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Author: Subject: Surface-to-Air systems
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[*] posted on 30-5-2018 at 06:24 PM


Germany has committed to raising a single Brigade have they?

That is mighty big of them... Old West German army commanders must shudder with horror...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 30-5-2018 at 07:03 PM


They don't shudder, they usually rave with anger and frustration..................
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[*] posted on 30-5-2018 at 07:26 PM


Latvia will receive Stinger MANPADS missile purchased from Denmark

Posted On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 08:42

According to the Baltic Times newspaper website, Latvia will receive Stinger Man-portable air-defense missile systems (MANPADS) purchased from Denmark. The planned deal is expected to be completed in the first half of 2018 when air defense systems will arrive in Latvia.


U.S. Army soldiers prepare to fire a FIM-92 Stinger during a training exercise, Hohenfels, Germany, April 25, 2018. (Picture source U.S. MoD)

In August 2017, Latvian Ministry of Defence and Danish Ministry of Defence have signed an agreement for the purchase of Stinger air defence systems which are in service with the Danish armed forces. Latvia would like to boost its air defense capabilities, a top priority for its defence forces.

The Stinger air defense missile will be delivered to many military units of Latvia including the National Guard. According to the deal for acquisition of Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia will receive missiles together with launch systems. Along with purchase of the Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia is also working on acquisition of the necessary, support, maintenance and training equipment. Armed forces of NATO countries and other allies are helping Latvia with experience and personnel training required to operate the systems.

The FIM-92 Stinger is a man-portable surface-to-air missile system (MANPADS) which was designed and manufactured by the American Company Raytheon. Developed in the United States, it entered service in 1981 and is used by the militaries of the United States and by 29 other countries.

The "fire-and-forget" Stinger FIM-92 missile employs a passive infrared seeker to home in on its airborne target. A passive infrared seeker emits no radiation that a target aircraft can detect, and, instead, guides on the infrared energy (heat) emitted by the target. The Stinger missile itself has an outward targeting range of up to 4,800 m (15,700 feet) and can engage low altitude enemy threats at up to 3,800m (12,500 feet).
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[*] posted on 4-6-2018 at 12:50 PM


China continues to market laser weapons as the Silent Hunter

Posted On Friday, 01 June 2018 13:08

China's Poly Technologies Inc continues to market its Silent Hunter laser weapon during international defense exhibition. Today, there is a increase in demand for China's tactical laser weapons on the international market from police and military forces.


Chinese-made Silent Hunter laser weapon mounted on military truck chassis (Picture source Army Recognition)

With the fast development of unmanned aircraft technology, drones are easier to obtain and are capable of carrying payloads, providing tools for criminals and terrorists to commit crimes or launch terror attacks.

The Silent Hunter laser weapon can intercept low-altitude, slow-speed and small aerial targets including drones. It can be used either by police for counter-terrorism or by military forces for air defense. The laser is mainly designed to intercept large numbers of low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and is said to be able to pierce five layers of 2-mm-thick steel plates at a distance of 800m, or 5-mm-thick steel plate from 1,000m away.

Compared with traditional air defense weapons, Silent Hunter has the following characteristics: It is highly responsive; it features a high interception rate and multi-target strike capability, and can shift and aim at a new target within six seconds; it is cost-effective and consumes electricity only, with the cost of less than $1 per firing; it doesn't use ammunition, so there is no need for ammunition transportation and storage; it has small collateral damages and doesn't generate a lot of fragments.

Silent Hunter offers four power patterns: 5kW, 10kW, 20kW and 30kW, its interception radius ranges from 200m to 4,000m and the target capture radius is more than 4,000m. It is able to intercept targets with the diameter of less than 2m and flying speed of less than 60m/s.

During the 2016 G20 Summit in Hangzhou, East China's Zhejiang Province, Silent Hunter was deployed to provide aerial safety, UK-based Jane's Defence Weekly reported in February 2017.
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[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 07:23 PM


Georgia reveals Python SAMs with Ground Master radar

Nicholas Fiorenza, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

06 June 2018

The Georgian Ministry of Defence (MoD) has published photos showing its Rafael Python surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) together with ThalesRaytheon Ground Master 200 and 400 mobile air defence radars.


Georgia has published a photo of its Python SAMs. (Georgian MoD)

The photos were published on the MoD’s website and Facebook on 31 May on the occasion of the 23rd anniversary of the establishment of Georgian air defences, in the presence of Georgian Defence Minister Levan Izoria and Chief of the General Staff Major General Vladimer Chachibaia.

In a speech to mark the occasion, Izoria emphasised the importance of Georgian air defences, saying that GEL238 million (USD97 million) have been allocated in the 2018 defence budget to upgrade them.

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[*] posted on 9-6-2018 at 10:22 PM


Finnish Defence Forces Performed A Successful Live Firing of their Thales Crotale New Generation, Equipped with New Catherine XP Thermal Camera

(Source: Thales; issued June 08, 2017)


The Finnish Army operates the Crotale NG (center) as its main SHORAD system; it is mounted on a Sisu 8x8 wheeled armored vehicle. (Finnish Army photo)

Finnish Defence Forces’ main role, besides operating alongside European and UN forces in numerous international missions, is to defend the national territory and the Finnish population. For the past 30 years, Thales has provided services and capability sustainment to the Finnish Defence Forces for their Crotale NG (New Generation) short-range air defence system.

Within the framework of a running support contract, the Finnish Defence Forces have acquired a new Thales thermal camera. This is part of the long-term sustainment of the system's optronic target acquisition and tracking capability. Operators find the Crotale NG's advanced optronic functions to be a valuable feature of the overall system.

Optronic mode also offers support to operators’ decision in the event of an air threat. The unmatched technical performance of the new camera helps providing Finnish Defence Forces with a dependable real-time image that is immediately available so that operators can make the best decision and act accordingly.

The test firing, with a VT1 missile, conducted at a Finnish Defence Forces training range, demonstrated the capabilities of the Crotale NG equipped with the Catherine XP camera. It proved the accuracy and robust performance of a system that is fully consistent with the requirements of the Finnish Defence Forces as it fulfils its mission of protecting civilian populations and deployed forces.

This latest evolution maintains the development momentum of the Crotale NG multi-sensor SHORAD system and further enhances its proven combat performance.

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[*] posted on 11-6-2018 at 09:07 PM


Eurosatory 2018: IAI Unveils ELM2138


As static radar with no moving parts, the ELM-2138M AD provides a significant advantage both in the operational aspect for on-the-move defence, while reducing long term maintenance and significantly increasing operational availability. (Image: IAI)

Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) unveiled the ELM-2138M air defence (AD) radar at Eurosatory, featuring four full active electronically scanned array (AESA) staring panels for 360 degrees azimuth coverage, and on-the-move surveillance capabilities, the radar is positioned to become a game-changer for tactical air-defence and force protection roles.

A first contract of five ELM-2138M AD radars was recently signed with a European customer. The radars will be integrated into the joint airspace surveillance system by the end of 2019.

The ELM-2138M AD can be used as mobile force protection radar as well as gap filler to complement the local or national Air Situation Picture/Recognized Air Picture (ASP/RAP), encompassing a broad range of airborne targets - such as transport aircrafts, high-speed fighters, helicopters, glide bombs or drones. The radar can also provide Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) detection, providing real time accurate launch and impact point information of incoming hostile fire.

“The ELM-2138M AD provides new surveillance capabilities and improved RAM detection performance, thus enhancing force protection against a wide range of threats,” Nissim Hadas, IAI EVP and President of ELTA Systems Ltd., said. “We are proud of this new system joining our family of air defense radars used for frontline operational defence and force protection.”
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[*] posted on 12-6-2018 at 06:25 PM


Rheinmetall unveils latest Oerlikon Skyranger Gun

Christopher F Foss, London - Jane's International Defence Review

12 June 2018


Oerlikon’s Skyranger mobile 35 mm air-defence gun system is integrated onto a Boxer 8x8 MRAV, showing the tracking unit with associated sensor package mounted on the turret roof at the rear. Source: Rheinmetall Defence

Switzerland’s Rheinmetall Air Defence has completed its first example of a new-generation Oerlikon Skyranger Gun 35 mm mobile air-defence system integrated onto an ARTEC Boxer 8x8 Multi-Role Armoured Vehicle (MRAV) platform.

Rheinmetall Air Defence told Jane’s that there will be a live firing of the complete system at the company’s Air Defence User Group (ADUG) 2018 meeting later this year.

While the Oerlikon Skyranger’s primary role is to counter increasing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) threats, it also has a secondary ground-ground capability as its 35 mm Advanced Hit Efficiency and Destruction (AHEAD) ammunition can be effective against some ground targets.

The new system is fitted with an Oerlikon Revolver Gun Mk 3 remote controlled turret armed with a 35 mm/90 calibre gas-operated Oerlikon Revolver Cannon. It has 252 rounds of ready use ammunition, and the empty cartridge cases are ejected externally.

In the air-defence role its maximum range is 4,000 m and it has a nominal rate of fire of 1,000 rounds per minute or a single-shot mode at 200 rounds a minute.

For the counter-unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) role, it would typically fire the latest-generation AHEAD 35x228 mm round that has a muzzle vehicle (m/v) of 1,050 m/s. The first example of the new Skyranger Gun is a single-feed system, but there is growth potential for a dual-feed system.

There are currently four types of 35 mm AHEAD ammunition: PMD062 with a payload of 152 sub-projectiles, PMD330 with 497 sub-projectiles, PMD375 with 860 sub-projectiles, and PMD428 with more than 600 sub-projectiles that are optimised against UAVs.

Other types of 35x228 mm ammunition can be fired, including high-explosive incendiary (HEI), high-explosive incendiary – tracer (HEI-T), frangible armour piercing (FAP), and associated training rounds.

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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 11:53 AM


Another pic of SKYRANGER............via Army Recognition:




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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 01:51 PM


MBDA Equips Its Licorne Pocket C2 with Anti-Drone Capability

(Source: MBDA; issued June 11, 2018)

MBDA’s Licorne pocket air defence command and control (C2) system has become the first fielded C2 to integrate anti-drone and traditional air defence capabilities.

Licorne is a very lightweight C2 solution with the ability to co-ordinate very short range air defence (VSHORAD) systems, such as those of the Mistral family. A highly mobile C2, it is derived from the I-MCP and PCP systems family currently in use with armed forces in export markets, using the same software components, architecture and human machine interfaces (HMI).

In order to deliver an effective response to the emergence of asymmetric threats, and particularly mini-drone attacks on deployed ground-to-air assets or other military assets inside the protected zone, Licorne can now also deploy anti-drone measures, and co-ordinate them with the traditional air defence assets.

To achieve this, MBDA has supplemented its C2 with a set of data link detectors and jammers originally developed to provide security for events or prisons, which have been adapted to military needs. For detection, Licorne uses a mobile radio frequency detection unit produced by Cerbair to intercept mini-drone data link transmissions. Once the threat has been detected and located, Licorne allows operators to activate countermeasures using a network of field-deployed jammers developed by KEAS.

Licorne’s scalable architecture is designed to enable the system to provide a first level of co-ordination for the VSHORAD systems used by rapid reaction forces, airborne units and amphibious units. Licorne provides surveillance, detection and identification functions with a high level of connectivity.

It can be used in association with passive infrared 360° surveillance sensors, lightweight radars or ESM and acoustic sensors. Pocket C2 Licorne provides all the functions expected of a C2, including multisensor data fusion; real-time ranging; shared tactical position calculation; and even uploading battery sensor images to upper command levels using standard NATO military data link protocols such as JREAP-C.

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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 03:36 PM


Estonia signs for an additional batch of Mistral SHORAD systems with MBDA

12/06/2018


Estonian Army Cpt. Kaimo Jurnas, the Air Defense School commander of the Air Defense Battalion, 1st Infantry Brigade, allows a child to look through the scope of a Mistral short-range air-defense missile system during a community engagement event in Tapa, Estonia, May 29, 2016. Soldiers from Eagle Troop, 2nd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, stationed out of Vilseck, Germany, also participated in the event. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Steven M. Colvin)


Estonia will acquire Mistral short range air defence missiles/ man portable surface to air missiles, training missiles, simulators and testing and maintenance equipment from European missile manufacturer MBDA under a 50 million euros contract. The first systems will be delivered in 2020. The contract between the Estonian Centre for Defence Investment (ECDI) and MBDA was signed today in Paris by Colonel Rauno Sirk, director of ECDI and Didier Philippe, Senior Vice President MBDA NATO countries.

The contract includes options for additional missiles up to the amount of 100 million euros. “Acquiring additional Mistral 3 rounds is one of our top priorities and critical defence investments in the near future besides automatic rifles and K9-Thunder howitzers,“ said Colonel Sirk, Director of ECDI.

Under the terms of the contract, Estonia will continue acquiring Mistral SHORAD missiles in their latest generation which provide increased accuracy and longer service life than missiles of previous generations. Mistral missiles are used by Estonian Defence Forces since 2009. The contract valid today was already renewed on 2015 and the last missiles acquired by this contract will arrive in Estonia on 2019. „We renewed contract now in order to ensure continuity of deliveries after 2019“, Sirk said.

“This third contract with our Estonian partners confirms the great confidence they place in MBDA products, and especially the latest generation of Mistral. We take this as a further mark of confidence from the Estonian armed forces in our ability to build long-term relationships with our customer nations”, Didier Philippe said.
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[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 09:24 AM


Denel Dynamics sheds light on new C-RAM missile

Helmoed-Römer Heitman, Pretoria - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

13 June 2018

Denel Dynamics has released details of its Mongoose 3 counter-rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) missile, which underwent its first flight tests in March and will be shown at Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD) show in South Africa in September.


Development versions of the Mongoose 3 missile. (Denel Dynamics)

The transonic Mongoose 3 is being developed to protect bases by engaging incoming munitions at ranges from 300 m to 2,000 m, complementing the 10,000 m range supersonic Cheetah missile the company is also developing.

The two missiles share a 105 mm diameter basic airframe, active radar seeker, warhead, fuze, and servos, as well as other components and algorithms. They are designed for integration with a range of sensors and fire-control systems, including the Rheinmetall Skyshield, which is to be acquired by the South African Army for its upgraded twin 35 mm anti-aircraft guns.

The 13 kg, 1.2 m Mongoose 3 is a highly agile, vertical-launch missile that uses side-thrust motors to tip it over after launch. It then uses synchronised dorsal and tail fins to steer it towards its target, guided by its active radar seeker.

In addition to its primary C-RAM role, the Mongoose 3 will also be able to engage unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including small types that present difficult targets for other systems and helicopters that come within range. It is also intended as a self-protection weapon for helicopters.

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[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 05:02 PM


Eurosatory 2018 - Keep Still!


A mock-up of IAI’s new EL/M-2138M ground-based air surveillance radar, with deliveries of this product to its first customer expected to commence in 2019. (Photo: Thomas Withington)

Israel Aerospace Industries have taken in interesting approach regarding the architecture of their new EL/M-2138M ground-based air surveillance radar exhibited in model form at this year’s Eurosatory exhibition being held in Paris between 11 June and 15 June in using four fixed-panel AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) antennae to provide continuous, staring 360 degree surveillance. Company officials disclosed to MONch that this new radar will replace the firm’s existing EL/M-2106 ATAR and EL/M-2106NG L-band (1.215GHz to 1.4GHz) ground-based air surveillance radar, with the new EL/M-2138M S-band (2.3GHz to 2.5GHz/2.7GHz to 3.7GHz) offering an instrumented range of between 54 nautical miles/nm (100 kilometres/km) up to 97nm (180km). The decision to employ a fixed, four-panel antennae array for the EL/M-2138M is interesting, and is indicative of a trend witnessed in the naval domain towards fixed panel radars, witness the configuration of the Lockheed Martin AN/SPY-1 S-band naval surveillance radar. Fixed panel systems offer some important benefits compared to their rotating counterparts, not least of which is a reduction in moving parts, and hence a reduction in maintenance burden.

From a surveillance perspective, the radar is also constantly looking at the sky for targets, rather than only looking at a section of the sky as the antenna rotates; a relevant analogy would an eye which remains constantly open looking at the environment, compared to one which blinks. Tactically, this translates into the ability to constantly monitoring the behaviour of threats; a particularly important capability regarding small and fast-moving targets such as rocket, mortar or artillery fire which may present a very small engagement window due to their short flight times.

IAI has developed the EL/M-2138M in two versions; namely full-sized and half-sized configurations. Both versions provide 360 degrees surveillance, an elevation angle of 60 degrees, and between 0.5 degrees and one degree of azimuth accuracy. The two versions differ in terms of their instrumented ranges; 180km for the full-sized version and 100km for the half-sized configuration, similarly the refresh rates for both radars are one kilohertz/KHz and 0.5KHz respectively, with respective power consumptions of ten kilowatts and five kilowatts. IAI officials told MONch that, while this new product is seen as a replacement for the EL/M-2106 family, both these radars will continue to be offered by the company. Furthermore, the officials disclosed that IAI had secured an undisclosed Western European NATO customer for the EL/M-2138M and that deliveries of the radar will commence in mid-2019.

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[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 06:08 PM


Tenth Giraffe for UK [ES18D4]

14 June 2018

Saab has just delivered the tenth Giraffe AMB (Agile Multi Beam) air defence radar to the UK Ministry of Defence, making it the largest operator of the land-based version of the radar in the world.

Giraffe AMB has been in UK service since 2010, and forms a vital element of the Sky Sabre ground-based air defence system. It provides target tracking to the British Army’s new Land Ceptor air defence system – recently demonstrated during live-fire trials in northern Sweden – and was used at the 2012 Olympics to support airspace management.

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[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 06:23 PM


Eurosatory 2018: Hensoldt begins serial production of new AESA radar

13th June 2018 - 17:00 GMT | by Alice Budge in Paris



Hensoldt has begun serial production of its new software-defined AESA land-based air defence radar, the TRML-4D after receiving an initial order for ten units from a non-NATO nation.

First deliveries of the Hensoldt’s latest radar system, based on the company’s existing Naval TRS-4D radar, already in use with the US and German navies, will be made at the end of 2019.

Qualification trials of the system have already been completed and live fire testing with the first customer will be conducted next year.

A total of 50 radar systems will be produced over the next two to three years.

Speaking to Shepard at Eurosatory 2018, a company spokesperson explained that additional trials have been planned with other potential customers as many nations now face more complex air threats in challenging environments.

‘Production of the new radar is a consequence of the change in the threat environment with more agile and fast moving flying threats which are difficult to detect against clutter,’ he said.

‘We have had a lot of interest as customers are looking for a remedy for defeating fast and agile threats in very dense and cluttered environments.’

The C-band (NATO G-band) radar features advanced signal processing technology which quickly establishes threats and is combined with active detection, tracking and classification of air targets.

In addition, utilising AESA radar technology the TRML-4D is capable of acquiring targets after one antenna rotation, further improving response times and hit probability.

‘The main capability parameters are defined by software, which enables us to provide specific capabilities to customers,’ the spokesperson said.

‘By using Gallium Nitride (GaN) solid state transmitters the system offers additional power and versatility, while delivering a C-band system offers high radar accuracy and high "PKill".’

In order to transfer the radar from a naval system to a land-based capability the size of the antenna was doubled and additional land-based signal processers were integrated.

With a maximum range of 250km and an altitude of 30km, the radar’s tracked classification capabilities enables the identification approximately 1,500 fixed and rotary wing, missile and ballistic targets.

The system features an integrated secondary radar to provide friend or foe identification (IFF). The 2D monopulse radar adapts automatically to the system’s antenna rotation speed with 360° coverage at a range of 140km.
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 05:11 PM


RAPIDFire: Keeping Troops Safe from Predators in the Sky

(Source: Thales; issued June 14, 2018)



How do you protect soldiers on the move from the latest airborne threats, including armed drones, hovering helicopters and even cruise missiles that are ready to prey on targets below them?

The answer is RAPIDFire, the latest generation in air defense systems, that will change everything you thought you knew about effective ‘anti-aircraft’ intervention.

This highly-mobile multi-role-gun system can protect troops as well as fixed battleground assets by zapping enemy predators out of the sky.

RAPIDFire’s precision tracking, targeting and destruction of the newest airborne threats is a field commander’s dream, explains Cyril Dupuytrent, of Thales whose 40 years of field-proven weapon systems’ experience are behind the system’s unique range of capabilities.

“RAPIDFire creates a protective ‘bubble’ of four kilometers around it” explains Cyril Dupuytrent, “Its speed, versatility and built-in intelligence create a true ‘shield’ for armed forces on the move”.

Speed and firepower come from its 40 mm CTA cannon that has the compactness of a 25 mm gun and from the ‘smartshells’ inside the cartridge for easier manipulation and logistics. The system is a result from a Thales partnership with Nexter.

RAPIDFire itself could not be ‘smarter’. Its built-in Optronics and Artificial Intelligence provide for 3D precision for the operator who guides the projectiles to their targets tot release their pellets at precisely the moment of interception.

And RAPIDFire lives up to its name, with a reaction time of target detection to ready-to-fire mode of 4.5 seconds and with a firing rate of up to 200 rounds per minute.

Cyril Dupuytrent concludes, “RAPIDFire’s mobility, precision, and efficiency can provide day and night protection needed to assure the safety of all elements needed for success in today’s connected Collaborative Combat”.

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[*] posted on 20-6-2018 at 09:15 AM


Elta 3D air-defence radar excluded from NATO air-defence architecture

Jiri Kominek, Prague - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

19 June 2018

The NATO Air and Missile Defence Command and Control Security Accreditation Board (ASAB) informed the Czech Ministry of Defence (MoD) on 7 June that the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) Elta EL/M-2084 3D mobile air-defence radar (MADR) systems it plans to procure for the Army of the Czech Republic (ACR) could not be integrated into NATO’s air-defence architecture since the system is not manufactured by an alliance member country.

“It is an extraordinary decision”, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babiš told the media on 7 June.

Babiš said that he had earlier consulted Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu about the MADR procurement and was assured that the Israel Defense Forces use the system in combat and that it had also been procured by the armed forces of NATO member Canada.

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[*] posted on 21-6-2018 at 09:36 AM


MBDA unveils evolved Licorne VSHORAD C2 system

Giles Ebbutt, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

20 June 2018


The twin-screen Licorne workstation installed in a VAB armoured vehicle. The left-hand screen is displaying the tactical picture. The laptop docking stations are situated under the keyboard shelves. Source: Giles Ebbutt

MBDA has unveiled a new version of its Licorne lightweight very short range air defence (VSHORAD) command and control (C2) system, which includes an integrated anti-drone capability.

First launched at Eurosatory 2016, the Licorne pocket C2 system is designed for use with systems such as MBDA’s Mistral family and has been derived from its existing Missile Control Post (MCP) and Platoon Command Post (PCP) systems, which are in service in several countries.

The system provides surveillance, detection, and identification functions with a high level of connectivity. It can be used in association with passive infrared 360° surveillance sensors, lightweight radars, or electronic support measures (ESM) and acoustic sensors. It provides multisensor data fusion, real-time ranging, shared tactical position calculation, and can upload battery sensor images to upper command levels using standard NATO military datalink protocols such as JREAP-C.

The organic sensor capability consists of a radar and an electro-optical (EO) sensor. The new anti-drone capability adds a mobile radio frequency (RF) detection unit produced by Cerbair to intercept mini-drone datalink transmissions. Drones can be detected and identified either by the radar/EO combination or by the RF unit. Once the threat has been detected and located, Licorne allows operators to activate countermeasures using a network of field-deployed jammers developed by KEAS.

The new version of Licorne has a scalable architecture and has been designed particularly for early entry forces to give them a lightweight and portable air defence (AD) C2 capability, including in the manpack role if necessary.

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[*] posted on 29-6-2018 at 09:13 AM


US Army’s interim short-range air defense solution crystallizes

By: Jen Judson   3 hours ago


Leonardo DRS has been chosen to provide the mission equipment package (rendering pictured) atop a Stryker combat vehicle to serve as the Interim Maneuver-Short-Range Air Defense system for the U.S. Army. (Courtesy of Leonardo DRS)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army’s interim short-range air defense system, which will urgently fill a capability gap identified a few years ago in the European theater, has crystallized.

The Army had already decided the Interim Maneuver-Short-Range Air Defense system would be developed around its Stryker combat vehicle, but it has now chosen Leonardo DRS to supply a mission equipment package that will include Raytheon’s Stinger vehicle missile launcher, according to Col. Chuck Worshim, program manager for cruise missile defense systems with the Army’s Program Executive Office Missiles and Space, who spoke to Defense News on June 28.

General Dynamics Land Systems — which produces the Stryker — will be the platform integrator for the IM-SHORAD system, he added.

The Army went through a selection process through the Department of Defense Ordnance Technology Consortium to determine the best collection of vendors to build prototypes.

A Boeing-GDLS team was a front-runner for an interim SHORAD mission package, unveiling before any other vendor a solution in August 2017 at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama.

Using an Avenger system on top of the Stryker, which was the team’s solution, sought to take what was already in the Army’s inventory to create a system.

And a SHORAD demonstration at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, last September saw more possibilities for the interim solution including Rafael’s Iron Dome and South Korean defense firm Hanwha’s Flying Tiger.

But a dark horse emerged at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Global Force Symposium, also in Huntsville, in March. Leonardo DRS showed an unassuming small-scale mock-up of its concept at its booth at the symposium that featured its partner Moog’s Reconfigurable Integrated-weapons Platform.

The platform would provide a choice of sites, direct-fire weapons and missiles, Ed House, DRS Land Systems’ business development manager, told Defense News at the show. The system would be able to integrate both Stinger and Longbow Hellfire missiles, requirements for the service’s IM-SHORAD solution.

It also would come equipped with a complement of direct-fire weapons and sites to include the M230 chain gun and the 7.62mm coaxial machine gun. But the solution also has non-kinetic defeat capabilities and Rada’s onboard multimission hemispheric radar.

And that dark horse has won the opportunity to provide the mission equipment package for the IM-SHORAD prototype program.

The system will also have Hellfire rails as well as an onboard sensor, according to Worshim.

The Army decided to choose DRS to provide the mission equipment package because of the flexibility of its reconfigurable turret, which allows for growth opportunities should the threat change or something else change that requires a new interceptor or another capability, Worshim said.

The solution also posed less intrusion to the existing Stryker platform, he added, and provided an increased level of protection as the crew reloads ammunition, which can be done under armor.

While the Avenger solution was deemed technically acceptable and met requirements, one of the reasons the Army decided against using the Avenger on Stryker as the solution was because the government felt it would require major modifications to the Stryker, according to Worshim.

The Army has a desire to keep the Stryker as common across the fleet as possible, Worshim said.

Boeing was also looking to the government to supply Avenger turrets, of which a limited amount of those exist readily in the service’s inventory, which would have been problematic when considering the Army’s goal to deliver 144 IM-SHORAD systems by fiscal 2022, he explained.

Now that vendors have been selected, the Army will move into a negotiation period expected to wrap up in mid- to late July. The service expects to officially award the contract to build nine prototypes by Aug. 31, but has the intention to possibly move that date up, Worshim said.

Once the contracts are solidified, DRS will provide the first mission equipment package, complete with a new digital Stinger missile launcher in February 2019. Then GDLS will fully integrate the SHORAD prototype by April 2019.

The final prototypes will be delivered to the service by the first quarter of fiscal 2020.

As the prototypes are coming along, the Army will conduct prototype testing to see if the systems are meeting requirements. “From there, the Army will decide if this solution truly meets requirements in this respect,” Worshim said. If the solution does meet requirements, production efforts to build 144 systems — a total of four battalions — will move forward.

The Army’s goal is to provide the first battery no later than the fourth quarter of 2020, but that will depend on funding. If funding is lower than expected, the Army will deliver the first platoon by about that time, according to Worshim.

The service has moved from receiving a directed requirement in late February 2018 to selecting vendors for the IM-SHORAD solution in just about four months, which, Worshim noted, is moving at “lightning speed” for a typical acquisition process.

The hope is the process to build an IM-SHORAD solution will be used as a model for Army procurement that incorporates the “fly before you buy” concept and creates a way to rapidly understand capabilities moving forward, he said.
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[*] posted on 3-7-2018 at 04:45 PM


ERA Participated in An International Baltic CESMO Trial, Part of Unified Vision 2018

(Source: ERA a.s.; issued June 29, 2018)


The VERA-NG is a passive surveillance system designed to provide the most advanced data for the detection, location, identification and tracking of air, ground and naval targets. (ERA photo)

ERA company has been involved in an international Baltic CESMO Trial 2018 (BCT18) at PUTLOS military training area on North of Germany from 14th to 28th June. ERA supported 53rd EW & RECCE regiment during training campaign with deployed VERA-NG system. BCT18 became a part of bigger international trial Unified Vision (UV18) 2018.

The goal of the trial was to test new procedures of electronic warfare information collection, exchange, fusion and evaluation according to AEDP13 and STANAG 4658 CESMO. EW product was distributed to EWCC and shared between other NATO nations in form of C-EOB formats and Link 16. Tasking of the unit was provided from SEWOC in Ramstein.

VERA-NG was in between other assets integrated to CESMO/EWCC contributing to Common Operational Picture. Capt. Petr Kos stated: “Cooperation between ERA company and Czech Army was effective. We are really contended that soldiers could try to operate new VERA-NG system in the CESMO.” An immediate and direct feedback from soldiers is key for company further developments.

The cooperation between Czech and German units regarding CESMO testing and evolution is already turning into long tradition and successful story. “We highly appreciate contribution provided by Czech Army and ERA deploying recent VERA-NG system for trials.

VERA-NG successfully proved its capability to be integrated into CESMO network. Also, an international aspect of the trial help NATO community to train procedures and reach higher level of interoperability,” said Trial manager Lt. Col. Marco Moehling.

VERA-NG is a unique and proven world leading Passive ESM (Electronic Support Measure) Tracker.

Air defence and passive surveillance are critical elements in today's military and security operations. Vera-NG addresses this by providing the most advanced and state-of-the-art Passive Surveillance System designed for detection, location, identification and tracking of air, ground and naval targets.

Vera-NG uses advanced techniques to conduct cross-border long-term and long-range surveillance without alerting neighbouring nations. It effectively "sees without being seen".

-ends-
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 10:19 AM


RADA’s MHR Radars Selected for US Army IM-SHORAD

(Source: RADA Electronic Industries Ltd.; issued July 3, 2018)


The Israeli company RADA said its Multi-mission Hemispheric Radar has been down-selected as part of the Leonardo DRS mission equipment package for the US Army’s Initial Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense (IM-SHORAD) capability. (Rada photo)

NETANYA, Israel --- RADA Electronic Industries Ltd. announced that its Multi-mission Hemispheric Radar (MHR) has been down-selected as part of the Leonardo DRS mission equipment package (MEP) solution for the US Army’s Initial Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense (IM-SHORAD) capability. DRS is in negotiations with the US Army for this prototype contract which should be awarded in August 2018.

The MHR radar, when integrated on the Stryker A1 platform, meets the Army’s on-board sensor requirements and provides 360-degree aerial surveillance to detect and track UAS, rotary wing and fixed wing threats at desired ranges. Each IM-SHORAD MEP includes four MHR radars to provide persistent surveillance, execute at the short-halt and operate on-the-move.

This accelerated IM-SHORAD prototype effort requires systems be delivered in early 2019. Nine prototype systems will inform a future production decision for more than 140 systems beginning in 2020.

Dov Sella, RADA’s CEO, commented, "We are proud to be selected for this important US Army program. This selection demonstrates the extensibility and adaptability of RADA’s highly advanced AESA, software-defined radars into multi-purpose, mission critical applications. Further the recent establishment of our US joint venture, RADA Technologies LLC, will allow us to provide optimal program performance to this customer. The MHR selection substantiates our strategic investments in continuous product development and efforts to transition and manufacture products in the US.”

RADA Electronic Industries Ltd. is an Israel-based defense electronics contractor. The Company specializes in the development, production, and sales of Tactical Land Radars for Force and Border Protection, and Avionics Systems (including Inertial Navigation Systems) for fighter aircraft and UAVs.

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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 10:41 AM


Czech MoD seeks SHORAD SAM system

Jiri Kominek, Prague - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

04 July 2018

The Czech Ministry of Defence (MoD) announced in late June that it is resuming the search for a replacement for obsolete Russian-designed 2K12 Kub mobile surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems in service with the Strakonice-based 25th Air Defence Missile (ADM) Regiment of the Army of the Czech Republic (ACR).

The MoD is seeking a short-range air-defence (SHORAD) solution as a replacement for the 2K12 Kub, which according to Jaromir Alan, head of the MoD capabilities planning section, reached the end of its operational service life several years ago.

According to Alan, the MoD has allocated CZK10 billion (USD450 million) for procuring a new SHORAD SAM system with a range of 14,000 m and would like to equip the 25th ADM Regiment with four batteries, each equipped with up to eight ready-to-fire missiles.

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[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 08:57 PM


Singaporean Surface-to-air PYthon-5 and DERby – SPYDER – ground-based air defence system operational

Posted On Friday, 06 July 2018 07:28

Senior Minister of State for Defence Dr Mohamad Maliki Bin Osman officiated at a ceremony to mark the achievement of Full Operational Capability (FOC) status by the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF)'s Surface-to-air PYthon-5 and DERby (SPYDER) Ground Based Air Defence system at Chong Pang Camp this 5 July.


An all-weather system equipped with advanced infra-red and radar-guided missiles, the SPYDER can intercept aerial threats at more than twice the range and three times the altitude of the Rapier, while engaging multiple targets at the same time. (Picture source: MoD of Singapore)

Speaking at the FOC ceremony, Dr Maliki highlighted the significance of this milestone to the overall enhancement of the Next Generation Singapore Armed Forces (SAF)'s capabilities.

He said "The SPYDER is an improvement from the Rapier system as it is able to intercept not just aircraft but also munitions, therefore widening the spectrum of threats that our air defences can tackle. An all-weather system equipped with advanced infra-red and radar-guided missiles, the SPYDER can intercept aerial threats at more than twice the range and three times the altitude of the Rapier, while engaging multiple targets at the same time."

The SPYDER is part of the enhanced Island Air Defence system, which is an island-wide networked system that brings together sensors, weapon systems, command and control elements, and decision-making tools to further strengthen Singapore's air defence. As an all-weather air defence system, the SPYDER possesses anti-aircraft and anti-munition capabilities to effectively deal with a wide spectrum of aerial threats, and only requires four-man crew to deploy. The SPYDER crew has undergone extensive training in order to operate and maintain the system, and has also validated the system's capabilities in local and overseas exercises. The SPYDER allows the RSAF to continue to protect Singapore's skies effectively.

Also present at the ceremony were Chief of Defence Force Lieutenant-General Melvyn Ong, Chief of Air Force Major-General Mervyn Tan, and other senior officers from the SAF.
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[*] posted on 11-7-2018 at 03:51 PM


Army Anti-Aircraft Stryker Can Kill Tanks Too

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

on July 10, 2018 at 4:00 AM

With its eyes firmly on Russia, the US Army is racing to field 8×8 Strykers with an array of weapons that can down enemy aircraft — from drones to helicopters to jets — and incidentally make enemy tanks think twice. The first prototypes will be delivered next year, with up to 144 (four battalions) by 2022, although the contract details are still being negotiated.

With the IM-SHORAD (Initial Maneuver Short Range Air Defense) Stryker, “you’ll have more combat power, more lethality, than the Bradley fighting vehicle,” says Ed House, the retired Army infantry colonel who runs the program for Leonardo DRS.

Now, before everyone gets too excited, this doesn’t mean the new Stryker is a substitute for the Bradley as an infantry assault vehicle. The Stryker’s got lighter armor, and wheels instead of tracks, so it can’t handle all the threats or terrain a Bradley can. Plus, this variant’s interior volume will be largely filled with spare missiles, leaving little room to carry troops.

But it does raise intriguing tactical possibilities for IM-SHORAD Strykers to take up positions right behind the frontline forces — ideally on hills with good fields of fire — to provide both air defense and long-range shots against enemy armor. It’s similar to how the German’s famous 88mm high-velocity cannon of World War II did double duty as flak gun and tank killer.


Close up of the Moog Reconfigurable Integrated-Weapons Platform (RiwP) turret for the anti-aircraft Stryker:: 4 Stinger missiles on one side, two Hellfires on the other, with a 30 mm autocannon and coaxial 12.7 mm machinegun in between (Leonardo DRS)

Rolling Arsenal

Put together by Leonardo DRS and then installed on the Stryker by the vehicle’s original manufacturer, General Dynamics Land Systems, the package includes an intimidating arsenal of weapon — and the flexibility to add more:

- Two Hellfire missiles, capable of hitting both air and ground targets. Hellfire has not only a larger warhead than the Army’s standard Stinger anti-aircraft missile (18-20 pounds vs. 6.6) but a long range than the TOW anti-tank missiles on its M2 Bradleys and ATGM Strykers (5 miles vs. at most 2.8).
- Four Stinger missiles for less well-armored aircraft targets, in a new quad launcher put together by Raytheon.
- A 30mm automatic cannon, an upgraded model (M230LF) of the gun on the AH-64 Apache attack helicopter and considerably more powerful than the Bradley’s 25 mm.
- A standard 7.62mm machinegun as backup and to kill targets that don’t merit a 30 mm round, such as slow-moving drones and infantry in the open.
- An electronic warfare package to jam drones’ control links without having to shoot them.
- A Rada multi-mission radar to track both air and ground targets.

What’s more, the weapons are all mounted on a multipurpose unmanned turret, Moog’s Reconfigurable Integrated-weapons Platform (RIwP, pronounced “rip”), which House said could take a wide range of alternative layouts as technology, tactics, and threats evolve. It could also be adapted to other vehicles, with Leonardo having tried a counter-drone version on an M-ATV truck.

“It takes us about four hours to put the RIwP turret on an M-ATV,” House told me. While they’ve haven’t put one on a Stryker yet, once General Dynamics preps a Stryker — which includes cutting the appropriate hole in the top armor — “it won’t be any harder to mount it on the Stryker.”

The loaded turret weighs less than the TOW missile turret already installed on the Stryker’s anti-tank variant, he said. (By contrast, a rival proposal from General Dynamics and Boeing involved a much larger turret that would have required cutting off the back half of the Stryker’s cargo bay).

With the turret installed and loaded, the vehicle has two Hellfires and four Stingers ready to fire and more would be carried in the hull. The three-man crew should be able reload the Stingers and the 30mm without leaving the vehicle, although they’d be partially exposed in an open hatch. The Hellfires, however, are simply too big and heavy to fit through the hatches, so the crew would have to get out and clamber on top of the vehicle to reload those. That’s an awkward operation under fire and another reason the IM-SHORAD Stryker shouldn’t hang out in range of enemy machineguns alongside the Bradleys.

If fewer or no reloads are needed for a particular mission, House said, some or all of the Stryker’s cargo/passenger area would be available for supplies or troops. But with Short-Range Air Defense identified as one of the Army’s glaring shortfalls against a modern adversary like Russia or China, the IM-SHORAD Stryker probably won’t have much time for odd jobs.


Anti-aircraft Stryker variant chosen by the US Army: 4 Stinger missiles on one side, two Hellfires on the other, with a 30 mm autocannon (and 12.7 mm machinegun) in between (Leonardo DRS)

Rushing vs. Russia

The Army is rushing to fill multiple gaps in Europe, not just air defense. It’s developing a new scout helicopter and adding Trophy Active Protection Systems (APS) to its M1 Abrams heavy tanks to protect them from Russian anti-tank missiles. But while armored brigades of M1 tanks and M2 Bradleys regularly deploy to Europe, the heaviest force stationed there permanently is mounted on Strykers. So the Army is rushing to upgun these relatively lightweight armored vehicles with anti-armor weapons from 30 mm cannon to Javelin anti-tank missiles, as well as the effectively dual-purpose IM-SHORAD package.

How fast is that schedule?

- September 2017: The Army conducts a SHORAD “shoot off” of potential systems.
- February 2018: Army issues a Directed Requirement for what they call an “initial material solution” for SHORAD.
- April: The Army holds an industry day with interested companies.
- May: An Army panel evaluates companies’ White Paper proposals and selects Leonardo DRS for the weapons, turret, and electronics (the Mission Equipment Package); Raytheon for the upgraded Stinger Launcher (which the government then provides to Leonardo); and General Dynamics to integrate everything on the Stryker.
- August 31: The Army’s target date to award contracts.

- Mid-2019 (3Q FY19): First prototype to be delivered.
- 2020: First IM-SHORAD battery deployed.
- 2022: Up to four IM-SHORAD battalions fielded.
- At this point the Army may either keep upgrading IM-SHORAD — note it’s called the “initial” solution, not the “interim” one as is sometimes reported — or choose another system. Different missiles, improved electronic warfare, and entirely new weapons such as lasers are all options, with 50 kilowatt lasers planned for 2023.
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[*] posted on 18-7-2018 at 11:42 PM


Serbia plans to procure Pasars-16 Terminator mobile hybrid air defence system

Igor Bozinovski, Skopje - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

18 July 2018


Serbia’s new Pasars-16 Terminator 6x6 mobile hybrid air defence system being test-fired at the Pasuljanske Livade range on 11 July. (Serbian MoD)

Serbia test-fired its new Pasars-16 Terminator 6x6 mobile hybrid air defence system in the Pasuljanske Livade training area on 11 July.

The firing of the 40 mm Bofors gun was part of testing ahead of the system being introduced into the Serbian Army by the end of 2018, Nenad Miloradovic, assistant minister for material resources in the Serbian Ministry of Defence, said.

During the testing, Pasars-16 was coupled with an M85 Zirafa air defence radar – an Ericsson Giraffe M75 radar mounted on a Yugoslav-made FAP2026 truck – with command and control capabilities. The Serbian Air Force and Air Defence’s 98th Air Brigade participated in the test-firing.

(131 of 270 words)
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