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[*] posted on 23-7-2018 at 10:32 PM


Boeing Delivers Multiple Laser Weapon Systems To Warfighters

Jul 19, 2018

Graham Warwick | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report


CLWS on Stryker: Boeing

Laser weapons are moving from development and testing to production and deployment, with the need to counter the growing threat from small unmanned aircraft leading the way.

Boeing has delivered multiple Compact Laser Weapon Systems (CLWS) to the U.S. Marine Corps for testing by an operational unit.

With power levels of 2-10 kW, the modular CLWS is one of the first high-energy laser system to begin the transition from development to production. But Boeing is also moving ahead with work on more powerful tactical and strategic laser weapons, says Ron Dauk, directed energy program manager.

CLWS uses industrial fiber lasers packaged by Boeing with a small beam director and integrated power and thermal management to produce a system that stands alone, or can be installed in a container or mounted on a Stryker armored vehicle.

The system is being used to train soldiers and show the capability that laser weapons bring to the battlefield.

“It gives you a low cost per shot against quadcopters and a deep magazine,” Dauk says. “As long as there is power, it can keep firing.”

Power for the electric laser can come from a battery, generator or the platform that the system is mounted on.

Systems supplied to the Marine Corps are being used by active warfighters, and are packaged in a Quadcon quarter-size intermodal container. Multiple systems can be operated remotely from a command-and-control center. With power levels of 2, 5 or 10 kW, the CLWS is effective against small drones 1-3 km (0.6-1.9 mi.) away, he says.

Boeing’s core directed-energy technology is in acquisition, tracking and pointing, Dauk says, and it has provided the beam director for the U.S. Army’s High-Energy Laser Mobile Test Truck (HELMTT). This will soon begin testing with a 60-kW fiber laser developed by Lockheed Martin. “We are integrating the laser now and will test in the very near future,” Dauk says.

The Army is already field testing the Stryker-mounted CLWS against drones, and the HELMTT will be tested against rockets, mortars and artillery as well as unmanned aircraft.

Boeing is also in discussions with U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command on plans to test a high-energy laser in an AC-130J gunship. In the mid-2000s, the company developed the Advanced Tactical Laser, a chemical laser that was test-fired from a C-130. “Since then the technology has matured with the development of electric lasers,” Dauk says.

In the strategic arena, Boeing’s Phantom Works is one of three companies working on the U.S. Missile Defense Agency’s Low Power Laser Demonstrator. This is a multi-kilowatt laser payload mounted on an unmanned aircraft to demonstrate precision tracking as a step toward shooting down ballistic missiles. “This is the next step in pointing and tracking,” he says.

Dauk says Boeing is now “actively engaged” with all the services on laser weapons. “The technology is ready. The focus now is on tactics, techniques and procedures, on how to bring these weapons into the battlefield,” he says. “We are working with customers to develop the capability to safely implement laser systems on the battlefield.”
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[*] posted on 24-7-2018 at 09:26 AM


U.S. Army's Initial Maneuver, Short-Range Air Defense (IM-SHORAD) System

(Source: Congress Research Service; issued July 18, 2018)

The Current State of Army SHORAD

The Army defines SHORAD as: Dedicated air defense artillery (ADA) and non-dedicated air defense capabilities that enable movement and maneuverby destroying, neutralizing or deterring low altitude air threats to defend critical fixed and semi-fixed assets and maneuver forces.

The Army summarizes the recent history and current state of Army SHORAD in the following section: Short-range air defense artillery units were historically embedded in Army divisions, providing them with an organiccapability to protect their critical assets against fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. However, in the early 2000s, theseADA units were divested from the Army to meet force demands deemed more critical at that time. Decision-makers accepted the risk that threat aircraft might have on maneuver forces and other critical assets because we believed the Air Force could maintain air superiority.

Thus, the short-range ADA force post-2005 was reduced to two battalions of active component Avenger and counter-rocket, artillery and mortar batteries and seven National Guard Avenger battalions; none of which are organic divisional elements. Defense against air threats in maneuver forces is currently limited to that provided by organic weapons and maneuver personnel.

Renewed Emphasis on SHORAD Since 2005, there has been a dramatic increase in air and missile platforms that could threaten U.S. ground forces. The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) has increased exponentially, and UASs have been used successfully by both sides in the Russo-Ukrainian conflict. Furthermore, fixed-wing aircraft, attack helicopters, and cruise missiles continue to pose a significant threat to U.S. ground forces. In its 2015 report to the President and Congress, the National Commission on the Future of the Army noted, among things, there were unacceptable modernization shortfalls in SHORAD and those major shortfalls caused other concerns across a wide range of contingencies, including in Europe and the Korean peninsula.

IM-SHORAD

While Initial Maneuver, Short-Range Air Defense (IM-SHORAD) is primarily intended to defend maneuver forces against air threats, it also has the capability to engage a range of ground targets.

The Army has requested $17 million in FY2019, $72.7 million in FY2020, $152 million in FY2021, $443 million in FY2022, and $291 million in FY2023 for IM-SHORAD procurement. IM-SHORAD is an Army directed requirement to address the urgent need to support Operation Atlantic Resolve to provide air and missile defense protection of Stryker and Armored Brigade Combat Teams. IM-SHORAD is the Army's "initial" solution, and new weapons systems and weapons carriers might be incorporated into future variants.

The Army reportedly plans to procure 144 IM-SHORAD Systems, with the objective to equip the first and second battalions with 36 systems apiece by FY2021 and a third and fourth battalion with 36 systems each by FY2022. The House and Senate Armed Services Committees have recommended fully funding the Army's FY2019 IM SHORAD budget request. The House Appropriations Committee also recommends fully funding the FY2019 request, and the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee has yet to markup its version of the FY2019 appropriations bill.

The Army reportedly categorizes IM-SHORAD as a rapid acquisition system and is not scheduled to go through a standard defense acquisition development cycle, but is to be developed under the Other Transaction Authority (OTA) contracting process. IM-SHORAD uses the M-1126 Stryker combat vehicle as its chassis. The weapons and radar packages will reportedly be put together by Leonardo DRS and then installed on the Stryker by General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS)—the vehicle's original manufacturer.

The Leonardo DRS–developed multi-purpose unmanned turret reportedly will include
-- two Hellfire missiles capable of hitting ground and air targets;
-- four Stinger missiles for less-well armored aerial targets in a launcher configured by Raytheon;
-- a 30mm automatic cannon;
-- a 7.62mm machine gun;
-- an electronic warfare (EW) package to counter selected enemy systems; and
-- a Rada (Israeli) multi-mission radar capable of tracking both ground and air targets

Potential Issues for Congress

-- The Army describes IM-SHORAD as an "initial" or "short term " capability to address the lack of air defense capability in maneuver forces. If the Army eventually opts to not adopt IM-SHORAD as the long-term solution for maneuver force air defense, what are the Army's subsequent plans for this potentially $1 billion plus program?

-- Would this capability be realigned to protect other Army assets, inactivated and placed in storage, or would it be made available to other countries under Foreign Military Sales?

-- While IM-SHORAD has the capability to engage ground targets and threats, given the criticality of the potential air threat to maneuver forces and the somewhat limited number of IM-SHORAD systems available, is having a ground attack capability in the Army's best interest?

-- Will the wheeled IM-SHORAD system have sufficient mobility and survivability to provide air defense protection to Armored Brigade Combat Teams that consist primarily of heavily armored and tracked M-1 Abrams tanks and M-2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicles?

-- Do IM-SHORAD's Stinger missiles have sufficient capability to destroy armored attack helicopters and ground attack fixed-wing aircraft or would some other type of weapon be better suited to address these "heavier" threats? If so, could another weapon be easily integrated into the current IM-SHORAD configuration?

-- While IM-SHORAD has a limited organic onboard capability to detect, track, and engage enemy air threats, it is also expected to be part of the Army's overall integrated air and missile defense architecture. As such, how will IM-SHORAD integrate with and depend upon the Army's Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System (IBCS)—a program that has experienced noteworthy developmental challenges?

-- What are some of the benefits and risks associated with the Army's decision to procure IM-SHORAD under an Other Transaction Authority (OTA) contracting process?

Click here for the full note (2 PDF pages) hosted on the website of the Federation of American Scientists.

https://fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/IN10931.pdf

-ends-
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[*] posted on 31-7-2018 at 09:10 AM


Confusion continues over potential Czech purchase of Israeli radar

Jiri Kominek, Prague - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

30 July 2018

Uncertainty continues to surround the potential purchase by the Czech Republic of an Israeli air-defence radar over the question of its potential integration within NATO’s air-defence network.

Czech officials claimed on 7 June that the NATO Air and Missile Defence Command and Control Security Accreditation Board (ASAB) had informed the Czech Ministry of Defence (MoD) that the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) Elta EL/M-2084 3D mobile air-defence radar (MADR) systems it planned to procure for the Army of the Czech Republic (ACR) cannot be integrated into NATO’s air-defence architecture as the system is not manufactured by an alliance member country.

NATO’s view of the matter, however, is somewhat at odds with this interpretation.

(112 of 553 words)
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[*] posted on 31-7-2018 at 09:12 AM


There is nothing wrong with this Israeli system/radar, in fact Canada, if memory serves me right, has started using the same radar system...............and the Israeli's almost always build to the latest NATO standard to ensure inter-operability.

Methinks this has more to do with Czech internal politics and, possibly, a lack of funds to pay for the damn things!
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[*] posted on 5-8-2018 at 01:59 PM


Ongoing trials of Serbian Pasars-16 Terminator air defense system

Posted On Friday, 03 August 2018 08:25

The Serbian ministry of Defense has released photos showing the new Pasars-16 short range air defence system, code-named “Terminator”, operated during a live fire exercise of the 98th Air Brigade of the Serbian Air Force and Air Defense.


PASARS-16 (Picture source: Army Recognition)

The ministry told that the new Pasars-16 Terminator short range air defense system takes part to military exercises of the 98th Air Brigade of the Serbian Air Force and Air Defense at the Pasuljanske Livade training range. According to the statement, the upgraded variant of the new Pasars-16 Terminator successfully conducted initial firing trials.

The first example of the Pasars-16 is fitted with Bofors 40mm automatic cannon. It is based on a 6×6 FAP 2026 military truck chassis with an armored cabin. Two operators control the cannon and, in optional, the launch of the two surface-to-air missile RLN-1C missiles. The system has an effective range of 4.000m for the guns, 12.000 for the missiles, both to hit air and ground targets.

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[*] posted on 12-8-2018 at 01:31 PM


Company to Develop Prototype to Counter Shoulder-Fired Missiles

8/9/2018

By Sonja Jordan



Photo-Sonics Inc., a Chatsworth, California-based technology company, was recently awarded a rapid prototyping contract which will help pilots defend against threats such as shoulder-fired missiles, which can take down helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

The $15.2 million contract is funded by the Army through the Training and Readiness Accelerator, a public-private partnership managed by the National Security Technology Accelerator, or NSTXL, to expedite the demonstration and delivery of prototypes to the military.

The development of the technology against shoulder-fired missiles is a two-stage program. The first stage involves data gathering, while the second stage will involve a separate contract, said Tim Greeff, NSTXL’s founder and CEO.

The necessity of the program stems from the rapid advancement of missiles and rocket-propelled grenades, which has made it more difficult to develop countermeasures that can be attached to helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, said Greeff.

There is also a lack of data on how the weapons move, he added.

“What this system is actually going to do is allow the military to collect a very rich data set on exactly how these missiles are flying,” Greeff said. Once the data is collected, it will be used to develop countermeasure systems used on the aircraft, he noted.

The Army is utilizing other transaction authorities — a contracting vehicle — to speed up the acquisition process, according to a press release.

“This particular project with Photo-Sonics is a great example of how OTAs are being used and implemented to ensure that end-use systems are going to be as effective as possible based on the intelligence, the best data and the best research we can offer,” Greeff said.

The path to contract award was competitive, but short, said Philip Kiel, Photo-Sonics’ president.

The company will develop “small and portable” ground units, weighing about 2,000 pounds. The optical tracking systems measure and track the position of the projectiles, he added.

Photo-Sonics will spend two years developing the optical tracking systems, with six months consisting of development, 12 months focusing on manufacturing, and the final six months working on testing. By the end of the two-year span, the company predicts an operational prototype will be finished and ready for use by the government, Kiel said.
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[*] posted on 22-8-2018 at 01:13 PM


Russian Sosna air defense missile system unveiled at Army-2018

Posted On Tuesday, 21 August 2018 20:20

The Russian Company High Precision Systems holding showcases its newest Sosna anti-aircraft missile system for the first time at Army-2018 International Military-Technical Forum. The Sosna is based to the hull of the multi-purpose tracked armored vehicle MT-LB.


Sosna air defense missile system at Army-2018 International Military Technical Forum in the Moscow Region, Russia. (Picture source Army Recognition)

The Sosna is able to destroy any types of air targets including high-precision weapons e.g. cruise missiles and guided aircraft missiles to a maximum range of 10 km at a maximum altitude of 5 km.

The system is expected to replace SA-13 Gopher Strela-10M air defense systems in service with the Russian armed forces.

According the manufacturer, a number of foreign countries, including those of the South-East Asia region and the Middle East, have shown interest in acquiring the Russian Sosna system.

The weapon system of the Sosna consists of 2x6 Sosna-R missile launchers mounted on a turret which can turn on 360°.

The turret also includes air search and target tracking equipments, missile flight control units that are combined by integrated high-precision ECM-protected electro-optical control system (EOCS).

The SOSNA-R 9M337 (SA-24) hyper-velocity beam rider missile is a two-stage missile designed for interception of fired wing aircraft and helicopters, as well as guided weapons and cruise missiles. It has a combined impact/proximity laser fuse. Its payload is made up of two warheads weighing a total of 7 kg.

The fragmented-rod warhead is designed for proximity detonation when flying close to the target, while the armor-piercing/fragmentation warhead goes off on impact.
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[*] posted on 23-8-2018 at 08:57 PM


Almaz-Antey from Russia presents Buk-M3 Viking air defense missile system

Posted On Wednesday, 22 August 2018 20:43

Russian Defense Company Almaz-Antey presents for the first time its new Buk-M3 air defense missile system at the static display of Army-2018, the International Military Technical Forum that takes place in the Patriotic Park Expo, Moscow Region, Russia.


Buk-M3 new Russian air defense missile system at Army-2018, International Military Technical Forum near Moscow, Russia. (Picture source Army Recognition)

The Buk-M3 also nicknamed Viking, medium-range surface-to-air missile system is a modernized version of the Buk-M2 system, features advanced electronic components and a deadly new missile and could be regarded as a completely new system.

A Buk-M3 Viking missile battery consists of two TELAR 9A317M (Transporter Erector LAuncher and Radar) and one TEL 9A316M (Transporter Erector Launcher) vehicle. The TELAR is based on the GM-569 tracked armoured chassis, carries six ready to fire missiles mounted on a turntable that can traverse a full 360°.

The turret of the Buk-M3 TELAR includes fire control radar at the front and a launcher with six ready-to-fire missiles on top. The TEL uses the same tracked chassis as the TELAR Buk-M3 but the turret is fitted with two blocks of six missiles

The Buk-M3 system boasts a new digital computer, high-speed data exchange system and a tele-thermal imaging target designator instead of the tele-optical trackers used in previous models. A battery of Buk-M3 missiles can track and engage up to 36 targets simultaneously, while its advanced 9R31M missile is capable of knocking down all existing flying objects, including highly maneuverable ones, even during active electronic jamming.

The Buk-3M’s target-destruction probability has reached 0.9999 and its maximum destruction range has been increased by 25 kilometers and now stands at 70 kilometers. The Buk-M3 is able to destroy any types of air targets from a range of 2.5 to 70 km, with a speed of 3,000 m/s at an altitude from 15 m to 35 km.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2018 at 09:53 PM


Lithuanian Armed Forces Upgrade RBS 70 Short-Range Air Defence System, Procure New Missiles

(Source: Lithuania Ministry of Defence; issued Aug 23, 2018)


Lithuania is investing less than €10 million before VAT to modernize its RBS-70 short-range air-defense systems with night sights and new missiles, which provide better performance as well as better effectiveness against ground targets. (Saab photo)

The Ministry of National and the Lithuanian Armed Forces enhances the present air defence capabilities and functionality of the weaponry in their possession by procuring improved missiles and BORC night-capability sights on the basis of a contract signed with Swedish manufacturer Saab. The new procurement will upgrade the RBS 70 short-range air defence capability the Lithuanian Armed Forces currently has.

“Enhancement of air defences is one of the key priorities of our defence, therefore we are continuing upgrading our short-range air defence system: the RBS 70 will be improved with night-capability sights and new missiles will be acquired,” Minister of National Defence Raimundas Karoblis says.

Lithuania is buying from the Swedish manufacturer RBS 70s of a newer generation greater range, higher altitude coverage and an enhanced effect against armoured targets. With improved missiles the RBS 70 system will be even more effective and dangerous to hostile aircraft, and the advanced BORC night sights will allow soldiers to stay operational during the dark part of the day.

Approximate value of both contracts is EUR 9.7 million (without VAT), the procurement contracts were signed in July.

The improved missiles and night vision equipment will be delivered to the Lithuanian Air Forces starting with 2019.

The Swedish-manufactured RBS 70 missile system is a short-range air defence capability based on control beam, i.e. laser equipment guides the missile. The greatest advantage of RBS 70 is that there has not been electromagnetic equipment so far created in the world capable of producing jamming that could disrupt RBS 70. The RBS 70 in possession of the Air Defence Battalion of the Lithuanian Armed Forces comprises RBS 70 missile systems with Giraffe Mk-IV surveillance radars.

Also, the Lithuanian Ministry of National Defence is strengthening Lithuania’s mid-range air defence capabilities: in October 2017 NASAMS mid-range air defence systems was bought for EUR 110 million from Norwegian enterprise Kongsberg and is expected to be delivered by 2021.

Airspace protection is one of the key guarantees the allies are able to enter the region if a necessity arises. Upgrading of the possessed air defence capabilities and procurement of new ones is Lithuania’s steps to at least partly fill one of the most important gaps in its defence - airspace protection.

(ends)

Lithuania Upgrades RBS 70 with Night Sight and New Missiles

(Source: Saab; issued Aug. 24, 2018)

Saab has received two orders from the Ministry of National Defence Republic of Lithuania for improved missiles and BORC night-capability sights for the RBS 70 system. The order value amounts to approximately SEK 100 million and deliveries are expected to take place starting in 2019.

The Lithuanian Armed Forces are already users of the RBS 70 system and are now acquiring improved capability with greater range, higher altitude coverage and an enhanced effect against armored targets as well as night-time capability.

“We welcome the decision by the Lithuanian Armed Forces to continue investing in the RBS 70 system. By adding BORC sights to the country’s current inventory, Lithuania gets an even more capable system with the additional ability to operate in darkness”, says Görgen Johansson, head of Saab business area Dynamics.

The Saab portfolio of very short-range ground-based air defence missile systems comprises of the RBS 70 and the further enhanced RBS 70 NG. The RBS 70 system has an impressive track-record on the market. Nineteen countries have procured more than 1,600 RBS 70 systems, including more than 18,000 missiles.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 27-8-2018 at 09:42 PM


Army 2018: tests began in Russia of guided ammunition for 2S38 Derivatsiya air defense system

Posted On Monday, 27 August 2018 08:08

Guided munition tests go on in Russia for the newest 2S38 Derivatsiya-PVO air defense system, Grigory Zakamennykh, director-general of Burevestnik Central Research Institute (part of Uralvagonzavod group, incorporated by the Rostec State Corporation), the developer of the machine, has revealed to TASS at the Army-2018 forum.


2S38 "Derivatsya-PVO" self-propelled air defense system at Armya 2018 (Picture source: Army Recognition)

"At present, the shells are undergoing preliminary tests," he said. Zakamennykh pointed out that at issue is the ammunition detonation time control throughout the flight path. "The projectile follows a ballistic trajectory, which is not corrected.

However, the detonation time can be preset," the director-general explained, adding that no plans are made to create 57 mm caliber rounds with an adjustable flight path. Also, the director noted that the use of guided ammunition will enable the Derivatsiya system "to build" a path from fragmentary explosions over the enemy trench so that the detonation time will be set by the fire control system with an accuracy within a millisecond. In addition, the self-propelled vehicle will be able to build "a vertical wall" from detonations for neutralizing, for instance, aerial threats.

Another specialized shell for Derivatsiya is a remotely controlled multifunctional type. For this shell, the detonation time is set by the so-called programmer at the launch moment so that it cannot be changed in flight. The self-propelled vehicle also uses conventional armor-piercing and high explosive fragmentation rounds.

The Derivatsiya air defense system fitted with the 57 mm cannon, is demonstrated for the first time at the Army-2018 forum. The artillery piece is designed for destroying drones, cruise missiles, air-to-surface missiles, tactical aviation aircraft, and fire support helicopters. "The air defense system can also effectively oppose multiple launch rocket systems’ fire, destroy lightly armored land-based and water-borne targets as well as manpower, including in buildings and lightly protected structures,’ the UVZ source said. The Derivatsiya system consists of a combat vehicle, transport/loading and repair vehicle, and ammunition supply. A UVZ source said that the system can operate round the clock in all weathers and is protected against optic and electronic countermeasures. "This machine can detect, track, and engage targets both on its own and based on the data supplied by the central command post.

For taking out each target "the smart system: will individually choose the most efficient ammunition," the source at the corporation added.
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[*] posted on 5-9-2018 at 10:42 PM


First Poprad air defence systems delivered

Remigiusz Wilk, Warsaw - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

05 September 2018


On 31 August, the first seven SPZR Poprad self-propelled very short-range air defence systems were handed over to Polish air defence forces. (PIT-Radwar)

On 31 August, the first seven SPZR Poprad self-propelled very short-range air defence systems were handed over to the 8th Air Defence Regiment in Koszalin.

Manufactured by PIT-Radwar, the system consists of a turret with a stabilised electro-optical (EO) target acquisition system with identification friend-or-foe and four Grom (possibly Piorun) infrared (IR)-guided missiles manufactured by Mesko, installed on an upgraded AMZ-Kutno Zubr-P 4×4 all-terrain armoured vehicle.

The Poprad system can operate in autonomous mode or as part of an air defence battery coupled with a short-range radar.

(111 words)
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[*] posted on 8-9-2018 at 02:43 PM


US Army close to greenlighting extra lethal Stinger missiles

By: Jen Judson   10 hours ago


Army Spc. Matthew Williams, a cavalry scout assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment, fires a Stinger missile using a man-portable air defense system during Artemis Strike, a live-fire exercise at the NATO Missile Firing Installation in Crete, Greece. (Sgt. 1st Class Jason Epperson/U.S. Army)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army is getting close to greenlighting Stinger missiles that are more lethal against enemy drones following a string of successful tests last month.

The Cruise Missile Defense Systems Project Office, or CMDS, demonstrated a new proximity warhead capability on a Stinger missile during flight testing at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, over a three-week period in August.

The first two weeks of the test event were focused on characterizing the capability of the proximity warhead against static drone targets. In the final week, the proximity fuze-equipped Stingers went up against nine free-flying unmanned aircraft systems ranging from small to roughly 1,000-pound variants — about the size of a Shadow UAS — according to Wayne Leonard, the product lead for Stinger-based systems at CMDS.

The Stinger missiles were fired from man-portable air-defense systems and Avenger launcher systems to show they can be safely fired from both.

The two systems are being used as a temporary capability-gap filler for short-range air defense in Europe as the Army works to bring on an interim SHORAD capability that can keep up with the maneuver force.

Stinger missiles will be a part of that interim SHORAD solution, too.

Previous versions of the Stinger missile use a hit-to-kill capability to take out targets, which requires extreme accuracy.

Drone targets, with unpredictable flight paths, make it even harder for a Stinger missile to make contact. A proximity warhead capability allows for a Stinger to get within close range of a target, then detonate an explosive to neutralize targets that are within close range of the missile.

Now that the critical testing has wrapped up for the Stinger missile with the proximity fuze warhead, the Army will make a determination on an urgent materiel release. That decision is expected in February 2019 after Army Test and Evaluation Command releases its report, according to Leonard.

Getting more lethal Stingers approved for urgent fielding was no small feat, but it was done in just a year following receipt of a new surge of funds to move forward on the project, Col. Chuck Worshim, project manager for CMDS with the Army’s Program Executive Office Missiles and Space, told Defense News in a Sept. 7 interview.

Just a year ago, there was no long-term plan to improve the Stinger missile, he said. In 2014, the Army received some funding to broadly find ways to make the missile better, but the money only covered some of the initial development of a proximity fuze capability, Worshim said. Then when the funding ran out, the effort stopped.

But with a new set of urgent modernization priorities outlined by Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley last year where SHORAD and counter-UAS — among other efforts — have risen to the top, the project office received enough funding in July 2017 to finally make the proximity fuze Stinger missile a reality.

The new Stinger missile “will bring an increased lethality,” Worshim said, and that will get “after those small UAS, drones, that are being proliferated across the world right now and wreaking havoc.”

The Army’s fast-paced effort to finish development and qualify the new more-lethal Stinger missile was made possible through the other transaction authority process, which helped the service bypass part of the initial drawn-out contracting timeline to rapidly prototype and move forward, Worshim said.

Once the Army approves the Stinger missile for urgent materiel release, that will trigger a five-year Service Life Extension Program, or SLEP, where the service will take 5,000 existing Stinger missiles in its inventory over a five-year period and add the proximity warhead as well as replace an older flight motor and a gas generator cartridge to address obsolescence issues, Leonard said.

The budget to upgrade the 5,000 missiles across five years is roughly $270 million.

This will not just increase the Stinger’s lethality, Worshim said, but also inject another 10 years of life into the missiles.

The SLEP program will be carried out at McAlester Army Ammunition Plant in Oklahoma.

The service expects that within three months of the approval of the urgent materiel release, it will have roughly 500 missiles to deploy wherever the Army deems necessary, according to Worshim.
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[*] posted on 14-9-2018 at 10:18 PM


DX Korea 2018: LIG Nex1 Starting Mass Production of KM-SAM for ROKAF

Posted On Thursday, 13 September 2018 13:09

During DX Korea 2018, the International Defense Exhibition currently held in Seoul, South Korea, Army Recognition learned that LIG Nex1 signed a mass production contract with the DAPA (Defense Acquisition Program Administration) for the KM-SAM (Cheolmae-2) medium range surface-to-air missile (SAM) system worth 499 billion won.


File picture: KM-SAM shown for the first time to the public during Seoul Air Show 2017

KM-SAM is a key weapon system of KAMD that forms a four-defense network with the THAAD, long-range surface-to-air missile (L-SAM). Development began in 2012 under the supervision of the Defense Science Research Institute (ADD), and 100% accuracy rate was achieved in a number of test launches, and it was judged to be suitable for battle in June.

The mass production contract was signed on September 7, 2018.

According to LIG Nex1, KM-SAM is attracting high interest in overseas market due to its excellent operational performance, and it is expected to be exported on a large scale in the future.

In addition, a large number of system makers such as LIG Nex1, Hanhwa System, Hanhwa Defense, Hyundai and Kia are participating in the mass production.


(Picture source LIG Nex1)

About KM-SAM

The missile with a 40-kilometer range, also called "Cheongung," was developed locally in 2011 to replace the ROK Air Force's (ROKAF) aging batteries of MIM-23 Hawk from the U.S. Each Cheongung battery consists of a multi-function radar, a firing control system, a launch pad, and eight missiles, according to Lee Hee-chul of the ADD. The multi-function radar is capable of detecting and tracing incoming enemy aircraft, identifying friend or foe, and guiding missiles. It can intercept up to six aircraft simultaneously, whereas the Hawk can intercept only one at a time. The Cheongung has a range of up to about 40 km and is aimed at intercepting aircraft flying at an altitude between 10-15 km. It will replace the American-made Hawk, which has been the Air Force's main surface-to-air weapon since 1964.

The Cheongung has a vertical launching system. Once it is launched into air based on a piston system, the missile's rocket motor ignites and the missile is guided by the radar. The missile can change direction quickly and has little chance of being detected by the enemy because it gives off little flare. Equipped with anti-electronic warfare capabilities, the missile system can keep functioning despite electronic jamming maneuvers. The ADD plans to further develop the Cheongung as a PAC-3-level ballistic interceptor missile. It will have to increase the Cheongung's altitude to 30 km and its range to 100-150 km.
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[*] posted on 15-9-2018 at 03:13 PM


DX Korea 2018: Upgraded Biho 30mm-missiles air defense vehicle in service with ROK army

Posted On Friday, 14 September 2018 14:39

The upgraded K-30 BiHo (Flying Tiger) 30mm self-propelled anti-aircraft armored vehicle fitted with two launchers of KP-SAM Shin-Gung BOW shoulder-launched surface-to-air missile mounted on each side of the turret is now in service with the ROK (Republic of Korea) Army. The vehicle was developed to meet the operational requirements of the Republic of Korea Armed Forces for a highly mobile short range air defense system.


South Korean army upgraded BiHo with 30mm cannon and surface-to-air missiles at DX Korea 2018, defense exhibition in South Korea. September 2018. (Picture source Army Recognition)

The Biho is based on the K200 infantry fighting vehicle tracked chassis, but has some differences. It has an extra road wheel in its suspension and uses a D2840L engine instead of the D2848T engine of the K200, with an increase in engine power from 350 horsepower to 520 horsepower, necessary since the K30 weighs almost twice as much as the K200.

The upgraded Biho air defense vehicle consists of twin 30 mm Oerlikon Contraves KCB weapons with a cyclic rate of fire of 600-rds/gun/min, each one being provided with 250 rounds of ready use ammunition, a TPS-830K surveillance and fire-control radar, an electro-optical targeting system (EOTS), panoramic periscope, forward looking infrared system (FLIR), laser rangefinder (LRF), thermal sight, a TV camera, and a digital fire-control system. There is one pod with two launchers for the shoulder-launched surface-to-air missile KP-SAM Shin-Gung BOW mounted on each side of the turret.

With the KP-SAM Shin-Gung BOW missile that features an integral Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system, full night and adverse weather capabilities, and a two-color infrared seeker, the Biho can destroy air targets at a maximum range of 5 km, while with the 30mm cannon, the maximum firing range is 3 km.

The Biho has a crew of four, with the driver at the front, gunner and commander in the turret and loader seating at the back of the vehicle. Mounted on the turret roof is the surveillance radar and mounted on the forward part of the roof is the day/thermal electro-optical tracker with laser range-finder which automatically tracks the target.

The Biho is motorized with a MAN-Doosan D2840L developing 520 hp. (388 kw) diesel engine coupled to a S&T HMPT500-3EK/4EK transmission. The torsion bar consists of six dual light metal rubber-tired road wheels with the drive sprocket at the front, idler at the rear and four track-return rollers on either side. The vehicle can run at a maximum road speed of 60 km/h with maximum cruising range of 500 km.
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[*] posted on 18-9-2018 at 11:07 AM


A bit more on the BIHO..................

DX Korea 2018: Hanwha to unveil Biho 2 self-propelled air defence system

Kelvin Wong, Goyang, South Korea - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

17 September 2018


A Republic of Korea Army Hybrid Biho self-propelled gun and air defence system seen during DX Korea 2018. Hanwha Defense Systems is developing the 8x8 Biho 2 and plans to unveil it at AUSA 2018 in Washington DC in October. Source: IHS Markit/Kelvin Wong

South Korea’s Hanwha Corporation is planning to unveil a new and improved version of its Hybrid Biho (Flying Tiger) self-propelled gun and missile defence system at the upcoming Association of the United States Army (AUSA) conference in Washington DC in October, company officials revealed to Jane’s during the DX Korea 2018 exhibition in Goyang City.

Chanwook Lim, senior research engineer at the Mobility and Fire System Research Institute, told Jane’s on 16 September that the company has developed the Biho 2, which will be based on a new 8x8 chassis derived from the 6x6 Tigon armoured personnel carrier (APC). The Tigon was earlier launched at the Defence Services Asia 2018 exhibition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and Jane’s understands that several prototypes have already been demonstrated to Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates.

“The new Biho 2 has already been fully developed and features improved radar detection and missile engagement capabilities and range,” Lim said, noting that the turret will be of a type and configuration similar to that of the Hybrid Biho, which is in service with the Republic of Korea Army (RoKA).

The 26.5 tonne Hybrid Biho is based on the tracked K200 APC chassis, but has been modified with an additional road wheel on each side for increased surface contact with the terrain, lowering the vehicle’s ground pressure and delivering improved traction. The K200’s original 350 hp Doosan Infracore D2848T diesel engine has been replaced with a more powerful 520 hp D2840L to address the increased combat weight.

The Hybrid Biho is armed with two 30 mm Oerlikon Contraves KCB-B cannons with a range of 3 km, with each gun firing at a cyclic rate of fire of 600 rds/min and a total magazine capacity of 600 rounds. The platform also has two missile pods, each containing a pair of LIG Nex1 Shingung (Chiron) short range air defence missiles designed to engage fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and cruise missiles out to a range of 7 km.

(356 of 596 words)
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[*] posted on 18-9-2018 at 07:12 PM


DX Korea 2018: Hanwha unveils electromagnetic launch system development

Kelvin Wong, Goyang, South Korea - Jane's International Defence Review

17 September 2018

Interesting possibilities........maybe's? :cool:

South Korea defence prime Hanwha Corporation has unveiled plans to develop an electromagnetic launch system (EMLS) for surface-to-air missiles (SAM) at the 2018 edition of the DX Korea land forces exhibition in Goyang City.

According to company officials, the EMLS programme is an internally funded effort that commenced in 2016. It aims to mature the necessary techniques to provide an alternative to conventional hot launch processes, in which the missile combusts its own fuel to propel itself out of its canister and achieve the necessary velocity for aerodynamic flight.


The RoKAF operates the Cheongung M-SAM medium-range surface-to-air missile, which is expelled from its canister via cold launch techniques. Future missile launchers could benefit from electromagnetic launch technology, which promises safer and more efficient operation as well as improved missile performance. (RoKAF)

Myungguen Song, a research engineer at Hanwha Defense Systems’ Vehicle and Launcher Research and Development Center, told Jane’s on 16 September that hot launching has several disadvantages. For example, additional volume is required within the launcher for exhaust plume control and discharge, and the canister itself must be able to isolate the heat generated by the missile’s motor during launch without igniting other missiles in adjacent canisters.

“More importantly, a missile can expend as much as 60% of its fuel during a hot launch situation to achieve enough velocity for aerodynamic flight, limiting its overall performance and range,” Song said.

More recent SAM systems – such as the indigenous Cheongung (Iron Hawk) KM-SAM system developed by LIG Nex1 and operated by the Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) – employ a cold launch system that uses compressed gas to eject a missile out of its canister before its rocket motor ignites.

“The advantage of the cold launch system is safety – a malfunctioning missile can be ejected to reduce the possibility of damage or destruction of the launcher, although the missile still has to expend fuel to attain flight velocity,” he explained. “The gas system is also not reusable.”

(312 of 680 words)
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[*] posted on 18-9-2018 at 07:52 PM


New Russian Sosna air defense missile system will enter soon in serial production

Posted On Tuesday, 18 September 2018 08:03

The new Russian-made Sosna short-range air defense (SHORAD) system will soon enter in serial production, according to Designer General of the vehicle Vladimir Ukleyev. The Sosna is based to the hull of the multi-purpose tracked armored vehicle MT-LB.


New Russian-made Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) SOSNA at Army-2018, the International Military Technical Forum in Patriotic Park Expo, near Moscow, Russia.(Picture source Army Recognition)

"The new mobile air defense system Sosna has already passed through the state trials. Ii is designed to replace the Strela-10 short-range surface-to-air missile (SAM) system [NATO reporting name: SA-13 Gopher] in service with the Russian Armed Forces. The manufacturing capabilities of the industry are now being prepared for the serial manufacturing of the Sosna SHORAD system," Ukleyev said.

The Sosna features modular architecture, which allows integration of the system`s combat module with various types of chassis with a payload capacity of no less than 3.5 t, including the BTR-82A armored personnel carrier, BMP-2 and BMP-3 infantry fighting vehicles, and BMD-4 airborne infantry fighting vehicle. The Sosna can be embedded in various automated command-and-control (C2) systems

The baseline variant of the SHORAD system is based on the MTLB tracked transporter. The Sosna has been fitted with a digital computing subsystem and works in automatic and semi-automatic modes. The system`s sensor suite incorporates optoelectronic units, which drastically reduce the signature of the Sosna on the battlefield. Thus, the new SHORAD system features a laser rangefinder, laser missile control (LMC) subsystem, TV camera, and thermal imager, with the rangefinder and LMC subsystem mounted on a gyrostabilized platform. The integration of the LMC unit has resulted in the increasing of the Sosna`s target engagement range to 10 km. The system has a reaction time of nearly 5-6 seconds.



The unmanned combat module of the Sosna carries twelve ready-use Sosna-R SAMs in two six-cell pods. The containerized missile weighs 42 kg and has a length of 2.4 m. The Sosna-R features a speed of up to 875 m/s and can engage aerial targets flying at an altitude of up to 5 km at a speed of 100 m/s (helicopters), 250 m/s (cruise missiles), and 300 m/s (fixed-wing aircraft). "The Sosna-R SAM can also hit unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)," an industrial source told TASS.

It should be mentioned that the Sosna SAM system does not require a transport-loader vehicle. "It takes some 10 minutes to reload all the twelve missiles of the combat module," the source added.

The Soviet/Russian Armed Forces have been using the Strela-10 family of short-range SAM systems since the late 1970s.

According to the Military Balance 2018 analytical book published by the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), the Land Forces (SV) still operate 400 9K35M3 Strela-10M3 (SA-13 Gopher) SHORAD systems.
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[*] posted on 20-9-2018 at 08:10 PM


Rheinmetall demonstrates Skyranger counter-UAV capabilities

Nicholas Fiorenza, Zurich - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

20 September 2018


Rheinmetall demonstrated its Skyranger system against UAVs at its Ochsenboden firing range in Switzerland on 18–19 September. Source: IHS Markit/Nicholas Fiorenza

An obvious applicability to Australia seeing as we have both BOXER and NASAM's in the future.............

Key Points

- Skyranger shot down jet UAVs with its 35 mm gun firing AHEAD air burst munition
- The demonstration illustrated the “Patriot and Below Concept”, which also includes NASAMS

Rheinmetall demonstrated its Skyranger system’s capabilities to counter unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at its Ochsenboden firing range in Switzerland on 18–19 September. The system, consisting of a Boxer 8x8 vehicle with an Mk4 turret equipped with a 35 mm Oerlikon Revolver Gun and an electro-optical (EO) tracking sensor, shot down a jet UAV by firing a 24-round burst of advanced hit efficiency and destruction (AHEAD) air burst munition on 18 September and another UAV of the same type with only three rounds on 19 September.

Rheinmetall Air Defence product manager Michael Gerber said placing the tracking sensor on the turret with the gun increases the precision of the system compared with aligning the two if they were separate. The Boxer with an Mk4 turret can carry 252 ready-to-fire rounds fired at a rate of 1,000 per minute.

The test firings were conducted using only Skyranger’s tracking function as the search function will only be ready in two years’ time, according to Gerber. Command and control was provided from a shelter by a Norwegian Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System (NASAMS) fire distribution centre (FDC) together with a Skymaster system. Fabian Ochsner, vice-president of Rheinmetall Air Defence, said the UAVs could be targeted when intersecting the beacons from two Aaronia passive emitter locators.

The destruction of the jet UAV was preceded by Skymaster queueing an Oerlikon GDF009 EO unmanned twin 35 mm gun to shoot down a quadricopter UAV seen by the FDC.

(293 of 426 words)
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[*] posted on 22-9-2018 at 12:58 AM


DVD 2018: Supacat unveils HMT 600 Coyote fitted with AUDS

Oscar Widlund, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

21 September 2018


A Supacat HMT 600 Coyote was shown at DVD 2018 fitted with a counter-UAV system produced by Chess Dynamics (IHS Markit/Oscar Widlund)

UK companies Supacat and Chess Dynamics displayed the former's HMT 600 Coyote tactical support vehicle in the counter-unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) role fitted with the latter’s Anti-UAV Defence System (AUDS) at DVD 2018, held at Millbrook in Bedfordshire, on 19–20 September.

According to a company press release, the AUDS is the only operationally proven counter-UAV system. The press release added that the AUDS-equipped Coyote would participate in the UK Ministry of Defence’s upcoming Autonomous Warrior ‘Army Warfighting Experiment’. This four-week exercise, which will begin on 12 November, will allow British soldiers to test and evaluate the effectiveness of robotic and autonomous systems on the battlefield.

Speaking to Jane’s at DVD 2018, Toby Cox, deputy head of support programmes at Supacat, and Dave Eldridge, sales director at Chess Dynamics, said that the Coyote/AUDS combination is being actively marketed to current HMT users.

(165 of 172 words)
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[*] posted on 24-9-2018 at 01:13 PM


Germany clears Egypt to buy 7 sets of IRIS-T SLM; Meteor parts for Qatar

Germany has agreed to sell seven sets of the IRIS-T SLM air defense missile system to Egypt.


By Boevaya mashina [CC BY-SA 4.0 ], from Wikimedia Commons

The same article mentioned that Qatar will be allowed to buy components of the Meteor air-to-air missile as well.
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[*] posted on 26-9-2018 at 07:51 PM


Lockheed Martin develops generic 8x8 SkyKeeper C2 module

Giles Ebbutt, Millbrook - Jane's International Defence Review

25 September 2018


The interior of Lockheed Martin’s SkyKeeper generic 8x8 module. The twin workstation installation fits over the seats on the left of the compartment. Source: Giles Ebbutt

Lockheed Martin UK (LMUK) has developed a generic 8x8 mission module for its SkyKeeper battlespace management command-and-control (C2) system, which was showcased at the DVD 2018 exhibition in September.

The new mission module is designed for easy installation in the crew compartment of an 8x8 armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) without the need to remove the seats. The lightweight twin-workstation configuration only requires a power supply and access to communications; it does not breach the perimeter of the vehicle. Transfer to another vehicle if necessary is therefore relatively simple.

SkyKeeper currently provides the core of the British Army’s Land Environment Air Picture Provision (LEAPP) capability, integrated with the Saab Giraffe Agile Multi-Beam (AMB) 3D surveillance radar. Located at formation headquarters level, this provides a fused recognised air picture (RAP) utilising Link 16, together with integrated weapon engagement management.

The module will be integrated with the new Saab Giraffe1X stacked beam 3D radar, mounted on the vehicle roof. This has a digital beam-forming active electronically scanned array (AESA) antenna, an elevation coverage of more than 70°, a rotation rate of 60 rpm, and a claimed instrumented range of 75 km. It has a capacity for more than 100 air tracks and 200 surface tracks.

The radar weighs less than 300 kg and the roof mounting contains a scissor lift, which can elevate the antenna to 3 m.

The mounting baseplate is designed for installation on generic vehicle mounting points. Integration with the internal module only requires a power and signal line.

Graeme Forsyth, programme manager for LMUK, told Jane’s that while the range of the 1X radar would be less than the Giraffe AMB this was a deliberate decision to trade range for speed and mobility.

(308 of 444 words)
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[*] posted on 28-9-2018 at 08:31 PM


IBCS tracks and engages air targets during three-week exercise

Geoff Fein, Washington, DC - Jane's International Defence Review

27 September 2018

Northrop Grumman’s Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System (IBCS) has completed another round of Soldier Check Out events (SCOEs), demonstrating the system’s ability to detect, track, and simulate air target engagements during testing at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

IBCS is a mobile ad hoc network that will link sensors and shooters on the battlefield, regardless of the system’s manufacturer, as nodes can come in and out of the network at will. IBCS is an element of the US Army’s Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) programme. The complete IAMD capability is expected to undergo a ‘Milestone C’ production decision in 2020.

(131 of 532 words)
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[*] posted on 3-10-2018 at 08:42 PM


Rheinmetall demonstrates Skyranger Gun air defense system anti-UAV capabilities

Posted On Wednesday, 03 October 2018 07:59

The fourth edition of the 35mm Air Defence Systems Group took place at the Rheinmetall facilities in Zurich, Switzerland, from 17 to 19 September 2018. The highlight of the event was a live firing demonstration of the Oerlikon Skyranger Gun and the Oerlikon Twin Gun GDF009 EO at the Ochsenboden firing range.

VIDEO: Rheinmetall Defence - Air Defence Days 2018: https://youtu.be/88PWySnaLmI

In partnership with Raytheon and Kongsberg, the German defense giant also introduced a new “Patriot and Below Concept” to existing and potential customers and to journalists.

A layered air defense system, the Patriot and Below Concept involves the Raytheon Patriot, Kongsberg’s NASAMS and the Rheinmetall Oerlikon Skyranger Gun. The three companies demonstrated their system capabilities within a detailed war game, using multiple air defense systems to annihilate short-range and medium-range ballistic targets, while simultaneously conducting an anti-aircraft and anti-cruise missile operation.

The scenario successfully concluded with Rheinmetall’ systems automatically targeting and destroying moving and static small UAVs. Command and control capability was provided from a NASAMS fire distribution centre (FDC) together with a Skymaster system.

This concept came as Germany and Switzerland both issued requirement for a new Air Defense System. Switzerland issued a tender on September 21, 2018, to the Company Rafael for the David's Sling, to France for the Eurosam SAMP/T and to United States for the Patriot. All three Companies will have to send their offer by the end of March 2019.


Rheinmetall's Oerlikon Skyranger Gun Mobile 35 mm Air Defence Gun, based on the Boxer 8x8 multirole armoured vehicle personnel carrier

Unveiled during Eurosatory 2018, the Oerlikon Skyranger Gun is a high-mobility, highly effective, future-proof wheeled armoured air defence vehicle based on the battle-tested Boxer, born and bred for network-enabled operations.

The heart of the new Oerlikon Skyranger Boxer is the air defence module, equipped with an Oerlikon Revolver Gun Mk3 turret. The system features an integrated sensor unit with X-band tracking radar and electro-optical sensors as well as electronic warfare components. This enables swift, autonomous engagement of externally assigned targets.

The Skyranger can receive and process target data from both 2D and 3D search radars. Furthermore, the integrated search sensor technology and Oerlikon Skymaster battle management system give the Skyranger an autonomous sector-monitoring and target engagement capability. The tried-and-tested 35mm x 228 cal. Revolver Gun delivers massive firepower and excellent precision. Teamed with Rheinmetall’s proprietary Ahead airburst ammunition, the Oerlikon Revolver Gun Mk3 is extremely effective against low altitude aerial targets of virtually every type.

The GDF009 EO twin-gun air defense system is a new modification of the 35-mm anti-aircraft guns manufactured in 1961 and purchased no less than 36 countries. The GDF009 EO in the standard configuration consist of two 35-mm automatic cannon Oerlikon KDC with a rate of fire of 550 rounds per minute per gun. It fires 35 x 228 mm standard projectiles and has an effective range of 4,000 m in the air defence role. Target information is fed to the weapon by an associated fire-control unit (FCU) such as the Oerlikon Skyguard, with a Skyguard FCU typically managing two GDF-009 AAGs.
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[*] posted on 3-10-2018 at 08:48 PM


MBDA Mistral ATLAS missiles on ACMAT VLRA 2 delivered to Georgia

Posted On Tuesday, 02 October 2018 13:24

On 1 October 2018, events took place at Aleksevka Air Base near Tbilisi on the occasion of Georgian Air Force Day in the presence of Georgian Prime Minister Mamuka Bakhtadze and Georgian Defense Minister Levan Izoria, and the Chief of Staff of the Georgian Armed Forces, Major General Vladimir Chachibaya.

During the events, the Mistral Atlas short-range air missile systems manufactured by MBDA was displayed on French-made ACMAT VLRA 2 vehicles.


MBDA Mistral ATLAS short-range anti-aircraft missile systems on Arquus ACMAT VLRA 2 chassis received by Georgia. On the left: TRS Ground Master GM403 on Renault Trucks Defense chassis. Aleksevka, 1st October 2018. (Picture source: Ministry of Defense of Georgia)

On 15 June 2015, the Georgian Ministry of Defense had concluded contracts with France for an amount exceeding 100 million euros for the purchase of air defense systems. A € 56.14 million contract with ThalesRaytheonSystems (TRS, a joint venture between the American company Raytheon and the French group Thales) provided for the delivery of a mobile ground-based warning radar to detect and monitor Ground Master GM403 air targets, and two mobile radars for mid-range detection of Ground Master GM200 air targets, as well as Thales mobile air defense command posts.

The second contract, worth more than 50 million euros, was for the supply of MBDA Mistral ATLAS anti-aircraft missile systems (initial report on Georgia's acquisition of the French air defense system MICA VL). The Mistral MANPADS is a short range (6.5 km) air defence weapon system, firing the Mistral, latest generation fire-and-forget missile (infrared homing). It features a lightweight man-portable launcher. It can easily be transported and operated from the ground, a vehicle, a building or a ship. It is normally operated by a gunner and a crew commander. However, if the mission is carried out in a simple tactical environment, it can be operated by one single soldier.

The Mistral itself is a man-portable, fully digital, heat-seeking missile, designed to meet the requirements of all branches of the armed forces. It boasts a 97% proven success rate and higher reliability than any other existing low-level air defence missile. The high-explosive warhead, which contains high density tungsten ballswarhead, weighs 2.95 kg. The missile flies at 800 m/s, approximatively Mach 2.6 (high supersonic).

The Mistral ATLAS dual launchers purchased by Georgia are installed on Arquus VLRA 2 chassis in 4x4 version.The French company Acmat, now belonging to Arquus, developed a top-class family of 4x4 and 6x6 tactical vehicles. The ALTV is air transportable by plane and suitable for parachuting. Many versions of this 3.5-tonne gross weight, 4-wheel drive liaison vehicle are available. The 1.3-tonne payload capacity enables up to ten people to be carried. The ACMAT ALTV can be fitted with weapons support, mounted to the back sides of the vehicle, as 12,7 mm machine gun circular station, 7,62 mm swivel stations or 40 mm grenade launchers. The ACMAT Defense ALTV has an extremely robust chassis, designed for mobile light army and police units. The vehicle is motorized with a 2.5-liter turbodiesel coupled to a manual gearbox with 6 forward and 1 reverse, or automatic gearbox with 5 forward and 1 reverse. The ALTV can reach a maximum speed of 170 km/h with a range of 1,600 km.

The implementation of the contracts with Georgia was delayed for political and financial reasons. It was not until 2017 that the French leaders gave their agreement for its implementation, following which the French bank Societe Generale granted a loan to Georgia of about 100 million euros. euros to finance contracts. Authorization for the shipment of the equipment was given in Paris in early 2018.

The GM403 Ground Master was the subject of a first military exhibition on 26 May 2018 on the Freedom Square in Tbilisi as part of the 100th anniversary of the proclamation of Georgia's independence; it has just been exposed again on October 1 in Aleksevka. The Ground Master GM200 radar, which is part of the Air Defense Command, was first shown in Aleksevka on 31 May 2018. The equipment supplied under this contract is mounted on an Arquus chassis (ex-Renault Trucks Defense) type K in 8x8 version.
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[*] posted on 4-10-2018 at 06:51 PM


Ukrainian Remote-Controlled ZU-23 Autocannon

Posted 1 min ago in Daily News, Defense, News by Hrachya H with 25 Comments



On September 21, Oleksandr Turchynov, the Secretary of the National Security and Defence Council of Ukraine, took part in an event where the latest developments of the Ukrainian defense industry were demonstrated. Among a variety of new and upgraded weapon systems and vehicles (helicopters, armored vehicles, UAVs etc.), they also revealed a remote-controlled conversion of the ZU-23 autocannon.



ZU-23 is a twin-barrelled 23mm autocannon initially developed for anti-aircraft use. More than half a century after its development, this autocannon is still in service in the armed forces of post-Soviet and many other countries. Although it is not too useful against modern military jets, it can be very successfully used against UAVs. Also, this autocannon is widely used in the Ukrainian and Middle Eastern conflicts as an anti-materiel and anti-personnel weapon system. With an extremely high rate of fire (2,000 rpm) and quite a potent cartridge, it is a devastating tool for the mentioned applications.



By designing the remote control conversion of the ZU-23 autocannon, Ukrainian arms designers probably try to further adapt this weapon system to the requirements of the modern warfare. According to the Ukrainian officials who demonstrate this weapon in the video embedded below, a single operator can control up to six remote-controlled ZU-23 autocannons. Apparently, the manual operation is still retained and upgraded, too.

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/gSRGRhxBzgs?t=102

Another tendency observed in the current wars is the almost exclusive use of the ZU-23 autocannon in a mounted configuration. If you watch combat footage from the Ukrainian or Syrian conflicts, you’ll see that these autocannons are mostly mounted on pickup trucks, BMP and MTLB chassis etc. Mobile ZU-23 autocannons are even more effective anti-materiel and anti-personnel weapons. So the mobility became pretty much a must-have feature for this weapon in the modern combat. That being said, I think this new remote-controlled version of the ZU-23 autocannon could possibly be even more effective if mounted onto an unmanned ground vehicle.
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