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Author: Subject: Australian Army, 2017 onwards
unicorn
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[*] posted on 14-8-2019 at 01:14 PM


It's a justification from those who want to retain Tiger, no matter what, for any number of reasons



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[*] posted on 15-8-2019 at 07:02 PM


Well that could become the reality. If the Tiger Mk 3 is just an upgrade for the current version of Tiger ARH (Mk 2?) then it could very well tick the boxes for a replacement. Mk 3 has Link 16, better comms, blue force tracking etc. If the targeting and EO/IR and future ATGM capability is a good improvement over the current generation then it could get the nod. It would certainly be a much easier integration then getting a whole new fleet. Whether or not it would be as competitive as the Apache and if Airbus can meet the fairly aggressive IOC and FOC timelines is another story, my money is on no.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2019 at 09:26 PM


Apache and Cobra exist.

Tiger Mk 3 does not.

That will be enough.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2019 at 09:46 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Raven22  
Apache and Cobra exist.

Tiger Mk 3 does not.

That will be enough.


I fully agree, and nor do I expect that a Mk 3 would win, just adding that there are more than two choices.
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[*] posted on 23-8-2019 at 09:06 PM


Saab signs Australian Army support deal

Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - Jane's Defence Industry

23 August 2019

The Australian Department of Defence (DoD) and Saab Australia have signed an agreement to expand the company’s support for the Australian Army’s air defence, radar, and artillery systems.

Under the agreement, announced on 23 August, the DoD said it had consolidated Saab’s existing maintenance arrangements into one contract valued at about AUD30 million (USD20.2 million). The new deal, it said, runs for three years and will streamline operational support.

Saab said the new deal includes support for the army’s ground-based air defence (GBAD) and counter-rocket, artillery and mortar (C-RAM) systems, which are fielded by the Royal Australian Artillery’s 16th Regiment.

(124 of 298 words)
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[*] posted on 30-8-2019 at 01:21 PM


Airbus Helicopters offers Australia cost-effective Tiger for operations beyond 2040

Proposal will generate over AUD3 billion in savings to Australian Army and taxpayers



Brisbane – Airbus Helicopters is offering a cost-effective approach for taking the Tiger platform beyond 2040, in response to the Commonwealth of Australia’s (CoA) Request for Information (RFI) for the Project LAND4503 Armed Reconnaissance Capability. The RFI seeks solutions for the army’s future armed reconnaissance helicopter needs.

Airbus is the manufacturer of the tandem seat Tiger helicopters introduced to the Australian Army in 2004. Eighteen of the 22 units were assembled at the Airbus site in Brisbane, Australia. The fleet has been supported in Australia for more than 15 years.

The Airbus Helicopters proposal will offer the Australian Army and taxpayer with more than AUD3 billion in savings against the expected budget for LAND4503.

“Tiger is an extremely agile, effective, and digitally connected armed reconnaissance helicopter,” said Andrew Mathewson, Airbus Australia Pacific Managing Director.

“Since delivery, the Australian Tiger has matured into a fully operational army capability, and is integrated into the combined arms team. It continues to prove itself as an adaptable platform, and is now a key element of Australia’s amphibious capabilities on-board the Canberra Class Landing Helicopter Docks.”

Cost per flight hour of the Australian Tiger has reduced by more than 30 per cent, and the sortie success rate is currently sitting at above 95 per cent. It is these measures that are acknowledged in Australia and internationally as unmatched, and place Tiger in a compelling position.

“Airbus proudly delivers a strong Australian industry capability, including more than 260 local staff supporting Tiger,” Mathewson added.

The Tiger fleet has proven itself in diverse and extreme environments around the world with 120,000 flights hours logged by international operators, including more than 30,000 in Australia. It has provided support to counter insurgency operations in Mali, security operations in Afghanistan, and amphibious strike in Libya, operating reliably in the harsh extremes of heat and cold of the desert and in the maritime domain.

Globally, 181 Tigers have been delivered to Australia, France, Germany and Spain. First deployed by the French Army in Afghanistan in 2009, Tiger continues to demonstrate its essential role in theatres of operation as a highly versatile, stealthy, and manoeuvrable attack helicopter.
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[*] posted on 30-8-2019 at 02:09 PM


Quote:
“Since delivery, the Australian Tiger has matured into a fully operational army capability, and is integrated into the combined arms team. It continues to prove itself as an adaptable platform, and is now a key element of Australia’s amphibious capabilities on-board the Canberra Class Landing Helicopter Docks.”


:lol:

Can't blame him for trying, but they seem to be missing the point as to why the Army is running a project to replace them when they are only half way though their intended service life.

If Airbus Helicopters had the slightest clue how to fully optimise the platform, they'd have done it already and there wouldn't be talk of a replacement.




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[*] posted on 31-8-2019 at 09:39 AM


Tiger, Apache, Zulu square off for Australian deal

30 August, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Airbus Helicopters and Boeing have highlighted their pitches for Canberra’s planned acquisition of up to 29 armed reconnaissance helicopters.

Airbus Helicopters says it can take the “Tiger platform beyond 2040,” and save Australian taxpayers and the army over A$3 billion ($2 billion).

Boeing notes the long heritage of the AH-64E, and its upgrade roadmap through the late 2040s.

Both companies stressed local industrial opportunities.

The pair each issued a statement to mark the deadline for responses to a July request for information (RFI) issued by the Australian Department of Defence. The RFI related to Canberra’s Project LAND4503 Armed Reconnaissance Capability, which calls for the acquisition of up to 29 attack helicopters to replace the army's 22 Tigers.


An Australian Army Tiger landing aboard the HMAS Canberra.

“Tiger is an extremely agile, effective, and digitally connected armed reconnaissance helicopter,” says Andrew Mathewson, managing director of Airbus Australia Pacific.

“Since delivery, the Australian Tiger has matured into a fully operational army capability, and is integrated into the combined arms team. It continues to prove itself as an adaptable platform, and is now a key element of Australia’s amphibious capabilities on-board the Canberra Class Landing Helicopter Docks.”

Airbus Helicopters adds that the cost per flight hour has been reduced over 30%, and the sortie success rate is above 95%.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” says Terry Jamison of Boeing Defense, Space and Security. “As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Bell highlighted the AH-1Z's ability to embark on ships.

"The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinized attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations," says Bell. "Marinization is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinization begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations."

The July RFI foresees deliveries commencing in the mid-2020s.

Initial Operational Capability (IOC) with a squadron of 12 helicopters is planned for Australia's 2025-2026 fiscal year, with Final Operational Capability (FOC) of up to 29 examples due in 2028-2029. Of the 29 helicopters, five would be located separately and used for training.

The RFI stresses that the helicopter be a mature platform, thereby reducing programme risk, with the three primary missions being reconnaissance, attack, and security. It places a strong emphasis on areas such as expeditionary capability, specifically the ability to operate from ships.

Updated with quote from Bell regarding AH-1Z.
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[*] posted on 1-9-2019 at 02:20 PM


Australia’s new armoured vehicles must operate from the north

30 Aug 2019|John Coyne and James Rickard



Article: https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/australias-new-armoured-ve...

It’s been 12 months since former major general and senator Jim Molan locked horns with ASPI’s Marcus Hellyer in the Strategist over armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs). Both put some great arguments forward, and the matter has rested there since.

However, recent discussions with Depfence Department officials indicate that the Australian Army 1st Brigade’s LAND 400 phase 3 vehicles are likely to skip Darwin for Adelaide so that they can be used year-round warrant a return to the issue.

In an August 2018 article in The Australian, Hellyer suggested that AFVs might be ‘ill-suited to tasks that feature heavily in modern counterinsurgency operations, such as route clearance and patrolling’, and highlighted their vulnerabilities on the conventional battlefield. He made a strong case that AFVs may be ‘poor value for the likely tasks the ADF will have to perform in the future’.

Later, Molan argued that AFVs have proven their worth, in terms of both winning conflicts and saving soldiers’ lives, through hard-earned experience on the battlefield.

These arguments are particularly relevant now as two contenders will soon be shortlisted for the army’s new infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs).

In 2011, the army released Plan Beersheeba, which sought to create three combined-arms multi-role combat brigades. Each brigade was to comprise two infantry battalions and an armoured cavalry regiment, ‘with organic armoured, cavalry and mounted combat lift capabilities along with the usual supporting element of artillery, signals, combat engineers and combat service support units’.

The army is more cognisant than ever that even in low-threat environments, non-state actors like insurgent groups and terrorists have the technology to seriously threaten Australia’s current armoured capabilities.

The LAND 400 program will provide the Australian Army with the means to reshape and reorganise its combat formation. The army is acquiring new IFVs to improve safety and minimise casualties across all conflict scenarios, while simultaneously providing increased firepower to operate in concert with tanks in offensive operations.

Former defence minister Marise Payne opened a request for tender for phase 3 of the LAND 400 program in August last year. The $10–15 billion project aims to replace the army’s ageing M113 armoured personnel carriers with a fleet of up to 450 state-of-the-art IFVs and 17 manoeuvre support vehicles.

The tender sought vehicles with high levels of protection, mobility and lethality. It also required the vehicle to be tracked, have the capability to carry a section of eight soldiers, and be able to engage in combined arms manoeuvres with Australia’s M1 Abrams tanks.

Three brigades will be equipped with vehicles from phases 2 and 3 of LAND 400. But rumour has it that 1st Brigade’s IFVs will likely be based in South Australia, where they can avoid Darwin’s wet season and train all year.

Professor Paul Dibb’s 1986 review of defence capabilities highlighted that when it came to Australia’s north, the army needed forces that could move quickly and effectively, with minimum logistical support and some fire support. It’s little wonder, then, that the first capability to be moved north after Dibb’s review was the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, which was soon followed by the mechanised 1st Brigade.

It’s surprising that, three decades later, the unchanged environmental challenge of ‘the wet’ has become a justification for moving whole units and capabilities—such as the tanks of the 1st Armoured Regiment—south to Adelaide.

If wet season factors are driving any plans to divert 1st Brigade’s IFVs to Adelaide from Darwin, it must be asked whether the vehicles themselves are fit for purpose.

As a former soldier, Molan argues convincingly that ‘there can be no sound defence policy or strategy without sound tactics’. At the same time, however, tactics should not be the sole driver of policy and strategy decisions. In this case, it seems that the tactical and administrative challenges of raising, training and maintaining capabilities in northern Australia are driving decisions that run counter to good national strategy.

In today’s increasingly unpredictable strategic environment, we are more likely to find ourselves operating throughout our region than defending our nation from within our own borders.

That means the possibility of having to operate our armoured vehicles in the tropics is high. At the very least, the IFVs need to be able to operate across the length and breadth of Australia regardless of the season and the weather. Without that ability they’ll be of neither tactical nor strategic value.

If the army is saying that its IFVs wouldn’t be able to operate in our region for large parts of the year if they were in Darwin, or that they will only be able to be deployed on sealed roads, it’s hard to justify the project’s price tag.
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[*] posted on 2-9-2019 at 09:10 PM


It’s one Regiment dickheads... The rest are in Brisbane and Townsville... FMD these people are clueless...



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[*] posted on 4-9-2019 at 05:44 PM


Autonomy Pivotal for a Future Ready Australian Army

(Source: BAE Systems; issued Sept 03, 2019)

Locally developed autonomous technologies will enhance the Australian Army’s current armoured personnel carriers in a demonstration project that could take soldiers off future battlefields.

BAE Systems and the Australian Army will convert two M113 AS4 Armoured Personnel Carriers at its Edinburgh Parks facility by October using autonomous technologies developed by the company in Australia.

The project will see these vehicles used by the Army to conduct experiments to better understand the opportunities to employ autonomy on the battlefield and implementing its recently released Robotics and Autonomous Systems Strategy.

Autonomous vehicles on the battlefield could have a range of uses from intelligence gathering to logistics support.

Following the demonstration, the optionally crewed M113 AS4 will also be available for BAE Systems, and other Trusted Autonomous Systems Defence Cooperative Research Centre partners, to use as test and demonstration vehicles as the company continues development of world leading autonomous technologies through the CRC program.

The Trusted Autonomous Systems CRC was announced by the Australian Government in 2017 under the Next Generation Technologies Fund to deliver game-changing autonomous systems that ensure trusted, reliable and effective cooperation between people and machines during military operations.

BAE Systems is a founding member of the CRC and is the industry lead for Land Autonomy, working closely with Army and with Defence Science and Technology Group to ensure soldiers have what they need to be future ready on the battlefield.

BAE Systems Australia CTO Brad Yelland said: “Autonomous technology will assist soldiers to respond in an accelerating warfare environment - increasing their speed of initiative to outpace, out-manoeuvre and out-think conventional and unconventional threats.

“The Australian Army Robotic and Autonomous Systems Strategy highlights the goals that Army is seeking from this disruptive technology.

“Through this demonstration and the CRC program, we will help the Army achieve that.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 10:51 AM


Dropping in the Right Direction

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept 10, 2019)

Precision-guided airdrop will soon deliver a quicker and more accurate means of sustaining troops over long distances.

Combining steerable parachutes with GPS guidance, the next generation of joint precision air drop systems (JPADS) have been demonstrated in a joint trial between Air Force and Army.

Group Captain Nicholas Hogan, the Officer Commanding No. 84 Wing, said JPADS could land on a dropzone (DZ) the size of a cricket oval, or a road, depending on the delivery mode.

“Historically, DZs have been a cleared area the size of a small airfield, several hundreds of metres long, and at a fixed location,” Group Captain Hogan said.

“Using JPADS significantly increases the areas that ground forces can be resupplied from, which increases their manoeuvre if they’re beyond the range of other resupply methods.

“Ground commanders can also easily control JPADS whilst it’s in flight, effectively allowing them to move the DZ with them on the battlefield instead of being tethered to a fixed point.”

The trials were conducted from August 19-30 at RAAF Base Richmond, New South Wales, and a demonstration at RAAF Base Curtin near Derby in the north of Western Australia.

Led by the Air Force’s Air Mobility Training and Development Unit (AMTDU), the trials also involved members of No. 37 Squadron, the Army’s 176 Air Dispatch Squadron and the Army Logistics Training Centre.

Wing Commander Stephen Monypenny, the Commanding Officer of AMTDU, said a C-130J Hercules from Air Force’s No. 37 Squadron was used for the airdrop.

“We conducted three passes over two separate flights,” Wing Commander Monypenny said.

“The first pass delivered a 500-pound (226 kilogram) load, and the second pass delivered a combination of a 4000-pound (1814 kilogram) and two 2000-pound (907 kilogram) systems.

“We then repacked one of the 2000-pound systems and demonstrated its reusability by delivering it again on a second flight.”

The trial allowed parachute riggers and air dispatch personnel to pack, fit and support the loads, as well as provide an opportunity for aircrew to train in how to conduct mission planning for the new systems.

The systems trialled by Air Force and Army rely on existing parachute rigger and air dispatch expertise, with little additional training required to construct loads for their use.

Applied to a C-17A Globemaster, JPADS could allow for the delivery of time-critical cargo over intercontinental distances.

That includes urgently needed medical supplies or spare parts for plant equipment from Australia.

Alternatively, a C-27J Spartan or C-130J Hercules could fly intra-theatre missions from a forward air base in theatre, overfly terrain and surface-to-air threats, and sustain deployed units.

Air Force is looking to roll out JPADS capability in conjunction with 176 Air Dispatch Squadron, providing more options for supporting forces on the ground.

“All three systems were demonstrated in-field with same day repacking and airdrop capability without the need for external support,” Wing Commander Monypenny said.

“A new tablet allowed a ground commander to track and monitor a JPADS loads in flight.”

“This is able to accurately deliver bulk loads and equipment, whether it’s small packets or containers of consumables, rations, or ammunition,”

It can also carry heavier cargo like fresh water, fuel, or specialised equipment.

“As we conduct more clearances with this system, we can expand the envelope for its employment to include heavier loads,” Wing Commander Monypenny said.

“The 2000-pound system is ready for small-scale use, and the remaining systems are still being used for training but could be fielded wider in the next 12 months.”

The equipment manufacturers, Wamore and Complete Parachute Systems, were present at the trials.

A key element of the newer JPADS systems is their use of an Ambassador Modular Autonomous Guidance Unit (MAGU).

Designed to be interchangeable and sustained by a fielded unit, the MAGU enables a JPADS load to use a parachute to ‘steer’ to a bullseye on the dropzone.

Warrant Officer Class 2 Mathew Hawkins, a project officer with AMTDU, said a JPADS system equipped with MAGU could use a circular DZ, with an accuracy better than 150 metres with 80 per cent confidence.

“A key point of difference is that the JPADS can be dropped from an aircraft significantly higher and further away from the DZ, than if it simply airdropped the load from 1000 feet,” Warrant Officer Hawkins said.

“There is also flexibility to utilise a ‘roadway’ mode that is highly accurate to a given axis laterally, while less accurate in a longitudinal sense than ‘accuracy’ mode.

“Its usage potential is vast, with the flexibility of containerising small load items in existing container systems, and a payload range on the family of parachutes between 500 to 4000 pounds.”

“The loads have the same construction requirements as conventional airdrop, with the parachute configuration taking approximately the same time as conventional systems.”

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[*] posted on 12-9-2019 at 01:23 PM


Shape of what should have been?


Australian Army soldiers from 2nd Commando Regiment disembark a 6th Aviation Regiment Black Hawk helicopter at High Range training area near Townsville, Queensland, during joint training with United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter gunships as part of Exercise Talisman Sabre 19








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[*] posted on 16-9-2019 at 06:46 PM


Both CV90 and the AJAX derivative are out of LAND 400 Phase 3. Rheinmetall and Hanwha are left, see PDF below...….

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/ebe687fe800f7d0f2f28fa168/file...

KF41 versus REDBACK...……...interesting! :cool: :cool: :cool:
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[*] posted on 16-9-2019 at 06:53 PM


Holy shit, did not expect that! I was thinking at least the AJAX getting through, but wow, this surprised me.

Two excellent (on paper) unproven designs getting through, this just got really interesting.
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[*] posted on 16-9-2019 at 08:46 PM


I had tickets on Ajax.
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[*] posted on 17-9-2019 at 12:47 AM


I just hope, that what ever the Army gets, they have a practical means to disembark them from the amphibs, unlike our tanks.



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[*] posted on 17-9-2019 at 09:19 AM


Australia Selects Korean, German Industries for Next Gen IFV/APC Evaluation

By News Desk - Sep 16, 2019


KF-41 Lynx from Rheinmetall and AS-21 Redback from Hanwha are shortlisted to the final evaluation for the Australian Land 400 Phase 3 program.

The Australian MOD has shortlisted two companies for the Land 400 Phase 3 Risk Mitigation Activity (RMA) of the next-generation tracked infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) and armored personnel carriers (APC), to replace the Australian M-113s. The two contenders are Hanwha Defense System AS21 Redback and Rheinmetall Lynx KF-41.

LAND 400 Phase 3 is a $10-15 billion program which will recapitalize the M113 Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC) force of the Australian Army, with a combination of tracked IFV and APCs. The new family of vehicles will be better armed, highly protected and more efficient than the current M-113s. They will also be heavier and will rely on a new combat service support systems to sustain the battle.

Defence Minister Linda Reynolds said: “These advanced vehicles will provide new levels of protection, firepower, mobility, and enhance communications… When fully delivered the LAND 400 Program will allow the Army to successfully sustain mounted close combat operations against emerging and future threats, as part of an integrated Australian Defence Force”

The Lynx KF-41 is based on a brand new platform developed by Rheinmetall, which is operated by a crew of three and has the capacity to carry nine troops. It mounts the Lance 2.0 turret with 30-35mm automatic cannon, 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun. Rheinmetall can rely on the significant workshare already launched with Australian industries, and the Military Vehicle Centre of Excellence MILVEHCOE (facility) being established Redbank to support the Land 400 Phase 2 (Boxer) vehicle acquisition.

The AS21 Redback is also based on a new platform that integrates an advanced Australian designed and built turret that mounts a 40mm automatic cannon, 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun and provisions for active protection system (APS). The vehicle is operated by a crew of three and has the capacity to carry eight troops. Both vehicles have an operational range of 500 km, and a top road speed of 70 km/h. Hanwha has approached Australian companies and has already teamed with some, to develop the Australian configuration of AS21. While the power train and automotive elements would be delivered by the Koreans, Hanwha said it is open to local participation in the fields of armor, electronics, structural assemblies, and system integration for the AS21.

Defense Industry Minister Melissa Price welcomed the announcement and stressed the importance of Australian Industry Content (AIC) in the multi-billion recapitalization effort.

During the testing-phase Defence will work with the shortlisted tenderers to ensure small and medium enterprises across Australia have the opportunity to showcase their capabilities. Minister Price said.
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[*] posted on 17-9-2019 at 01:04 PM


A win for Australia's Bisalloy, both contenders have confirmed they will source steel from their Illawarra plant.

Bisalloy is in the running for steel for the Navy's ships and subs as well.




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[*] posted on 17-9-2019 at 07:34 PM


Rheinmetall Lynx KF41 Infantry Fighting Vehicle downselected for Australian Land 400 Phase 3 program

Posted On Tuesday, 17 September 2019 07:57

Rheinmetall confirms that its Lynx KF41 Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) has been selected by the Commonwealth of Australia to compete with Hanwha Defense' Redback IFV in the Risk Mitigation Activity (RMA) trials for the $15 billion LAND 400 Phase 3 program.


Lynx KF41, the competitor with Hanwha Defense' Redback IFV in Australia's LAND 400 Phase 3 programme (Picture source: Rheinmetall)

Lynx KF41 is a next generation tracked, networked and highly protected IFV which meets the stringent military requirements of LAND 400 Phase 3. The Australian Army needs a networked, protected and enabled IFV for close combat - to close in and defeat an enemy in the most dangerous and lethal environments for Australian soldiers.

Rheinmetall will deliver three Lynx IFVs to compete in RMA trials to be conducted in Australia. If successful, the Lynx IFV fleet will be manufactured in Queensland at Rheinmetall's new Military Vehicle Centre of Excellence at Redbank south west of Brisbane.

Rheinmetall Defence Australia Managing Director, Gary Stewart, said: "We welcome the Commonwealth's decision to select Lynx KF41 for the RMA trials and look forward to demonstrating the capability of our next generation infantry fighting vehicle. We believe Lynx is the best vehicle in its class for Australian needs and it sets new standards in protection, mobility, lethality and knowledge needed to survive and defeat any adversary.

Rheinmetall has developed this vehicle so it is positioned at an ideal level of maturity when Australia needs it to enter service in 2026 - and it has the inherent growth capacity and a growth path to extend these capabilities through its 40+ year life."

Rheinmetall is already delivering an Australian Industry Network for Land 400 that builds an industrial capability in Australia. This includes creating high technology enduring jobs for hundreds of Australians by localising design and manufacturing expertise in electro-optics, weapon systems, fire control and sensor systems, turret manufacturing, variant design and manufacture, integration, armour systems, simulation, training and fleet sustainment.

Ben Hudson, Global Head of Rheinmetall's Vehicle Systems Division, said: "We are delighted to have been selected in Australia for the next phase of this important program. Design, development and manufacture of the Lynx in Australia for the Australian Defence Force will build on the advanced manufacturing jobs at our new MILVEHCOE as well as a strong national industrial network of Australian small and medium businesses across Australia".

Rheinmetall is delivering 211 8x8 Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles (CRV) to the Australian Army from 2019 after the vehicle was selected by the Commonwealth after 12 months of RMA trials by ADF personnel in 2016-2017.

Both the Boxer and Lynx are modular. That means the vehicles can be reconfigured to achieve many different missions with high commonality. This allows for reconfiguration of the fleets for emergent operational needs, providing greater mission flexibility, reducing through-life costs, enabling faster introduction of new technology, and optimising ongoing fleet management.

"Rheinmetall has taken all of the significant benefits of BOXER and ensured they are part of the Lynx KF41 package," Mr Stewart said, "with significant commonality between the vehicle fleets. Extending our partnership with the Army and the Commonwealth to deliver the Lynx for Land 400 Phase 3 would deliver a fully integrated armoured vehicle fighting force for the ADF."
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[*] posted on 18-9-2019 at 09:46 AM


Hanwha Shortlisted for Australian Infantry Fighting Vehicle Program

(Source: Korea Herald; issued Sept 17, 2019)

South Korea’s Hanwha Defense said Tuesday it has been shortlisted for the Australian military’s multi-billion-dollar plan to replace its current ageing fleet of mobility vehicles with advanced capability.

According to the company, its AS21 Redback Infantry Fighting Vehicle is one of the two contenders for the Land 400 Phase 3 Program. Competing against Hanwha's Redback is German firm Rheinmetall Defence’s Lynx KF41.

The two companies' IFVs were selected over other global competitors such as CV90 from BAE Systems and Ajax from General Dynamics. The Australian military is expected to reach a final decision by 2021 after conducting two years of assessment.

“Being shortlisted for the Australian military project is a testament to our advanced defense technology and proactive commitment in the global market,” said Hanwha Defense CEO Lee Sung-soo.

Land 400 Program is A$15 billion (US $10.3 billion) project aimed to upgrade the Australian army’s mobility and reconnaissance vehicles. Under the program, up to 450 modern IFVs will be acquired to replace current M113AS4 Armored Personnel carriers.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 22-9-2019 at 04:44 PM


The reasons behind the Land 400 Phase 3 decision

By Julian Kerr | Sydney | 19 September 2019

Rheinmetall Defence’s KF41 Lynx Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) and Hanwha Defense’s AS21 Redback IFV have been shortlisted to compete against each other for the opportunity to provide Army with up to 450 tracked IFVs and 17 manoeuvre support vehicles.

Announcing the shortlist for Land 400 Phase 3 earlier this week, Defence Minister Linda Reynolds said the $10-15 billion project would provide Army with world-class levels of protection, firepower, mobility and enhanced communications.

“When fully developed the Land 400 program will allow Army to successfully sustain mounted close combat operations against emerging and future threats as part of an integrated ADF,” she said.

The IFVs will replace obsolescent M113AS4 Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs) that were upgraded in recent years but date from the mid-1960s.

The German and South Korean contenders defeated proposals by General Dynamics Land Systems, which pitched its AJAX armoured fighting vehicle, and BAE Systems Hägglunds, which proposed its CV90 IFV, in a Request for Tender (RfT) that closed in March.

According to informed sources, the AJAX was regarded as not fit for purpose, and the BAE Systems-Hagglunds CV90 was assessed as too expensive.

AJAX is entering service with the British Army while the CV90 is in service with seven user nations, four of them NATO members.

According to informed sources, the AJAX was regarded as not fit for purpose, and the BAE Systems-Hagglunds CV90 was assessed as too expensive.

The Phase 3 RfT listed only three essential requirements. These were the ability to carry six dismounts, the ability to be strategically deployed by the RAN’s two Canberra-class Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) amphibious ships, and the ability to be carried by RAAF C-17A Globemaster III strategic airlifters.

Minister for Defence Industry Melissa Price commented in a statement that Rheinmetall and Hanwha had been assessed as offering vehicles that were best able to meet Army requirements while offering value for money.

A key part of potential cost efficiency could be commonality with Project Land 400 Phase 2, under which Rheinmetall was contracted in August 2018 to supply Army with 211 8x8 Boxer combat reconnaissance vehicles (CRVs), the RfT stated.

Although the Lynx has yet to enter service, it deploys the same Lance 30mm digital turret as the Boxer. All but 25 CRVs will be manufactured at the Military Centre of Excellence being constructed by Rheinmetall at Ipswich as will the full production run of Lynx, should the type be selected.

Hanwha’s AS21 Redback is a heavily-upgraded version of the KT21 IFV that has been in service with the South Korean army since 2009. The platform is being offered with a new two-man T2000 30mm turret developed by Canberra company Electro-Optic Systems, and will benefit from close collaboration with Israel’s Elbit Systems on C4I systems integration.

Hanwha has undertaken to establish a self-reliant manufacturing base at Geelong for the Redback. This facility would also be used to manufacture the company’s K9 155mm self-propelled howitzer (SPH) that is believed to be under consideration for a sole-source acquisition of 30 SPH for the recently-revived and renamed Land 8116 Protected Mobility Fires Requirement.

In welcoming the Lynx’ shortlisting, Rheinmetall stressed the type’s significant commonality with Boxer and the vehicles’ modularity, allowing the reconfiguration of both fleets for emergent operational needs.

For its part, Hanwha emphasised the Redback’s integrated active protection systems, comfortable space for eight dismounts, and the origin of its technologies “from countries where capabilities are needed to defeat constant real-world threats.”

Other companies involved have also made statements emphasising their potential contributions.

"EOS Defence Systems is exhilarated by this announcement and the opportunity it provides to demonstrate to our home customer the advanced technology and skills that Australian industry can deliver," Grant Sanderson, EOS' CEO of Defence Systems, said.

Meanwhile the vehicle mobilisation element of a Risk Mitigation Activity (RMA) that will begin later this year had been extended from six to 12 months, Defence stated. This would provide the shortlisted tenderers with a more reasonable timeline in which to manufacture and prepare test vehicles to the configuration required.

Each contender will be funded to provide three platforms for the RMA. One of each will be tested to destruction to assess survivability.

“Concurrent activities and workshops will also be undertaken in order to clarify and refine the offers to mitigate risk to the Commonwealth (and) Stage 2 is anticipated to conclude around the end of 2021,” Defence said.

Submission of best and final offers would be followed by final evaluation, with a full contract award expected in 2022.

Initial operating capability is anticipated in 2024-25 and final operating capability is planned for 2030-31.

Read more at https://www.australiandefence.com.au/news/the-reasons-behind...
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[*] posted on 23-9-2019 at 12:16 PM


For what it's worth, this comment was made by a correspondent on Sturgeon House...……...sounds like it could be the case?


Quote:

In the land domain, ADF has generally been very conservative (ASLAV was forced onto it by then MINDEF, M113 upgrade, LR for decades, upgrading the EF88). This decision is a bit of a surprise.

There was was no way K21 would’ve met the blast & protection requirements of L400-3. “Redback” is an almost-new design. Who exactly was “disappointed” by the K21? ROKA?

GDLS fell into a (seemingly common) trap made by UK-staffed entities (the team for 400-3 was overwhelmingly UK/Brit) in Australia: “we know best.”

There was a marked reluctance to accept Australian requirements and input, for cost/design reasons, but also because of (imo) arrogance. Even the ramp vs. back door discussion took longer than it should’ve. The customer has been operating tracked APCs with ramps since 1965 - they know what works for them.

Then there’s the 40mm AGL piece: the customer just struggled through Land 40-2 (vice 400-2) to select the Mk47, proposing a solution that used the H&K GMG (i.e. the losing solution to 40-2, regardless of the fact that the British Army bought it) was both dumb & tone deaf.

Further; the coax - the 7.62mm chain gun coax makes sense in the UK context (Warrior & AJAX) but makes zero sense in the ADF context. A MAG58 would’ve made a lot more sense. Even Rheinmetall realised offering a MG3, MG4, or MG5 wasn’t a good move, offering the MAG58 coax instead.

AJAX seemed to get caught up in their own hype & it bit them.
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[*] posted on 23-9-2019 at 01:53 PM


I was stunned by this comment.

"According to informed sources, the AJAX was regarded as not fit for purpose..."







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the lips acquire stains,
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[*] posted on 24-9-2019 at 07:30 PM


Australia takes delivery of first new Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles

Posted On Tuesday, 24 September 2019 07:23

The .50cal RCWS looks like a 22 on the Boxer...……...:lol: :lol: :lol:

The first of the fleet of new Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles (CRV) Boxer for the Australian Defence Force has been unveiled at a ceremony on 24 September 2019, at Enoggera Barracks in Brisbane. The 211 new Boxer 8x8 CRVs will be delivered by Rheinmetall Defence Australia under the $5 billion LAND 400 Phase 2 Mounted Combat Reconnaissance Capability program.


Australian Minister for Defence Senator the Honourable Linda Reynolds CSC, at the acceptance ceremony for the Australian Army’s first Boxer vehicle at Enoggera Barracks, Brisbane. (Picture source Australia MoD)

Australian Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said the new Boxer armored vehicles, with their high levels of protection, firepower and mobility, will provide a world-class capability to the Australian Army. Minister Price also announced an additional seven small businesses that have been contracted by Rheinmetall as suppliers for the first 25 Boxer vehicles.

This brings to a total of 12 small businesses across Australia who will contribute to the Boxer program, ensuring the delivery of these vehicles is a national enterprise. The first 25 vehicles will be assembled in Germany and delivered to Australia as part of technology transfer activities to familiarise Australian workers and suppliers on the specific manufacturing techniques of these vehicles.

The remaining vehicles will be assembled at Rheinmetall’s Military Vehicle Centre of Excellence facility in Redbank, near Ipswich, using companies located across Australia.

In August 2019, Germany’s Rheinmetall announced the signature of a €2.1 billion (Au$3.3 billion, $2.27 billion) contract to supply Australia with 211 Boxer wheeled armored vehicles. The Australian Defence Force will introduce several variants of the Boxer 8×8 vehicles including 133 of the reconnaissance variant with the Lance turret system and 30mm automatic cannon, according to Rheinmetall.

Delivery of the Boxer vehicles will take place between 2019 and 2026, with the first expected to be available for training in 2020. More than 40 Australian companies will be included in the program, the company added.

In March, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, Minister for Defence Marise Payne and Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne announced the Au$5.2 billion (€3.3 billion, $4.1 billion) acquisition, the largest ever for the Australian Army.

The Australian Government will spend Au$5.2 billion to acquire 211 Boxer vehicles, which will replace the Army’s current aging Australian Light Armoured Vehicle fleet.

The Boxer is a German-Dutch multirole armored fighting vehicle designed to accomplish a number of operations through the use of installable mission modules. It is produced by the ARTEC GmbH (ARmoured vehicle TEChnology) industrial group, and the program is being managed by OCCAR (Organisation for Joint Armament Cooperation).

The Lance turret was developed by the German Company Rheinmetall featuring a new modular design. Its main armament is normally a Rheinmetall MK30-2/ABM 30mm automatic cannon, though similar weapons of this type may also be used. Up to 200 rounds of two different types of ammunition can be loaded without leaving the safety of the fighting compartment. A 7.62 x 51mm or .50 cal. machinegun serves as secondary armament.
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