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Author: Subject: Ship-launched Missiles
buglerbilly
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[*] posted on 22-5-2017 at 12:45 PM
Ship-launched Missiles


IAI Signs Another Significant Deal in India: Will Supply $630 Million Worth of LRSAM Air & Missile Defense Systems to Indian Government Company BEL

May 21, 2017



Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) announced today it has been awarded an additional, $630 million- contract for supply of LRSAM air & missile defense systems for four ships of the Indian navy. The contract will be carried out, for the first time, with Indian government company BHARAT ELECTRONICS LIMITED )BEL), which serves as the main contractor in the project as part of India's "Make in India" policy. Prior to signing the contract, the System was successfully tested last week in India as part of operational interception trial aboard India's navy ship, demonstrating again the System's operational capabilities in a representative scenario with genuine target.

The trial scenario started with the launch and engagement of the target. The MFSTAR radar aboard the Indian naval ship has identified the air-borne threat and has tracked it over its flying course. The data was sent to the command center of the weapon system which launched the intercepting missile into orbit. Having been successfully launched, the missile has navigated itself to the target. During its flight, it engaged the target, aligned its course, hit it and destroyed it. All components of the weapon system have successfully met the goals set to them.

Joseph Weiss, IAI president and CEO, said, "The new contract adds to other deals signed in the last decade by IAI with India's defense forces, reinforcing IAI's global leadership position in air and missile defense systems. The inclusion of Indian governmental company BEL for the first time, is a step up in our relationship with the Indian industry as part of the 'Make in India' policy. This unique project represents the close collaboration between India's DRDO, IAI and the defence forces of both countries. We will proceed to implementing it with joint efforts."

Boaz Levi, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Systems, Missiles & Space Group said: "We take pride, along with our partners in India, in the great results of the trail conducted last week, which reestablishes the System's reliability and quality as well as its advanced technological capabilities. IAI is in an accelerated process to supply the various air and missile defense systems to the client. We will continue to support our partners in India in advancing the industry and security of both countries."

LRSAM is an advanced air and missile defense system, a unique joint development by IAI and India's Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) in collaboration with IAI subsidiary ELTA, RAFAEL, various Indian companies including BEL, L&T, BDL and other private Indian companies. The system comprises several key state-of-the-art elements, advanced phased-array radar (MFSTAR), command and control system, launchers and missiles with advanced RF seekers. The system provides the ultimate protection against a variety of aerial, naval and air born threats and is operational with the Indian Air Force, Indian Navy and Israel Defense Forces and in the near future with Indian Army.
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[*] posted on 6-6-2017 at 01:56 PM


Navies must focus on auto EW systems to survive hypersonic missiles, says expert

By: Andrew Chuter, June 5, 2017

LONDON — Naval forces will need to rely on more automated electronic warfare systems if warships are to survive an attack by hypersonic missiles, according to an expert scheduled to speak at the EW Europe conference in London on June 8.
 
Future hypersonic weapons engagements will present scant warning cues to platforms, and will be delivered so fast that traditional man-in–the-loop responses will be unable to cope, according to Paul Bradbeer, the electronic warfare operational support sales manager at MASS, a leading British company in the field. 

Bradbeer is expected to tell conference delegates at the EW Show, which opens here June 6, that the key to countering this emerging threat will be to use machine learning to automate EW responses.
 
This, he's to say, maximizes such defensive capabilities by exploiting every piece of information available to the platform: establishing and filling platform information gaps, using data to locate your position in another’s kill chain, and then taking effective action to disrupt the kill chain. 
 
“In future, we will need machines to interpret these indicators and assess the likely sequence of events. The response could involve machine-led reconfiguration of combat systems and initiation of countermeasures,” Bradbeer said, speaking ahead of the show opening. 
 
The problem is that some platforms, such as warships, rely on legacy command-and-control systems that are often based on human thinking, decision-making and communication — thereby increasing the risk from new and evolving threats, said the executive.
 
Some navies are aware of the threat, but Bradbeer told Defense News “there needs to be more work done to address the problem.” 

Hypersonic missiles remain a development item at the moment, but work is advancing in China, the U.S., Europe, India and Russia to produce a weapon that would be a game-changer in its ability to defeat the defenses of naval and other targets.

India and Russia are collaborating in the development of the Brahmos II hypersonic weapon.
 
In April, the Moscow-based news agency TASS reported unnamed sources as saying Russia test fired a missile known as the Zircon at a speed of Mach 8, or 9,878 mph. 
 
No further details were given, although a later story claimed production of the weapon, initially destined for the Russian Navy, could start next year.
 
None of this has been officially confirmed, and Doug Barrie, the senior air analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, reckons Zircon’s speed profile at best is likely to be “barely hypersonic” at somewhere around Mach 5 or maybe even Mach 6. 
 
The broad rule of thumb is that below Mach 5 a weapon is supersonic, and above it is hypersonic, said Barrie. 
 
Bradbeer noted that as a general guide, some “future hypersonic missiles may be seven times faster than the threats we have dealt with in the past, and engaging from twice the distance.”
 
IISS' Barrie said the threat to high-value targets is further exacerbated by the possible attack profile of these new cruise weapons.
 
“Some of these cruise missiles could fly at 80,000 feet or more, an altitude most naval radars traditionally don’t bother to look [at],” Barrie said.
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[*] posted on 7-6-2017 at 04:44 PM


French Naval Cruise Missile Enters Service (excerpt)

(Source: Mer et Marine; posted June 06, 2017)


The French navy has quietly begun to deploy its first Missile de Croisière Naval (MdCN) cruise missile on its FREMM-class frigates. It will also arm French submarines, giving them a new land-attack capability that they presently lack. (FR navy photo)

The French Navy now has at its disposal a new sea-based deep-strike capability. The first MdCN naval cruise missiles quietly entered service in February as part of the combat systems carried by the force’s first FREMM multi-mission frigates.

Six FREMMs to carry cruise missiles by 2019

The French fleet will soon count three FREMM frigates armed with MdCN cruise missiles, the first of their type to be developed in Europe. The Aquitaine and Provence followed by the Languedoc which is scheduled to enter service in a few weeks. By 2019, these three will be joined by the Auvergne, the Bretagne and the Normandie. Each FREMM frigate will be equipped with two A70 eight-cell vertical-launch silos for a total of 16 MdCN missiles designed, developed and produced in France by MBDA.

The first cruise missile developed in Europe was fired for the first time by FREMM frigate Aquitaine in May 2015. This qualification firing was followed by other tests and trials until MBDA was in a position to deliver production missiles for operational deployment.

Designed to knock out remote land targets

The MdCN is based on the Scalp EG air-launched cruise missile now in service with Mirage 2000 and Rafale combat aircraft deployed by the French Air Force and Rafale Marine aircraft carried by the Navy’s Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier. The naval version is 7 metres long, including the booster, and weighs 2 tonnes. This fire-and-forget missile deploys its wings after leaving the launcher then flies at around 1,000km/h using multiple modes of navigation.

The guidance system combines inertial navigation, a radio-altimeter and a GPS receiver enabling the missile to fly a precise course at low altitude. During the approach phase, an IR seeker guides the warhead to within a metre or so of its target. The MdCN carries an advanced warhead designed to knock out strategic targets in hardened shelters.

While the weapon’s precise range remains a military secret, trade sources suggest that it is at least 1,000km. Vessels armed with MdCN missiles will be able to strike strategic targets deep inside enemy territory with unprecedented precision from a safe stand-off distance. For example, a ship off Cyprus could readily knock out a target near, say, Mosul in northern Iraq. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the Mer et Marine website.

http://en.meretmarine.com/french-naval-cruise-missile-enters...

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[*] posted on 21-6-2017 at 04:46 PM


Israel Tests Sea-Launched LORA Missile

By Tamir Eshel - Jun 20, 2017



Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) has successfully completed a firing trial with the Long-Range Artillery weapon system (LORA), marking as part of the demonstration and validation phases of the system, under a number of procurement programs involve the system. On this experiment, the missile was launched from a cargo ship toward a target at sea.



LORA is an artillery weapon system which consists of a long-range, tactical ground-to-ground missile developed by IAI’s MALAM division. It is intended for strike scenarios with a range of up to 400 km and boasts a precision range better than 10 meters.

The version tested was an operational, ground launched version, tested on a vessel to enable the Israeli company to demonstrate the weapon’s full range, in compliance with safety requirements for trails of this kind. The system on board consists of a command trailer and ground launcher. Following the launch, the missile has navigated its course to the designated location, striking the target with high precision. Both the weapon system and the missile have successfully met all objectives.

“This was one of the most complex trials we held over the past few years” Boaz Levi, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Systems, Missiles and Space Group commented. The trail was held according to a full operational outline, including an assessment of the system’s manoeuvring, terminal attack and precision. According to Levi, the impressive results attest for the system’s maturity and advanced capabilities.”

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/i52JUuT4dY0
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[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 01:27 PM


Newest SM-6 Interceptor Aces Final Land-Based Test, Moves to At-Sea Testing

(Source: Raytheon Company; issued June 20, 2017)

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, N.M. --- During its final land-based test, Raytheon's advanced Standard Missile-6 Block IA engaged and destroyed a subsonic target from the USS Desert Ship, a test site in southern New Mexico. The SM-6 Block IA will now enter the at-sea testing phase, bringing it closer to low-rate initial production later this year.

The SM-6 Block IA is an emerging change to SM-6 BLK 1, with improvements to the guidance section. These enhancements allow the missile to seek out and destroy a wide variety of advanced threats with precision.

"The Block IA brings a new level of sophistication to the SM-6 and increases the precision of the missile even more," said Mike Campisi, Raytheon's SM-6 senior program director. "Relying less on a ship combat system means the missile can continue to engage targets further and further away with extreme accuracy."

SM-6 is the only missile in the world that can perform anti-air warfare, anti-surface warfare, and terminal ballistic missile defense.

Final assembly of SM-6 takes place at Raytheon's state-of-the-art production facility at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala. Raytheon has delivered approximately 340 SM-6 missiles with continuing production.

Raytheon Company, with 2016 sales of $24 billion and 63,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts.

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[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 01:30 PM


Aster On Course To Provide Missile Defense

by David Donald - June 21, 2017, 5:48 AM

Around 1,500 MBDA Aster medium-range air defense missiles have now been delivered to nine nations, equipping 55 air defence systems. Now the company (Chalet 173) is working with its partner in the Eurosam consortium, Thales, to develop a new version that gives expanded capabilities, with an accent on ballistic missile defense. Development is scheduled to be complete by 2023, with production beginning the year after.

Known as Aster 30 Block 1NT, the new version employs the same body and booster as the current Aster 30, but features a new Ka-band active seeker in place of a Ku-band unit. The seeker produces a narrower beam giving longer range and much better angular resolution. In turn this allows the missile to engage a target earlier in its trajectory, an important consideration in the case of multi-warhead missiles, and also to accomplish more refined course corrections during the fly-out.

The missile uses the “Pif-Paf” control concept that combines aerodynamic and thrust controls.

Eurosam received an initial contract from France to begin Block 1NT development in December 2015, and a year later, Italy formally joined the program. The armies of both nations operate the current Aster 30 with the SAMP/T system, which will require some modifications to fire the Block 1NT.

As well as its land-based capabilities, the Aster can also provide air defense at sea. The Aster 30-based PAAMS system is on French and Italian frigates, and on the UK’s Type 45 destroyers, where it is known as Sea Viper. Italy has specified the Block 1NT for five new PPA-class frigates, while the Royal Navy is considering upgrading its Sea Viper systems to fire the new missile to provide an anti-ship ballistic missile defense.
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[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 03:19 PM


SM-2MR production line restarting to fulfill orders from Australia, Japan, Netherlands, S. Korea

The SM-2MR production line is being resurrected after Raytheon received an order to produce 280 missiles for the U.S. Navy and four other foreign navies.


By Ministerie van Defensie [CC0 or CC BY-SA 1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Speaking at the Paris airshow, president of Raytheon’s Missile Systems, Taylor Lawrence, said the orders are for the SM-2 Block IIIA and IIIB variants.

Lawrence added that he expects the line to be active till 2035 because of anticipated fresh orders from the Pentagon and foreign nations.
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[*] posted on 25-6-2017 at 07:57 PM


Quote:
Quote: Originally posted by buglerbilly  
Israel Tests Sea-Launched LORA Missile

LORA is an artillery weapon system which consists of a long-range, tactical ground-to-ground missile developed by IAI’s MALAM division. It is intended for strike scenarios with a range of up to 400 km and boasts a precision range better than 10 meters.

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/i52JUuT4dY0


And they barely mention it being vertical launched. Something that has always failed when trying to navalise the M270 MLRS. Such an containerized or even integrated land attack option may even be of interest to European navies.
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[*] posted on 26-6-2017 at 02:30 PM


Exactly! The fact it can, obviously, be container mounted ala the Russian Club-K and "hidden" among other containers on a non-descript cargo vessel, should also be note-worthy...................
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[*] posted on 29-6-2017 at 06:13 PM


IDAS partners look to re-plan submarine development firing

Richard Scott, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

27 June 2017


The Interactive Defence and Attack System for Submarines (IDAS) Concept of Operations. Source: Diehl

The IDAS Consortium of Diehl Defence and thyssenkrupp Marine Systems (tkMS) is working to reschedule an engineering development firing of the IDAS (Interactive Defence and Attack System for Submarines) missile system from a submarine before the end of 2017.

This follows the identification of a technical problem which stopped a development firing and flight test from the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN) submarine KNM Uredd in May this year.

Designed for a range in excess of 10 km, IDAS is a submarine-launched guided weapon system designed to provide close-range protection against anti-submarine warfare helicopters. The system is also designed to have a secondary offensive capability against surface and coastal targets.

Launched through the submarine torpedo tube, the IDAS missile uses operator-in-the-loop (OITL) control for high precision and direct control. This is enabled through the combination of an imaging infrared seeker (IIR), and a fibre-optic link to relay seeker imagery back to the submarine.

After discharge from the submarine, the IDAS rocket boost motor fires while the missile is still submerged. During the underwater 'flight' phase, the missile manoeuvres into the direction of the target before broaching, accelerating to cruise speed (200 m/sec), and flying out towards the target area.

The operator onboard the submarine maintains full OITL control over the missile so as to provide the option to re-target in flight or abort the mission. In the event that the fibre-optic link is broken, the IDAS missile switches to an autonomous mode based on the existing engagement parameters.

The IDAS Consortium was formed by the two industry partners in 2012 to complete industrially financed system development after the German government stopped funding in 2010. Diehl Defence is responsible for the IDAS missile itself, the fibre-optic system, and the missile control system, while tkMS is performing submarine integration and the ejection container system (four IDAS missiles are housed in each container, with a thrust piston system used to eject each missile separately out of the torpedo tube).

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[*] posted on 14-7-2017 at 01:10 PM


IAI trials Green Dragon naval variant

Robin Hughes, London - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

13 July 2017


Image of the tactical land version of the Green Dragon loitering munition engaging a static target in a series of full operational end-to-end trials. Source: Israel Aerospace Industries

Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) has introduced a new naval application for its Green Dragon loitering munition to address "the unique requirements of the naval arena".

Weighing 15 kg, Green Dragon is a sealed canister-launched tactical loitering munition/intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) system, designed initially to provide small ground units and special operations units with significant situational awareness and firepower in a compact envelope.

The munition is equipped with a 4 in/1 kg Micro-Pop stabilised electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) payload sourced from IAI's Tamam Division, and a 3 kg blast fragmentation warhead.

Powered by an electric motor, Green Dragon has a given loitering duration of approximately 90 minutes, and can deliver ISR and precision accuracy of higher than 1-metre circular error probable (CEP) out to ranges of 40 km (21 nm). Operated by a tablet-sized control panel via a tactical low-power datalink, Green Dragon also features a built-in 'abort and go around' capability to avert collateral damage or targeting errors. As currently designed, the new loitering munition will not be recoverable once the warhead is activated, although it can potentially be retrieved if the warhead remains inert.

For the naval application, IAI has made "adjustments to the sealed canister and communication antenna", Boaz Levi, executive vice president and general manager of Systems, Missiles & Space Group at IAI told Jane's . For a maritime-platform role, the Green Dragon is launched by a small rocket assist motor from a sealed marine-approved canister, enabling the system to quickly clear the ship's deck area.

Levi said that the company has recently conducted a series of tests with the modified Green Dragon from a "non-naval military platform" to demonstrate the naval application of the system as a tactical, low-cost situational awareness and firepower solution for patrol boats, offshore patrol vessels, and light combat ships.

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[*] posted on 14-7-2017 at 08:08 PM


Egyptian Mistrals using Avengers for air defence

Jeremy Binnie - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

13 July 2017


A still from the Egyptian MoD video showing Avengers strapped to the deck of one of a Mistral LHD. Source: Egyptian Ministry of Defence

The Egyptian Ministry of Defence (MoD) has confirmed that AN/TWQ-1 Avengers are being put on the flight decks of Mistral landing helicopter dock (LHD) amphibious assault ships to provide short-range air defence.

The Avenger, which has been in service with the Egyptian Air Defence Forces for many years, consists of a manned turret armed with eight Stinger missiles mounted on a modified Humvee.

The confirmation of its new naval role came in the form of a video that the MoD released on 12 July showing the ‘Cleopatra 2017’ joint exercise with the French Navy. An Egyptian Mistral was seen with at least three Avengers strapped to its flight deck and their turrets rotating as if scanning for targets.

Two vehicles that resembled Avengers have been previously spotted on the flight deck of an Egyptian Mistral, suggesting that this is becoming standard practice.

Egypt’s Mistrals were built for Russia in France and were expected to be fitted with two 3M-47 Gibka turrets with Igla-S missiles and two AK-630 rotary cannons to provide short-range air defence. However, the LHDs could not be delivered to Russia due to the European Union sanctions imposed on Moscow after it annexation of Crimea, at which point Egypt stepped in to buy them without their Russian systems.

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[*] posted on 15-7-2017 at 03:45 PM


Interesting concept, would someone who knows more about the subject be able to comment on the effects of the maritime environment on the sensors and weapons system?

Things like ship motion, sea haze, water spray, salt air, that sort of thing.




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[*] posted on 15-7-2017 at 11:37 PM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
Interesting concept, would someone who knows more about the subject be able to comment on the effects of the maritime environment on the sensors and weapons system?

Things like ship motion, sea haze, water spray, salt air, that sort of thing.
i can tell you what the effects of ship motion are on me... But they might not be very enlightening...

But I am a land-lubber through and through...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 21-7-2017 at 02:12 PM


Modernising the TOMAHAWK


A Tactical TOMAHAWK Block IV cruise missile, conducts a controlled flight test over the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) western test range complex in southern California.

In July, the US Navy (USN) successfully test fired in the Gulf of Mexico, near Florida, two Raytheon-built TOMAHAWK cruise missiles from new the submarine Block III Virginia Payload Tube fitted on the VIRGINIA’ class submarine, USS NORTH DAKOTA (SSN-784). The tests proved the ability of the submarines to load, carry and vertically launch Tomahawk missiles from the upgraded tubes, which feature fewer parts and will be even more reliable.

In addition to the new payload tubes, the USN is also developing a new Virginia Payload Module, which will triple the number of TOMAHAWK missiles that ‘VIRGINIA class submarines can carry, thus dramatically increasing each submarine’s firepower. Surface ships and other classes of submarines can carry more than 100 Tomahawks when needed. US and British forces use Tomahawk cruise missiles to defeat integrated air defence systems and conduct long-range precision strike missions against high-value targets.

“As the Navy continues to modernise its subs, Raytheon continues to modernise TOMAHAWK, keeping this one-of-a-kind weapon well ahead of the threat,” said Mike Jarrett, Raytheon Air Warfare Systems Vice-President. “Today’s TOMAHAWK is a far cry from its predecessors and tomorrow’s missile will feature even more capability, giving our sailors the edge they need for decades to come.”

The USN continues to upgrade the TOMAHAWK Block IV’s communication and navigation capabilities, while adding a multi-mode seeker so it can hit high-value moving targets at sea. These modernised versions are on track to deploy beginning of 2019 and are expected to be in the USN inventory beyond 2040.
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[*] posted on 28-7-2017 at 12:29 PM


U.S. Navy and Air Force Award Lockheed Martin First Production Lot for Long Range Anti-Ship Missiles

(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued July 26, 2017)



ORLANDO, Fla. ---- Lockheed Martin received an $86.5 million contract from the U.S. Navy and Air Force for Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) production.

The contract marks the first production award for the air-launched variant of LRASM, and includes 23 missiles and engineering support. Low-rate initial production Lot 1 is the first of several expected annual production lots that will deliver next-generation anti-ship missiles to the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force.

"This first production lot of LRASM brings a new level of capability to both the U.S. Air Force and the Navy," said Mike Fleming, LRASM director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "LRASM enables our warfighters to prosecute even the most advanced enemy ships."

LRASM is designed to detect and destroy specific targets within groups of ships by employing advanced technologies that reduce dependence on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, network links and GPS navigation in electronic warfare environments. LRASM will play a significant role in ensuring military access to operate in open ocean/blue waters, owing to its enhanced ability to discriminate and conduct tactical engagements from extended ranges.

LRASM is a precision-guided, anti-ship standoff missile based on the successful Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile - Extended Range (JASSM-ER). It is designed to meet the needs of U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force Warfighters in contested environments. The air-launched variant provides an early operational capability for the U.S. Navy's offensive anti-surface warfare Increment I requirement to be integrated onboard the U.S. Air Force's B-1B in 2018 and on the U.S. Navy's F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in 2019.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

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[*] posted on 2-8-2017 at 02:26 PM


LRASM firing demonstrates canister launch

Richard Scott - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

01 August 2017

Lockheed Martin has completed a first launch of its Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) surface-launch variant from a topside canister installation.

Performed at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on 26 July, the flight test “proved the missile’s ability to conduct an angled launch from the newly designed topside canister, replicating a ship-launched environment,” said the company in a statement.

The air-launched AGM-158C LRASM missile is being developed by Lockheed Martin Missile and Fire Control to meet a US Navy (USN) requirement for a near-term Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare (OASuW) Increment 1 capability able to defeat major maritime targets. Derived from the AGM-158B Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range (JASSM-ER), LRASM introduces additional sensors and systems specific to the offensive anti-surface warfare mission, and has been conceived to be able to penetrate sophisticated shipborne defences, with reduced dependence on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, network links and GPS navigation.


Lockheed Martin has conducted the first-ever launch of the LRASM surface-launch variant from a topside canister at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. (Lockheed Martin)

The LRASM is intended to deliver an Early Operating Capability (EOC) in September 2018 on the US Air Force’s B-1B Lancer, followed by the USN F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in September 2019. A Lot 1 production contract covering an initial 23 missiles was awarded to Lockheed Martin on 25 July.

Having previously demonstrated a LRASM surface launch capability using the Mk 41 vertical launch system (VLS), Lockheed Martin has invested in the design of a topside (or deck-mounted) launcher configuration that is designed to allow for easy integration on multiple surface ships as part of the ‘Distributed Lethality’ construct. The all-up-round configuration for this topside launcher – which incorporates a Mk 114 boost motor, is identical to the LRASM surface-launch missile previously flight tested.

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[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 12:35 PM


Coastal Patrol Ships Conduct Test Fire of Griffin Missile System in Arabian Gulf

(Source: US Navy; issued Aug 03, 2017)


A Griffin missile is launched from the coastal patrol ship USS Chinook (PC 9) during a test and proficiency fire, July 18. USS Chinook is one of ten coastal patrol ships assigned to Coastal Patrol Squadron (PCRON) 1 home-ported in Manama, Bahrain. (USN photo)

Five coastal patrol ships assigned to Patrol Coastal Squadron (PCRON) One conducted a proficiency fire test of their MK 60 Griffin Missile Systems (GMS) July 18-20 in the Arabian Gulf.

Coastal patrol ships USS Tempest (PC 2), USS Squall (PC 7), USS Chinook (PC 9), USS Firebolt (PC 10) and USS Thunderbolt (PC 12) launched surface-to-surface Griffin missiles at moving target sleds to demonstrate their ability to hit surface targets, like small boats.

"Conducting this test and executing this realistic exercise generates greater proficiency for the crews and provides the perfect venue to put their training to use," said Cmdr. Chris Gilbertson, deputy commodore of PCRON One. "When the time comes to act, they will have these experiences to provide the confidence to act and execute. Frequent, realistic training is necessary to keep these skills fresh to maintain combat readiness. Everyone this week made the most of this unique opportunity."

Lt. Cmdr. Greg Page, the Commanding Officer of USS Firebolt (PC 10) echoed those sentiments. "This live fire event was an excellent opportunity for the crew to build proficiency in use of the weapons system as well as build confidence in capabilities of the system," said Page. "Furthermore, hitting the target added to my operator's confidence in his own ability and bolstered the crew's understanding of the system itself."

At-sea tests of GMS began in 2012, but the GMS program was only declared operational following the first live-fire tests on PCRON One's ships on March 25, 2014. Over the next several years, the program was implemented on each of PCRON One's 10 ships. The addition of the GMS to the coastal patrol ship's arsenal provides even more options for crews when faced with any number of threats in the 5th Fleet area of operations.

"The Griffin Missile System complements the crew-served weapons we have onboard, giving us options for layered defense," said Lt. Cmdr. Chad Stewart, commanding officer of USS Squall. "The multiple weapons systems onboard allow us to choose the best course of action when we need to make those difficult decisions."

The participating ships are five of the 10 PCs forward deployed to Manama, Bahrain assigned to Task Force 55, which is responsible for all surface forces in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations, to include U.S. Navy coastal patrol ships and U.S. Coast Guard cutters.

U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility encompasses about 2.5 million square miles of water area and includes the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Red Sea and parts of the Indian Ocean. The expanse comprises 20 countries and includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal and the Strait of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 9-8-2017 at 01:51 PM


Lockheed Martin funded for LRASM Lot 1 production

Richard Scott - IHS Jane's Missiles & Rockets

08 August 2017

Lockheed Martin has been contracted to begin production of the AGM-158C Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) to support an Early Operational Capability (EOC) requirement for the US Air Force (USAF).

Being developed and integrated to meet the near-term Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare (OASuW) Increment 1 programme requirement, LRASM is a highly autonomous, precision-guided anti-ship stand-off weapon that leverages the basic design of the AGM-158B Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range (JASSM-ER) but introduces additional sensors and systems specific to the offensive anti-surface warfare mission. It has been conceived to be able to penetrate sophisticated shipborne defences and with reduced dependence on intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance platforms, network links and GPS navigation.

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[*] posted on 11-8-2017 at 02:57 PM


Government of Thailand – RGM-84L Harpoon Block II Surface Launched Missiles

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10, 2017 - The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Thailand for RGM-84L Harpoon Block II Surface Launched Missiles.  The estimated cost is $24.9 million.  The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on August 9, 2017.

The Government of Thailand has requested the possible sale of up to five (5) RGM-84L Harpoon Block II Surface Launched Missiles and one (1) RTM-84L Harpoon Block II Exercise Missile.

Also included are containers, spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor representatives technical assistance, engineering and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The estimated cost is $24.9 million.

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to strengthen the U.S.-Thai strategic relationship and to improve the security of an important partner.

The proposed sale will provide enhanced capabilities in effective defense of critical sea lines. Thailand intends to use the missiles on its DW3000 Class Frigate. The proposed sale of the Harpoon Block II missiles and support will increase the Royal Thai Navy’s maritime partnership potential. Thailand has purchased Harpoon missiles previously and will have no difficulty absorbing these missiles into its armed forces.

The proposed sale will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The principal contractor will be the Boeing Company, St. Louis, MO. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will require annual trips to Thailand involving U.S. Government personnel and contractor representatives for technical reviews, support, and oversight for approximately five years.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

All questions regarding this proposed Foreign Military Sale should be directed to the State Department's Bureau of Political Military Affairs, Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, pm-cpa@state.gov.
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[*] posted on 21-8-2017 at 02:27 PM


Raytheon marks milestone for its Tomahawk, looks to the future

By: David B. Larter   3 hours ago


Sailors aboard the U.S. destroyer Preble conduct an operational Tomahawk missile launch while underway in a training area off the coast of California. (MC1 Woody Paschall/Navy)

TUSCON, Ariz. – Raytheon and the U.S. Navy marked the 4,000 delivery of Tomahawk Block IV in a ceremony Tuesday, all amid a push to modernize the Navy’s venerable long-range strike missile for service into the 2050s.

The Navy is getting ready to send its original Block IVs from the early 2000s back to Raytheon in 2019 for upgrades to the navigation and communications systems, as well as the warhead. Raytheon is also planning to integrate a seeker into a maritime version that can function as a long-range anti-ship missile, something the surface fleet has been spoiling for as it looks to add more offensive capabilities to its surface combatants.

“When a country sees a cruiser or destroyer sitting off its coast, one of the primary reasons they are concerned because they know about the capabilities the Tomahawk brings,” said Capt. Mark Johnson, who heads the Tomahawk office for the Navy.

The tomahawk missile, which debuted in Operation Desert Storm, has been fired more than 2,300 times in anger since.

But as China and Russia invest in high-end air defense systems, the sub-sonic missile has been under pressure from stealthy competitors such as Lockheed Martin’s Long-range Anti-Ship Missile, or LRASM.

In a 2014 study for the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, analyst Bryan Clark argued that the Navy should explore adding range to Lockheed Martin’s stealthy long-range anti-ship missile and using it for land-attack missions as a means of making the most of each ship’s vertical-launch cells.

The study highlighted a creeping issue with the Navy in a world where adversaries such as Iran, Russia and China are investing in anti-ship missiles that can be launched in sufficient numbers to overwhelm the Aegis combat system and force the ships the expend all its anti-air missiles to shoot them down, leaving it vulnerable.

Clark argued that investing in missiles that take up a VLS cell but do more than one missile leaves more space in the launchers for more capabilities.

Clark, in an Aug. 15 phone call, said the Tomahawk still has some key advantages in keeping its edge over up-and-comers, most notably because its already integrated on a wide array of platforms and is common throughout the fleet. The missile could be configured to carry different payloads, anything from a high-powered microwave to an electronic warfare weapon, he said.

“The missile has advanced to the point now that it can really function as a long-range UAV,” Clark said.

The downside, however, is that Tomahawk is less survivable against a high-end adversary than a tomahawk. 

Raytheon has increased the stealthy features of the missile but those details are classified, Clark said. Raytheon officials likewise declined to comment on upgrades to the Tomahawk’s counter-detection features.

Some in the surface community have suggested that firing both an LRASM and a Tomahawk against an adversary could present an insurmountable and deadly problem to even the most sophisticated adversary.

Missile upgrades

Raytheon is aiming to make sure its tried-and-true missile is the mainstay of the Navy’s strike mission.

Johnson, the program manager, told reporters at the event that the navigation system upgrades will ensure the missile can strike targets even if GPS is taken down.

The Navy is getting ready to sign a contract for the ship-killer version of the Tomahawk, Johnson said, but there will still be some development needed for the actual sensors.

“There will be a couple-year development effort to determine the configuration of the seeker to go into the missile,” Johnson said. “Then a couple of years to fully vet it out and make sure we accurately know what the system performance is.”

The missile should be ready for fleet use in the 2022 timeframe, he said.

Raytheon is also looking at future mission sets for the Tomahawk, according to the program’s top executive Dave Adams. Though he would not go into detail about the kinds of missions he’s looking at – such as the uses Clark discussed – the missile is capable of supporting other kinds of missions given its onboard power generation and ability to hang around over an area before being directed to a target.

“Clearly tomahawk has very good communications capabilities and those are going to be upgraded,” Adams said. “It can loiter, its got tremendous range.”

“There is a unique thing about Tomahawk, Adams continued. “Every other weapon is limited by power and energy because they are usually battery operated. Tomahawk has its own power generation so in terms of doing things that require additional power, we have the capability of doing that because it generates its own power. It gives us options.”

As for the LRASM, analysts say in the short term choosing it over the Tomahawk for strike and anti-surface missions might be a mistake, especially given that Lockheed’s missile is significantly more expensive.

“It’s not an either-or situation,” said Eric Wertheim, a naval analyst and author and editor of the U.S. Naval Institute’s Guide to Combat Fleets of the World. “You’ve got one that’s tested and tried and another that isn’t tested anywhere near the way that Tomahawk has been. I’d say at the very least Tomahawk offers a stop-gap capability until the new system is fully vetted.”

The Tomahawk can also serve as part of a high-low mix, Wertheim said, with Raytheon’s missile being available for missions that might not need to full capability of Lockheed’s missile. LRASM is currently being built for use on the F/A-18 Super Hornets and Air Force B-1B bombers.
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[*] posted on 11-9-2017 at 01:44 PM


MSPO 2017: Kongsberg showcase sub launched NSM

9th September 2017 - 03:09 GMT | by Richard Thomas in Kielce



Displaying its submarine-launched variant of the Naval Strike Missile (NSM) Kongsberg officials said that while it was not targeted at a specific national maritime requirement, it demonstrated the continued development of the system.

Well matured at this point, the NSM has been under development by Raytheon and Kongsberg for a number of years. In 2014 the system performed a launch test from the USS Coronado as part of demonstrations for the US Navy. 

The missile followed the pre-planned trajectory towards a target ship at 100nm; locating and hitting the target at the pre-selected hit point.

In 2015 Raytheon and Kongsberg formed a teaming agreement for the NSM, described as the second step in the companies’ efforts to meet ASuW requirements in the international market.

Speaking to Shephard at MSPO 2017, Kyrre Lohne, VP strategic communications, explained that the development of the submarine variant NSM had been ‘a small path’, adding that the loading and missile delivery booster were the main adaptations to the system.

Although there is no current national requirement for such a submarine-launched capability in Europe, continued developments of programmes ongoing in the region could see a demand for such a capability in future.

The NSM is also being adapted to fit the Norwegian F-35 fighters, providing a long-range air-to-surface capability.

The NSM has an effective range of over 200km against land and sea targets and the main offensive capability for Norwegian and Polish naval and land-based coastal defence.
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[*] posted on 12-9-2017 at 01:43 PM


Tomahawk Vs. LRASM: Raytheon Gets $119M For Anti-Ship Missile

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

on September 11, 2017 at 1:29 PM

WASHINGTON: Just three years ago, the Navy faced the Russian and Chinese fleets with just one aging, short-range anti-ship missile, the Harpoon. Today, it’s successfully test-fired at least four very different missile types and may actually need to narrow down. There’s the converted SM-6 anti-aircraft missile as the lightest, fastest option and the Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile as the middleweight. Then we have two monster missiles with 1,000-pound warheads competing for the heavyweight slot: Lockheed’s new Long-Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM), which we’ve dissected here, and Raytheon’s Tomahawk – a venerable missile that’s about to get a major upgrade.

Since 1991, Tomahawks have been/ presidents’ first resort for precisely striking stationary targets on land. What they’ve lacked was the capability to precisely strike moving targets at sea, a much harder problem. A short-lived Tomahawk Anti-Ship Missile (TASM) variant was withdrawn from service in the 1990s because the Navy wasn’t sure it would consistently hit the right ship. (No one wanted to sink the future equivalent of the Lusitania by mistake).

Since then, however, Moore’s Law has helped lead to immensely improved electronics. Raytheon has invested millions of its own money in a more sophisticated anti-ship seeker, built around a new high-powered and versatile “multi-function modular processor” it aims to use on other missiles as well. A prototype Maritime Strike Tomahawk successfully struck a target in a 2015 test, and on August 30, the Navy awarded Raytheon $119 million to continue its development.

The plan, Raytheon executive Chris Sprinkle told me, is to install the new seeker on a still to-be-determined fraction of the 4,000-plus Block IV Tomahawks – the latest model – as they come back to Raytheon’s Tucson factory for their regularly scheduled mid-life checkup. The missiles are meant to last 30 years, he explained, and bringing them back in for maintenance and upgrades at the 15-year mark was always part of the plan. The oldest Block IV missiles, built in 2004, were already scheduled to come in for overhaul next year, when they’ll all get new radios and navigation hardware. The marginal cost of installing a new seeker on some of them at the same time will be, well, marginal.

Incumbency is Tomahawk’s great advantage in its competition with LRASM. The US and Royal navies have bought more than 10,000 Tomahawks since the missile entered service in 1984.

They’re battle-tested, and they can launch from both ships and submarines. Upgrading the proven Tomahawk from land-attack-only to anti-ship is less costly and risky than buying a new missile like LRASM.

But incumbency is a double-edged sword. Underneath all the upgrades, Tomahawk’s basic technology was designed in the early 1980s. LRASM, by contrast, derives from the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM), which had its first flight test in 1999. That makes the JASSM/LRASM family almost 20 years younger, even though it’s almost 20 years old.

Sure, Raytheon can update Tomahawk’s electronics, and the new processor will allow the missile to download frequent software updates iPhone-style, Sprinkle said. That’s all crucial for a precision weapon. But Raytheon can’t do much about the Tomahawk’s basic shape, which is not designed for stealth the way JASM and LRASM are. In an era of increasingly sophisticated anti-missile systems that can jam, decoy or shoot down incoming weapons, that matters. How much? That’s classified.

While LRASM has some edge in stealth, Tomahawk has an advantage in range. The exact details are classified, but LRASM’s range is officially “over 200 miles” while the Tomahawk’s is over 1,000. That’s roughly 400 percent more.

With range like that, said Sprinkle, you may not even need to go to sea to fight an enemy fleet: “We can reach out and touch you, probably, from port.” The Tomahawk’s tremendous range was designed to strike targets deep inland from ships at sea, almost anywhere on earth – “I think there’s some spot from Tibet you can’t reach with the Tomahawk” – so enemy fleets would have nowhere to hide.

Of course, like everything else, range comes with a price, in this case weight. A Tomahawk with rocket motor weighs in about 3,330 lbs, compared to LRASM at about 2,500 lbs, almost a third less. Lighter missiles are easier to accommodate on both the warships that would fire them and the supply vessels that would bring them to the battle fleet in a prolonged war.

There is a potential place for both missiles in the inventory: the stealthier LRASM for the best-defended targets, the longer-ranged Tomahawk for those furthest away. But judging from Sprinkle’s comments, Raytheon is not counting on a compromise. It wants to win.
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 12:21 PM


Ducommun to build NSM fire control system

13th September 2017 - 03:09 GMT | by The Shephard News Team



Ducommun will build fire control systems for Raytheon’s Naval Strike Missile (NSM) under a contract announced on 11 September.

Raytheon is offering the NSM for the US Navy’s over-the-horizon requirement for its Littoral Combat Ships and future frigates.

NSM is a long-range, precision anti-ship and land-attack missile that provides advanced strike capability against heavily defended land and sea targets. The weapon originated in Norway, and Raytheon and Kongsberg Gruppen are teaming to produce it in the US and make the technology available to the navy.

The agreement with Ducommun is part of Raytheon’s work to assemble a manufacturing and supplier team for US production of the weapon.

Work on the fire control systems is expected to begin in late 2017.
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[*] posted on 15-9-2017 at 01:52 PM


Sea Ceptor User Group Launched, as Sea Ceptor Makes DSEI Debut

(Source: MBDA; issued Sept 13, 2017)

HMS Argyll, the first vessel to be fitted with MBDA’s Sea Ceptor, is alongside at DSEI 2017 – marking the world debut of the next generation air defence system, and also the location for the formal launch of the Sea Ceptor User Group.

Hosted by the Royal Navy, the two-day user group also includes the Royal New Zealand Navy and the Armada de Chile (Chilean Navy).

The User Group has been devised to improve Sea Ceptor’s operational effectiveness through life and to deliver long-term reductions in the cost of ownership. It will enable users to share their experiences of introduction of the Sea Ceptor into service and employment and support of the operational systems, through a community of interest among the employing navies.

Built around MBDA’s Common Anti-air Modular Missile (CAMM), Sea Ceptor is capable of protecting naval forces from the full range of current and future air threats, including the latest supersonic anti-ship missiles, small precision guided munitions and combat aircraft.

Rear Admiral Simon Charlier, Senior Defence and Political Adviser at MBDA said: “Having just successfully become the first vessel to complete an at sea firing of Sea Ceptor, HMS Argyll is the perfect location to host the formal launch of the group. MBDA is committed to always providing the best in-service support for its customers, and the Sea Ceptor User Group will provide a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and experience that will lead to significant benefits for all involved. Sea Ceptor is the future of naval air defence, and I am hopeful that we will soon welcome additional user navies to the club.”

In total six nations have already chosen the CAMM family to provide their future air defence capabilities in both the maritime and land domains. In British Army service, the system is known as Land Ceptor – which is also making its debut at DSEI 2017 – while for the export market it is known as EMADS (Enhanced Modular Air Defence Solutions).

By purchasing the same missile to meet the air defence needs of both the British Army and the Royal Navy, development costs are significantly reduced and both services are able to utilise a common stockpile that will significantly reduce procurement and support costs.

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