more than 5,000 VSHORAD portable systems to Saab of Sweden, Rafael of Israel, MBDA and Thales of France, Raytheon of United States, Rosoboronexport of Russia and LIG Nex 1 of South Korea. Rafael, Thales and LIG Nex 1 did not qualify after the technical evaluation and Raytheon did not participate in the bid. Only Igla-S by Rosoboronexport, RBS 70 NG by Saab and Mistral by MBDA were qualified for trials after completion of technical evaluation in 2012.

The Indian army conducted two rounds of separate trials before opening the commercial bids last week. A senior service official said the “Indian army discovered Igla-S system fielded by Rosoboronexport to be non-compliant and not-recommended for induction into the service because it failed missile locking and direct hit repeatedly during both separate trials.”

However, the Russian system was permitted and eventually approved by some officials within the service and MoD, despite the strict defense procurement guidelines that non-compliant systems should be rejected outright.

MoD is not expected to award this contact anytime soon, given the current funds crunch in India. Any award to a Russian company could also lead to U.S. sanctions under the Countering America’s Adversaries through Sanctions Act or CAATSA, another MoD official noted. He also pointed to plans for a thorough review before any decision is made to move forward or cancel this program.

Of the 5,175 missiles and associated equipment sought in the VSHORAD program, 2,315 missiles are to be bought in fully formed condition, 260 semi- knocked down condition and 1,000 missiles in completely knocked down condition and 600 missiles will be produced in India. In addition, Indian army is seeking other equipments including launchers, sensors, thermal imaging sights and command & control units.

An executive with the industry group, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry or FICCI, who requested anonymity alleged that the Russian company never followed the technology transfer norms in the VSHORAD program. Since the tender involved domestic transfer of technology, Saab teamed up with state-owned Bharat Electronics Ltd and MBDA tied-up with private sector Larsen & Toubro Ltd, but Rosoboronexport chose to go alone.

“Indian defense forces including army and the air force have large requirements of short range air defense systems,” said Mahindra Singh, a retired army major general. “It makes sense to produce these systems in the country with full transfer of technology from suitable overseas original equipment manufacturers.”
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[*] posted on 27-5-2018 at 02:06 PM


US - Smartphone technology drives mini-missile program

Posted On Friday, 25 May 2018 12:40

While the best gifts might come in small packages, so do some of the most challenging and destructive enemy munitions. Their size can make them extremely difficult to detect and defend against.


Lockheed Martin's Miniature Hit-to-Kill missile weighs five pounds and stands about 30” tall. (Picture source: Lockheed Martin)

This challenge led Lockheed Martin to develop their Miniature Hit-to-Kill missile that borrows consumer electronics technology to defend against threats like drones and IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devises). Roughly the size of a collapsed umbrella, the missile is part of the Army’s Indirect Fire Protection Capability program focused on defending against compact artillery, mortar, and rocket threats that are typically less expensive to produce, very fast, and remarkably precise.

According to Lockheed, advances in miniaturized electronics have developed more rapidly in the consumer sector than aerospace or military applications. This led the company to utilize a design and bill of materials similar to a smartphone, and a tracking system that borrows from medical imaging technology in converting radio frequencies to light signals.

Apparently, this platform offers a unique dynamic where the electronics are durable enough for military use but don’t interfere with each other despite their compact enclosure. The result is a ‘baby’ missile that weighs five pounds and stands about 30” tall. Embedded into this compact design is an advanced radio-frequency seeker for tracking and hitting a smaller target traveling at high speeds. Essentially, it’s kind of like a bullet tracking and impacting another bullet.

Detection and control systems, a rocket motor similar to those used in aircraft ejection seats, and the fuel supply are all embedded into a footprint small enough to be launched from a 1-1/2” diameter tube, but with enough mass to destroy its target. In addition to the cost and maneuverability advantages, these smaller munitions can also limit collateral damage to civilians and surrounding infrastructure.

Lockheed and the Army hope to have Miniature Hit-to-Kill missiles in action by 2022.
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[*] posted on 30-5-2018 at 04:16 PM


Rebuilding Germany’s Air Defence Capabilities (excerpt)

(Source: OSW; posted May 17, 2018)

By Justyna Gotkowska

As NATO has returned its focus to collective defence since 2014, very short, short-range and medium-range surface-based air defence has become a desirable capability. Germany, which has been recalibrating the Bundeswehr to resume participation in conventional military conflicts, is in the process of re-creating air defence capabilities. In 2018–2019, the German Defence Ministry is expected to take decisions regarding two crucial air defence programmes: the NNbS and the TLVS.

The very short and short-range air defence capabilities have effectively been dismantled within the German Army over the last decade. The Bundeswehr plans to rebuild them in the NNbS programme in order to meet its commitments within the NATO Defence Planning Process (NDPP). The contract for the NNbS is expected to be signed in 2019.

However, the plans to quickly rebuild capabilities in this area may stumble on technical, financial and personnel challenges. As Germany has committed to deploy a fully modernised brigade for NATO Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) duty in 2023, Berlin is also seeking alternative solutions, such as co-operation with The Netherlands, or smaller purchases outside the NNbS programme.

In late 2018 or early 2019, the German Defence Ministry is also planning to sign the contract for the medium-range air defence programme, TLVS, three years after it decided to use the results of the MEADS programme that was completed in 2014. The TLVS system will replace the Patriot batteries that have been in use since the late 1980s and have been successively upgraded.

Time will tell as to whether the lengthy negotiations will enable the Defence Ministry to avoid delays and financial and technical problems in the complex TLVS programme, of which Germany is going to be the sole user for now. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the OSW website.

https://www.osw.waw.pl/en/publikacje/osw-commentary/2018-05-...

-ends-

The full article is worth a read..........
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