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Author: Subject: RAAF 2017 onwards
unicorn
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[*] posted on 10-8-2017 at 01:20 PM


What replaces the capability, or will it lapse?



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[*] posted on 11-8-2017 at 05:19 AM


Quote: Originally posted by unicorn  
What replaces the capability, or will it lapse?


Certified Predator or Reaper. Heron 2 has no chance.

Already have operators detached to the US training and working on Predator / Reaper now.




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 11-8-2017 at 09:21 AM


PREDATOR's are nearly finished and replaced by REAPERs............
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[*] posted on 12-8-2017 at 06:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by buglerbilly  
PREDATOR's are nearly finished and replaced by REAPERs............


Nah, the UK just invested in a bunch of 'Certifiable' new-build Predators that are so called because they can operate in manned, domestic airspace...

These ones:

http://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/united-kingdom-certifia...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 13-8-2017 at 01:58 PM


Let me clarify, USAF Predators................etc.
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[*] posted on 17-8-2017 at 06:23 PM


Australia's Chief of Air Force Completes First Flight in the AIR 5428 PC-21

(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued Aug 15, 2017)


Australia has received the first of 49 Pilatus PC-21 turboprop trainers that it ordered in December 2015 under an A$1.2 billion contract with Lockheed Martin, which will provide seven years of pilot training to the Royal Australian Air Force. (LM photo)

EAST SALE, Australia --- In a recent ceremony that marked a significant milestone for the AIR 5428 Pilot Training System, Lockheed Martin celebrated the Chief of Air Force first flight of the in-service PC-21 aircraft.

The occasion was celebrated at a media event hosted by Australian Minister for Defence Senator the Hon Marise Payne, in East Sale, Australia. Also in attendance was the Hon Darren Chester MP, Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, highlighting the significance of the program to the Australian Government.

Vince Di Pietro, chief executive for Lockheed Martin Australia attended the event along with AIR 5428 partners Pilatus Aircraft and Hawker Pacific.

"We are excited to celebrate this momentous occasion with the CAF and recognise this marks the beginning of training for Australia's fifth-generation air capability," said Vince Di Pietro. "This milestone is a great achievement to all involved and we celebrate the Australian Defence Force's first flight in service and acceptance of the first six of 49 PC-21 aircraft, as the mainstay trainer for Australia's pilot training program for decades to come."

"Combining the PC-21 turboprop training aircraft with state-of-the-art training simulations and an electronic learning environment, Australia's new Pilot Training System will prepare Australia's next-generation pilots for mission success."

The AIR 5428 Pilot Training System is an integrated solution tailored for all future pilots of the Royal Australian Air Force, Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army.

"Lockheed Martin Australia leads the delivery of integrated solutions for all future pilots of the Australian Defence Force," said Amy Gowder, vice president of Training and Logistics Solutions for Lockheed Martin's Rotary and Mission Systems business. "This milestone is an important achievement, and confirms the Lockheed Martin-led team is on track to deliver a world-class pilot training solution to the Australian Defence Force."

Under the AIR 5428 contract, Lockheed Martin is providing overall project management for the pilot training system and delivering a family of integrated ground-based training technologies. Pilatus Aircraft is providing 49 PC-21 turboprop training aircraft and through-life engineering and airworthiness support, while Hawker Pacific is providing maintenance services and fleet support, and leveraging its established supply chain in Australia.

Signed in December 2015, the initial seven-year AIR 5428 Pilot Training System is valued at AU$1.2 billion, with performance-based options to extend the value and length of the contract for up to 25 years.

Headquartered in Canberra, Lockheed Martin Australia is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Lockheed Martin Australia and its related entities employ more than 1000 people in Australia and New Zealand working on a wide range of major programs spanning the aerospace, defence, maritime civil sector.

Established in 1939, Pilatus Aircraft Ltd is the world's leading manufacturer of single-engine turboprop aircraft. Headquartered in Stans, Switzerland, Pilatus is a privately held company employing close to 2000 people. Pilatus provides aircraft and aviation services worldwide for the general aviation, commercial, training, utility, and special mission markets. The company, through Pilatus Australia Pty Ltd, currently supports over 140 Australian-based military and civil aircraft.

Hawker Pacific Pty Ltd was formed in 1978 with its corporate headquarters in Sydney NSW, employs over 400 people across Australia and has significant aviation sales and support capabilities across the Asia Pacific and the Middle East. Hawker Pacific's Government Business unit is the prime contractor to the ADF delivering the B300 aircraft capability to 32 and 38 Squadrons at RAAF Bases East Sale and Townsville, holding AMO and AEO accreditation. At RAAF Base Pearce, Hawker Pacific has successfully provided maintenance support to the Singapore Air Force PC-21 aircraft training capability in synergy with Lockheed Martin and Pilatus since 2007.

(ends)

First Fleet of PC-21 Handed Over to Defence

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Aug 11, 2017)

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, and Member for Gippsland, the Hon Darren Chester MP, today officially welcomed the first six new Air Force Pilatus PC-21 training aircraft at RAAF Base East Sale.

From early 2019, the new fleet of cutting edge PC-21 aircraft will replace the PC-9/A training system, which has been in service since 1987.

“The new pilot training system is a significant leap forward and will train more of our people faster, and to a higher standard than our current system,” Minister Payne said.

“Our future generations of Joint Strike Fighter, Wedgetail and Growler pilots will begin their training on these aircraft ensuring we have a pipeline of highly skilled trainees.

“This will provide the Australian Defence Force with a tailored pilot training system to meet the needs of our pilots for the next 30 years,” she said.

Minister Payne congratulated industry partners Lockheed Martin Australia, Pilatus and Hawker Pacific, and Defence’s Capability and Sustainment Group for its on-time delivery of this project stage.

“Over $300 million is being invested in new state of the art training facilities, which incorporates seven new PC-21 flight simulators, both here at RAAF Base East Sale and at RAAF Base Pearce in Perth,” Minister Payne said.

Minister Payne also congratulated Laing O’Rourke Australia and Defence’s Estate and Infrastructure Group for its delivery of facilities for this project stage in highly challenged timelines.

“The Government’s investment in the new pilot training system and relocation of Basic Flying Training School to RAAF Base East Sale is part of our commitment to continue producing highly skilled and talented personnel across Air Force, Navy and Army.

“Overall, this is a $1.5 billion investment that will ensure young pilots looking to serve in the Australian Defence Force have access to the latest facilities and training methods.

“The ADF will now have an intake of up to 165 trainee pilots each year at RAAF Base East Sale, leading to an increase in the number of successful graduates,” she said.

Federal Member for Gippsland, the Hon Darren Chester MP, said he was proud of the role his electorate played in training Australia’s pilots, as well as the economic benefits it generated for the local community.

“The flow of investment and job opportunities anticipated for the Sale region with the relocation of Basic Flying Training School, including $200 million for facilities works, will provide a significant economic boost for our community,” Mr Chester said.

“The services contract awarded to Lockheed Martin Australia for the new Pilot Training System will include engineering, maintenance and operating support for the mission systems, and ground-based training,” he said.

The new facilities in Sale will be constructed by September 2018. The Royal Australian Air Force is planning to commence PC-21 based training of undergraduate students in piloting and flying instructor courses in early 2019.

-ends-
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[*] posted on 21-8-2017 at 05:40 PM


ADF exploring aircraft countermeasures

21st August 2017 - 7:30

by The Shephard News Team



Australia's Defence Science and Technology Group (DST) and Chemring Australia have signed a five-year research agreement to explore new technologies for protecting Australian Defence Force (ADF) aircraft against missile threats, the Australian Department of Defence announced on 17 August.

The agreement was signed in Adelaide as part of the DST Group Partnerships Week. 

The ADF is looking to enhance countermeasure capabilities that 'hide' its aircraft from radar detection and heat-seeking missiles. 

The partnership will see the development of an advanced flare capability to provide protection against increasingly sophisticated missile systems. The use of more efficient manufacturing technologies will also be examined, such as resonant acoustic mixing, and novel concepts for pyrotechnic device.

Partnerships Week is an annual external engagement event open to invited representatives from industry, academia, research agencies, defence and stakeholders from the science, technology, engineering and mathematics community. 
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[*] posted on 31-8-2017 at 03:23 PM


Australia Welcomes New Pilatus PC-21 Turboprop Trainers

by Mike Yeo - August 30, 2017, 4:03 PM


The Republic of Singapore Air Force also trains pilots in Australia using PC-21s. (Photo: Commonwealth of Australia)

Australia has officially welcomed its new Pilatus PC-21 turboprop trainers into service, marking a key milestone in the Australian Defence Force effort to overhaul its pilot training program.

The AIR 5428 Pilot Training System Project will deliver an integrated pilot training program to the Australian Defence Force, tailored for all future pilots of the RAAF, Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army.

Under a $946.8 million contract signed in 2015, Lockheed Martin is providing overall project management for the pilot training system and delivering a family of integrated, ground-based training technologies. Pilatus Aircraft will supply 49 PC-21 turboprop trainers and through-life engineering and airworthiness support, replacing PC-9/A and CT-4B trainers.

There are currently 10 PC-21s in Australia; the first two aircraft arrived in March.

In a welcome ceremony August 11 at Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base East Sale, Defence Minister Marise Payne said the new pilot training system using PC-21s “is a significant leap forward and will train more of our people faster and to a higher standard than our current system.” Vince Di Petro, Lockheed Martin chief executive for Australia, said the training system “marks the beginning of training for Australia’s fifth-generation air capability.”

The acquisition and services contracts call for Lockheed Martin Australia to deliver seven flight simulators, a modern learning environment for students, updated courseware and support for an initial seven-year term.

Basic flying training will eventually be delivered from East Sale with 22 aircraft. Advanced flying training is conducted at RAAF Base Pearce, where the number of Australian pilot graduates will increase from 77 to 105 annually.

In another development involving the PC-21, the defense ministers of Australia and Singapore on August 21 signed a treaty to extend the latter’s flying training program at RAAF Base Pearce for a further 25 years. The Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) operates and maintains a Flying Training Institute at Pearce that conducts the nine-month basic wings course for trainee pilots and a Standards Flight that conducts the flying instructors course using 19 PC-21s.

Lockheed Martin is also the systems integrator for the RSAF’s basic wings course, providing aircraft, maintenance, simulators, courseware and ground-based instructors under a 20-year contract signed in 2006.

Singapore maintains several aircraft detachments overseas to make up for the lack of training airspace at home. The detachment at RAAF Pearce started in 1998 with the Aermacchi S-211 before deliveries of the PC-21 started in 2008.

The PC-21 has proved to be a popular training platform with militaries around the world, and has also been ordered by Switzerland, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan and the UAE.
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[*] posted on 1-9-2017 at 03:44 PM


Some home truths about LVC

31 Aug 2017

Patrick Durrant | Sydney

Director Air Force Ranges Darren Manser delivered a talk on Plan Jericho and the role of Live Virtual and Constructive (LVC) training in a fifth generation Air Force during a plenary session at ASC2017. He was disarmingly frank about some of the challenges that lie ahead. 

“There are some things that LVC can't do for us right now. The ‘L’ in VC is not something that is technologically possible – that is, putting simulated returns into the cockpit of a fifth-gen platform. Manser said his ‘fast jet friends’ are crying out for it.

“To be honest we'll not see LVC as a true legitimate replacement for the live fight until we can actually start feeding virtual and constructive entities into the platform so they can fight them, kill them and then come home for tea and medals.”

Other challenges are generating contested degraded and operationally limited (CDO) environments and training with closed loop systems.

“We have the capability for closed loop systems but we are not doing it in Australia and there are good reasons for that – the capability to perform high-end, highly secure exercises costs a lot of money and it's not something that is particularly attractive or feasible from an Australian perspective.”

Manser said the Air Warfare Centre had to focus on developing capabilities for the high end fight. The skills that pilots would gain from their initial training on simulators were standard behaviours the centre expected from operators.

“What we want to do is take already highly competent operators and then bring them together with other platforms such that they can fight in an integrated way – we have to change the culture of the organisation.”

Continuing on this theme, he said one easy way to create a conversation in the room with the fighter pilots he worked with was to say, “you don't need high fidelity simulators”.

“They believe it’s very important to put your hand on the right switch at the right time in the dark under pressure and that is true for skills and drills and blocking and tackling. But if I want them to operate in an environment that is complex, with multiple platforms interacting with Navy and Army simultaneously, I don't need them to be concentrating on hands and feet. I do need them to understand the complexity of the environment that they are in and how they should react under pressure, and I don't need a high fidelity simulator to do that.”

Another controversial point of contention according to Manser, was that finite monetary resources created a ‘forced choice’ situation when it came to the fidelity for simulator acquisition.

“So it's never an approach of acquiring a mix of high and low fidelity simulators, it's more like, ‘you'll need to get one less high fidelity sim to get five of those low fidelity sims’.

He said the offers by OEMs of open system solutions that would meet his needs and connect up all the platforms, were only valid so long as standards set by their systems were complied with. “They're not necessarily the same – so we don't have those open systems, we can't connect easily, nor is there a great deal of appetite to drive those things together; I understand commercial advantage, but that is an inhibitor to us in getting a solution.”

Cyber security was another problem that needed to be overcome.

“If you have a virtual system that truly replicates the live one, then it's subject to all of the same security risks, issues and constraints and that is a huge overhead. If you extrapolate that further to a LVC environment, you have created a vehicle whereby cyber attack can penetrate the live platform.”

Manser said the US was investing millions and growing their workforce to combat this but Australia wasn't there yet.

A persistent pool of appropriately skilled personnel to support LVC training was also non-existant.

“I want a persistent workforce of people who can develop scenarios, manage accreditation, and take care of modelling and the security of facilities. That worforce does not exist in the scale needed both now and in the future.”



He said the resistance towards LVC that needs to be overcome inside Air Force, and probably more generally, is not the community that will be there when it's implemented.

“The senior echelons have to be convinced that this is a good thing, but by the time we actually provide the solution the next generation will come through and they'll be all over it – we'll be lucky to keep up with the demand.”

Manser said apart from JP9711 which is creating the backbone, there were no major programs to drive in-service, massive growth in LVC.

“At the end of the day we have to do it; we will not get the best out of an F-35, or a Growler or Wedgetail without using LVC.”
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[*] posted on 2-9-2017 at 06:47 PM


Defence accused by Israeli company of lack of transparency over Reaper drone deal with US

ABC News

Exclusive by defence reporter Andrew Greene

2 hrs ago


© Reuters/Amit Dave An Israeli-made Heron unmanned aerial vehicle

Australia is poised to purchase lethal remotely-piloted Reaper drones from the United States for use in future conflicts.

American company General Atomics is widely tipped to soon win a multi-million-dollar contract for Australia's first armed unmanned aerial vehicles.

Now its sole competitor — Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI) — is going public to accuse the Defence Department of lacking transparency in the evaluation process.

Project AIR 7003 is pitting the General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper product against the Heron TP system manufactured by IAI.

Shaul Shahar from IAI said the American rivals appeared to have enjoyed favourable treatment from the contract competition.

"With all the risk analysis, all competitive analysis they need to do here, they haven't done it because no-one has approached us, " he said.

"No-one has offered to put our data of the system on the table. So … no evaluation can be complete.

"The preference for a US product, in the absence of an open competitive tender, creates an environment in which there is little transparency of how the Australian Department of Defence is managing the project, and how it has arrived at its decision."

Defence says no decision made yet

Senior Defence figures told the ABC the Israeli technology was reliable, but interoperability with the United States and other allies who already use the MQ-9 Reaper was crucial.
Mr Shahar rejected the argument.

"We have more than 100 pilots, Australian pilots, that have been trained on our Heron-1 system," he said.

"I want to remind you that one of the successful programs of UAV here in Australia was with our Heron-1 system.

"They used it for three years in Afghanistan successfully."

Doctor Malcolm Davis from the Australian Strategic Policy Institute is closely watching the multi-million-dollar international contest to supply the country's first armed drones, and suspected the Reaper would win out.

"I'm sure the Israeli system is very good, but there's an awful lot to be said for close interoperability with our key allies.

"The Americans are using Reapers, the British are using Reapers.

"I think that it would be probably the most likely choice to go down the path of Reaper.

"[But] I'm certainly not attempting to pre-judge the outcome of the contest."

Defence Minister Marise Payne told AM: "Defence is considering a range of options for the future Australian Defence Force armed remotely piloted aircraft system."

In a statement, she insisted "no decision on which system will be acquired has been made".

"As the evaluation process is ongoing, it is not appropriate to comment," she said.
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[*] posted on 2-9-2017 at 08:47 PM


Having massive public whinges has done Dassault wonders in Australian Defence Procurement circles...

One might have thought IAI might have got the hint from that.

Apparently not...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 13-9-2017 at 03:10 PM


Our JSF One Step Closer

(Source: Australian Department of Defence; issued Sept 12, 2017)

The team charged with bringing home Australia’s F-35A Lightning II in December 2018 has reached a few important milestones.

In May, 27 of the first cadre of Australia’s F-35A maintenance crew completed their technical training.

Senior Engineering Officer for the F-35A Transition Team Squadron Leader (SQNLDR) Leigh Tinker said he now had 20 personnel stationed at Luke Air Force Base near Phoenix, Arizona, after the initial maintenance training was completed at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida.

“It’s great to see blue Aussie cams out there on the flightline, getting hands-on experience with the F-35A, working side-by-side with the USAF’s 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit and Lockheed Martin,” SQNLDR Tinker said.

“A number of maintenance personnel have also returned to Australia to begin preparations for the arrival of the F-35As at RAAF Base Williamtown.”

Most of these personnel will form the core of No. 3 Squadron when it stands up as the RAAF’s first F-35A squadron, with others posted to No. 2 Operational Conversion Unit.

The other Australian F-35A pilot currently under training, Wing Commander (WGCDR) Darren Clare, is still part-way through his operational conversion but recently completed his first flight in the F-35A after comprehensive simulation training.

“The sims set you up very well for the flights,” WGCDR Clare said.

“The jet feels very similar to a Hornet in most flight regimes, and it was exciting to take off in an airplane for the first time solo.

“The operations and maintenance teams made sure I flew an Australian aircraft (A35-002) for the flight, and I was also launched by an Aussie Crew Chief, which made it all the more special.

“I can see the momentum building, and our people will be ready when Air Force receives its next eight F-35As in 2018, as the transition hits full swing.”

WGCDR Clare will become the Commanding Officer of 3SQN when the unit transitions from F/A18A Classic Hornet operations to the F-35A.

The RAAF personnel are fully embedded with the 61st Fighter Squadron “Top Dogs” and Maintenance Unit at Luke Air Force Base.

CO 61st Fighter Squadron Lieutenant Colonel (LTCOL) Rhett Hierlmeier said he had noted how seamless the integration between the Australians and their US hosts had been.

“The Aussies are more than pulling their weight here in the Top Dogs,” LTCOL Hierlmeier said.

“They are highly professional operators and we feel privileged to be a part of Royal Australian Air Force history supporting their transition to the F-35A.”

-ends-
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[*] posted on 21-9-2017 at 12:46 PM


http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2017/mid-air-refuel-extend...

Mid-air refuel extends reach of Australian Antarctic Programpeople on sea ice

20th September 2017

A mid-air plane refuel has extended Australia’s ability to reach its Antarctic stations and enabled a pre-season airdrop of supplies to isolated expeditioners.

The Royal Australian Air Force C-17A Globemaster III took off from Avalon airport in Victoria yesterday for the 10,000 kilometre round-trip to Australia’s Davis research station.

It was refuelled by a KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport about half-way through the mission, high above the Southern Ocean.

Australian Antarctic Division Future Concepts Manager, Matt Filipowski, said the additional fuel meant nine tonnes of cargo could be parachuted on to the sea ice near Davis research station...

[more at link]
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[*] posted on 21-9-2017 at 08:39 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Mercator  
http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2017/mid-air-refuel-extend...


"This new capability will enable the Australian Antarctic Division to airdrop supplies year-round, if required, to all of its Antarctic research stations and deep into the interior of Antarctica"

Now that's a capability well worth having.




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[*] posted on 29-10-2017 at 05:51 PM


Suppliers from Israel and US battle to supply to ADF drones

NIGEL PITTAWAYThe Australian12:00AM October 28, 2017

Suppliers from Israel and the US are locked in a close battle to supply an armed unmanned aircraft capability to the Australian Defence Force early next decade.

As foreshadowed by the 2016 defence policy white paper, Australia is seeking to acquire an armed, medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) remotely piloted aircraft, under Project Air 7003 Phase 1.

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) of the US and the Malat division of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) are competing for the contract which, according to government figures, will be worth between $1 billion and $2bn in the next two decades. In line with Turnbull government policy, millions of dollars in contracts will up for grabs to local industry.

The new capability will replace the unarmed IAI Heron 1 system acquired by the Royal Australian Air Force for use in Afghanistan in late 2009. Brought back to Australia after the withdrawal of the bulk of Australian forces in 2014, the Heron finally retired in August this year.

According to the white paper, the acquisition of an armed unmanned aerial system will provide enhanced firepower and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance support to a range of missions, including counter-terrorism missions overseas, as well as augmenting Australia’s search and rescue and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief capabilities.

The system is expected to be based at RAAF Edinburgh in South Australia, but it will also operate from forward operating bases around the country, including RAAF Townsville which, according to the white paper, will require the construction of additional facilities to support remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA) operations. It will be acquired in two tranches, the first in the 2021 time frame and the second about five years later.

General Atomics is proposing a variant of its certifiable Predator B platform, currently under development for Britain’s Protector Program, which is due to enter service around 2020. In the US, the variant is referred to as the MQ-9B Reaper and an earlier version has seen extensive use in the Middle East, including the overwatch of deployed Australian forces.

The certifiable Predator B/Reaper is being built to dual civil-military standards, capable of flying in non-segregated airspace. This capability will be demonstrated next year when a Predator B will operate for three hours in the busy airspace around Los Angeles.

At Australia’s Avalon Air Show in February, GA-ASI announced the formation of an industrial partnership to meet the industrial requirements of Project Air 7003.

Known as Team Reaper Australia, it initially included Cobham, CAE Australia, Flight Data Systems and Raytheon Australia, but expanded in September to include Airspeed, Collins Aerospace Systems, Quickstep Holdings, TAE Aerospace, Rockwell Collins and Ultra Electronics.

“In addition, we need partners for our global supply chain for the MQ-9B, irrespective of Air 7003,” says GA-ASI’s director of international strategic development Australia, New Zealand and South-East Asia, Warren Ludwig.

“Obviously nations who invest with us will get a priority for their industry, but some Australian companies are very competitive and we’re talking to them right now about getting into our global supply chain, irrespective of the competition here,” Ludwig says.

Israel Aerospace Industries is proposing its Heron TP MALE RPA, which it says will leverage the experience the ADF has built up over eight years of Heron 1 operations, including limited integration into Australian civil airspace.

A spokesman for IAI’s Malat division says that although the Heron TP is about twice the size and five times the weight of the Heron 1, it uses the same ground control station and operational concept. He says it is a mature system, which has been in active service with the Israel Defence Forces since 2010 and has accumulated thousands of operational hours.

IAI promises significant benefits to Australia’s defence industry. “IAI will partner with a major local prime and some other Australian companies to deliver the Heron TP capability,’’ its spokesman says.

“These local partners will provide sovereign local integration of all payloads, sensors and communications systems.

“Essentially, through local industry partnerships, it allows Australia to control its own destiny and shape the capability over time.”

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/defence/sup...




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[*] posted on 29-10-2017 at 09:01 PM


If the IAI platform gets up I will be astonished...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 31-10-2017 at 09:15 PM


Ditto, BUT they did get the German contract against all odds.................much to the chagrin of large sections of the Luftwaffe.....................
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[*] posted on 2-11-2017 at 10:25 PM


RAAF to assist in development of next generation jammer

02 November, 2017 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has signed a memorandum of understanding with the US Navy to jointly develop the of the Raytheon AN/ALQ-249 next generation jammer mid-band capability (NGJ-MB).

The MOU defines the scope of communication, coordination, and cooperation during the engineering and manufacturing of NGJ-MB, says Australia's department of defence in a statement.

The AN/ALQ-249 will equip the Boeing EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft. The only operators of the type are the RAAF and US Navy.

“This is a very important milestone for both nations, one that took four years of communication and collaboration to successfully achieve,” says RAAF air marshal Leo Davies.

“As this is a rapidly evolving area, we will work in partnership with the US Navy to develop the next generation jamming capability, which will ensure that our aircraft remain at the technological forefront throughout their service life.”
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[*] posted on 20-11-2017 at 09:14 PM


Australia invests to support P-8A Poseidons

Jon Grevatt - IHS Jane's Defence Industry

20 November 2017

The Australian Department of Defence (DoD) has announced funding worth AUD659 million (USD498 million) to support the Royal Australian Air Force’s (RAAF’s) Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime multimission aircraft.

The DoD said on 19 November that AUD409 million of the funding will be used to improve base facilities for full P-8A operations, with the upgrade estimated to be complete by 2019.

The remaining AUD250 million will be allocated to the procurement of a Boeing training simulator system at RAAF Base Edinburgh in South Australia, said the DoD.

Australia’s Minister for Defence Industry, Christopher Pyne, said, “The simulator will be a part of a broader investment programme at RAAF Edinburgh to make it ‘Poseidon ready’ by extending the runway and building new state-of-the-art maintenance hangars and facilities.”

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ADMK2
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[*] posted on 20-11-2017 at 10:53 PM


However we are still going to park these $300m a pop aircraft, under tin sheds, if we in fact park them under anything at all...



In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 20-11-2017 at 11:09 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
However we are still going to park these $300m a pop aircraft, under tin sheds, if we in fact park them under anything at all...


The same as every other large aircraft in the world, civilian or military.

I’m afraid I don’t understand your point.
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[*] posted on 20-11-2017 at 11:48 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Raven22  
Quote: Originally posted by ADMK2  
However we are still going to park these $300m a pop aircraft, under tin sheds, if we in fact park them under anything at all...


The same as every other large aircraft in the world, civilian or military.

I’m afraid I don’t understand your point.


I was alluding to the point that the time may be approaching where we need to consider parking scarce military resources under something a tad more substantial than 0.60mm colour bond...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 20-11-2017 at 11:57 PM


Why? RAAF Edinburgh is about as far away from any credible threat as it is possible to be in the world. What possible justification would there be for constructing hardened shelters for aircraft the size of a P8? Something that wasn’t done by anyone, even at the height of the Cold War?

Simple dispersal and more investment in active defences would be a far wiser use of scarce dollars.
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[*] posted on 21-11-2017 at 12:26 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Raven22  
Why? RAAF Edinburgh is about as far away from any credible threat as it is possible to be in the world. What possible justification would there be for constructing hardened shelters for aircraft the size of a P8? Something that wasn’t done by anyone, even at the height of the Cold War?

Simple dispersal and more investment in active defences would be a far wiser use of scarce dollars.


Edinburgh true enough, but I’m not suggesting we require full HAS for the entire P-8A / E-7 fleets, however South Australia is not the only place we park P-8A’s and there are portable kevlar based systems that provide a much greater level of protection against small arms and fragmentation, that in conjunction with greater use of revetments would go a long way to ensuring these few assets upon which we rely upon so much, could be protected against more than the sun and a light drizzle...




In a low speed post-merge manoeuvring fight, with a high off-boresight 4th generation missile and Helmet Mounted Display, the Super Hornet will be a very difficult opponent for any current Russian fighter, even the Su-27/30
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[*] posted on 21-11-2017 at 12:30 PM


I think if you wargame out the idea of a conflict involving P8s against a submarine/warship fielding First World power, you do get some interesting threat profiles in the Homeland environment.

I mean how hard would it be to smuggle in some mortars into this country. If I was China, I probably already have (even if they are in the embassy, for now).

There is a housing estate about 200 yds off the western end of Edinburgh's main runway. If someone sets up a mortar or two in their backyard and fires off some GPS guided munitions, they only have to go about a thousand yards to hit the targets. Amberley would be much the same (maybe 2000-4000 yards, depending on which suburb you choose).

With our current level of urban encroachment and First World western tech, it's pretty hard to defend against some of this, even if they did give us warning. There'd be a lot of backyards to search and you'd have to set up permanent cordons on quite a few suburbs. Dispersal to our bare bases is definitely something of a counter, but it relies upon warning and nonetheless leaves a portion of the fleet behind for maintenance. And a lot of our spares. And our people. There'd still be worthwhile targets. I don't know what the solution is there, but I do know it's a bloody mess once you start wargaming out what a sophisticated enemy could try.

It's a bit of a nightmare scenario. But every time I visit my folks next to Amberley and I look out over the base from the Ipswich Golf Course environs, these are the thoughts I have.
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