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[*] posted on 13-12-2018 at 11:05 PM


Saab Receives Order from Ireland for RBS 70 Missiles

(Source: Saab; issued Dec 12, 2018)


The Bolide supersonic missile provides a de facto upgrade for the RBS-70 short-range air-defense system, seen here is Swedish service fitted with a night sight. (Saab photo)

Saab has received an order for RBS 70 BOLIDE missiles from Irish Defence Forces, the total order value is approximately 60 MSEK and deliveries will take place in 2019-2022.

Ireland has been a RBS 70 customer for more than 30 years; this order contains the BOLIDE missile, which is latest missile available for the RBS 70 system.

“With this order Ireland continues to improve their air defence capability. The BOLIDE missile is our most advanced RBS 70 missile yet, with a top speed of Mach 2 and an effective range for up to 9000 meters, it provides excellent protection for their forces and a deterrent to opponents”, says Görgen Johansson, Head of Saab business area Dynamics.

The Saab portfolio of short-range ground-based air defence missile systems includes the RBS 70 and the latest version, RBS 70 NG. The RBS 70 system has an impressive track-record on the market with more than 1,600 launchers and over 17,000 missiles delivered to nineteen countries.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 14-12-2018 at 09:46 PM


Lockheed Martin readies its latest L-band radar for production

Geoff Fein, Washington, DC - Jane's International Defence Review

13 December 2018


TPY-X is Lockheed Martin's next-generation long-range multimission radar. The company has completed the final full-scale prototype and is readying the radar system for production. Source: Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin has completed the final full-scale prototype of its TPY-X multimission ground-based radar system and is now preparing to begin production.

TPY-X was developed as part of Lockheed Martin's long-term vision of continuous support and service for its existing long-range surveillance products, addressing obsolescence and enhancing performance as the threat has evolved.

The L-band radar is scalable, has a modern digital architecture, a distributed architecture with digital beam forming, and uses gallium nitride semiconductors. The radar will be available in fixed and mobile variants. It is transportable via C-130 or C-17 cargo aircraft, truck, rail, or helicopter.

TPY-X is designed to provide increased performance against smaller threats in the clutter and electromagnetic attack environments that ground-based radars operate in, Mark Mekker, director of next-generation radars for Lockheed Martin, told Jane's .

Since initially introducing the radar in mid-2016, Lockheed Martin has completed several designs and releases of system builds at various levels, he said.

"Each one was used to flush out improvements for performance and manufacturability as part of our affordability initiatives," he said. "The final version provided what was needed to begin the production process for initial release."

For its new radar, Lockheed Martin leveraged development and production radar programmes that offered direct-use technology, such as the leveling legs and rapid emplacement capability from the TPQ-53 radar system, Mekkor said.

Lockheed Martin continues to utilise the prototype TPY-X system to validate and qualify hardware designs leading into a production release. The system also serves as an asset to use as software baselines are finalised.

"We can use the actual AESA [Active Electronically Scanned Array] antenna to test our SW [short-wave] functionality and control instead of relying on models and simulations," Mekker said.

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[*] posted on 18-12-2018 at 07:37 PM


The Swiss Army Knife of Radars: the KuRFS radar does it all and all at once

(Source: Raytheon Co.; issued Nov 02, 2018)


Designed and built by Raytheon, the KuRFS AESA radar is being deployed as part of a counter-unmanned aircraft system. It can use the expendable Coyote UAS, KuRFS becomes a hit-to-kill kinetic interceptor against small, consumer-sized drones. (Raytheon photo)

Raytheon's KuRFS radar uses advanced electronically scanned array, or AESA, technology to provide precise, persistent surveillance of airborne objects.

A small object takes flight, picks up speed, turns and heads south — directly toward a U.S. military base.

It could be anything from a guided rocket to an explosive-strapped quadcopter. Back at the post, a Ku-band, or KuRFS radar detects and tracks the object so soldiers can make the call: It’s nothing to worry about. Just another bird.

One of the radar’s many important jobs is to know the difference.

“It’s like a Swiss Army knife with all the components out and being used at once; the corkscrew, the knife — everything,” said Don Williams, manager of Raytheon’s Multifunction RF Systems product line. “The Army recognizes it as a true multi-mission radar because, unlike other radars, which can do multiple things but not at the same time, KuRFS does them all simultaneously.”

Designed and built by Raytheon, KuRFS is an advanced electronically scanned array, or AESA, radar that uses the ku-band frequency for precision tracking. One of its main missions is to provide nonstop surveillance of airborne objects, while another is to sense incoming threats such as rockets, artillery or mortars and warn soldiers so they can take cover.

The radar is being deployed as part of a counter-unmanned aircraft system for the battlefield. When paired with Raytheon’s small, expendable Coyote UAS, normally an intelligence and surveillance drone, KuRFS becomes a hit-to-kill kinetic interceptor that can take out small, consumer-sized drones.

The U.S. Army has taken the unique combination a step further, putting Coyote and KuRFS on an armored vehicle to create a mobile defense system. In addition, Raytheon has successfully integrated the radar into or tested it with a 50-caliber gun, the AI3 interceptor, land-based Phalanx weapon system and more.

“Soldiers will now be able to take this defense against drones into the field with them, in addition to having it on their base,” Williams said. “Drone threats are spiking and becoming more creative, and they’re hard to see. That’s one reason why this radar is so important.”

In August and September, KuRFS also cued targets during a test with Raytheon’s high-energy laser weapons systems.

“Before the laser system can destroy small drones from far away, it first needs to be able to know they are there,” said Dr. Ben Allison, product line director for Raytheon high-energy laser weapons systems. “KuRFS provides cue accuracy at long range. That level of precision, paired with the ability to simultaneously track multiple targets, makes high-energy lasers more lethal.”

Perhaps the best trick up KuRFS’ sleeve is its ability to add more tools for future needs. In 2009, the Army put out an urgent request for a way to better warn about incoming rockets and mortars; just 19 months later, KuRFS went from Raytheon idea to deployed product.

Raytheon met the timeline by scaling down the larger Ka-MRFS radar, using open-architecture software, tapping its vast pre-existing line of radars for proven parts like processors, and adding new technology taken from its internal research and development efforts.

The result was KuRFS. Today’s version includes several upgrades over the original, and the radar system itself is nearing its millionth hour of operational time. As such, it’s become a prime example of how the Army’s vision for faster development of adaptable technology is already taking place.

“We talk with the Army users on a regular basis, and they tell us what else they now need it to do,” Williams said. “One cool factor with this setup is that we can now develop and deploy a critical, software-based capability to them in just three months, instead of the year it used to take. It makes all the difference to keeping soldiers on the ground safe.”

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[*] posted on 19-12-2018 at 02:39 PM


Indian Army issues global RFI for 938 air-defence guns

Rahul Bedi, New Delhi - Jane's Defence Weekly

18 December 2018

SMART 3P ammo means 40mm cannons does it not?

The Indian Army (IA) has invited responses by 17 January from foreign manufacturers to its request for information (RFI) for 938 air-defence guns and 505,920 rounds of ammunition to plug an operational gap in its inventory.

The RFI, which was issued on 27 November, requires the ammunition to comprise 342,720 high-explosive rounds and 163,200 Smart 3P all-target rounds.

The air-defence guns, which must not weigh more than 5,000 kg, are required to fire 300 rds/min and be able to engage aerial targets to a range of more than 4 km and an altitude of 2,500 m.

They should also be able to engage targets moving at speeds of 500 m/s and above, and have a “minimum hit probability of 0.6 during an engagement cycle”.

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[*] posted on 19-12-2018 at 03:12 PM


Saab Receives RBS 70 NG Order for the Czech Republic’s Armed Forces

(Source: Saab; issued Dec 18, 2018)


Saab’s RBS 70 NG short-range air-defense system fires during a demonstration for the Czech armed forces, which have now awarded an initial contract for this system. (Saab photo)

Saab has signed a contract to supply the Armed Forces of the Czech Republic with RBS 70 NG, the latest generation of the RBS 70 man-portable air defence system. The order is valued at 365 MSEK and deliveries will take place in 2020 and 2021.

In addition to the system itself, the order also includes integration with Czech Air Defence, test equipment and training. The Armed Forces of the Czech Republic is already a user of RBS 70, the preceding version of the system.

“We are happy to provide the Armed Forces of the Czech Republic with Saab's newest short-range air defence system; RBS 70 NG. The fact that a NATO country decides to invest in Saab’s RBS 70 NG system is the best possible assessment it can get and proof that Saab is a leading provider of Air Defence solutions,” says Görgen Johansson, Head of Saab business area Dynamics.

“We are very pleased with our experience of the RBS 70 System and Saab´s support. The RBS 70 is the backbone to provide surface-based Air Defence in NATO´s Multinational Task Force and from 2019 a part of the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF). The completely new RBS 70 NG entails crucial system developments which significantly will add to our current capabilities for threats against Czech Republic and NATO´s sovereignty”, says Ján Sedliačik, Commander of 25th Air Defence Regiment, Czech Armed Forces.

Automatic tracking, extensive operator aids, the possibility of the firing sequence to be aborted (missile self-destruct), hit-point selection, possibilities to identify friend or foe, and optical target tracking all increase an RBS 70 NG operator's chance of striking the correct target, while also significantly increasing safety during critical actions. The RBS 70 NG operator has full control over what and where the missile hits or does not hit, which eliminates the risk of friendly fire.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 19-12-2018 at 04:54 PM


Russia wants back in on India’s gun and missile system competition

By: Vivek Raghuvanshi   15 hours ago


A picture shows a Russian Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft defence system at the Russian Hmeimim military base in Latakia province, in the northwest of Syria, on December 16, 2015. The Indian army said a Pantsir system did not quality for a competition for a gun and missile system currently underway. (Photo credit should read PAUL GYPTEAU/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW DELHI — Russia has lodged a protest over India’s decision to disquality its two munitions systems from the $1.6 billion Army program, spurring newfound tensions between the two allies.

During a meeting of the India-Russia Inter-Governmental Commission on Military Technical Cooperation in New Delhi Thursday, visiting Russia Defence Minister Gen. Sergei Shoigu made clear his displeasure about the upgraded Tunguska system and a system from Pantsir being kicked out of the pending program, a source from the India Ministry of Defence confirmed.

In October, the Indian Army officially declared Hanwha Defense Systems of South Korea as the only qualified company for the gun and missile system program. In the 2013 global tender, Indian Army shortlisted three companies — Hanwha Defense Systems, which offered its Hybrid Biho system, and Russian companies Almaz Ante, which offered its upgraded Tunguska system, and KBP Tula, which offer its Pantsir system. During the IRIGC-MTC, Gen. Shoigu accused the Indian Army trial teams of purposely not completing the full trials last year. A Russian diplomat said on condition of anonymity that the two defense companies and the Russian defense ministry issued separate letters to MoD last month to reevaluate the entire selection process before making a final call.

However, a senior Indian Army official said both the upgraded Tunguska system fielded by Almaz Ante and Pantsir by KBP Tula systems were not fully compliant during the trials. The program calls for procurement of five regiments, or 104 systems, of gun missiles systems, including 4,928 missiles and 172,260 rounds of ammunition costing $1.6 billion. The winner will have to provide full maintenance technology transfer for missiles to state-owned Ordnance Factory Board. The proposed gun and missile system should have a day and night camera functionality and a built-in simulator, and the gun should engage a target at 350 rounds per second, while the missile should have a range of five kilometers. The system should be able to operate up to 50 kilometers on a single fuel tank, and should have a minimum operation endurance of eight hours without refueling.

The Indian Army is looking for a mix of both gun and missiles mounted on one or separate high mobility vehicles. In addition, the gun as well as the missile should be able to engage aerial targets both with and without the fire control radar, either independently or simultaneously.
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[*] posted on 21-12-2018 at 03:34 PM


Czech Republic signs for RBS 70 NG

Robin Hughes, London - Jane's Missiles & Rockets

20 December 2018


The RBS 70 NG manportable VSHORAD system will replace the legacy S-10M systems in ACR service, and complement its existing RBS 70 capability. Source: Saab Dynamics

The Czech Republic Ministry of Defence (MoD) has signed a SEK365 million (USD42.3 million) contract with Saab Dynamics to acquire the new RBS 70 NG manportable very short-range air defence (VSHORAD) system.

The contract, signed on 18 December at the headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Czech Republic's (Armáda České republiky: ACR) 25th Air Defence Missile Regiment/ 252nd Air Defence Missile Group in Strakonice, provides for the delivery of 16 RBS 70 NG systems with the Bolide laser-beam riding surface-to-air missile, and includes integration with existing Czech air-defence assets along with the provision of test equipment and training. Deliveries of the new RBS 70 NG systems from Saab will begin in 2020 and will be finalised in 2021.

The Czech MoD issued a request for proposals in March 2017 to evaluate a replacement solution for its legacy S-10M systems - the local designation for the Russian 9K35 Strela-10 (SA-13 'Gopher') low-altitude, short-range surface-to-air missile systems. Responses were received from Saab (RBS 70 NG), Raytheon (FIM-92 Stinger), MBDA (Mistral), and PGZ of Poland (Piorun). In July 2017 the MoD confirmed that it intended to acquire the RBS 70 NG system within the "next three years".

The RBS 70 NG procurement is part of a wider Czech defence acquisition initiative unveiled in June 2018 by ACR Chief of the General Staff, Lieutenant General Ales Opata, which allocates CZK100 billion (USD4.5 billion) to what he described as the largest military modernisation programme in the history of the Czech Republic.

Under the provisions of the 18 December contract, Saab will integrate the RBS 70 NG system with the ACR's ReVISOR X-band 2D 360° short-range surveillance radar, and the ACR's RACCOS mobile command-and-control (C2) system. The ReVISOR sensor, which can detect and track airborne targets out to ranges of 30 km at altitudes of up to 16,404 ft (5,000 m), is produced by local company Retia, which also manufactures the RACCOS C2 system.

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[*] posted on 26-12-2018 at 04:12 PM


It looks like the Philippines Airforce has chosen the Israeli SPYDER GBADS-MR system as it's new ground-based missile defence system, formal contract to be announced soon.

This will use both PYTHON 5 and DERBY MR missiles, although there is talk about them also buying SR systems and missiles.

These two missiles will also be procured for, and used by the FA-50 LIFT/light fighters, although whether standard Python 5 and Derby or the extended range versions, is open to question at the moment.............


Above shows the missiles that can be used by the SPYDER ADS: From left to right: Python 5 short range IIR missile and Derby medium range missile both of which are used by the SPYDER-SR system; the Python-5 MR and Derby-MR which are both used by the SPYDER-MR system. The Stunner missile is another type of missile that can be fired by a modified SPYDER-MR system and is used in the David's Sling ABM system. Definitely a future capability worth looking at by the PAF and AFP in general. Photo taken from Deagel.com.
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[*] posted on 27-12-2018 at 03:21 PM


Philippines has selected Israeli SPYDER as new air defense missile system

POSTED ON WEDNESDAY, 26 DECEMBER 2018 10:39

According to the Blog Mintfo, Philippines has selected the SPYDER from Israel as new ground based air defense systems (GBDAS) for its armed forces. The SPYDER (Surface-to-air PYthon and DERby) is an Israeli-made short and medium range mobile air defence system developed by the Company Rafael Advanced Defense Systems with the collaboration of IAI (Israel Aerospace Industries).


Rafael Spyder MR medium-range air defense missile system at Paris Show, June 2013. (Picture source Army Recognition)

The SPYDER (Surface-To-Air Python & DERBY) is a quick reaction, low level surface-to-air missile system designed to counter attacks by aircraft, helicopters UAVs and precision guided munitions. The system provides effective protection of valuable assets, as well as first-class defense for forces located in the combat area.

SPYDER incorporates RAFAEL's most advanced, proven performance air-to-air missiles - the Derby active radar (RF) missile and Python-5, a dual waveband Imaging Infra Red (IIR) missile. The SPYDER family includes SPYDER-SR (Short Range) and SPYDER-MR (Medium Range) systems.

The SPYDER's truck-mounted Missile Firing Units (MFU) are equipped with both IIR and RF missiles. The MFU carries any combination (IIR/RF) of missiles on a rotatable launcher assembly. The system's high mobility allows quick deployment and operational agility. SPYDER has 360° day/night all-weather engagement capability. The system can also engage multiple threats simultaneously. It has Lock-On-Before Launch (LOBL) and Lock-On-After Launch (LOAL) modes of operation. SPYDER’s intercept envelope spans from less than 1km to 15 km against targets flying at altitudes between 20 m and 9,000 m.

The SPYDER-SR (Short-Range) is a combat-proven, quick reaction, low level surface-to-air missile system designed to effectively counter attacks by aircraft, helicopters UAVs stand-off weapons and precision guided munitions. The SPYDER-SR provides excellent protection of valuable assets, as well as first-class defense for forces located in the combat area.

The SPYDER-MR Medium Range Air Defense Missile System (MRADMS) shares SPYDER-SR’s cutting-edge technology. The SPYDER-MR engages and destroys the same wide spectrum of threats at medium ranges. SPYDER-MR protects high-value assets (capital areas, air force bases, etc.) as well as maneuvering combat forces.
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[*] posted on 2-1-2019 at 11:10 PM


PEMZ from Russia first export contract for Samum 23mm anti-aircraft vehicle

POSTED ON WEDNESDAY, 02 JANUARY 2019 11:35

The Podolsk Electromechanical Plant (PEMZ) has signed the first export contract for its new Samum self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG), Designer General of the system Umahan Umakhanov told TASS.


Samum 23mm anti-aicraft vehicle at Army-2017 defense exhibition near Moscow, August 2017 (Picture source Army Recognition)

We have a partner for the Samum program, and the plant has already signed the first contract for the system," said Umakhanov. According to him, potential foreign customers have already shown keen interest in the new SPAAG. "We are conducting negotiations over the acquisition of the Samum with some 12 countries through JSC Rosoboronexport, a subsidiary of Rostec," said Umakhanov.

The Samum SPAAG is primarily intended for special forces. "The vehicle is armed with an upgraded ZU-23-2 twin-barrel anti-aircraft gun that is being produced by the PEMZ. The system provides sufficient fire support and can shoot down low-flying aerial targets, including multirole combat aircraft, helicopters, and some types of unmanned aerial vehicles [UAVs]," said Umakhanov. The Samum can also engage air-droppable targets, ground and surface soft-skin or light armoured targets, and manpower. "The optical-electronic suite of the Samum allows the system to operate in automatic, semi-automatic, or manually controlled modes," said the designer.

The Samum is mounted on a 4x4 wheeled chassis that is armed at Level 3-5 GOST (protection against 5.45 mm, 5.56 mm, and 7.62 mm steel core and armor-piercing bullets). The vehicle has retained its conventional cab that has three workseats for the crew. The updated ZU-23/30M1-4 anti-aircraft gun is mounted in the rear. The SPAAG carries an ammunition load of 1,000 armor-piercing, high explosive-fragmentation, and shrapnel rounds. According to the PEMZ, the Samum is 5,000 mm long, 2,750 mm wide and 2,700 mm high and weighs some 6,500 kg. The SPAAG can transport a 1,500-kg payload. The all-terrain vehicle has a wheelbase of 3,100 mm, a wheel track of 2,600 mm, and a ground clearance of 500 mm. The SPAAG is powered by a 200-hp engine, producing a speed of up to 160 km/h and a cruising range of some 1,000 km.

According to Umakhanov, the Samum features high target acquisition and engagement performance. "The system can detect aerial targets at a distance of no less than 8 km. The SPAAG engages an aerial target flying at an altitude of up to 1,500 m and at a distance of up to 2,500 m," said the designer.



The Samum is armed with the ZU-23/30M1-4 anti-aircraft gun that is a deeply upgraded variant of the venerable ZU-23-2 23 mm twin-barrel automatic cannon. "Unlike the baseline weapon, the updated anti-aircraft gun is fitted with a digital fire control system and optical-electronic sensor suite. We have developed two modifications of the gun, namely, an artillery variant [ZU-23/30M1-4] and a modification armed with a twin launcher for the Igla-family surface-to-air missiles," said Umakhanov.

According to the designer, the upgraded ZU-23-2 is in high demand on the global arms market. "In 2011-2016, we delivered more than 200 upgraded ZU-23-2 weapons to a foreign customer. We have a contract, under which we should ship 20 such systems in 2019," said Umakhanov. A source from the PEMZ told TASS that a MENA (the Middle East and North Africa) country had contracted 600 upgraded ZU-23-2s. The PEMZ can produce the weapon at a rate of 100 items per year.

The upgraded ZU-23-2 anti-aircraft gun features very high cost-effectiveness ratio, the designer pointed out. "The modernized weapon can engage new types of targets, such as UAVs, and it fires less expensive 23 mm rounds," said Umakhanov.

He emphasized that the PEMZ had conducted a deep modernization of the baseline gun. "The proportion of new components integrated with the ZU-23/30M1-3/4 reaches 75-78%. The system is being produced at the plant, and subcontractors supply only 5% of the weapon`s components, namely, electronic units," said Umakhanov

© Copyright 2019 TASS / Army Recognition Group SPRL .
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[*] posted on 3-1-2019 at 01:53 PM


Laos displays Chinese-made Yitian, or Tianlong 6, air defense missile system

POSTED ON WEDNESDAY, 02 JANUARY 2019 13:16

The Lao People's Army has begun its extensive modernization through the purchase of a new generation of weapons and equipment originating from many different countries, namely Chinese-made Yitian (Tianlong 6) air defense systems.


Yitian (Tianlong 6) SHORAD missile defense system (picture source: Army Recognition)

In addition to Russian-made weapons such as the Yak-130 trainer and the T-72B "White Eagle" main battle tank, the proportion of Chinese weapons in the Lao Army is also increasing. Since the Lao special forces soldiers marched with carbine QBZ-97B, this changing trend has also been mentioned, followed by "surprise" to reveal CS/SH1 self-propelled self-propelled guns. And most surprisingly, recently in the parade preparation for the 70th day of the army's establishment, the Yitian low-range air defense missile system (Tianlong 6) appeared.

The Yitian anti-aircraft missile complex consists of a combat module mounted on a 6x6 WZ-551 armored vehicle chassis built by NORINCO (China). The system is equipped with 8 Tianlong 6 short-range surface-to-air missiles, which is a modified version of the air-to-air missile TY-90 (Sky Swallow-90) with an effective range of 300-6,000m, high combat operation 4,000 m. The shooting for the TY-90 is a fairly passive, multi-phase array radar placed on the top of the operational module, the armored WZ-551 chassis still retaining a heavy 12.7 mm machine gun for self-defense. The Chinese-made Yitian low-range anti-aircraft missile systems are rated to be more technically superior to the existing Strela-10 in the military service in both range and accuracy of radar. The Lao People's Army will however not eliminate the Strela-10 used in parallel with Yitian. Both systems will be the two vehicles that play the role of protecting the lineup of armored units.
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[*] posted on 5-1-2019 at 06:48 PM


Laser Weapons Ready as China Creates Cutting-Edge Military Hardware

(Source: China Daily; issued December 28, 2018)

The newest members of China's military arsenal are a host of laser weapons, as the country makes a serious commitment to cutting-edge hardware.

China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp, the nation's largest missile maker, has developed a road-mobile laser defense system called the LW-30, which the company is promoting to international markets.

The LW-30 uses a high-energy laser beam to destroy targets ranging from drones and guided bombs to mortar shells. It features high efficiency, rapid response, a good hit rate and flexibility, according to CASIC.

An LW-30 combat unit is composed of one radar-equipped vehicle for communications and control on the battlefield, at least one laser gun-carrying vehicle and one logistical support vehicle.

The laser gun can be deployed with close-in weapons systems and air-defense missiles to form a defensive network free of blind spots, the company said.

It said that in a typical scenario, the LW-30's radar will scan, detect and track an incoming target before transmitting the information to the laser gun. The gun will analyze the most vulnerable part of the target and then direct a laser beam onto it. Destruction takes place in a matter of seconds.

Fast-moving targets such as guided bombs and mortar shells are difficult to intercept with most types of existing weapons because they are too fast to be caught and usually come in large quantities, said Wu Peixin, an observer of advanced weaponry in Beijing, adding that while advanced air-defense missiles are capable of hitting such targets, it is unreasonable to use an expensive missile to bring down a bomb or shell.

"Therefore, a laser gun is the most suitable weapon to defend against these threats," he said. "Every military power in the world has been striving to develop laser weapons. They have bright prospects in the international arms market."

In addition to CASIC, other State-owned defense conglomerates are ready to take their laser weapon systems to market.

China Shipbuilding Industry Corp, the world's largest shipbuilder, has made another vehicle-mounted laser weapon that integrates detection and control devices and the laser gun in one six-wheeled vehicle. Observers said the system should be fielded to deal with low-flying targets such as small unmanned aircraft.

China South Industries Group, a major manufacturer of ground weapons for the military, is trying to attract buyers for its mine-clearing laser gun, which is carried by a light-duty armored vehicle. Designers said the system is able to dispose of land mines from a distance, avoiding hazards to personnel.

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[*] posted on 8-1-2019 at 02:29 PM


Russia Screws Up Korea’s Arms Sales to India (excerpt)

(Source: Korea Joongang Daily; published Jan 04, 2019)

By Lee Keun-Pyung

The Russian government is attempting to slam the brakes on Korea’s sale of 3 trillion won (around $2.66 billion) in anti-aircraft arms to India, according to official sources in Seoul.

The Indian military selected a Korean-built anti-aircraft system as a candidate for acquisition last October after a bidding process involving a number of foreign arms makers as part of a recent plan by New Delhi to upgrade its air defenses.

The weapon in question - the K30 Biho - was developed by Korea’s Agency for Defense Development in 2013 as a short range anti-aircraft and anti-missile system. In the bidding process, it beat out an upgraded Tunguska-M1 model built by the Russian state-owned defense company Almaz-Antey and the Pantsir missile system from the Russian KPB Instrument Design Bureau. The K30 Biho was judged the most capable of dual purpose use as an anti-missile and anti-aircraft defense system.

If a final contract is signed for the acquisition of the K30 Biho - paired with the surface-to-air Chiron missile developed by the Korean aerospace manufacturer LIG Nex1 - India plans to deploy the system by 2020 along a point on its border with Pakistan where five brigades are stationed.

The bidding was first officially announced in 2013, and the candidate weapons were evaluated throughout 2015 and tested in 2017. The Korean defense industry was eyeing the Indian market as a chance to move away from domestic sales to exports. The contract involves exporting 104 Biho systems, 97 ammunition carriers, 39 command vehicles, 4,928 missiles and 172,260 rounds of ammunition, bringing the contract’s total value to 2.5 to 3 trillion won. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Korea Joongang Daily website.

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.asp...

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[*] posted on 15-1-2019 at 02:00 PM


Saab Receives RBS 70 NG Order from the Brazilian Army

(Source: Saab; issued Jan 14, 2019)

Saab has signed a contract with the Brazilian Army for deliveries of RBS 70 NG – the latest generation of the RBS 70 man-portable air defence system.

In addition to the RBS 70 NG system, the order also includes training systems, camouflage systems and other associated equipment. This is the Brazilian Army’s first order of the latest RBS 70 NG version and marks a significant upgrade to their air defence capability. Their existing RBS 70 inventory has been in service with the Brazilian Army since 2014. The system had a big role in 2016 as it was a part of the protection of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“We welcome the Brazilian Army as our latest customer for the RBS 70 NG. We see their decision to continue to select us as clear proof of their confidence in Saab’s state of the art air defence solution. The RBS 70 NG offers a day/night capability, unjammable laser guidance and an automatic target tracker that ensures the missile hits its target,” says Görgen Johansson, Head of Saab business area Dynamics.

The Saab portfolio of short-range ground-based air defence missile systems includes the RBS 70 and the latest version, RBS 70 NG. The RBS 70 system has an impressive track-record on the market with more than 1,600 launchers and over 17,000 missiles delivered to nineteen countries.

This order was booked during Q4 2018.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 19-1-2019 at 08:41 PM


Saab Signs Support Contract for Land-based Radars with the UK

(Source: Saab; issued Jan 18, 2019)


A Saab Giraffe AMB land-based radar operated by the British Army. (Saab photo)

Saab has signed a contract with the UK Ministry of Defence for support and services related to the land-based Giraffe AMB radar systems. The contract period runs from 2019 to 2024.

The contract includes provisions to supply spares, repairs, maintenance and Field Service Representative (FSR) services as well as design assurance and configuration management. Saab will carry out the work on site at Baker Barracks in Thorney Island, UK and at Saab in Gothenburg, Sweden.

“Top-tier support is an important part of Saab’s offer. Our support offer has in-built flexibility to enable high readiness and availability as well as long-term sustainability. We are proud to assist the British Army with further enhancing their air situational awareness” says Anders Carp, Head of Saab’s business area Surveillance.

Saab’s multi-function Giraffe AMB radars have been in operation with the UK armed forces since 2007, contributing both to force protection through the detection of incoming rockets, artillery shells and mortars and to air situational awareness and air defence on operations and at public events.

The UK’s fleet of land-based Giraffe AMB, the largest in the world, has been upgraded to the latest build standard, with features including Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode 5 and integration with the Link 16 data network. The radars will support the Land Environment Air Picture Provision (LEAPP) as part of the future Sky Sabre system.

Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions within military defence and civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents around the world. Through innovative, collaborative and pragmatic thinking, Saab develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

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[*] posted on 22-1-2019 at 02:20 PM


Finland orders ELM-2311 C-MMR radars from IAI Elta Systems

Yaakov Lappin, Tel Aviv and Nicholas Fiorenza, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

21 January 2019

Finland is ordering ELM-2311 Compact Multi-Mission Radars (C-MMRs) from Israel Aerospace Industries’ (IAI’s) Elta Systems division, Jane’s learned on 21 January.


Finland is procuring ELM-2311 C-MMR radars from IAI’s Elta Systems division. (IAI Elta Systems)

The Finnish Ministry of Defence (MoD) announced on its website on 11 January that Defence Minister Jussi Niinistö had tasked the Defence Forces’ Logistic Command to procure counter-battery radars from IAI Elta Systems. The number of systems was not disclosed, but the ministry said they would also be used for fire observation and air surveillance.

Deliveries are scheduled for 2021, according to the Finnish MoD, which added that the contract would include options for ordering an undisclosed number of additional systems and would cover training and spare parts.

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[*] posted on 24-1-2019 at 07:50 PM


704th Test Group Successfully Leads Directed Energy Experimentation Campaign

(Source: US Air Force; issued Jan 22, 2019)


The directed energy system emits an adjustable energy beam that, when aimed at airborne targets such as drones, renders them unable to fly. During tests in October 2018, it shot down small UAVs using high-power microwaves. (US Army photo)

KIRTLAND AFB, N.M. --- After the success of the first range experiment of the Directed Energy Experimentation Campaign at White Sands Missile Range, in October 2018, the 704th Test Group’s Directed Energy Combined Test Force is now planning future experiments in support of the campaign.

The Air Force Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation office at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, tasked the 704th TG Directed Energy Combined Task Force at Kirtland Air Force Base to execute the DE Experimentation Campaign. The task force is an operating unit of Arnold Engineering Development Complex, which is headquartered at Arnold AFB, Tennessee.

The Directed Energy Combined Task Force was developed after the secretary of the Air Force signed the Air Force Directed Energy Weapons Flight Plan, charting a course to transition DE weapons to operational users. Part of the flight plan, headed by the SDPE office, is to execute the DE Experimentation Campaign.

According to John Cao, director of the DE CTF, the objective of the initial DE experiment was to understand capabilities and limitations offered by existing, off-the-shelf high-power microwave and high energy laser systems against group 1 and group 2 unmanned aerial systems.

“The test scenario was air base defense against small unmanned aerial systems,” he said. “Two industry systems, one high power microwave and one high energy laser, were evaluated, with more than 220 vertical-lift and fixed-wing UAS sorties flown as threats.”

To obtain operator feedback, Air Force security force members from Kirtland AFB, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, and Edwards AFB, California, operated the DE systems.

“Valuable data were collected to address the experiment’s objective,” Cao said. “Now we’re in the planning stages of conducting more DE experiments.”

The DE experiments are meant to provide further understanding on how DE capabilities can be used and progressed.

“The Department of Defense has demonstrated that DE weapons can negate threats,” Cao said. “However, transitioning the DE technology is a different story. We must also understand concept of operations, tactics, techniques and procedures along with the potential implications to doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, facilities and policy. The campaign’s primary goal is to understand these areas.”

Col. Scott Cain, AEDC commander, recently praised the work being done by the DE CTF team.

“The 704th Test Group’s Directed Energy CTF did a phenomenal job representing the Air Force Test Center and demonstrating their leadership in the Directed Energy experimentation at White Sands Missile Range,” he said. “Mr. John Cao, the Directed Energy CTF Director, led a live counter-UAS test demonstration to multiple senior executive service and general officers from across the Air Force, and he gave a great talk on the CTF construct the 704th has built that's the engine behind this experiment.

“John and several others in the 704th, and one member of the 96th were singled out by Mr. Thomas Lockhart, SDPE Director, for their contributions to the experiment. I have received many compliments from the office of the Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition and the Air Force Research Laboratory, among others, on how the 704th is making another experiment happen for the Air Force.”

Brig. Gen. Christopher Azzano, Air Force Test Center commander, said the 704th TG is “synonymous with ‘experimentation.”

The 704th TG has also supported other SDPE experimentation campaigns, such as the Air Force Light Attack Experiment, a series of trials using light aircraft in attack roles.

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[*] posted on 13-2-2019 at 01:14 PM


South China Sea Countries Boost Air Surveillance

Feb 13, 2019 Marhalim Abas | Aviation Week & Space Technology

Step by step, Southeast Asian countries are improving their air defense surveillance. The Philippines military is finally regaining an ability to monitor the country’s skies with ground radars, while Indonesia is planning more such sensors, and Thailand is updating its equipment. Singapore has deployed an aerostat that should serve as an economical supplement to airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft.

A need to keep an eye on China’s aircraft, as that country seeks to annex the South China Sea, is an obvious motivation behind the programs. But others include plans to set up air defense identification zones (ADIZ) and simply to replace old radars with better ones.

The Philippine Air Force will receive two air defense radars this year, says former chief Lt. Gen. Galileo Gerard Kintanar. They are likely to be the second and third of three Elta ELM-2288s ordered in 2016. The country is especially keen to monitor airspace around its main island, Luzon.

- More ground radars are on the way
- But AEW requirements are unfunded

Delivery of the first ELM-2288 in 2018 ended a quarter century for the Philippines without air defense radar coverage. Until 1992, it could rely on the U.S. for air surveillance, but then the Americans left. From that point until 2018, the Philippines used only civilian air traffic control radars to watch aircraft in and near its airspace.

Since 2013, the Philippines has had a requirement for at least two AEW aircraft. Indonesia initially needs at least six such aircraft, says that country’s armed forces chief, Air Marshal Hadi Tjahjanto. Neither country has provided funds for such equipment, but Saab has offered its Erieye system to both, suggesting it be mounted in converted turboprop airliners.


Thailand has ordered an undisclosed number of Indra Lanza long-range radars. Credit: Indra

Indonesia has ordered a locally developed 2D air-surveillance radar but has ambitions for many more sensors to watch its airspace. The immediate program, apparently including the indigenous sensor, requires five air defense radars and two passive sensors; air force chief Air Marshal Yuyu Sutisna pledged in early 2018 to make the acquisition. Since Sutisna’s other promise, to conclude the contract to buy eight Sukhoi Su-35 fighters, was quickly realized, prospects for funding the new surveillance sensors look good.

Tjahjanto said last year that 32 ground-based air defense radars were needed; this appears to be a longer-term requirement. The country has 20 radar-operating units, he says. Whether each unit has a long-range air defense radar is unclear, but the air force is known to operate at least 10 such radars and an unknown number of passive radio sensors that can locate emitting air and surface targets by triangulation.

Indonesia’s declaration of an ADIZ in March 2018 is a factor. The air force followed up the announcement by saying the ADIZ would imminently be expanded to cover the whole Indonesian archipelago, but this was unlikely to happen before the installation of new air defense radars. The initial ADIZ covers only the most populous Indonesian island, Java.

Singapore began using its 55-m-long (180-ft.) aerostat in November 2016. The unmanned balloon was built by U.S. manufacturer TCOM, and is reportedly fitted with an Elta radar. Floating as high as 600 m, it is tied to a mooring station and built to withstand strong winds and lightning strikes. The government has said the aerostat will watch maritime as well as air targets.

Singapore already had four G550 CAEW air-surveillance aircraft built by Gulfstream and Israel Aerospace Industries, raising the question of why it needed the aerostat. An obvious but unstated reason is that the aerostat can economically provide continuous coverage, though its survivability in wartime must be questioned. Alternatively, it may be imagined as a high-mounted and therefore far-seeing ground radar. From 600-m altitude, the sea-level horizon is 88 km (55 mi.) away, almost double the distance that could be achieved if a radar were emplaced on the highest point in Singapore, Bukit Timah Hill.

Thailand contracted Saab in August 2018 to upgrade an air command-and-control system, which has been operational since 2010 and links two Saab 340 AEWs, a force of Gripen fighters and ground-based radars. In the following month Spanish company Indra said the air force had contracted them to supply an undisclosed number of Lanza 3D long-range radars and another air command-and-control system. Why Thailand needs two such systems is unclear. The Indra contract includes training, spares and a warranty.

The Lanzas will probably replace BAE Systems S-743D Martellos and other radars bought in the 1990s. Thailand also operates at least two Northrop Grumman TPS-78 long-range surveillance radars; the latest was delivered in 2015.

—With Bradley Perrett in Beijing
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[*] posted on 13-2-2019 at 01:31 PM


Hypermodern Radar Systems Are New Eyes for the Army

(Source: Netherlands Ministry of Defence; issued Feb 11, 2019)


A Thales Nederland Multi Mission Radar (MMR) on a truck during the contract signing ceremony. According to Dutch media reports, the contract is worth between 100 million and 250 million euros. (NL Army photo)

Every second counts during military missions. A radar that detects and tracks enemy actions extremely quickly is therefore of vital importance. And that is exactly what the so-called Multi Mission Radar (MMR) can do. Today the army and Thales signed the contract for the delivery of 9 systems.

The MMR will become the new eyes of the army. The MMR sees and registers everything, from drones and unmanned reconnaissance aircraft to planes, helicopters and missiles. Thanks to its simplicity and high degree of automation, the radar saves a lot of time. This applies to training, installation on vehicles, but also the actual deployment. Within two minutes, the radar is installed and ready for use.

The development of this hypermodern radar was preceded by years of study and testing by specialists of both parties. It is the latest version of the Thales 4D AESA radar family which includes, for example, the Dutch Navy’s SMART-L radar. The MMR has been adapted for use on land.

Versatile and mobile

The MMR can be used for a large number of tasks: artillery support, 3D airspace surveillance and air defense. Also consider other security applications, such as locating weapons. The system can simultaneously detect, track and fully classify a large number of air targets. It can even distinguish individual tracks in a fire salvo. Its size has been limited by applying the most modern technologies, so the MMR is therefore particularly mobile and is easy to transport on a standard truck.

Decisive and future-proof

The Commander of Land Forces, Lieutenant General Leo Beulen, said: "The exact reference of the MMR can be decisive for winning battles at great distances. In addition, it strengthens the army’s air defense capabilities. This is possible because the system can respond to the constantly evolving air threat.

"It is all about so-called 'software-defined systems'. This means that they can be constantly updated on the basis of the latest state of missions, threats and technology. This makes them very future-proof.”

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[*] posted on 14-2-2019 at 09:17 AM


Netherlands orders Thales MMR

Matteo Natalucci, London - Jane's Defence Weekly

12 February 2019


The Dutch MoD announced on 11 February that it had awarded Thales a contract for the delivery of nine MMRs. Source: Thales

The Dutch Ministry of Defence (MoD) announced on 11 February that it had awarded Thales a contract for the delivery of nine Multi Mission Radars (MMRs). The radars are designed for artillery, air surveillance, air defence, and security applications, according to Thales.

The contract value was not disclosed, but the Dutch government gave a range of EUR100-250 million (USD113-282 million) in its November 2018 Defence Industry Strategy.

The radars will be delivered to the Royal Netherlands Army (RNLA) starting in mid-2021.

The MMR - marketed as the GM200 MM/Compact - is the latest version of the T- and S-band active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar family (like the NS100, NS200, and SM400) developed for ground applications including air surveillance, weapon locating, and counter-battery missions.

The MMR can be transported by truck and is claimed to be deployable within two minutes. The radar is fully automatic, designed to detect, track, and classify a large number of targets including rockets, artillery shells, mortar rounds, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), aircraft, helicopters, and cruise missiles. In the counter-battery role, the MMR is capable of distinguishing the individual tracks in a salvo firing, according to Thales.

Thales said the system is 'future-proof', able "to keep pace with changes in missions and threats".

"Due to its unique true multi-mission capability, the MMR will not only set the conditions for winning battles at long range by accurate target acquisition, the MMR will also enhance the RNLA air-defence capability by addressing the evolving air threat, including rocket, artillery, and mortar and unmanned air systems," said RNLA Commander Lieutenant General L J A Beulen.

This project is part of the 'Nederland Radarland' platform launched in 2002 to ensure the coherency of radar research by the Dutch science and technology community, and alignment and co-ordination of research programmes to achieve maximum synergies.

(326 of 391 words)
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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 08:43 AM


IDEX: MBDA PRESENTS ATLAS-RC/LIC2ORNE AND MISTRAL COMBINATION

MBDA is promoting the ATLAS-RC/LIC2ORNE combination at IDEX this week. Used in tandem with the MISTRAL short-range air defence missile, the combination offers substantial protection to mobile units, carried on light armoured vehicles while also integrating into the theatre air defence network.

The MISTRAL is an extremely reliable fire-and-forget air defence missile, with a success rate of nearly 95%. Equipped with an infrared imaging seeker and advanced image processing capabilities, the missile offers excellent countermeasures resistance and can engage low thermal-signature targets such as UAS and turbojet-powered missiles at long range, in addition to the usual combat aircraft and helicopter targets.

The ATLAS-RC is an automated turret, carrying two ready-to-fire MISTRALs controlled from within the vehicle. It is equipped with day/night sensors for fire control and tracking.

LIC²ORNE is a command and control (C2) unit, developed from a set of software already proven on MBDA's MISTRAL and VL MICA air defence systems. It can coordinate up to 8 ATLAS-RC systems and connect them to higher-level command systems, including using advanced connections such as Link 16 or satellite links. With its ability to use radar or electro-optic sensors, LIC²ORNE ensures that the ATLAS-RC turret has sufficient early warning to make full use of the MISTRAL’s firing envelope.

Thanks to LIC²ORNE's open architecture, MBDA has been able to build in defences against mini- and micro-UAS in just a few months. These defensive systems can now protect the firing unit against terrorist actions or asymmetric attacks.

“Drawing on the lessons of recent conflicts in Europe or the Middle East, the ATLAS-RC/LIC²ORNE combination is designed to provide a real air defence and engagement capability in the lower layer, while ensuring very high mobility to accompany and protect mobile detachments and front-line units. The deployment of an air defence system as close as possible to ground units is once again becoming a necessity, and a key survivability factor for ground forces,” explained MBDA’s Military Advisor, Land Systems, Francis Bordachar.


ATLAS-RC makes use of the MISTRAL fire-and-forget air defence missile. (Photo: MBDA Systems)

Published: 18 February 2019
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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 02:18 PM


MBDA Packs Fully Integrated Air Defence Capability on Light Armoured Vehicles

(Source: MBDA; issued Feb 17, 2019)


By combining its Mistral fire-and-forget anti-aircraft missile with the Atlas RC/Licorne fire-control system into a single unit, MBDA can provide permanent and autonomous Shorad capabilities to very small and very mobile units. (MBDA photo)

MBDA presents the Atlas-RC/LIC²ORNE combination which, together with the Mistral missile, provides a substantial protection to mobile units, while fully integrated into the theatre air defence network and portable on light armoured vehicles.

The Mistral is an extremely reliable fire-and-forget air defence missile, with a success rate of nearly 95%. Equipped with an infrared imaging seeker and advanced image processing capabilities, the Mistral offers excellent countermeasure resistance and can engage low thermal signature targets such as UAVs and turbojet-powered missiles at long range, in addition to the usual combat aircraft and helicopter targets.

The Atlas-RC is an automated turret, carrying two ready-to-fire Mistrals and controlled from the cabin of the vehicle. It is equipped with day/night sensors for fire control and tracking.

LIC²ORNE is a command and control unit, developed from a set of software components that have already been proven on MBDA's Mistral and VL MICA air defence systems. It can coordinate up to 8 Atlas-RC systems and connect them to higher-level command systems, including via advanced links such as Link 16 or satellite links. With its ability to use radar or electro-optic sensors, LIC²ORNE ensures that the Atlas-RC turret has sufficient early warning to make full use of the Mistral’s firing envelope.

Thanks to LIC²ORNE's open architecture, MBDA has been able, in just a few months, to build in defences against mini and micro UAVs. These defensive systems can now protect the firing unit against terrorist actions or asymmetric commando attacks.

“Drawing on the lessons of recent conflicts in Europe or the Middle East,” says Francis Bordachar, MBDA’s Military Advisor Land Systems, “the Atlas-RC/LIC²ORNE combination is designed to provide a real air defence and engagement capability in the lower layer while ensuring very high mobility to accompany and protect mobile detachments and front-line units. The deployment of an air defence system as close as possible to ground units is once again becoming a necessity, and a key survivability factor for ground forces."

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[*] posted on 19-2-2019 at 02:57 PM


IDEX 2019: Development of Denel Cheetah C-RAM, C-PGM missile on track

18 FEBRUARY 2019

Making its official debut at the 2016 African Aerospace and Defence (AAD) show in Pretoria, the Denel Cheetah C-RAM/C-PGM missile has already passed a number of important development milestones. The product can be integrated into the Oerlikon Skynex, Skyranger, Skyshield or Skyguard gun-based air defence systems made by Rheinmetall.


Cheetah C-RAM/C-PGM countermissile (Picture source: Army Recognition)

The Cheetah C-RAM/C-PGM missile constitutes an enhanced, highly effective force protection system for countering conventional, unconventional and terrorist attacks, specifically assuring low-cost neutralization of the threat posed by guided aerial bombs, mortars and rockets. The capability will be a major pillar of future full-spectrum air defence solutions such as the “Patriot and Below Concept” unveiled by a team comprising Raytheon, Kongsberg and Rheinmetall at the 2018 Air Defence Systems Group and Full Spectrum Air Defence conference in Switzerland.

In partnership with Rheinmetall Denel Munition, Denel Dynamics and Rheinmetall Air Defence and Radar Systems, the Cheetah missile is currently being developed as a countermissile to be deployed against RAM projectiles – rockets, artillery and mortars – often used by militias and terrorist groups.

These weapons are used in hit-and-run tactics which are difficult to counter and defeat. Moreover, recent conflicts like the one in the Donbas region in eastern Ukraine have shown that force protection against artillery rockets is an urgent priority, and the day when forces will have to fend off aerial guided bombs seems bound to come. Analysts at the three companies see a significant capability gap if the defence against RAM combined with aerial bombs and precision guided munition (PGM) becomes part of the future threat to be managed by ground-based air defence systems. Some countries are already factoring this into their requirements for future air defence systems.

A number of field tests at South African firing ranges have confirmed initial simulations of a new threat-defeating concept which will enable extremely high-precision, highly efficient engagement of incoming threats. High accuracy guidance and control coupled with a specialized warhead allows the missile to destroy hardened RAM and PGM targets.

Cheetah will be integrated into the inner layer of the Patriot and Below Concept, and queued in along with other inner-tier shooters from the overarching command and control system, generating the necessary situational awareness. Automated target assignment algorithms select the best effectors to engage targets in rapid succession. Cheetah will be available in containers of up to 60 missiles and can be integrated into mobile platforms such as trucks or armoured vehicles.

Working in conjunction with other inner-tier effectors such as future high-energy lasers and the famous 35mm Oerlikon guns using Rheinmetall’s proprietary Ahead ammunition technology, Cheetah will form part of a solid, ruggedized system for protecting vital assets, units on the move, and small areas from a full spectrum of symmetric and asymmetric threats at distances of up to 6 kilometres with maximum resistance against saturation. Larger targets such as fixed-wing and rotary aircraft can be engaged at distances of up to 10 km.

Rheinmetall Denel Munition, Denel Dynamics and Rheinmetall Air Defence and Radar Systems are currently finalizing a plan to achieve the technology readiness level TRL 4 with a first set of semi-dynamic warhead tests by the end of 2019, and are in discussion with various potential customers to secure the timeline for the reminder of the development programme.
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[*] posted on 21-2-2019 at 09:04 AM


IDEX 2019: ALIT displays small MANPADS for UAVs

Jeremy Binnie, Abu Dhabi - Jane's Defence Weekly

20 February 2019

China Aerospace Long-March International (ALIT) displayed what was labelled as the FN-M Multi-role Missile System at the IDEX show held in Abu Dhabi on 17–21 February.


The FN-M was displayed on the first day of IDEX, before its sight became disconnected from the launcher. (IHS Markit/Jeremy Binnie)

An ALIT official said it is primarily designed for shooting down unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), making it a manportable air-defence system (MANPADS).

The launcher has an optical sight for acquiring targets, at which point the missile seeker can be locked on before launch. The seeker uses a CCD camera rather than infrared to make it cheaper, the ALIT official said.

(110 of 134 words)
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[*] posted on 21-2-2019 at 08:12 PM


Russian SAMs get mobility [IDEX19D5]

21 February 2019



The Russian KBM Joint Stock Company (High Precision Industries Stand 09-C20, Russian Pavilion) is now marketing overseas its latest Gibka-S mobile air defence system. This is based on the Russian Tigr (4x4) light vehicle, which is already used in large numbers by the Russian Army for a variety of battlefield missions.

There are two elements to the Gibka-S: the 9A332 Combat Vehicle for MANPADS Squad and the 9S937 Reconnaissance and Control Vehicle for MANPADS Platoon Commander.

Mounted on the roof of the 9A332 is a retractable mast with four Verba or Igla-S fire-and-forget surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) in the ready-to-launch position. There are an additional four replacement SAMs carried internally for manual reloading or for being deployed in the normal ground air defence role.

The 9A332 has a crew of three consisting of driver and two air defence gunners, so in theory the system could potentially engage three targets at once. One 9S937 can control up to six 9A332 units and this is fitted with a roof-mounted radar scanner that can be lowered into the horizontal position when not required.

According to the KBM JSC, the 9S937 can receive information from a higher chain of command at ranges of up to 8km on the move and up to 17km while stationary.

In a typical target engagement, the 9S937 detects the target and then passes this information onto the best positioned 9A332 to carry out the engagement. Target engagement capability depends on the actual SAM, but Russian sources are claiming the Verba can engage targets operating at an altitude from 10m to 3,500m, and with a maximum engagement range of 6,000m.

(269 words)
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