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Author: Subject: RAAF 2017 onwards
unicorn
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[*] posted on 1-8-2020 at 12:58 PM


Question out of left field, has anyone seen anything about the progress on the new MC-55 Peregrine electronic spy birds?

Just wondering as they have flown under the radar a bit




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bug2
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[*] posted on 1-8-2020 at 01:49 PM


Apart from the fact that late last year, the fourth airframe had been delivered for modification, nothing since, publicly at least.........
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[*] posted on 1-8-2020 at 02:51 PM


Maintenance Milestone for Hornet

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued July 31, 2020)

The last F/A-18 Classic Hornet to have deeper maintenance servicing rolled out of the Boeing Defence Australia facility at RAAF Base Williamtown on July 9.

It was the 163rd deeper maintenance servicing for the Classic Hornet fleet and Boeing has provided contracted maintenance support to the Classic Hornet fleet since February 2013.

Commander of Air Combat Group Air Commodore Tim Alsop said deeper maintenance servicings would no longer be required as the drawdown of the Classic Hornet capability continued.

“This is one of the many milestones that the Classic Hornet fleet will mark during this year and in 2021,’’ Air Commodore Alsop said. “Boeing and Defence Industries’ contribution to Air Combat capability cannot be understated.

“Deeper maintenance servicings produce the available flying hours that drives aircraft availability and fleet health, this in turn allows 81 Wing to project Air Combat Capability and go about its business,’’ he said.

In total, Boeing has supported 293 deeper maintenance servicings of Classic Hornets, generating an additional 140,000 flying hours. This is around one-third of all Classic flying hours, Air Commodore Alsop said.

This role extended to Operation Okra support as an additional two lines of deeper maintenance were added in through task prioritisation, servicings structure and schedule optimisation.

“These vital 24 deeper maintenance servicings were completed in support of Air Combat Group’s contribution to Operation Okra,’’ Air Commodore Alsop said.

The F/A-18A/B Classic Hornet fleet of 75 aircraft was introduced into service in May 1985 and will have accumulated 36 years’ service by the planned withdrawal date of December 2021.

The F/A-18A/B Classic Hornet fleet achieved the 400,000 hours service milestone in July 2019.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 10-8-2020 at 10:20 PM


10 AUGUST 2020

Anticipated fatigue life of RAAF's Hawk lead-in fighter trainers extended to late 2040s

by Julian Kerr

A major structural test programme has subjected a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Hawk BAE Systems Hawk Mk127 lead-in fighter trainer (LIFT) to the equivalent of 50,000 ‘flying’ hours: more than 10 times the actual flying hours currently accrued by most of the RAAF’s 33-strong Hawk fleet.

Based on current usage, the fatigue life remaining in the Hawk airframe would allow the aircraft to continue operations well into the late 2040s, BAE Systems Australia pointed out in a 10 August statement.

The statement follows the 31 July deadline for responses to a request for information (RFI) issued by the Australian Department of Defence (DoD) that could lead to the replacement of the Hawks in RAAF service under Project Air 6002 Phase 1. The type entered service with the RAAF in 2001.


A RAAF Hawk Mk127 LIFT aircraft. (BAE Systems)

The test programme involved a Hawk airframe being subjected since 2006 to 14 years of fatigue testing under a joint activity with the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group in M
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[*] posted on 11-8-2020 at 03:14 PM


That will NOT be welcome news to Boeing who had entertained hopes of the RAAF being a potential early customer for their new Red Hawk trainer



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[*] posted on 12-8-2020 at 12:14 AM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
That will NOT be welcome news to Boeing who had entertained hopes of the RAAF being a potential early customer for their new Red Hawk trainer


In one way it is, in another it isn’t. The Hawk Adour engine is a problem, it is becoming very difficult to support today, can’t imagine it will even be flying in 20 plus years time... We may see relatively young airframes parked, because they can’t sustain the engines...

But Red Hawk can’t carry or employ live munitions, which RAAF has a requirement for with current RAAF Hawks utilising a 30mm gun, Sidewinder and Mk.82/83 bombs for a pretty useful ‘wartime emergency’ close air support and point defence role...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 12-8-2020 at 09:02 AM


My understanding is that the Red Hawk can be modified to have a secondary armed role.

The USAF may not want it, but they have the funding to build new F-15s as 'second line' fighters, most air forces don't have that luxury.

The potential is there, after all the Talon was built from the F-5 Freedom Fighter, so going the other way shouldn't be insurmountable.





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